July gives way to

August and hints of
summer’s end ap-
pear on the horizon,
but there will be no
time nor space for midsummer malaise
and ennui in the Hamptons art scene.
Yes, the dueling Bridgehampton art
fairs have packed up their booths and
gone home, but for those who can’t
get enough of these pop-up mercan-
tiles, on July 26 comes Art Southamp-
ton, which will bring an additional
fifty temporary exhibitors to the East
End. While the results of the first two
fairs weren’t available at press time,
it’s safe to assume that no exhibitor
pulled in as much as Mitt Romney,
whose three stops in the Hamptons
netted his campaign somewhere up-
ward of $3 million.
One of those stops was a fundrais-
er at The Creeks, the 57-acre Georgica
Pond-fronted enclave of the late ab-
stract expressionist Alfonso Ossorio,
now in the heavily-guarded hands of
equity titan and 2008 Obama mega-
donor Ronald Perelman. In politics, as
perhaps in art, how quickly our tastes
change. So it goes.
The richness of visual art in the
Hamptons may appear small beside
the embarrassment of the closely-held
riches of its 1% residents, but the va-
riety, novelty and aesthetic integrity
more than balance the scale. Here’s a
brief look of what’s on view now and
throughout August:
In the museums
“The Landmarks of New York” contin-
ues through September 4 at the Parrish
Art Museum in Southampton. Curat-
ed by noted landmark preservationist
Barbaralee Diamonstein-Spielvogel, the
exhibition consists of 90 photographs
of both famous and lesser-known New
York City landmarks and serves as the
basis for an examination of preserva-
tion and new development issues in New
York. It’s a fitting final show for the Par-
rish, which will move from its current
Jobs Lane location in Southampton to
larger, Herzog-&-de-Meuron-designed
quarters in Watermill in November.
On Thursday evenings, the Parrish is
holding a series of discussions exploring
ideas of preservation, adaptive re-use
in architecture and intelligent devel-
opment. Robert Hammond and Joshua
Diamond, the two men who spearhead-
ed the realization of Manhattan’s High
Line, will speak on July 26. They will be
followed by Yale School of Architecture
dean Robert A.M. Stern on August 9,
At the very tip of Long Island lies
Montauk, a sleepy and scenic har-
bor. The dozen or so marinas almost
blend into the quaint atmosphere of
this Hamptons hamlet, with its res-
taurants, resorts, beaches, relaxed
games of golf.
But Montauk Harbor is very much
alive and happening. Beyond the post-
card of a picture is a world that only a
few know well and many skim over. A
trip of just a few miles brings men like
Captain Gene Kelly of Montauk Sport-
fishing and those who accompany
them to the breeding grounds of fish
that end up on 5-star dinner plates
and in record books.
The inlet that points north of the
sound is a “natural fish trap,” ex-
plained Captain Kelly, a fisherman of
40 years. “Everything comes in; all
[fish] pass by here.”
According to Montauk Boatmen Inc
(MBI), an organization of the area’s
charter and open boat captains, Mon-
tauk is the closest port to canyons and
Gulfstream in the entire Northeast,
which makes it a short trip to the big
fish – tuna, shark, marlin. Montauk is
surrounded by three different bodies
of Water: Fort Pond Bay, Gardiner’s
Bay, Block Island Sound, and the cur-
rents bring in a large quantity of bait
and nutrients. It is the self-proclaimed
and defended “sportfishing capital of
the world” with both inshore and off-
shore fishing and always with the op-
portunity to catch trophy-sized fish.
“If you haven’t fished Montauk, you’ve
only been practicing,” MBI claims on
its website, adding that Montauk has
given up “more world record fish than
any other port.”
Captain Mike Albronda of Charter
Boat Montauk explained the unique
formation of Montauk’s sound. Ten
thousand years ago, Montauk was
a part of Block Island until a glacier
from Long Island broke off and cov-
ered the land bridge. “Basically now
we’re fishing on that land bridge
and with the current that runs out of
Long Island,” he said. The glacier also
carved a huge hole about five miles
south of the point. This area, known
as Butterfish Hole, is what makes the
waters so good for shark and big game
fishing, he said, noting, however, that
he hasn’t seen a white shark for many
years. (He may have been happier to
see the great white in Cape Cod on July
7 than the unfortunate kayaker who it
chose to accompany inshore.)
Big game fishing emerged as a
sport after the invention of the mo-
torized boat in 1898, but it was some
time after WWI that Montauk became
a hunting and fishing ground for the
rich and famous, according to Cap-
tain Albronda. It was at that time that
mass fishing boats and permanent
establishments began to appear. The
Long Island Rail Road (LIRR) made it
easier for the working class to come to
the island in the the late ’40s and ’50s.
The unique thing about deep sea
fishing, said Captain Kelly, is that,
“There’s no other recreational [sport
where] they can go out with and they
can come out with getting almost
they’re money back in terms of their
food” he said. “On typical trips, like
[trips for] striped bass… they’re prob-
ably going to go home with 50-60 lbs
of filleted fish, which costs them $15-
18 a lb in a supermarket.”
Fish can keep up to a year if freezed
properly, explained Captain Skip Ru-
dolph of Adios Boat Charters, a fish-
erman of 43 years who has spent the
past twelve 12 years in Montauk. He
primarily fishes striped bass on his
trips out, but also goes after blue fish,
sea bass and porgies.
“I do a lot of bottom fishing,” he said.
“Porgie is a delicious eating fish.”
“They’re boney,” he admitted, “but
don’t eat the bones.”
Captain Albronda releases most
sharks, as blue shark are not good to
eat. Mako and Thresher sharks he
will keep, and they’ll catch a couple of
striped bass to send home with their
clients.
Fishing is as much about the gain
as it is the experience of being out on
Continued on page C2 Continued on page C2
s u m m e r s i z z l e s o u t e a s t
Hamptons living
MONEY, POWER AND THE CITY
S3.50OUTSIDETHECREATERNEWYORKMETROPOLITANAREA
July 30, 2012
speci al adverti si ng secti on for the new York observer
PROFilE
KEllY KlEin
DivES inTO
SUMMER in
THE HAMPTOnS
WiTH HER nEW
POOl BOOK
page C4
FASHiOn
A SAg HARBOR
BOUTiQUE
TEllS US
WHAT TO
WEAR, WHERE
page C4
REAl ESTATE
THE WHEElingS
AnD DEAlingS
OF inSAnE
HAMPTOnS
PROPERTiES
page C6
a
n
n
ie
t
r
it
t
/
g
e
t
t
Y
im
a
g
e
s
c
o
u
r
t
e
s
Y
s
k
ip
r
u
d
o
l
f
c
l
iv
e
b
r
u
n
s
k
il
l
/
a
l
l
s
p
o
r
t
Fishing the Atlantic Of of East End Long Island
~ By Melissa Wiley ~
I n s i d e
art
SUMMER
Striped bass
pictured here
aboard Captain
Skip Rudolph’s
vessel are a
popular catch
of of Montauk.
This one
weighed 41lbs.
Amazing (2011) by Mel Bochner from
the Gallery Valentine.
Sport fshing is a
popular pastime
for visitors to
Montauk and the
far East End.
Where’s
the
art at?
Shark fshing boats of the eastern tip of long Island.
No signs of a
cool down for
Hamptons art scene
~ By Jeffrey Kopie ~
WHAT LIES BENEATH
c
o
u
r
t
e
s
Y
a
r
t
s
o
u
t
h
a
m
p
t
o
n
a
n
d
g
a
l
l
e
r
Y
v
a
l
e
n
t
in
e
and then by David Rockwell on the 23.
In East Hampton, Guild Hall has
committed all of its exhibition space to
“Beach Life,” a painting survey of Sag
Harbor resident Eric Fischl. Initially
gaining wide recognition for his pruri-
ent, underside-of-suburbia scenes, Fis-
chl has expanded his work to include
society portraiture, bull fighting, im-
pressions of India and, of course, the
beach. Expect psychologically-fraught
images and lots of nudity.
In the galleries
Halsey-McKay, a Newtown Lane
gallery operated by curator Hilary
Schaffner and artist Ryan Wallace,
continues its high-level programming
of vital new art with work by Andrew
Kuo and Sarah Greenberger Rafferty
downstairs, and Ryan Travis Chris-
tian on the second floor. Kuo’s paint-
ings seem to take their visual cue
from both high modernism (Albers,
Mondriaan, Riley) and corporate bro-
chure graphic design (pie-charts, bar
graphs), their compositions deter-
mined by his charting of emotion-
al states and meditations, which are
provided in carbon transfer informa-
tional keys beside the images. The ac-
companying confessional texts are,
by turns, sardonic, bittersweet and
hilarious. In contrast to Kuo’s strict
geometry, Rafferty’s large-scale, ma-
levolent photographs on acetate are
strenuously manipulated, with rep-
resentational images morphing into
near abstraction—the process inte-
gral to the artist’s exploration of the
body. In the upstairs space, Chica-
go-based Ryan Travis Christian will
exhibit large-scale graphite draw-
ings, a potent combination of comic
book imagery embedded in geometric
chiaroscuro.
Following on August 10 and remain-
ing on view until the 29, Halsey McKay
brings in two Brooklyn-based paint-
ers: Eddie Martinez
and Jose Lerma.
Martinez’s often-
large canvases are
packed to bursting
with figures and
bold, kinetic shapes
and executed with
a loud palette and
muscular, urgent
brushwork.
The subject of
Lerma’s paintings
is history—both of
the political/social
type and that of art.
Often starting with the appropriation
of images from historical portraiture,
the artist uses a wide range of media
(including carpeting, towels and key-
boards) and references a similarly wide
range of art historical techniques to re-
interpret and personalize the past—
the boat and taking on a fish.
“It’s rewarding for me,” said
Captain Rudolph, “when the
people get off the boat and they
thank me for the greatest day.”
The first week in July he had
a three-year-old out on the boat
who, with a little help from his
mother and company, reeled in
a 33/34-lb bass. “The look on
his face,” he began. “He was
hootin’ and hollerin’….”
Tradition also plays a large
part in the allure of the sport.
While Captain Rudolph caters
to all kinds of people, families
to corporate, he has cultivated
a strong family clientele base on
word of mouth.
There are small scales on the
boat in addition to the larger
scale on the dock to weigh the
fish, which can turn into a point
of friendly competition among
people on the boat.
Perhaps Captain Rudolph’s
most memorable trip was back
when he was a mate on Phil
Lewis’ boat, when they worked
together for an hour and a half
to haul a 937-lb bluefin tuna
out of 80-foot water. The tuna
was down inside lobster traps,
and they had to maneuver the
fish through the traps before
they got him. “It was a pretty
cool battle,” he reminisced.
“It requires dedication, a
certain attitude,” he admitted.
"Sometimes the fish come easy,
some days you have to work for
them.”
Of what he has learned from
fishing over the years? “I’ll say it
one word,” he said. “Patience.”
“And humility,” he added,
laughing.
Out there on the water, you
are at the mercy of nature. “You
may have the president of IBM
on the boat,” he explained, “but
when his rod is bending, he’s got
to listen to you.”
This year, due to the warm
winter, has been very produc-
tive. There are “tons of porgies
in every spot, a load of sea bass;
the main body of flukes came by
already, they’ll move back a lit-
tle later… but all in all there has
been plenty of fish,” Captain Ru-
dolph said.
Market demand comes and
goes, he reported, but Cap-
tain Rudolph estimated that he
makes around 180 trips a year.
These include half-day and all-
day trips. Captain Albronda just
last year made his 6000th trip.
Captain Rudolph has fished
quite a number of waters and
has friends up and down the
coast, from Florida and Maine,
yet defends Montauk as a fish-
ing haven. “A lot of places claim
to be the sportfishing capital in
the world. There are very good
locations of course all through-
out the planet, but for the avail-
ability, the price, I think we are
probably the fairest-priced trip
that produces fish, maybe on the
entire East Coast.”
The key characteristic is per-
haps its consistency. “We can
land a lot of something every-
day,” he said. “It would be al-
most impossible not to catch
something, and I think that’s
why Montauk stands out.”
Captain Albronda echoed
this sentiment. First-time cus-
tomers are surprised, he said,
when “they realize how good
Montauk is. Most of them have
fished here and there—they tell
you, 'Well we’ve been to Cap-
tree, we’ve been to New Jersey,
and we’ve had limited success'—
but when they came to Montauk,
they came once, and they [were]
hooked.”
Closer to very few points in
the world can one experience
the wonders of the deep. Cap-
tain Albronda’s son, who works
on the boat, had heard stories
of the 2397-lb shark that his fa-
ther caught back in the ’80s (a
photo of him and shark appears
at the top of his website, under
which the caption appears:
“Smaller fish upon request”),
but had never seen one. They
were hanging a blue shark one
day when a white came up and
bit the head off it at the same
time as it lodged about half-
a-dozen of its teeth in the bot-
tom of his then wooden boat.
Captain Albronda cited it as the
shark’s loss.
and collapse it into the present.
At Glenn Horowitz Bookseller, Prince
of Flatness Ryan McGinness will show
two related series of drawings from
August 4 through September 4. Start-
ing with sketches of the female nude,
he simplifies and compresses the origi-
nal images via digitalization to focus on
their underlying geometry. The deliber-
ate precision of these works is loosened
up in the second series of “cyano-
types,” in which the same imag-
es are utilized, but the printing
process is through sun expo-
sure, allowing chance and
environmental conditions to
influence the results.
At the Drawing Room, a gal-
lery that focuses on work creat-
ed by both past and present East
End residents, Watermill denizen
Mary Ellen Bartley will be showing
her photographs of book arrange-
ments from August 2 through Septem-
ber 3. Shot in extreme close-up, her
photographs capture the ethereal es-
sence of her subject matter. Offsetting
Bartley will be sculptures by the late
Costantino Nivola.
East of Newtown Lane, just down and
across the road from the Pollock-Kras-
ner House, The Fireplace Project will
present “yes pleased,” a new sculpture
by Terence Koh. Details about the ex-
hibition would not be divulged at press
time and, given the enormous breadth
of his past installations, it’s difficult to
know what to expect. A hyper-flamboy-
ant, shamanistic, queer, art world provo-
cateur, his paradoxical oeuvre projects a
sense that everything and nothing is sa-
cred. His installations and performance
work have ranged from the ascetic to the
decadent and, while his shock value is
high, there’s sincerity and humanity
underneath it all.
Along Main Street in
Amagansett, first-time
gallerist Sara De Luca
launched the contempo-
rary gallery Ille Arts at
summer’s start. After an
opening group exhibition
of the gallerist’s friends and
family as well as solo shows
by Sydney Albertini and Liz
Marcus, the gallery is currently
showing “In the Arms of Time,”
by Brazilian-born photographer and
documentary filmmaker Vivien Bitten-
court. Shot in both black and white and
color, Bittencourt’s unpeopled images
are observations on time’s passage and
her subject matter ancient living olive
and cedar trees extant in Italy and Leb-
anon, while a second series focuses on
ruins in the two countries.
Following Bittencourt, from August
11 to September 11, Ille will present
paintings and furniture by Bridgehamp-
ton resident Mary Heilmann, master
abstractionist whose work, over a ca-
reer spanning more than thirty years,
has quietly, but unwaveringly, traveled
from underappreciated and undersung
to a near-canonical status. Her insouci-
ant, exuberant paintings are based on
high modernist principles, but they’re
painted with an energy and looseness
that dissolve any sense of modernist
stricture. They’re fully-resolved paint-
ings painted by a true believer, per-
haps best savored while rolling around
in the artist’s plywood and nylon strap
caster chairs.
speci al adverti si ng secti on for the new York observer
Continued from page C1
e
r
ic
f
is
c
h
l
im
a
g
e
s
c
o
u
r
t
e
s
Y
a
r
t
s
o
u
t
h
a
m
p
t
o
n
c
o
u
r
t
e
s
Y
s
k
ip
r
u
d
o
l
p
h
a
r
t
s
o
u
t
h
a
m
p
t
o
n
a
n
d
g
a
l
l
e
r
Y
v
a
l
e
n
t
in
e
; k
o
h
im
a
g
e
p
a
t
r
ic
k
m
c
m
u
l
l
a
n
c
o
u
r
t
e
s
Y
e
l
e
c
t
r
o
n
ic
a
r
t
s
in
t
e
r
m
ix
(
e
a
i)
, n
e
w
Y
o
r
k
c
o
u
r
t
e
s
Y
t
h
e
e
r
ic
f
ir
e
s
t
o
n
e
g
a
l
l
e
r
Y
s h o w s a n d g a l l e r i e s t o v i s i t n o w
Summer art
WHAT LIES BENEATH
‘You may have the
president of IBM on
the boat, but when his
rod is bending, he’s got
to listen to you.’
Captain Skip Rudolph
The Haberdashery
Installation at Eric
Firestone Gallery.
Terence
Koh.
Female Sensibility (1973) by Lynda Benglis at Guild Hall.
This young man’s striper weighed almost as much as him he did.
Congress of Wits Study
(2007) by Eric Fischl.
Inset: Mr. Fischl working
in his studio.
A John
Chamberlain
piece from
Gallery
Valentine.
C 2 | July 30, 2012 | The New York Observer Hamptonsliving
Continued from page C1
The New York Observer MPTONS LIVING | July 30, 2012  | C 3 Hamptonsliving
550 Park Avenue was designed in 1917 by the city’s foremost architect of luxury residential buildings, J.E.R. Carpenter, and
has long been prized for its sophisticated elegance and grandeur. One of the few smaller apartments in the building, this
5-room residence is ideally situated on the 16th floor, with sunny open views, including an oblique view of Central Park
from the master bedroom. With charmingly scaled rooms, soaring ceilings, and well designed division of public from private
space, the apartment is in excellent condition, having just undergone a complete renovation. As an ideal home in the city, or
as a pied a terre, this is a rare opportunity to live in one of New York’s most distinguished residential cooperatives. Owner/
Broker. $3,650,000 . WEB:0018149
LISA K. BURGETT | Associate Broker
212.400.8777 | lisa.burgett@sothebshomes.com
LEILA C. STONE | Senior Vice President, Associate Broker
212.606.7663 | leila.stone@sothebshomes.com
EAST SIDE MANHATTAN BROKERAGE | www.sothebyshomes.com
38 East 61st Street, New York, NY 10065
Operated by Sotheby’s International Realty, Inc. Sotheby’s International Realty® is a registered trademark. Equal Housing Opportunity.
550 PARK AVENUE
C 4 | July 30, 2012 | The New York Observer Hamptonsliving
Shelling Out ClamS
tO Save the ClamS
June 23
Group For The East End Gala
www.groupfortheeastend.org
Despite the carbon footprint of
the high-performance vehicles
driven by guests to the event, the
“green” cause triumphed on Sat-
urday at the Group For The East
End’s 40th Anniversary Gala.
The fundraiser was held at the
stunning Wölffer Estate Vine-
yard and set out to prove that man
apparently cannot live on wine
alone.
Group For The East End Presi-
dent Bob DeLuca said that water
is now environmental priority
number one. “What we did with
land protection and preserving
tens of thousands of acres we are
now doing with water,” he said.
“The long-term sustainability
of our surface water is essential
not only for safe drinking water,
but to prevent the loss of fish and
shellfish.”
Designer and Benefit Co-Chair
Nicole Miller has lived for 16
years here on the wetlands, with
kayaking and clamming among
her favorite activities. The
group’s mission hit home when
her favorite local clamming cove
was shut down for contamina-
tion concerns. “You don’t want to
poison your dinner guests,” she
reflected.
Alec Baldwin is a force of na-
ture himself with huge street cred
in the Hamptons, having donat-
ed six figure sums to the causes
he believes in. He arrived with
daughter Ireland, a stunning wil-
lowy beauty who looks very much
like her mother, Kim Basinger.
She now speaks her ‘truth’ albeit
as a tattoo gracing the back of her
swan-like neck. In terms of Bald-
win’s expanding family with new
wife Hilaria Thomas looking radi-
ant in red, no word. However, we
did see him carefully monitoring
his silent auction bid on the Lex-
ington Company beach-chic ta-
bletop setting for eight.
Major mariner Billy Joel also
lent his support to his favorite
cause. For fans looking for a new
album, he shared, “I’m always
writing something.”
Thank goodness that’s music
and not checks to ex.
In the Hamptons, where hedge
fund managers have redefined
the preservation of open space
to mean unused portions of their
10,000 square foot homes, it is
rare to find such an environmen-
tal advocate as benefit Co-Chair
Marco Birch. Mr. Birch, who is
a partner in the $15 billion Moore
Capital Management hedge fund
(and a second generation Hamp-
tons homeowner), credits his in-
volvement with Mr. DeLuca’s
ability to deliver. “He’s engaging
and hands-on and down-to-earth,”
Mr. Birch said of Mr. DeLuca. “He
knows how to identify a goal that
is a stretch but not a dream.”
Alongside the worthiness of its
cause, each Hamptons benefit is
defined by its silent auction. With
items ranging from energy heal-
ing for pets to a ride on a Clydes-
dale to a Maidstone threesome
(get your mind out of the sand
trap) to a fresh water filtration
system used by restaurants like
Le Bernardin, Per Se and Daniel
Boulud valued at $18,000, we have
to say green thumbs up.
BeaCheS & BayS
Benefit gala
June 30
The Nature Conservancy
www.nature.org
Guest enjoyed an evening of cock-
tails, dinner and dancing at the
Nature Conservancy center in East
Hampton in support of the organi-
zation. The party raised funds to
help protect the East End’s natural
environment.
SearChing fOr
Sugarman with
aleC Baldwin
July 6
Hamptons International
Film Festival SummerDoc
Screening
www.guildhall.org
The Hamptons International Film
Festival (HIFF) is known for its sur-
prises, and Director of Program-
ming David Nugent has an eye
for the breakout films. The festi-
val has previewed Academy Award
winners Slumdog Millionaire, The
King’s Speech and The Artist. As
part of their SummerDocs program
at Guild Hall, which includes dis-
cussions between Alec Baldwin and
the documentary filmmaker, HIFF
again surprised audiences with
Searching For Sugar Man from Di-
rector Malik Bendjelloul. “This is
one of the strangest, most amazing
films I’ve ever seen,” Baldwin said.
It’s truly one of the best examples

SearChing fOr Sugarman (COnt’d)
of urban legend meets magical mys-
ticism meets fairy tale since The
Riddle Of The Shadow Martini. Two
South African fans are on the hunt
to find out the story of ‘60s prophet-
ic singer/songwriter Rodriguez who
was famous for blowing his brains
out onstage at a particularly bad
gig. What Rodriguez didn’t know is
that, while he sold very few albums
in the U.S. (this is before there was
iVinyl), he was a superstar in South
Africa, inspiring youth and the anti
apartheid movement with his com-
pelling anti-establishment lyrics.
The film offers its own series of
surprises. If you don’t want the se-
cret revealed à la “I talk to dead peo-
ple” and “the girl is actually a dude,”
stop reading here.
Rodriguez, who is alive and well,
made a surprise appearance at the
East Hampton screening, playing a
few tunes to a standing ovation. Re-
ferring to the amazing twists and
turns of this real life tale, Mr. Bald-
win looked at Mr. Bendjelloul and
asked, “Now come on, how did you
find this story?”
The 20th Anniversary Hamptons
International Film Festival runs Oc-
tober 4 – 8, 2012.
unmaSked
Benefit hOSted By
alexander SOrOS
July 7
Global Witness
www.alexandersorosfoundation.com
In a Bridgehampton meadow with
a view of swans on Mecox Bay, the
thought of children in mines in the
Congo might feel far away. For sum-
mer Hamptonites, human rights
abuses often consist of usurious
prices for lobster salad and spray
tans gone wrong. Conflicts over nat-
ural resources often manifest them-
selves as fights for beach parking.
But under the tent at the Alex-
ander Soros Foundation benefit for
Global Witness, guests were trans-
ported to poor countries where rich
natural resources cause battles and
destruction to the native popula-
tion and the environment.
Alexander Soros met director of
Global Witness Patrick Alley when
he was traveling with his father,
George Soros, on a trip in 2010 to
talk about climate change and the
tropical forests. Mr. Alley reported,
“We met and got along. As a cam-
paign, this has been a dream to find
someone genuinely committed to
making an impact, especially as we
are not a massive organization, but
come from humble origins.”
Mr. Alley also pointed out that the
17-year-old Global Witness Founda-
tion is not just about pioneering
campaigns against natural-re-
source-related conflict and its
abuses, but also the willing in-
ternational buyers of the re-
sources who play a part in it.
(Do you know where the miner-
als to create your cell phone come
from?)
Attracted by the stories told by
Mr. Alley and the willingness of the
workers at Global Witness to risk
their lives, Mr. Soros wanted in. “I
wanted to help in my own modest
way,” he said. “I’m honored to be on
the board. In terms of effectiveness,
there’s not a better organization.”
Producer Ed Zwick (can we admit:
our “thirtysomething” addiction)
lent Hollywood heavyweight to the
event. Mr. Zwick discovered Glob-
al Witness as part of his research
for the blockbuster Blood Diamond
with Leonardo DiCaprio.
“When their name first came up,
I didn’t know what it was,” said Mr.
Zwick. “We developed an intense
relationship with our research on
conflict diamonds. I also was con-
cerned with other issues and stayed
on their advisory board.”
Guests ranged from proud Papa
Soros to MC Hammer, who got the
crowd dancing.
lOve healS at
luna farmS
July 7
Alison Gertz Foundation
for AIDS Education
www.loveheals.org
You know an organization is dedi-
cated to safe sex when they make
sure every goody bag contains
a “Proper Attire Required For
Entry” condom, designed by host
Charlotte Ronson. The 13th an-
nual Love Heals event held at Luna
Farm in Sagaponack attracted 650
guests and raised over $300,000.
“It’s the ultimate birthday
party for the 20th anniversary of
Love Heals,” Love Heals Executive
Director Jasmine Nielsen said.
“We’ve reached 530,000 young
people about AIDS education.
It’s a big deal for a small organi-
zation. We’re getting an amaz-
ing younger crowd.” Indeed, naer
a blue-blazered senior could be
found. “It’s not true that they are
not a philanthropic generation,”
she added.
Host Andrew Saffir there with
Daniel Benedict admitted, “I’m
semi-allergic to Hamptons events.
[But] this is always one of my fa-
vorites. Dini is so tirelessly ded-
icated. It’s an honor to help in a
small way.”
Notable attendees included DJ
Kiss, supermodel Nicole Trun-
fio, pianist Chloe Flower, design-
er Rebecca Minckoff, Rodale’s
David Zincenko, news anchor
Chris Wragge, SCENE magazine
Editor-in-Chief Peter Davis, Scott
Lipps, Avis Richards, Teresa Sor-
kin, Martin and Nina Varsavsky,
Eric Villency and Niche Media’s
Samantha Yanks, among others.
Alison Gertz’s parents, Mr. and
Mrs. Jerrold Gertz, were also in
attendance.
empire State pride
agenda hamptOnS
tea danCe
July 14
The Ark Project
www.prideagenda.org
DJ Lady Bunny kept over 1,000
guests dancing for this year’s ben-
efit for the LGBT rights organiza-
tion, which attracted prominent
political figures and industry and
design leaders who support LGBT
initiatives.
vent planning and catering doyenne Janet O’Brien knows
the secret to success for memorable Hamptons events. Ms.
O’Brien speaks the language of her sophisticated clients and
infuses her fresh local menus with international flare. Her
magic is to create a polished, seamless event without it feeling staged.
Her A-team of loyal purveyors exudes excellence from top to bottom
with her hands on guidance. If the devil is in the details, Ms. O’Brien
has him by the tail. Every design element from the tent to the coor-
dinated color palette to the garnish is carefully orchestrated. Ms.
O’Brien notes, “My ordinary is other’s extra-ordinary.”
Janet O’Brien Caterers and Events headlines everything from an in-
timate reception at Elie Tahari’s East Hampton store for Guild Hall’s
Patti Lupone and Mandy Patinkin to the Azuero Foundation Earth
Project Benefit for 400 guests this Labor Day Weekend. Look out for
her as she takes on Amy Winehouse Foundation’s August 4 event. Here,
Ms. O’Brien and her partner in crime, Heather Buchanan, dish on
their most recent Hamptons social engagements.
Pachute, a two-year-old women’s boutique located in
Manhattan’s Upper East Side, has dived into the East
End’s retail market by opening its pop-up location, Pa-
chute East, in the bohemian town of Sag Harbor.
Owner Sharone Komoroff partnered with mother-
in-law and longtime Sag Harbor summer resident Au-
drey Orell, to open the store. Pachute, which translates
as “simple” in Hebrew, is a perfect match for Sag Har-
bor’s laid-back, Hamptons aesthetic.
At the boutique, shoppers can discover a custom-
ized selection of women’s clothing, jewelry and acces-
sories in fun summer styles. “I love all of the brands we
carry,” said Ms. Orell. “There isn’t a thing in the bou-
tique I wouldn’t wear! Some of my favorites include
Pas de Calais, Pip-Squeak Chapeau, Loup Charmant
and Ivan Grundahl. For jewelry, MCS Design and Sarah
MacFadden are my go-to designers right now and Amy
Kreiling for bags.”
The Observer asked Ms. Komoroff to pick three out-
fits currently available at the store and
match them with their perfect Hamp-
tons outing, here are her responses:
Pachute East, 78 Main Street,
Sag Harbor • 631-899-4888
Open daily from 10a.m. to 7p.m.
P
H
O
T
O
G
R
A
P
H
S

B
Y

P
A
T
R
I
C
K

M
C
M
U
L
L
A
N


B
Y

J
A
N
E
T

O

B
R
I
E
N

&

H
E
A
T
H
E
R

B
U
C
H
A
N
A
N
speci al adverti si ng secti on for the new York observer
“Pools have evolved, but one thing re-
mains unchanged—the tranquility,
sensuality and escape they offer,” said
notable New Yorker Kelly Klein on
the launch of her seventh glossy tome
Pools: Reflections. In the book, she ex-
plores various pool styles in regards
to their design, architecture, style and
opulence. It features beautiful imag-
es—many taken in The Hamptons—
by renowned photographers such as
Bruce Weber, Steven Klein, Robert
Mapplethorpe and Juergen Teller. The
Observer tracked down Ms. Klein, a
seasoned Hamptons dweller, to learn
more about the new book and the ins
and outs of her life out East.
Which is your favorite party in
The Hamptons each year?
My favorite party is the ACRIA Cock-
tails at Sunset benefit. They always
have such an interesting mix of guests
and it is always held some AMAZING
location. Last year it was held at Steven
Klein’s farm, and this year it’s hosted
by Ross Bleckner. ACRIA happens to
be one of my favorite charities, and I
am donating all the proceeds from my
new book, Pools: Reflections, to the or-
ganization. My other favorite is The
Hamptons Classic, which really isn’t a
party, but rather a weeklong event that
I attend each summer.
Which towns do you think people
should explore more?
They are all so different and each has
its own unique charm…I live in East
Hampton and love to walk around and
explore in Amagansett. Recently there
have been a lot of unusual, cute new
stores that have opened there. I also
love going to Sag Harbor to shop the
home stores.
Where do you go
for fresh produce?
My favorite farm stand that I always go
to is on Sagaponack Road. I don’t know
the name of it, or even if it has a name,
but it is the right off Route 27. They
have the best fresh-cut sunflowers,
and the best home-grown tomatoes,
strawberries and sweet corn. Recently,
I started my own vegetable garden and
am hoping that I won’t have to go fur-
ther than my own back yard for vegeta-
bles soon! I’m also excited for all of the
summer berries that are just starting
to appear in the markets.
What is the most divine beach out
East?
I take a two-hour walk on the beach
every day for exercise, and I have al-
ways loved Gibson Beach in Saga-
ponack, so I walk from my house in
East Hampton there and back daily.
What is your favorite activity to
do in the Hamptons?
I love going to spinning classes at Soul
Cycle. For me, they are the best classes
anywhere! Most of my time is spent
visiting or hosting friends, which
seems to revolve around fresh food
and cold, crisp wine. Other than that,
it seems most of my time these days is
spent taking my five-year-old son to
his activities, tennis and swimming.
What projects are you currently
working on?
This fall will be spent promoting the
book through events and book sign-
ings in New York, Los Angeles, Miami,
Houston, Palm Beach and The Hamp-
tons. I am also working on my personal
photography as well.
Any great suggestions for fine
dining in the East End?
The truth is I don’t go out for dinner
that often, but when I do, one of my fa-
vorite places to go is Gabby Karan’s
restaurant, Tutto il Gionio, in Sag
Harbor. The pasta is fresh and amaz-
ing, and the atmosphere is so charm-
ing and comfortable. I feel very much
at home. Another place I like to go to in
Sag [Harbor] is Sen.
Take a Dip
with Kelly
Klein
~ By Benjamin-Émile Le Hay ~
Hamptons Simple
~ By Benjamin-Émile Le Hay ~
1
2
3
1 This linen Normandy dress
by Pip-Squeak Chapeau is great
for spending an afternoon at
the Polo matches.

c
o
u
r
t
e
s
Y
p
a
c
h
u
t
e
p
a
t
r
ic
k
M
c
M
u
l
l
a
n
Clockwise from top: The tents at Ark Project’s Pride party; Janet O’Brien
canoodles with Jacob Stovall at the Unmasked Soros Beneft; Designer
Rebecca Minkof strikes a pose at Love Heals; Billy Joel and Bob DeLuca
at Group for The East End gala; Lady Bunny brought the juice at the
Empire State Pride tea dance; revelers at The Nature Conservancy gala;
The likes of Ruth Appelhof, Hilaria Baldwin and Alec Baldwin graced
the step-and-repeat at HIFF’s Summer Screening.
2 I love this organic cotton
gauze maxi dress by Loup
Charmant for the Bay
Street Theatre Beneft.

3 This aqua blue
print bandeau bikini
by Deedee would be
perfect for a relaxing
day at Peter’s Pond.

g
e
t
t
Y
iM
a
g
e
s
O
u
T



A
B
O
u
T
&
E
The New York Observer MPTONS LIVING | July 30, 2012  | C 5 Hamptonsliving
S A L E S | R E N T A L S | R E L O C AT I O N | N E W D E V E L O P ME N T S | R E T A I L | MO R T G A G E | P R O P E R T Y MA N A G E ME N T | T I T L E I N S U R A N C E
YOUR ONE-IN-A-MILLION HOME NEEDS THAT
ONE-IN-A-MILLION BUYER. HOW DO YOU ENSURE THE TWO MEET?
As the largest regional and global network of real estate experts, Douglas Elliman has a way of understanding your home and what
makes it unique. From buying and selling to appraisals, mortgage financing and rentals, top experts on AskElliman.com offer timely
answers to today’s questions about all things real estate. With a powerful combination of talent and technology, we have the experience,
insight and access to guide you skillfully from beginning to end. Put the power of Elliman to work for you.
©

2
0
1
2

B
R
E
R

A
f

l
i
a
t
e
s

I
n
c
.

a
n

i
n
d
e
p
e
n
d
e
n
t
l
y

o
w
n
e
d

a
n
d

o
p
e
r
a
t
e
d

b
r
o
k
e
r

m
e
m
b
e
r

o
f

B
R
E
R

A
f

l
i
a
t
e
s

I
n
c
.

P
r
u
d
e
n
t
i
a
l
,

t
h
e

P
r
u
d
e
n
t
i
a
l

l
o
g
o

a
n
d

t
h
e

R
o
c
k

s
y
m
b
o
l

a
r
e

r
e
g
i
s
t
e
r
e
d

s
e
r
v
i
c
e

m
a
r
k
s

o
f

P
r
u
d
e
n
t
i
a
l

F
i
n
a
n
c
i
a
l
,

I
n
c
.

a
n
d

i
t
s

r
e
l
a
t
e
d

e
n
t
i
t
i
e
s
,

r
e
g
i
s
t
e
r
e
d

i
n

m
a
n
y

j
u
r
i
s
d
i
c
t
i
o
n
s

w
o
r
l
d
w
i
d
e
.

U
s
e
d

u
n
d
e
r

l
i
c
e
n
s
e

w
i
t
h

n
o

o
t
h
e
r

a
f

l
i
a
t
i
o
n

w
i
t
h

P
r
u
d
e
n
t
i
a
l
.

E
q
u
a
l

H
o
u
s
i
n
g

O
p
p
o
r
t
u
n
i
t
y
.

C 6 | July 30, 2012 | The New York Observer Hamptonsliving
“Cash is the new black! It’s not unusual for buy-
ers to pay all cash for homes here,” explained Paul
Brennan and Sachiko Goodman, Hamptons Re-
gional Manager and Managing Director, respec-
tively of Prudential Douglas Elliman Real Estate.
“Whether $1,000,000 or $20,000,000. It’s the best
currency for the strongest deal – and sellers re-
spond well to it!”
“I would say that a large percentage of my trans-
actions are structured as a ‘cash’ deal,” echoed
Associate Broker Brian Buckhout of Prudential
Douglas Elliman’s East Hampton office, “but it is
extremely rare that someone actually shows up
with a bag of cash.”
“More often than not, the buyer will have some
sort of financing, but they are comfortable enough
with their financial situation that they do no need
to make it a contingency of
purchase,” he said. “It basi-
cally strengthens their offer
from the outset as the buyer
does not have the financing
as an out clause.”
While cash may make for
strong deals, there are al-
ways a few deals that fall
through the cracks. “We had
a last-minute request from
a nightclub owner that we
know for a Memorial Day
weekend rental for one of his
friends who is a big name ce-
lebrity and his entourage,”
Mr. Buckhout shared. “We
got the call on Friday and
had a client who was going
to be out of town for the
weekend and agreed to rent
his house for $25,000. The
group showed up on Friday
night but only had half of the
money, so myself and the owner’s son, who is a
local attorney, had to go the house the next morn-
ing and collect all of their debit cards, go to the
village and withdraw the remaining money.”
“The stories are legendary,” he said, adding,
only somewhat jokingly. “If I told you, I’d have to
kill you.”
Though we may never know all that goes on in
the real estate market, to experiences like this, Mr.
Buckhout said, the best agents are the ones that
respond with “verve” and “professionalism.” At
least, these are the ones “that come out smiling.”
To insane demands? “We’re in the service busi-
ness, after all,” he said. “So nothing is impossible,
the answer is always ‘yes!’ with a big smile.”
Drama doesn’t always involve difficult hur-
dles put forth my finicky clients. Even four-legged
creatures can add an unexpected twist, requir-
ing realtors to act with swift compassion. Terry
Thompson, a Licensed Sales Associate at Pruden-
tial Douglas Elliman said that one of her most out-
rageous tales in the Hamptons involved a dog from
a disheveled property.
“I ‘won’ a listing after six other agents were in-
terviewed. Then the work began,” she recalled.
“First, I along with Nancy Hardy, also [a broker
at Prudential Douglas Elliman] from the South-
ampton office rescued two dogs from this owner
that were crated all day!” Ms. Thompson took mat-
ters quickly into her own hands and emailed vari-
ous Hamptons agents and found both dogs a new
home upstate.
“The home was extremely cluttered so I made the
owner order a 20-yard dumpster… and transformed
the home into something we
could put on the market,” she
told The Observer.
Saying yes with a smile
seems to stay the policy, even
when beautiful, relative-
ly new homes on the market
are completely bulldozed by
new owners. “I’ve sold several
homes on the water that have
been bulldozed or completely
gut-renovated, even though
they were in relatively great
condition,” said Mala Sand-
er, Senior Vice President and
Associate Broke of Corcoran
Group. “There’s so little wa-
terfront out there, so people
that don’t find what they want
are prepared to rip down and
start over.”
And what it is that peo-
ple want from their homes
in The Hamptons is varying
more and more. While many real-estate options
in the area subscribe to its “quaint,” vacation-es-
cape atmosphere, there are always a few that push
the definition of what it means to live in the The
Hamptons, the Water Mill property, Ito Estate, de-
signed by famed architect, sculptor and artist Set-
suo Ito (pictured), being one of them.
While surrounded by verdant pastures and pan-
oramic ocean and bay views, with a half-mile drive-
way surrounded by white pine forest, the property
somehow pulls off working a 32-foot-high steel
pyramid into the picture. Inside, Japanese-style
bedrooms and a rare open-glass fireplace intro-
duce a new level of zen to the pastoral outside. A
rare 22-acre horse farm is also available for pur-
chase a few blocks down the road. Talk about com-
bining the best of both worlds.
‘The group only had half
of the money, so myself
and the owner’s son ... had
to go to the house the next
morning and collect all of
their debit cards, go to the
village and withdraw the
remaining money.’
Brian Buckhout,
Prudential Douglas
Elliman
Hamptons Real Estate Confessions
Clockwise
from top left:

The phenomenal Ito
Estate in Water Mill;
707 Pleasure Drive
just of Flanders
Bay; the grand
entrance of Brown
Harris Stevens’
Sandcastle Estate in
Bridgehampton; the
living room of one
of Brian Buckhout’s
East Hampton
listings; a marble
bathroom inside
Sandcastle Estate.
speci al adverti si ng secti on for the new York observer
Realty PRos’ sHaRe stoRIes

~ Written by Melissa Wiley • Compiled by Benjamin-Émile Le Hay ~
c
o
u
r
t
e
s
Y
b
r
o
w
n
h
a
r
r
is
s
t
e
v
e
n
s
; c
o
u
r
t
e
s
Y
p
r
u
d
e
n
t
ia
l
d
o
u
g
l
a
s
e
l
l
im
a
n
The New York Observer MPTONS LIVING | July 30, 2012  | C 7 Hamptonsliving

R
C 8 | July 30, 2012 | The New York Observer Hamptonsliving

Sign up to vote on this title
UsefulNot useful