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Appendix 7 USAP Airlift of Hazardous Materials Manual

2/10/2008Raytheon Polar Services Company Document Number LO-MS-101 USAP Airlift of Hazardous Materials Manual Revision #4, 18 September 2002 McMurdo Station, South Pole Station, Field Camps Approved by Derrold Burnett

USAP Airlift of Hazardous Materials Manual
Document Number LO-MS-101 Revision #4 Revision Date 18 September 2002

Logistics/ATO Attachment 6a

Raytheon Polar Services Company Document Number LO-MS-101 USAP Airlift of Hazardous Materials Manual Revision #4, 18 September 2002 McMurdo Station, South Pole Station, Field Camps Approved by Derrold Burnett

Table of Contents
Table of Contents...................................................................................... .........i Purpose............................................................................... .............................1 Scope/Applicability...........................................................................................1 Terms and Definitions.......................................................................................1 Responsibilities............................................................................................. ....3 Discussion............................................................................... .........................4 Procedure................................................................................... ......................5 Introduction.......................................................................................... .........8 General Packaging Requirements ...............................................................10 Marking & Labeling.....................................................................................16 Documentation & Notification.....................................................................19 Carriage & Stowage ...................................................................................31 Special Provisions.................................................................................. ......36 Exceptions............................................................................................. ......44 Hazardous Material......................................................................................... 47 A............................................................................................................. .....47 Y..................................................................................................... .............47 A – May be carried in baggage Y = Yes N = No............................................................................. ...............................47 Measurement..............................................................................................48 To................................................................................................................ ....48 References.....................................................................................................49 Quality Records..............................................................................................49 Attachments, Appendices...............................................................................50 Appendix 1 - Hazardous Cargo Manifest/Checklist Printable Form.................50 Appendix 2 - Harry Mahar Approval E-Mail.....................................................50
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Raytheon Polar Services Company Document Number LO-MS-101 USAP Airlift of Hazardous Materials Manual Revision #4, 18 September 2002 McMurdo Station, South Pole Station, Field Camps Approved by Derrold Burnett

Logistics/ATO Contract No. OPP 0000373

ii

Raytheon Polar Services Company Document Number LO-MS-101 USAP Airlift of Hazardous Materials Manual Revision #4, 18 September 2002 McMurdo Station, South Pole Station, Field Camps Approved by Derrold Burnett

Purpose
The purpose of this procedure is to provide the requirements to airlift hazardous materials aboard non-DOD/military aircraft within the confines of Antarctica.

Scope/Applicability
This procedure provides guidance to the Fixed Wing Coordinator and the Helo Coordinator on the requirements and procedures for packaging and transporting hazardous materials aboard contract aircraft.

Terms and Definitions
Antarctica

The continent of Antarctica and those areas of ice, ocean, and land surrounding the continent that are not the territory of any country (as recognized by the United States).
Air Terminal

For the purposes of this procedure; a facility designed for the takeoff and landing of civilian aircraft and the loading of passengers and cargo that is manned by personnel responsible for these activities. This does not include unimproved helicopter pads and landing strips at remote sites.
ATF

United States Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, and Firearms
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Raytheon Polar Services Company Document Number LO-MS-101 USAP Airlift of Hazardous Materials Manual Revision #4, 18 September 2002 McMurdo Station, South Pole Station, Field Camps Approved by Derrold Burnett
Closed-head Drum

A drum with a top opening that does not exceed 70 mm (2.75 in) in diameter. Also called a "non-removable head drum".
Combination Packaging

Packaging consisting of an inner container/receptacle that is secured inside an outer container.
DOT

United States Department of Transportation
49 CFR

Code of Federal Regulations, Title 49. (U.S. Federal regulations for hazardous material transportation)
Hazardous Material

A substance or material which the DOT or ICAO has determined to be capable of posing an unreasonable risk to health, safety, and property when transported.
IATA

International Air Transport Association (an association of commercial airlines)
ICAO

International Civil Aviation Organization (an organization of government civil aviation authorities)
ICAO Technical Instructions

The ICAO Technical Instructions for the Safe Transport of Dangerous Goods by Air. is a document recognized by most countries, including the United States, for regulating hazardous material shipments by civil aviation. 49 CFR accepts use of the ICAO Technical Instructions, with a few caveats, so they are not mutually exclusive.
IME

Institute of Makers of Explosives

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Raytheon Polar Services Company Document Number LO-MS-101 USAP Airlift of Hazardous Materials Manual Revision #4, 18 September 2002 McMurdo Station, South Pole Station, Field Camps Approved by Derrold Burnett
kPa

Kilopascals - a unit of pressure
Open-head Drum

A drum that can have its entire top removed. Also called a "removable-head drum" or "overpack drum".
Operator

Person(s) or company responsible for operating the aircraft.
Proper Shipping Name

Standard name of a hazardous material used for transportation as found in Table 172.101 of 49 CFR or the List of Dangerous Goods in the ICAO Technical Instructions.
psi

Pounds per square inch--a unit of pressure.
Single Packaging

A packaging that contains material without the aid of inner containers, such as a closed-head drum or jerrican.
UN/ID #

A four-digit number (preceded by "UN", "ID", or "NA") used to identify hazardous materials.

Responsibilities
The USAP Hazardous Cargo Specialist is responsible for maintaining and updating this procedure. The Hazardous Cargo Specialist will also delineate/distribute the procedure to the respective departments.

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Raytheon Polar Services Company Document Number LO-MS-101 USAP Airlift of Hazardous Materials Manual Revision #4, 18 September 2002 McMurdo Station, South Pole Station, Field Camps Approved by Derrold Burnett

Discussion
The purpose of this manual is to set forth the procedures for transporting hazardous materials by civilian aircraft under contract to the United States Antarctic Program (USAP) as administered by the National Science Foundation and its contractors. This manual is not to be used as a single-source document for preparing hazardous material shipments. Knowledge of established standards on hazardous material transportation (49 CFR, IATA, ICAO, AFMAN 24-204) will be necessary.

This manual is primarily directed at shippers (those who prepare hazardous materials for transport) and operators (those who operate the aircraft). Those who are involved with, or dependent upon, hazardous material transportation should make themselves aware of the rules and procedures set forth in this manual which will affect them. A copy of this manual will be carried aboard all USAP-contracted civilian aircraft operating in Antarctica.

For the purposes of this manual, hazardous materials (also known as dangerous goods, hazardous cargo, or restricted articles) are defined as those articles or substances which are capable of posing a significant risk to health, safety, or to property when transported by air—as determined by the United States Department of Transportation (DOT).

The DOT regulations pertaining to the transport of hazardous materials by aircraft (49 CFR, Part 175) do not apply to USAP flight
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Raytheon Polar Services Company Document Number LO-MS-101 USAP Airlift of Hazardous Materials Manual Revision #4, 18 September 2002 McMurdo Station, South Pole Station, Field Camps Approved by Derrold Burnett
operations in Antarctica (see 49 CFR, Part 175.5(a)). However, the USAP has established comparable requirements to ensure the safe transport of hazardous materials in its aircraft. The procedures set forth in this manual are considered to be USAP policy (see Appendix) and shall apply to all contract aircraft operating in support of the USAP.

Aircraft operators that are subject to this manual may not overrule the manual and ignore its requirements at any time (see also Chapter 7, Exceptions) without consultation with the NSF. However, aircraft operators reserve the right to be stricter than the regulations contained herein and may refuse to carry certain articles and substances at their discretion. This manual does not apply to the following: • • • • Aircraft operated by U.S. Department of Defense (DOD) personnel Aircraft not under contract to the USAP Aircraft owned and operated by a foreign government Aircraft under contract to the USAP when outside of Antarctica

Though the rules and procedures of this manual are styled after those found in documents that govern commercial and military aircraft, there are significant differences. No part of this manual will be used to determine the requirements of shipping hazardous materials via commercial or military means.

Procedure
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Raytheon Polar Services Company Document Number LO-MS-101 USAP Airlift of Hazardous Materials Manual Revision #4, 2 August 2002 McMurdo Station, South Pole Station, Field Camps Approved by Derrold Burnett

United States Antarctic Program

Airlift of Hazardous Materials Manual

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Raytheon Polar Services Company Document Number LO-MS-101 USAP Airlift of Hazardous Materials Manual Revision #4, 2 August 2002 McMurdo Station, South Pole Station, Field Camps Approved by Derrold Burnett

USAP Airlift of Hazardous Materials Manual Approved by: Harry Mahar, Safety and Health Officer, OPP Revision 4, 2 August 2002
(Ensure this is the most current copy prior to use.)

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Raytheon Polar Services Company Document Number LO-MS-101 USAP Airlift of Hazardous Materials Manual Revision #4, 2 August 2002 McMurdo Station, South Pole Station, Field Camps Approved by Derrold Burnett

Chapter 1
Introduction

1.1

Purpose

1.1.1. The purpose of this manual is to set forth the procedures for transporting hazardous materials by civilian aircraft under contract to the United States Antarctic Program (USAP) as administered by the National Science Foundation and its contractors. This manual is not to be used as a single-source document for preparing hazardous material shipments. Knowledge of established standards on hazardous material transportation (49 CFR, IATA, ICAO, AFMAN 24-204) will be necessary. 1.1.2. This manual is primarily directed at shippers (those who prepare hazardous materials for transport) and operators (those who operate the aircraft). Those who are involved with, or dependent upon, hazardous material transportation should make themselves aware of the rules and procedures set forth in this manual which will affect them. 1.1.3. A copy of this manual will be carried aboard all USAP-contracted civilian aircraft operating in Antarctica.

1.2

Applicability

1.2.1. For the purposes of this manual, hazardous materials (also known as dangerous goods, hazardous cargo, or restricted articles) are defined as those articles or substances which are capable of posing a significant risk to health, safety, or to property when transported by air —as determined by the United States Department of Transportation (DOT).

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Raytheon Polar Services Company Document Number LO-MS-101 USAP Airlift of Hazardous Materials Manual Revision #4, 2 August 2002 McMurdo Station, South Pole Station, Field Camps Approved by Derrold Burnett
1.2.2. The DOT regulations pertaining to the transport of hazardous materials by aircraft (49 CFR, Part 175) do not apply to USAP flight operations in Antarctica (see 49 CFR, Part 175.5(a)). However, the USAP has established comparable requirements to ensure the safe transport of hazardous materials in its aircraft. The procedures set forth in this manual are considered to be USAP policy (see Appendix) and shall apply to all contract aircraft operating in support of the USAP. 1.2.3. Aircraft operators that are subject to this manual may not overrule the manual and ignore its requirements at any time (see also Chapter 7, Exceptions) without consultation with the NSF. However, aircraft operators reserve the right to be stricter than the regulations contained herein and may refuse to carry certain articles and substances at their discretion. 1.2.4. This manual does not apply to the following: • • • • Aircraft operated by U.S. Department of Defense (DOD) personnel Aircraft not under contract to the USAP Aircraft owned and operated by a foreign government Aircraft under contract to the USAP when outside of Antarctica

1.2.5. Though the rules and procedures of this manual are styled after those found in documents which govern commercial and military aircraft, there are significant differences. No part of this manual will be used to determine the requirements of shipping hazardous materials via commercial or military means.

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Raytheon Polar Services Company Document Number LO-MS-101 USAP Airlift of Hazardous Materials Manual Revision #4, 2 August 2002 McMurdo Station, South Pole Station, Field Camps Approved by Derrold Burnett

Chapter 2
General Packaging Requirements

2.1

Transportability

2.1.1. Hazardous materials will be transported in original UN/POP (United Nations / Performance Oriented Packaging) or other DOTrequired / approved containers whenever possible. When the original packaging is not available, similar or superior containers may be substituted provided they give equal or better protection to the contents. Only packagings of the same construction will be used for substitution (steel drums substituted for steel drums, fiberboard boxes substituted for fiberboard boxes). 2.1.2. All completed packages must be capable of withstanding significant changes in temperature (-40°F to 150°F), air pressure, and humidity without leaking their contents. All packages, regardless of UN/POP standards, must be able to withstand a four-foot drop on any side, corner, or edge of the package without releasing its contents. 2.1.3. Packaging material must not react adversely with the hazardous material it contains. 2.1.4. Inner receptacles should be secured inside outer containers with cushioning material to prevent shifting and breaking. Cushioning material must be absorbent when the inner receptacles contain liquids. Inner receptacles made of glass or other materials made brittle by cold temperatures should be surrounded by cushioning material that provides insulation.

2.2

Shipping Liquids
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Raytheon Polar Services Company Document Number LO-MS-101 USAP Airlift of Hazardous Materials Manual Revision #4, 2 August 2002 McMurdo Station, South Pole Station, Field Camps Approved by Derrold Burnett

2.2.1. Single packagings designed to hold liquids must be able to withstand an internal pressure of 100 kPa (15 psi) without leaking their contents –Refer to 49 CFR part 178 or the ICAO Technical Instructions for test procedures. UN/POP packagings designed to hold liquids have the test pressure (in kPa) marked on the outside of the container (as part of the UN package marking). Non-UN/POP packaging will not be used as a single packaging for liquids unless proof is given that the pressure requirements have been met. 2.2.2. Inner receptacles designed to hold liquids as part of a combination package must be capable of withstanding 95 kPa (14 psi) of internal pressure without leaking their contents. Proof of meeting pressure requirements is not required for inner receptacles. Tape should be used on the lids/closures of inner receptacles to bolster their protection against leaks. 2.2.3. Containers designed to hold liquids must not be completely filled. Space must be left inside the container to allow liquid to expand due to temperature or pressure changes. An ullage (outage) of at least two percent at 130°F is required. When filling liquid containers outdoors at extremely cold temperatures, consideration should be given to the possibility that the inside of the aircraft may be more than 100°F warmer than ambient outdoor temperatures—which may cause significant expansion of some liquids.

2.3

Absorbent Cushioning / Liners

2.3.1. Combination packagings containing liquids must use absorbent cushioning material between the outer and inner containers. There should be enough cushioning material to absorb the contents of any one inner container, and where the inner containers vary in size, enough to absorb the contents of the container with the greatest quantity.

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Raytheon Polar Services Company Document Number LO-MS-101 USAP Airlift of Hazardous Materials Manual Revision #4, 2 August 2002 McMurdo Station, South Pole Station, Field Camps Approved by Derrold Burnett
2.3.2. Single packagings for solids must use an intermediate liner such as a plastic bag when the contents are in powder or fine granular form if the outer container is not sift-proof.

2.4

Use of Other Regulations

2.4.1. Hazardous materials that have been packaged in compliance with the passenger or cargo aircraft requirements of 49 CFR, the ICAO Technical Instructions, the IATA Dangerous Goods Regulations, or Air Force Manual 24-204, will be considered to be in compliance with this manual. Similarly, materials that are considered “excepted” or “exempt” from the requirements of any of those documents will be excepted from the requirements of this manual.

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Raytheon Polar Services Company Document Number LO-MS-101 USAP Airlift of Hazardous Materials Manual Revision #4, 2 August 2002 McMurdo Station, South Pole Station, Field Camps Approved by Derrold Burnett

2.5 Personnel Shipment

Who

Prepare

Hazardous

Materials

For

2.5.1. Only those personnel who have been properly trained in the identification, classification, labeling, marking, and documentation of hazardous material shipments shall prepare hazardous materials for airlift in Antarctica. Personnel may receive training in-house or attend a commercial hazardous cargo course as long as the training requirements of 49 CFR, part 172, subpart H, or ICAO are met. Proof of training, such as a certificate, must be available. Recurrent training is required every two years. 2.5.2. Personnel preparing hazardous retrograde cargo in the field do not need to attend formal hazardous cargo training. In these cases, the cargo retrograde procedures in the Field Manual of the U.S. Antarctic Program must be followed. 2.6 Authorized Packagings and Quantities

2.6.1. When packaging hazardous materials for air shipment, Tables 2.A and 2.B of this chapter must be used to determine the authorized packaging and quantity limits. Chapter 6 must be consulted for the requirements on shipping gases. Chapter 6 must also be consulted for specific requirements for each hazard class. Table 2.A Authorized Packagings and Quantities for Liquids

COMBINATION PACKAGINGS
Receptacle Material: Maximum Quantity :
Inner Receptacles Glass, Plastic earthenware 10 L 25 L Metal 25 L

Outer Packagings
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Raytheon Polar Services Company Document Number LO-MS-101 USAP Airlift of Hazardous Materials Manual Revision #4, 2 August 2002 McMurdo Station, South Pole Station, Field Camps Approved by Derrold Burnett
Boxes
Fiberboard, Wood , Plastic, Metal
1

Open-head Drums
Metal, Plastic, Fiber

Maximum Total Quantity Per Combination Package: 220 Liters

SINGLE PACKAGINGS
Type Package:
Maximum Quantity:

of Closed-head
Drums
2

Jerricans
Plastic, Metal3

Metal, Plastic, Fiber

220 L

20 L

Table 2.B Authorized Packagings and Quantities for Solids

COMBINATION PACKAGINGS
Receptacle Material: Maximum Quantity:
Inner Receptacles Glass, Plastic Earthenware 5 Kg 45 Kg Metal 45 Kg

Boxes

Outer Packagings Open-head Drums
Metal, Plastic, Fiber, Plywood

Fiberboard, Wood1, Plastic, Metal

Maximum Total Quantity Per Combination Package: 250 Kg

SINGLE PACKAGINGS
Type of Package:
Maximum Quantity:

Boxes
Fiberboard, Wood , Plastic, Metal
1

Open-head Drums
Metal, Plastic, Fiber, Plywood

Bags

4

Plastic, Paper

250 Kg

250 Kg

50 Kg

“Wood” indicates wood, plywood, and reconstituted wood. Open-head drums are allowed as single packagings for liquids when meeting pressure requirements but are discouraged.
1 2

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Raytheon Polar Services Company Document Number LO-MS-101 USAP Airlift of Hazardous Materials Manual Revision #4, 2 August 2002 McMurdo Station, South Pole Station, Field Camps Approved by Derrold Burnett The DOT 5L steel jerrican, traditionally used by the military, is not authorized for hazardous material air shipments since it does not meet pressure/leak-proof requirements. 4 Bags may only be used when they are the original packaging from the manufacturer, as in the case of charcoal briquettes or ANFO (ammonium nitrate – fuel oil mixture).
3

2.7

Different Hazardous Materials Packaged Together

2.7.1. Different hazardous materials may be packed together in the same outer packaging under the following conditions: • Hazardous materials are compatible with each other according to table 5.A of this manual and will not react dangerously with one another. Total net quantity of all inner containers does not exceed that allowed for the outer container. The completed package meets the marking and labeling requirements for each hazardous material packed within.

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Raytheon Polar Services Company Document Number LO-MS-101 USAP Airlift of Hazardous Materials Manual Revision #4, 2 August 2002 McMurdo Station, South Pole Station, Field Camps Approved by Derrold Burnett

Chapter 3
Marking & Labeling

3.1

Marking

3.1.1. The outside of all packages of hazardous materials will bear the following markings unless specifically excepted by this manual:
• • • • • • Proper Shipping Name (PSN) Hazard Class Number UN/ID Number Packing Group (when applicable) Description of Package & Net Quantity Consignee/Destination (This may be an abbreviation for the field camp, remote site, or station.) • Gross Weight (in pounds)

3.1.2. Combination packagings containing liquids must be marked with orientation arrows (“Up Arrows”) on two opposite sides of the package. The top of the package should be marked “This End Up” or “This Side Up”. 3.1.3. Packages containing materials that are “poisonous by inhalation” according to 49 CFR (part 172.101/102) must be marked “Inhalation Hazard.”

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Raytheon Polar Services Company Document Number LO-MS-101 USAP Airlift of Hazardous Materials Manual Revision #4, 2 August 2002 McMurdo Station, South Pole Station, Field Camps Approved by Derrold Burnett
3.1.4. To ensure proper documentation, the packing group (when applicable), net quantity, and specific handling/safety instructions should also be marked on the outside of each package if the packager is not the same person who is preparing the manifest. 3.1.5. Markings must be legible and in English. Stencils and manufactured labels may be used to satisfy marking requirements. Letters in the markings must be at least ¼” (0.6 cm) high. 3.1.6. When the surface, shape, or structure of a package makes permanent markings difficult or impossible, the required markings may be put on tags that are affixed to the cargo. 3.2 Labeling

3.2.1. All packages of hazardous materials will bear the appropriate hazard class label(s) for primary and subsidiary risks as specified by 49 CFR or ICAO.

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Raytheon Polar Services Company Document Number LO-MS-101 USAP Airlift of Hazardous Materials Manual Revision #4, 2 August 2002 McMurdo Station, South Pole Station, Field Camps Approved by Derrold Burnett

3.2.2. The “Cargo Aircraft Only (CAO)” label will not be used. Old CAO labels must be removed or obliterated. 3.2.3. Labels may be on tags affixed to the cargo when necessary. 3.2.4. An example of a properly labeled box is shown below.

ConsumerCom dity Clas 9 ID80 OneBox@450Grams Groswt=2lbs LakeExample/B042Schuman

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Raytheon Polar Services Company Document Number LO-MS-101 USAP Airlift of Hazardous Materials Manual Revision #4, 2 August 2002 McMurdo Station, South Pole Station, Field Camps Approved by Derrold Burnett

Chapter 4
Documentation & Notification 4.1 Hazardous Cargo Manifest

4.1.1. Personnel responsible for turning hazardous cargo over to the aircraft at a terminal facility (such as a helicopter hangar/pad or airstrip) must prepare a written manifest of all hazardous cargo that is to be loaded on board the aircraft. The hazardous cargo manifest does not need to be a separate document from the general cargo manifest, however, when both hazardous and non-hazardous cargo are included in the same manifest, the hazardous cargo must be highlighted or emphasized in a manner that makes it stand out from the other cargo. 4.1.2. Hazardous cargo must be manifested from field camps and remote sites when the ability to do so exists. See also section 4.3 of this chapter. 4.1.3. The hazardous cargo manifest must include the following for each package of hazardous material: • • • • • • Proper Shipping Name (PSN) Hazard Class UN/ID Number Packing Group (PG) –when applicable Description of Package and Net Quantity Specific handling or safety instructions–if any.
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Raytheon Polar Services Company Document Number LO-MS-101 USAP Airlift of Hazardous Materials Manual Revision #4, 2 August 2002 McMurdo Station, South Pole Station, Field Camps Approved by Derrold Burnett

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Raytheon Polar Services Company Document Number LO-MS-101 USAP Airlift of Hazardous Materials Manual Revision #4, 2 August 2002 McMurdo Station, South Pole Station, Field Camps Approved by Derrold Burnett
Hazardous Cargo Manifest / Checklist Form 4.2.1. A hazardous cargo manifest / checklist form has been created to make documenting hazardous cargo in the USAP easier. Use of this form fulfills the documentation requirements of paragraphs 4.1.1 and 4.1.2. The completed form should be attached to the general manifest showing cargo and passenger weights. Samples of a blank form and a completed form are included in this chapter in section 4.7.

4.3

Documentation in the Field

4.3.1. When loading hazardous cargo at field camps and remote sites, efforts will be made to document hazardous cargo to the greatest extent possible. Blank manifest/checklist forms and copies of original manifests/checklists should be retained by field parties. A new manifest/checklist should be given to the aircraft operator when being picked up in the field. Updating net quantities on an original manifest/checklist is also a permissible way of generating a “new” manifest/checklist.

4.4

Notifying the Station of Incoming Hazardous Cargo

4.4.1. The air terminal / station should be aware of incoming hazardous materials on aircraft. Whenever possible, this information should be passed by radio to the air terminal / station from the field camp or from the aircraft. At a minimum, the UN/ID number of each material to be retrograded should be passed on. Line numbers (1 through 34) from the Hazardous Cargo Manifest / Checklist may also be used since each line number identifies a unique hazardous material. For manual entries on the manifest/checklist (lines 35 through 42) the UN/ID numbers must be passed on since these line numbers do not represent specific materials.

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Raytheon Polar Services Company Document Number LO-MS-101 USAP Airlift of Hazardous Materials Manual Revision #4, 2 August 2002 McMurdo Station, South Pole Station, Field Camps Approved by Derrold Burnett
4.5 Record Keeping

4.5.1. Copies of hazardous cargo manifests must be kept on file for at least one year by the agency/work-center that is responsible for preparing manifests.

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Raytheon Polar Services Company Document Number LO-MS-101 USAP Airlift of Hazardous Materials Manual Revision #4, 2 August 2002 McMurdo Station, South Pole Station, Field Camps Approved by Derrold Burnett 4.6 Instructions for Completing the Hazardous Cargo Manifest / Checklist
4.6.1. The Hazardous Cargo Manifest/Checklist is used to document hazardous cargo on civilian aircraft in Antarctica. The information necessary to complete the Manifest/Checklist will be provided by those trained personnel who are responsible for preparing hazardous cargo shipments (Cargo/Logistics personnel). The Manifest/Checklist is not to be filled out without first having this information provided by trained personnel. This information will usually be marked on the outside of hazardous cargo packaging but may also be sent electronically to those responsible for preparing cargo manifests at air terminals. 4.6.2. An already-filled-out Manifest/Checklist may be used by field parties for return flights. Net quantities should be updated and nonreturning items crossed out. 4.6.3. The checklist part of the form features the most common hazardous materials that are carried in the USAP on civilian aircraft. Checking-off these entries saves time over having to write out all the necessary information. A check or “X” mark may be made in Column A next to an item description. Columns H (quantity) and I (gross weight) then must be filled out. If Columns D, E, F, and G of a preprinted checklist entry do not match what is marked on the cargo, a check must not be put in Column A next to that preprinted entry. For hazardous cargo that does not have a matching preprinted entry on the checklist, a manual entry must be made in the blank spaces provided on the bottom of the form. Manual entries must be legible. 4.6.4. The Manifest/Checklist columns and blocks are explained below: A – Line Number. Line numbers may be referred to in the “Additional Information” box. They may also be used during radio transmissions in lieu of reading the entire preprinted entry.

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Raytheon Polar Services Company Document Number LO-MS-101 USAP Airlift of Hazardous Materials Manual Revision #4, 2 August 2002 McMurdo Station, South Pole Station, Field Camps Approved by Derrold Burnett
B – Check Box. Place a check or “X” in this box if you are shipping this item. Do not check this box if the information from the package or other supporting documentation does not match what is preprinted in Columns D, E, F, and G. C – Item. A basic layman’s description of the hazardous material (not part of the official hazardous material description). This column may be left blank when not using the preprinted checklist entries. D – Proper Shipping Name. The official, legal shipping name of the hazardous material as assigned by the DOT or ICAO. E– Class. The numerical transportation hazard class and division (when applicable) of the material as assigned by the DOT or ICAO. When a material meets the definition of more than one hazard class, the secondary class(es)/subsidiary risk(s) are shown in parentheses. F – UN/ID#. A four-digit number assigned by the United Nations, used to identify a hazardous material. This number must be preceded by “UN” or “ID” as appropriate. The “NA” prefix may also be used for those numbers recognized only by the US and Canada. G – PG (Packing Group). The degree of risk for some materials as assigned by the DOT or ICAO. PG I = Great Danger, PG II = Medium Danger, PG III = Minor Danger. Class 2 and 7 do not have packing groups. Only some class 9 materials have packing groups. The U.S. assigns PG II to all explosives. When more than one packing group is shown in column F of the checklist portion of the form, cross out the non-applicable number. If the PG is not known, refer to the original packaging or documentation. H – Type of Package & Net Quantity. A physical description of the packaging and the net quantity of hazardous material per package— not the gross weight. (Example: Two steel drums x 200 L. ea.) Metric
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Raytheon Polar Services Company Document Number LO-MS-101 USAP Airlift of Hazardous Materials Manual Revision #4, 2 August 2002 McMurdo Station, South Pole Station, Field Camps Approved by Derrold Burnett
measurements (liters, kilograms) are preferred. “Residue” is an acceptable net quantity entry for packages of liquids that are fairly empty but not drained or purged. Net quantity of compressed gases may be shown in number of cylinders. For “Engines, Internal Combustion”, describe the equipment (Example: One Generator). For "Vehicle (flammable liquid powered)", describe the equipment (Example: One Snowmobile). For Class 1–excluding class 1.4–indicate NEW (net explosive weight) in kilograms (Example: 0.5 Kg. NEW). For Class 7, show activity (curies and/or becquerels). I – Gross Weight. The gross weight of the entire package(s) (contents + packaging material). Show in pounds. Additional Information. This block is used for any additional handling instructions or for any other information the shipper or manifest preparer feels is important. The line number for the applicable items should be referenced (Example: #11- Keep Aircraft Well Ventilated). Total Gross Weight of Hazardous Cargo. The total gross weight of all the cargo on the Hazardous Cargo Manifest/Checklist. This number is then added to the main manifest which shows the total weight of all cargo and passengers for the flight. Name. The printed name of the person who completed the manifest. Signature. The signature (not initials) of the person who completed the manifest. Only trained personnel should sign the manifest. Those untrained personnel who may be using the manifest in the field need not sign the manifest. Date. The date the manifest was completed; showing day, month, and year (Example: 11 Oct 98 or Oct 11, ’98). Do not use straight

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numeric dates (Example: 10-11-98) as this means different dates to different nationalities.

4.7

Samples of the Hazardous Cargo Manifest/Checklist

4.7.1 The following two pages contain samples of a blank Hazardous Cargo Manifest/Checklist and a completed Hazardous Cargo Manifest/Checklist. A printable copy of the Hazardous Cargo Manifest/Checklist is provided on the last page of this document.

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Raytheon Polar Services Company Document Number LO-MS-101 USAP Airlift of Hazardous Materials Manual Revision #4, 2 August 2002 McMurdo Station, South Pole Station, Field Camps Approved by Derrold Burnett
HAZARDOUS CARGO MANIFEST/CHECKLIST Destination: Mission:
A B # X
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34

Date:
E
8 (3) 8 3 2.1 2.1 2.2 2.2 8 9 3 9 9 3 2.2 3 (8) 8 3 2.2 8 3 3 3 9 4.1 8 2.2 2.2 3 3 2.1 8 8

C Item
Acetic Acid,>80%,glacial Acetic Acid,11%-80% Acetone Acetylene Aerosis, flammable Aerosis, non-flammable Air & SCUBA Cylinders Batteries (wet,spillable,acid) Burning Paste/Gel/Blocks Coleman Fuel/White Gas Dry Ice (more than 10 kg per box) Engine-powered equip/vehicle Ethanol Solutions Fire Extinguisher(s) Formaldehyde 37% (100% Formalin) Formaldehyde 25% to 36% Gasoline/Petrol/Mogas/Pre-Mix Helium Cylinders Hydrochloric Acid Isopropanol JP-8/Diesel Fuel Kerosene Lithium batteries Matches (strike-on-box/book) Methanol Nitric Acid Nitrogen Cylinders Nitrogen, Liquid Oxygen Cylinders Paint Varnish/Lacquer, etc. Paint Thinner/Reducer, etc. Propane Mixtures Sulphuric Acid >51% Sulphuric Acid ≤ 5 1

D Proper Shipping Name
Acetic Acid Glacial Acetic Acid Solution Acetone Acetylene,Dissolved Aerosois Aerosois Air, Compressed Batteries, Wet Filled With Acid Consumer Commodity Petroleum Distillates, N.O.S. Dry Ice Engine, Internal Combustion Ethanol Fire Extinguishers Formaldehyde Solution, Flammable Formaldehyde Solution Gasoline Helium, Compressed Hydrochloric Acid Isopropanol Fuel, Aviation,Turbine Engine Kerosene Lithium Batteries Matches, Safety Methanol Nitric Acid Nitrogen, Compressed Nitrogen,Refrigerated Liquid Oxygen,Compressed Paint Paint Related Material Petroleum Gases, Liquefied Sulphuric Acid >51% Sulphuric Acid ≤ 5 1

F
UN2789 UN2790 UN1090 UH1001 UN1950 UN1950 UN1002 UN2794 ID8000 UN1268 UN1845 UN3166 UN1170 UN1044 UN1198 UN2209 UN1203 UN1046 UN1789 UN1219 UN1863 UN1223 UN3090 UN1944 UN2031 UN1066 UN1977 UN1263 UN1263 UN1075 UN1830 UN2796

G PG
II II II N/A N/A N/A N/A III N/A II III N/A II/III* N/A III III II N/A II II III III II III II I/II* N/A N/A N/A II/III* II/III* N/A II III

H
Type of Package & Net Quantity

I
Gross Weight

Class UN/ID#

3 (6.1) UN1230

2.2 (5.1) UN1072

Preprinted entries above may only be used when the information in columns D,E,F, and G matches what is marked on the package or on other supporting documentation. All other items must be entered in the spaces below. Handwritten entries must be legible! Copy information exactly as it appears onthe package or other supporting documentation. Proper Shipping Name, Class, UN/ID#, and PG must be determined by trained personnel only. For instructions on using this form, refer to The USAP Airlift of Hazardous Materials Manual. *Delete non-appicable PG

# X
35 36 36 38 39 40 41 42

Item

Proper Shipping Name

Class UN/ID#

PG

Type of Package & Net Quantity

Gross Weight

Additional Information

(Reference the applicable line numbers)

Total Gross Weight of Hazardous Cargo:
(Add to main manifest)

0.00
Date:

Manifest prepared by: Name(print)

Signature:
for use with civilian aircraft only

RPSC Form LO-MS-162, Revision #2, 19 August 2002

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Raytheon Polar Services Company Document Number LO-MS-101 USAP Airlift of Hazardous Materials Manual Revision #4, 2 August 2002 McMurdo Station, South Pole Station, Field Camps Approved by Derrold Burnett
HAZARDOUS CARGO MANIFEST/CHECKLIST Destination: Lake Example Mission:
A B # X
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34

Date: 29 July 02
E
8 (3) 8 3 2.1 2.1 2.2 2.2 8 9 3 9 9 3 2.2 3 (8) 8 3 2.2 8 3 3 3 9 4.1 8 2.2 2.2 3 3 2.1 8 8

C Item
Acetic Acid,>80%,glacial Acetic Acid,11%-80% Acetone Acetylene Aerosis, flammable Aerosis, non-flammable Air & SCUBA Cylinders Batteries (wet,spillable,acid) Burning Paste/Gel/Blocks Coleman Fuel/White Gas Dry Ice (more than 10 kg per box)

D Proper Shipping Name
Acetic Acid Glacial Acetic Acid Solution Acetone Acetylene,Dissolved Aerosois Aerosois Air, Compressed Batteries, Wet Filled With Acid Consumer Commodity Petroleum Distillates, N.O.S. Dry Ice Engine, Internal Combustion Ethanol Fire Extinguishers Formaldehyde Solution, Flammable Formaldehyde Solution Gasoline Helium, Compressed Hydrochloric Acid Isopropanol Fuel, Aviation,Turbine Engine Kerosene Lithium Batteries Matches, Safety Methanol Nitric Acid Nitrogen, Compressed Nitrogen,Refrigerated Liquid Oxygen,Compressed Paint Paint Related Material Petroleum Gases, Liquefied Sulphuric Acid >51% Sulphuric Acid ≤ 5 1

F
UN2789 UN2790 UN1090 UH1001 UN1950 UN1950 UN1002 UN2794 ID8000 UN1268 UN1845 UN3166 UN1170 UN1044 UN1198 UN2209 UN1203 UN1046 UN1789 UN1219 UN1863 UN1223 UN3090 UN1944 UN2031 UN1066 UN1977 UN1263 UN1263 UN1075 UN1830 UN2796

G PG
II II II N/A N/A N/A N/A III N/A II III N/A II/III* N/A III III II N/A II II III III II III II I/II* N/A N/A N/A II/III* II/III* N/A II III

H
Type of Package & Net Quantity

I
Gross Weight

Class UN/ID#

X Engine-powered equip/vehicle
Ethanol Solutions

1 skandic snowmobile 1 cylinder @ 2KG

750 5

X Fire Extinguisher(s)
Formaldehyde 37% (100% Formalin) Formaldehyde 25% to 36%

X Gasoline/Petrol/Mogas/Pre-Mix
Helium Cylinders Hydrochloric Acid Isopropanol JP-8/Diesel Fuel Kerosene Lithium batteries Matches (strike-on-box/book) Methanol Nitric Acid Nitrogen Cylinders Nitrogen, Liquid Oxygen Cylinders Paint Varnish/Lacquer, etc. Paint Thinner/Reducer, etc. Propane Mixtures Sulphuric Acid >51% Sulphuric Acid ≤ 5 1

1 jcan @ 5 liters

20

3 (6.1) UN1230

2.2 (5.1) UN1072

Preprinted entries above may only be used when the information in columns D,E,F, and G matches what is marked on the package or on other supporting documentation. All other items must be entered in the spaces below. Handwritten entries must be legible! Copy information exactly as it appears onthe package or other supporting documentation. Proper Shipping Name, Class, UN/ID#, and PG must be determined by trained personnel only. For instructions on using this form, refer to The USAP Airlift of Hazardous Materials Manual. *Delete non-appicable PG

# X
35 36 36 38 39 40 41 42

Item

Proper Shipping Name

Class UN/ID#

PG

Type of Package & Net Quantity

Gross Weight

Additional Information

(Reference the appl icable line numbers)

Total Gross Weight of Hazardous Cargo:
(Add to main manifest)

0.00
Date:

Manifest prepared by: Name(print)

Signature:
for use with civilian aircraft only

RPSC Form LO-MS-162, Revision #2, 19 August 2002

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Raytheon Polar Services Company Document Number LO-MS-101 USAP Airlift of Hazardous Materials Manual Revision #4, 2 August 2002 McMurdo Station, South Pole Station, Field Camps Approved by Derrold Burnett

Chapter 5
Carriage & Stowage

5.1

General Stowage

5.1.1. All hazardous materials must be stowed as far away from passengers and foodstuffs as much as possible. 5.1.2. All packages of hazardous materials must be restrained to prevent movement of the packages during flight. Packages should be protected from excessive vibration. 5.1.3. Packages containing liquids must be stored in an upright position. 5.1.4. Stowage of hazardous materials must be in accordance with and special handling instructions or safety information that is indicated on the package or on the manifest. 5.2 Ignition Sources

5.2.1. Smoking or the use of items producing flames, sparks, or extreme heat will be prohibited aboard aircraft when flammable or explosive materials are being carried.

5.3

Hazardous Materials and Passengers

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5.3.1. No hazardous material or category of hazardous materials will be expressly forbidden from being transported on an aircraft with passengers. However, attempts should be made to carry the following categories of hazardous materials on cargo-only aircraft wherever possible.

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Raytheon Polar Services Company Document Number LO-MS-101 USAP Airlift of Hazardous Materials Manual Revision #4, 2 August 2002 McMurdo Station, South Pole Station, Field Camps Approved by Derrold Burnett

• • •

Class 1 – Explosives (excluding Division 1.4) Class 2.1 – Flammable Gases Class 2.3 – Toxic Gases Class 7 – Radioactive Materials if… A Radioactive Yellow III label is required or… The transport index of the package is 3.0 or higher

5.4

Helicopter Sling-Loads

5.4.1. Helicopter sling-loads should be utilized whenever possible to transport hazardous cargo. Hazardous cargo moved by sling-load is excepted from the requirements of this manual, however, if the cargo is likely to be returned by aircraft internally, then the packaging, marking, and labeling requirements of this manual should be adhered to. Slingload cargo should also be manifested whenever the capability to do so exists.

5.5

Compatibility and Segregation

5.5.1. Incompatible hazardous materials must be segregated to the greatest extent possible. Due to variations in aircraft size and the limited amount of cargo space on most aircraft in the Antarctic, no specific segregation distances will be mandated. Table 5.A will be used to indicate the compatibility and segregation requirements of hazardous
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Raytheon Polar Services Company Document Number LO-MS-101 USAP Airlift of Hazardous Materials Manual Revision #4, 2 August 2002 McMurdo Station, South Pole Station, Field Camps Approved by Derrold Burnett
materials. Table 5.A is only an aid and should not prevent shippers and operators from applying personal knowledge and experience when deciding how to segregate hazardous materials.

Table 5.A Segregation of Incompatible Materials

Class/Division of Primary Hazard 11 3 4.2 4.3 5 82

11
3

3 X

4.2 X

4.3 X

5 X X X X

82 X

X X X X X X X X X

X

An “X” at an intersection of a row and column indicates that these hazard classes/divisions should be segregated. Materials in hazard classes 2, 6, 7, and 9, and division 4.1, need not be segregated from other hazard classes/divisions.

1

Division 1.4 explosives may be transported with all other hazard classes, but will be segregated from other explosives according to explosives compatibility group/letter.
2

Segregation only applies to corrosive liquids.

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Raytheon Polar Services Company Document Number LO-MS-101 USAP Airlift of Hazardous Materials Manual Revision #4, 2 August 2002 McMurdo Station, South Pole Station, Field Camps Approved by Derrold Burnett
3

Explosives will be segregated among themselves according to their explosives compatibility groups (represented by letters). Explosives which do not belong in the same compatibility group should not be stowed together, except that Compatibility Groups C, D, and E, may be stowed together. Explosives of Division 1.4, Compatibility Group S, may be stowed with other compatibility groups except Compatibility Groups A or L. The compatibility group letter is displayed on the explosive hazard label on the package.

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Raytheon Polar Services Company Document Number LO-MS-101 USAP Airlift of Hazardous Materials Manual Revision #4, 2 August 2002 McMurdo Station, South Pole Station, Field Camps Approved by Derrold Burnett

Chapter 6
Special Provisions

Specific Packaging, Handling, and Stowage Requirements by Hazard Class

6.1

Class 1 - Explosives

» Explosives will be transported in their original containers or may be packaged in similar or superior containers under the supervision of a licensed explosives handler. » Explosives, which are not compatible with each other, such as detonators and high explosives, will be kept separated at all times. (See Chapter 5 for compatibility.) If incompatible explosives cannot be carried on separate flights then they must be separated to the greatest extent possible with the guidance of an explosives handler. » Explosives handlers may hand-carry small amounts (10 kgs gross weight or less) of explosives onto aircraft in carrying cases ("day boxes", "cap boxes") that meet IME or ATF standards. These containers should be secured during flight. These containers must be either marked or labeled to indicate they contain explosives but are exempt from other marking and labeling requirements. » Explosives will only be transported with passengers who are part of the project which will be using the explosives. Explosives handlers are considered technical escorts not passengers. In certain instances, it may

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be necessary to transport other passengers with explosives due to logistical and safety concerns; this will be done at the pilot's discretion. » Due to their limited explosive hazard, Division 1.4 explosives may be packaged, loaded, and transported without the supervision of an explosives handler and may be transported with passengers at all times. General packaging, labeling, and marking requirements still apply.

6.2

Class 2 - Gases and Cryogenic Liquids

Flammable Gases (Division 2.1) Nonflammable, Non-toxic Gases (Division 2.2) Toxic (Poisonous) Gases (Division 2.3) » Gases will be transported in cylinders, tanks, Dewars, aerosol cans, and any other containers that have been approved by a competent authority of the country of origin (the DOT in the US). » There will be no quantity limits per package for gases. Gas containers must not exceed the maximum service pressure. » Cylinders and tanks must always have their valves protected. » Aerosol cans must be packaged in strong, rigid outer containers with the original cap or cover in place. » Even nonflammable, non-toxic gases can asphyxiate passengers or crewmembers if enough gas is released inside an aircraft. For this reason, venting the aircraft cargo compartment to the greatest extent

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Raytheon Polar Services Company Document Number LO-MS-101 USAP Airlift of Hazardous Materials Manual Revision #4, 2 August 2002 McMurdo Station, South Pole Station, Field Camps Approved by Derrold Burnett
possible allowed by the flight profile and environmental conditions should be followed when transporting gas. » Insulated packagings containing liquid nitrogen fully absorbed in a porous material (dry shippers) are not subject to the requirements of this manual provided that the packaging does not allow pressure to build up or liquid nitrogen to leak out irrespective of the orientation of the packaging. If these "dry shippers" are being used to preserve a hazardous material, then the requirements of that material's hazard class must be met.

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Raytheon Polar Services Company Document Number LO-MS-101 USAP Airlift of Hazardous Materials Manual Revision #4, 2 August 2002 McMurdo Station, South Pole Station, Field Camps Approved by Derrold Burnett
6.3 Class 3 - Flammable Liquids » Collapsible Fabric Drums ("seal drums", "drop drums") may be used to transport bulk quantities of flammable fuels. Maximum Net Quantity: 500 Gallons (1890 Liters) » Fuel storage tanks and bladders which do not meet air transportability requirements may be airlifted when containing residual fuel. These containers must be drained to the greatest extent possible. Containers should be marked to indicate they contain residual fuel or verbal warning must be given to the pilot. No other marking, labeling, or documentation requirements apply. » Paints and other viscous flammable liquids may be packaged in open-head drums and pails that have not passed pressure/leak-proof tests under the following conditions: ⋅ The flashpoint of the material must be 100°F or greater ⋅ The drum/pail must contain no more than 20 liters » Camping stoves and camping fuel bottles (Sigg bottles) may be shipped with fuel inside only when the stove or bottle is the inside container in a combination package containing the proper amount of absorbent material. Stoves and camping fuel bottles containing only residual fuel (no dripping when turned upside down) are excepted from the requirements of this manual provided that the caps/closures are firmly in place. Stoves being shipped without fuel tanks or reservoirs are considered non-hazardous. » Flammable fuels in engines and vehicles see Miscellaneous Hazardous Material in this chapter. Class 9 -

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Raytheon Polar Services Company Document Number LO-MS-101 USAP Airlift of Hazardous Materials Manual Revision #4, 2 August 2002 McMurdo Station, South Pole Station, Field Camps Approved by Derrold Burnett

6.4

Class 4 - Flammable Solids

Flammable Solids (Division 4.1); Substances Liable To Spontaneous Combustion (Division 4.2); Substances Which In Contact With Water, Emit Flammable Gases (Dangerous When Wet) (Division 4.3) » Boxes of matches should be wrapped in aluminum foil or sealed in an airtight bag or inner container before being placed in an outer container. » Packages containing Division 4.3 materials must include an airtight intermediate liner or container between the inner and outer packagings to aid in keeping moisture out.

6.5

Class 5 - Oxidizers

Oxidizing Substances (Division 5.1); Organic Peroxides (Division 5.2) » Some organic peroxides may have emergency or control temperatures. When this is the case, these temperatures must be marked on the package and must also be included as part of the written or verbal notification of hazardous cargo given to the pilot.

6.6

Class 6 - Toxics (Poisons)

Toxic (Poisonous) Substances (Division 6.1);
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Raytheon Polar Services Company Document Number LO-MS-101 USAP Airlift of Hazardous Materials Manual Revision #4, 2 August 2002 McMurdo Station, South Pole Station, Field Camps Approved by Derrold Burnett
Infectious Substances (Division 6.2) » Division 6.2 material must be in an inner packaging that is comprised of a leak-proof primary receptacle surrounded by a leak-proof secondary liner/packaging. Enough absorbent material to absorb all liquid contents must be placed in-between the primary and secondary inner packagings. This combination inner packaging must then be placed in a rigid airtight outer packaging.

6.7

Class 7 - Radioactive Materials

» Radioactive material will be packaged in conformance with 49 CFR (part 173, subpart I)/ICAO. » Radioactive material must be stowed away from unexposed film. » Packages, which meet the criteria of an “excepted package”, may travel as otherwise non-regulated cargo providing the requirements of 49 CFR part 173.421 have been met. » Special Form radioactive material must be accompanied by the Special Form certificate. » When transporting radioactive materials that have a transport index above 3.0, a radiation safety officer or specialist should be consulted before loading or handling the radioactive cargo. » Radioactive II-Yellow and III-Yellow packages must be separated from passengers, crew, and undeveloped photographic film and plates according to the applicable charts in 49CFR (parts 175.701/703)/ICAO.
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Raytheon Polar Services Company Document Number LO-MS-101 USAP Airlift of Hazardous Materials Manual Revision #4, 2 August 2002 McMurdo Station, South Pole Station, Field Camps Approved by Derrold Burnett

6.8

Class 8 - Corrosive Material

» Combination packages containing corrosive liquids must contain enough absorbent cushioning material to absorb the entire liquid contents of all inner containers in the package. » Special care should be taken when stowing packages containing corrosive liquids so that they do not pose an immediate risk to other hazardous materials or aircraft equipment in the event of leakage. » Non-spillable wet batteries such as "gel cells" may travel as nonregulated cargo. Batteries will only be considered non-spillable when they have been marked "non-spillable" by the manufacturer or have documentation from the manufacturer asserting that they are nonspillable. These batteries must still be securely boxed and protected from short circuit. The outer packaging must be plainly and durably marked “Non-spillable” or “Non-spillable Battery.”

6.9

Class 9 - Miscellaneous Hazardous Material

» Dry ice should be stowed on the floor of the aircraft away from passengers. Packaging for dry ice must allow the release of carbon dioxide gas. Aircraft compartments where dry ice is stowed should be vented to the greatest extent possible allowed by the flight profile and environmental conditions. » Engine-powered equipment and vehicles may contain fuel in their tanks when immediate use will be necessary. Fuel tank quantity limit is one gallon or half a tank, whichever is greater. Equipment not being used immediately must be drained of fuel (purging is not necessary).
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Raytheon Polar Services Company Document Number LO-MS-101 USAP Airlift of Hazardous Materials Manual Revision #4, 2 August 2002 McMurdo Station, South Pole Station, Field Camps Approved by Derrold Burnett

» Magnetized material must be shielded and stowed in a manner that precludes it from interfering with aircraft navigational equipment.

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Raytheon Polar Services Company Document Number LO-MS-101 USAP Airlift of Hazardous Materials Manual Revision #4, 2 August 2002 McMurdo Station, South Pole Station, Field Camps Approved by Derrold Burnett

Chapter 7
Exceptions

7.1

Aircraft Equipment

7.1.1.Hazardous materials that are carried on board an aircraft which are necessary for the operation or airworthiness of that aircraft are not subject to the requirements of this manual.

7.2

Hazardous Materials Used During Flight

7.2.1.Hazardous materials that are to be used during flight, such as batteries to power camera or radar equipment, will be considered "aircraft equipment" and are excepted from the requirements of this manual. These hazardous materials shall be packaged/stowed in accordance with the air worthiness certificate issued for that instrument in that specific airframe. Safe packaging and handling procedures should be used to the extent that is possible. The pilot must be notified verbally of the material.

7.3

Emergency Operations

7.3.1.Hazardous materials that are airlifted as part of an emergency operation, such as a search and rescue (SAR) mission, will be prepared according to the requirements of this manual --to the extent that is possible without compromising the timeliness or efficiency of the operation. At a minimum, the pilot should be notified verbally of the presence of hazardous materials.
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Raytheon Polar Services Company Document Number LO-MS-101 USAP Airlift of Hazardous Materials Manual Revision #4, 2 August 2002 McMurdo Station, South Pole Station, Field Camps Approved by Derrold Burnett

7.4

Field Camp Retrograde

7.4.1.Hazardous materials being returned from field camps and remote sites should be repacked in their original containers as much as possible. Packages of hazardous materials that can no longer be readily identified by their original hazard markings and hazard labels must be pointed out to the pilot when loading the aircraft. Retrograde cargo should be documented in accordance with Chapter 4 whenever the ability to do so exists. Camping stoves, vehicles, and other engine-powered equipment may exceed the fuel levels allowed in Chapter 6 of this manual when being returned from the field.

7.5

Hazardous Materials Carried by Passengers or Crew

7.5.1.Some hazardous materials are excepted from the requirements of this manual when carried by passengers or crew in accordance with Table 7.A. 7.6 Survival Bags

7.6.1 Survival bags provided by Berg Field Center (BFC) for use aboard USAP-contracted civil aircraft, (i.e., Helicopters, Twin Otter, or DC3/Basler) are exempt from the requirements of this manual provided that the following packaging is complied with. Matches will be wrapped in aluminum foil, then placed in a zip lock bag. The matches and up to 75g of burning paste may then be placed in a cooking pot prior to being placed into the survival bag. Fuel for stoves will be stored in aluminum Sigg bottles of either 22 or 32 oz capacity only. These bottles will be placed inside schedule (sch) 40 PVC pipe and will be wrapped in at least one (1) but preferably two (2) 18 X 18 inch absorbent pads capable of holding up to 72 ounces of liquid each. Every effort should be made to
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Raytheon Polar Services Company Document Number LO-MS-101 USAP Airlift of Hazardous Materials Manual Revision #4, 2 August 2002 McMurdo Station, South Pole Station, Field Camps Approved by Derrold Burnett
ensure that the PVC pipe and inner Sigg bottle are oriented with the Sigg bottle closure upright in the survival bag. The waiver regarding survival bags in the previous version of this manual is no longer in effect.. RPSC is now in compliance with the proper shipment of survival bags in accordance with the AoHMM.

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Raytheon Polar Services Company Document Number LO-MS-101 USAP Airlift of Hazardous Materials Manual Revision #4, 2 August 2002 McMurdo Station, South Pole Station, Field Camps Approved by Derrold Burnett

Table 7.A

Hazardous Materials Carried by Passengers and Crew B C

Hazardous Material
Medicinal or toilet articles for personal use. Total quantity must not exceed 2 Kg or 2 L per person and net quantity per package must not exceed 1 Kg or 0.5 L Dry ice. Quantity must not exceed 5 Kg per package and per person. Package must allow the release of carbon dioxide gas. Safety matches and lighters for personal use. One package of matches and one lighter per person. Not to be used during flight without pilot approval. No strikeanywhere matches. Small gas cylinders being used for medical purposes. Wet or lithium batteries used by passengers for medical purposes or wheelchairs. Barometers or thermometers containing mercury when packed within a mercury-resistant case/liner or with absorbent material. Battery-powered heat producing articles such as dive lamps and soldering irons. Battery must be disconnected or other measures must be taken to prohibit accidental operation. A – May be carried in baggage Y = Yes N = No B – May be carried on one’s person (e.g., in pocket) C – Pilot must be notified of its presence
Logistics/ATO Contract No. OPP 0000373

A Y Y

Y

N

N Y N

N Y

N

Y

Y N N Y

N Y Y Y Y Y

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Raytheon Polar Services Company Document Number LO-MS-101 USAP Airlift of Hazardous Materials Manual Revision #4, 2 August 2002 McMurdo Station, South Pole Station, Field Camps Approved by Derrold Burnett

Chapter 8
Measurement 8.1 Measurement 8.1.1. The metric system is the preferred system showing/documenting net quantities of hazardous materials. Table 8.A Conversion of Measurements of measurement when

To Convert To Liters (L) U.S. Gallons (gal) Kilograms (kg) Pounds (lb) Kilopascals (kPa) Pounds per square inch U.S. Gallons Liters (L) Pounds (lb) Kilograms (kg) Pounds per square inch (psi) Kilopascals (kPa)

Multiply by 0.2642 3.785 2.205 0.4536 0.1450 6.895

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Raytheon Polar Services Company Document Number LO-MS-101 USAP Airlift of Hazardous Materials Manual Revision #4, 2 August 2002 McMurdo Station, South Pole Station, Field Camps Approved by Derrold Burnett

References
AFMAN 24-204, IATA Code of Federal Regulations, Title 49 ICAO Technical Instructions for the Safe Transport of Dangerous Goods by Air

Quality Records
Record Identification, Format, & Owner Active Location Storage, Protection, & Retrieval Electronic (J:Logistics-haz cargo mainifest A1) Hardcopy (in file drawer) Facility Storage, Protection & Retrieval Retention Time (Active and/or Facilities Storage_ One year Ultimate Dispositi on

Form LO-MS162, Logistics/ATO/ Hazardous Cargo Specialist

Hazardous Cargo Specialist’s desk

Delete electronic copy, shred hardcopy

Logistics/ATO Contract No. OPP 0000373

Page 49 of 38 total pages

Raytheon Polar Services Company Document Number LO-MS-101 USAP Airlift of Hazardous Materials Manual Revision #4, 2 August 2002 McMurdo Station, South Pole Station, Field Camps Approved by Derrold Burnett

Attachments, Appendices
Appendix 1 Hazardous Cargo Manifest/Checklist

Appendix 2 – Harry Mahar Approval E-Mail”
-----Original Message----From: Mahar, Harry [mailto:hmahar@nsf.gov] Sent: Monday, September 09, 2002 5:38 AM To: 'patrick.schuman@usap.gov' Subject: Revisions to AoHMM Patrick: I have read and reviewed your revised draft of the USAP Airlift of Hazardous Materials Manual (rev # 4, 8/02), along with your responses to my specific questions and concerns (ref your eMAIL of 9/3/02). I approve that updated draft as the official policy and procedures for transporting hazardous materials on-board civilian aircraft operating under the aegis of the USAP. Harry Mahar Safety and Health Officer

Logistics/ATO Contract No. OPP 0000373

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