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How to Channel a PhD
An Intuitive Researcher’s Guide to Inspirational Thesis Writing
Marcus T Anthony, PhD
www.marcustanthony.webs.com
This 24 000 word booklet tells you everything you need to know about how to write your dream dissertation – and have a ball doing so! The author, Marcus T Anthony shares with you the way he completed a PhD dissertation, published a dozen journal articles and an academic book all in four years - while working full-time as a teacher and educational administrator! This eBook is regularly updated by the author. For the latest Kindle version go to Amazon.com.

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Table of Contents
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Introduction 1. How I came to Develop Integrated Inquiry

A brief history of rational and intuitive ways of knowing 3. What is Integrated Intelligence? 4. The INQ Tools 5. Using Integrated Intelligence in research 6. Some other useful tools 7. Important considerations 8. Finally Appendix 1: From zero draft to dissertation! References About the Author Other books by Marcus T Anthony Endnotes
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Don’t get so far ahead of the parade that nobody can see where you are. John Naisbitt (futurist) Only intuition, resting on sympathetic understanding can lead to these laws. The daily effort comes from no deliberate intention or program, but straight from the heart. Albert Einstein Introduction One day several decades ago, a young man walked into a public library. He wanted to find answers to some deep questions he had been asking himself about the nature of mind, cosmos and their relationship to modern physics. In those days there were no computers, and he did

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not have much of a liking for the card catalogue, so he did what he often did when he wanted to home in on some hard information. He began walking along the many shelves of books. He did not bother to look at the call numbers librarians had spent thousands of hours inscribing on the binding of the books. Instead, he just kept walking. Suddenly, he got the strong feeling he had been waiting for, stopped, reached out and grabbed a book from the shelf. The book was exactly what he needed, addressing the effect of human observation on experiments in quantum physics. It was that moment which launched Michael Talbot on a lifelong interest in the confluence between mysticism and what he called “the new physics” (Talbot 1992 p 137). What interests me about Talbot’s tale, is not so much his beliefs about links between mysticism and physics, but the ‘way of knowing’ he used to locate his data. Why did he not just use a computer search like everybody else? Was he just being lazy? The answer, according to Talbot, is that he often relied on his intuition, and a sense of feeling to find books in libraries. He felt that this was often a more reliable process than using conventional methods. He believed that he would be led to find the answer to the question she was posing. What would you do? Chances are you would head for the card catalogue, or the modern equivalent, the computer database. And that tells us something about the way our minds have been trained to think, and the ways of knowing that we have come to call “normal” in the modern world. Some will dismiss Talbot as a “New Ager”, “hippie”, or as simply deluded. Yet these terms relegate Talbot to the realm of the other, and effectively prevent us from asking “why” - and more importantly “how” - he used intuition to locate information in public libraries. In this way we as researchers remain confined within our comfort zones, and the boundaries to our knowledge are unconsciously maintained. In this booklet I am going to push the boundaries, and bring us to the frontiers of mind – at least as defined in the modern Western world.

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Below, I will outline five intuitive research tools which can be used by researchers. Together they form an approach to research I call Integrated Inquiry (INQ). Although the title of this booklet addresses doctoral candidates, there is no reason why researchers and students at any level – undergraduate or postgraduate – cannot use INQ in their research or studies. It can be used by professional and lay researchers everywhere. The modern researcher Most students embarking on a higher degree have spent many years and made great sacrifices learning their trade. Most have spent nearly two decades in a modern education system. This educational experience shapes not only the way they use their minds and conduct their research, but creates strong beliefs about what constitutes ‘rational’, as well as what ways of knowing are valid. They have learned to identify problems, design projects, ask questions, construct experiments, conduct literature reviews, collect data, calculate, analyze, cite sources, and report findings. These processes and their ‘rational’ ways of knowing are all part of the formal research process. Such is the restrictive nature of conventional research, and the training process so long, that by the time a research student has come to write up her masters or doctoral thesis, it is almost inevitable that she has forgotten about an entire range of cognitive processes that are actually very natural to human beings. These are the ‘other’ ways of knowing which have been left off the map of modern research, and neglected by the entire modern education system, and our science. They have been largely rejected by developed civilisations, both East and West. For underpinning the modern research project is a hegemonic process which has both retarded and silenced mystical/spiritual ways of knowing, and removed potentially invaluable information and tools from the research process. In How to Channel a PhD, I want to share with you some of the skills and processes of Integrated Inquiry. I believe that INQ can be

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utilized by all researchers to make research and learning more passionate and fun. What’s more, the processes I outline can actually make your work more efficient, because once you have learned to trust your intuitions you can skip a lot of the guessing that is involved in relying too much on ‘rational’ methods of inquiry! However you have to be willing to open your mind - literally. In Part 1 of this booklet I describe how I came to develop the theory of Integrated Intelligence (INI) - a human mental capacity which exists both within and beyond the brain, and encompasses mystical insight. This section includes how I developed my own intuitive abilities. In Parts 2 and 3 I provide an explanation of Integrated Intelligence and brief historical overview of it (if you are only interested in the hands-on applications of INI, you might like to skip these sections). Parts 4 and 5 represent the crux of this booklet. They detail the practical intuitive processes which you can start using right away in your research. These are the INQ Tools. These two sections include very practical examples from my experience as a researcher, and excerpts from the study diary I kept as a doctoral candidate. In Part 6 I present some other useful tools which will help keep your mind and heart on your research, even during tough times. Part 7 addresses several issues you may face as you apply these kinds of tools to your research. The approach I recommend in this booklet may be an affront to seasoned researchers. However, in the spirit of my own academic discipline – 1Deep Futures - I like to challenge common conceptions. I offer this booklet as an act of dissent – a challenge to prevailing methods and the dominant paradigm. Finally, please keep in mind that How to Channel a PhD is not a work of science. It reflects my personal approach to knowledge, and this has emerged from many years of engagement with my subject matter – including formal research. I can only encourage you to engage
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For an overview of Deep Futures, see Article of the same name, which I wrote for Nanyang Technological University: http://www.mindfutures.com/articlepdfs/artpdf25.pdf

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in this exciting topic with all the passion and enthusiasm you can muster. If you can do that, you will truly know what it means to love learning.

1. How I came to develop Integrated Inquiry
I have used all the tools and processes I outline in this booklet for many years. I adapted them from intuitive abilities I learned long before I became a researcher. From about 1993-2002 I spent much of my time engaging in meditative states, recording and analyzing dreams and visions, as well as engaging in inner child work and emotional healing.2 At one point in the 1990s I read almost nothing for five years, instead focusing upon experiencing other ways of knowing and being. This ‘initiation’ into the intuitive mind taught me a lot about the limits of the ‘rationality’ that dominates modern education and science. I came to see that human knowledge and understanding can be greatly enhanced by developing mental abilities and processes that are not currently accepted in the Western world (and many other parts of the world, too). When I came to research and write a doctoral thesis beginning in 2002 (the topic was about Integrated Intelligence), I deliberately employed these intuitive ways of knowing alongside the ‘rational’ mental processes expected of me by ‘the system’. As a result I was able to complete a 110 000 word thesis and publish a dozen or so research booklets within the space of four years – all while working full-time as a teacher and educator. My thesis was accepted for publication, and formed much of the research detailed in my book Integrated Intelligence (Sense Publishers, 2008). What is more, the experience of writing and researching my doctoral thesis was often a joyful one! At times it was effortless, as I entered a relaxed state of non-ordinary consciousness. Ideas and understandings often gushed out of me like water from a fountain.
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You can read about my early intuitive experiences in more detail in the introduction to my Book Discover Your Soul Template (Inner Traditions, 2012). This book also details the INQ Tools in greater detail, in relation to the way they can be used in real life situations.

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Yes, I channeled my PhD! (Well, at least part of it). My thesis received very strong reviews from my three independent examiners. One wrote: This doctoral thesis is an exceptional document. I am hard put to adequately express all the thoughts it brings to mind. I am first most impressed by the fact that, based on where I see the hopeful discourse for our time headed, this thesis seems to have leaped ahead and got to where the discourse will, if we are lucky, arrive in maybe another decade or more. I see this thesis as being the sort of island or rock upon which one can build a very significant career either as an educator or as a writer, or as both. Again, I must stress I see (Marcus T Anthony) as having reached where others will arrive, and most not so well, some years yet ahead in time. His marshaling of references is very impressive. Rather than simply tie his presentation to one or more powerful established positions, he has fought his way clear to achieve what seems to me a rare independence and maturity of mind. My doctorate was officially awarded under the discipline of “Policy Studies.” I read a lot of literature in Futures Studies and intelligence theory, and the qualitative methodology I used was developed by futurist Sohail Inayatullah. I compared and contrasted modern dominant theories of intelligence with alternative mystical theories, drew conclusions about the validity of mystical insight, and then suggested possible applications for the modern knowledge economy and education. However there is no reason why any dissertation writer in any discipline or science - regardless of whether the methodology is qualitative or quantitative - cannot use INQ to enhance their research. Of course you will have to adhere to the protocols of your field. But there is nothing stopping you from using Integrated Intelligence as you plan, design and write your thesis; as you

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ask questions and identify problems; and as you, locate and analyze information, diagnose problems, synthesize bodies of thought and communicate your results. The mental applications if INI, which I outline in Part 3 below, are perfectly suited to aiding in all these processes.

2. A Brief history of rational & intuitive ways of knowing
Western civilization has established rational ways of knowing as the dominant cognitive processes which underpin the way we access knowledge. However at the same time it has largely forgotten about the intuitive mind and mystical intuition. I believe this is a significant problem, because it is mystical intuition which helps us understand the deeper context and meanings hidden within information. It also prevents us from connecting with Inspiration, which is an incredibly valuable tool for any researcher. This problem has its roots in the atomistic and analytical philosophy of ancient Greece, the influence of scholastic universities in Europe in the middle ages, and in the scientific and industrial revolutions. Around the 1500s the scholastic movement developed in Europe. Scholasticism featured classification as its prime way of knowing. By 1800 analysis had developed in the social sciences, and around 1850 experimentation became crucial in the sciences (Pickstone 2000). Finally, the birth of the modern personal computer after the midtwentieth century heralded a new way of knowing. The computer became a prime mediator of knowledge, and with it came the advent of computer rationality (Klein 2003) as a highly influential way of knowing. The separation between observer and subject became even more distinct. Data was mediated via the machine on the desktop. As just one example, where once weather forecasters had relied, in part, upon an intuitive connection with the environment—going outside to check weather vanes, to feel the wind on their faces and the humidity in

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the air—now they sit before computers and analyze data fed to them by sophisticated computer models.i The development of modern science thus brought a rapid increase in our ability to process and develop knowledge and technologies. Yet this tremendous progress in the hard and soft sciences has come at a great price. It has created a split in the Western mind, as Richard Tarnas (2000) has pointed out. By the turn of the twentieth century another domain of knowledge had become suppressed, silenced. For it was by this time that the once-influential Romantic Movement lost momentum. Its prime ways of knowing had involved intuition and featured an emotive relationship with nature and the cosmos: the deep connection of knower and the known. This intuitive cognitive process stood in complete contrast to the detachment of the emerging scientific method, which necessitated that the observer be disconnected from the subject of observation. Even in the analytical and humanistic disciplines, academics were eventually forced to remove emotional language and first person references. This is how the “alienated mind” was born.ii The alienated mind is consciousness which exists in separation from its environment, and by implication, from the intuitive and emotional body. As the twentieth century progressed, and life became increasingly individualistic and focused upon career, achievement, and entertainment, this estrangement from inner worlds became entrenched across the Western world. It has now, I believe, become the norm in many Asian cultures as well, especially in East Asian countries with a Confucian culture.iii It is the intuitive mind which has been the obvious victim of this historical process. People in modern societies have few opportunities to access and employ the intuitive mind, and it plays no formal part in education and research.3
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If you wish to explore this historical process, I go into it in more detail in my book Integrated Intelligence.
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The essential point I wish to make here is that not only have we jettisoned much superstition and ignorance, we have also discarded a great deal of wisdom and lost touch with something vital – Integrated Intelligence. The baby has been thrown out with the bathwater. It’s time to correct the mistake. Mundane and Mystical Intuition Yet, what exactly is ‘intuition’? There are multiple definitions, but for the sake of manageability I like to break intuition into two main categories. The first is mundane intuition, which involves the subconscious processing of information in the brain. This intuition makes itself known through subtle feelings which bubble up from just below the surface of conscious awareness. Because this intuition is explained in terms of known brain physiology, it does not challenge mainstream scientific thinking about human consciousness. There is a body of legitimate research available on mundane intuition (e.g. Torff & Sternberg 2001). It is the second kind of intuition – mystical - which is central to the ideas presented in this booklet. Mystical intuition has been featured relatively little in academic research, and is thus poorly understood. Few researchers want to touch it, because mystical intuition contains references to spiritual, mystical, and religious experience. It requires a discussion of psi phenomena and the so-called paranormal, and the idea of the extended mind—that consciousness transcends the brain. There is an effective “psi taboo” (Radin 2006) in modern science, making this domain of research unattractive for most researchers.

3. What is Integrated Intelligence?
Integrated Intelligence, in which the individual draws upon transpersonal information, has been a key theme of my research. But I have not merely investigated INI intellectually by reading, analyzing, and writing academic booklets and popular books and articles. I have,

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in the tradition of the Romantic vision, systematically applied these alternative ways of knowing during my life and my research. The result is the concept of Integrated Intelligence, which incorporates a more complete range of cognitive processes and ways of knowing than typically found in mainstream discourses on mind and intelligence. Let me be a quite specific. Integrated Intelligence is: The deliberate and conscious employment of the extended mind, so that an individual can solve problems or function successfully within a given environment. In turn I define the extended mind as: The state of personal awareness whereby personal experience is infused with a transpersonal consciousness that transcends the confines of the individual mind and the limits of the sensory perception.4 Finally, integrated inquiry is: The deliberate application of Integrated Intelligence during research and learning. Using Integrated Intelligence There are seven mental applications and two outcomes of the employment of Integrated Intelligence.iv The mental applications of Integrated Intelligence are: 1. Integrated Perception 2. Location 3. Diagnosis
I have borrowed the term “the extended mind” from Rupert Sheldrake (2003). The term “integrated intelligence” is my own.
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4. 5. 6. 7.

Evaluation Fore-sense Creativity and Inspiration Recognition

The outcomes of using Integrated Intelligence are: 1. Wisdom 2. Personal and Social Transformation Tables 1 and 2 (below) list these, and provide applications, evidence, and examples.v Table 1: The Mental Applications of Integrated Intelligence
Cognitive Process Integrated Perception Potential Applications Other Evidence & References Integrated perception of Mystic Edwin Bucke’s Mystical & spiritual the underlying order & (1991) immediate traditions. Non-ordinary meaning of systems, & perception “that Cosmos is states of consciousness ‘intelligence’ within those not dead matter but a (Psychiatrist Stan Grof systems - including living Presence.” 2000, Sheldrake, cosmos. Terrence McKenna, & Enhancing “spiritual” Ralph Abraham (2001), worldview; meaning & Ken Wilber’s (2000) sense of relationship with “empirical” mysticism), nature & cosmos. claiming that mystical Perceiving the connection experience transcends between & amongst culture and time. concepts & schemata. Determining location of Researcher Michael Talbot Remote viewing, important objects (Russel employs “deeper & more including scientific Targ & Jane Katra 1999: intuitive abilities” in remote viewing (Braud 139-141). Also location of locating research data 2003, Radin 2006, information & data for (Talbot 1992: 137). Sheldrake 2003). research; finding relevant Dowsing (the scientific people & places. data for dowsing is unsupportive - see Wikipedia). Anecdotal Examples

Location

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Diagnosis

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Diagnosis of medical & Accounts of intuition, Larry Dossey’s (2003) mechanical problems; dreams & spiritual research into healing & safety, health & guidance to facilitate prayer, distant mental environmental hazards; & diagnosis of problems. influence. sources of human error Hawkins’ (2002) (Targ & Katra 1999: 141). intuitively diagnosed Spiritual & psychological patients’ illnesses. Carolyn introspection. Myss (2001), medical intuitive (see example of Integrated Perception in Part 5, below). Evaluation Evaluating design & Individuals who employ Card guessing construction alternatives, intuition & spiritual experiments from investment choices, guidance to make choices parapsychology, e.g. the research strategies, & (e.g., novelist Richard Rhine ESP experiments technology alternatives Bach 1986 - see “fore(Dean Radin 2006: 83(Targ & Katra 1999: 139). sense,” below). 89). Evaluation of life, career, & relationship choices. Fore-sense Foresight of natural Richard Bach (1986). Scientific experiments disasters, political Using an introspective into “presentiment” conditions, technological visionary technique, he (Dean Radin 2006: 161developments, wear “sees” the disastrous 180), which suggest that conditions, & investment consequences of leaving emotional events from opportunities (Targ & his partner—& adjusts his the future subtly effect Katra 1999: 142). Sensing choice accordingly. the body before they where to look for occur. information sources. To determine consequences of choices. Creativity & The individual draws Chemist August Kekule Indigenous and mystical Innovation upon the extended mind was “seized with the conceptions of creativity to facilitate increased notion” of molecular being influenced by inspiration & creativity in nature of benzene ring in ancestors and spiritual work, business, research, dream (Kafatos & Kafatou entities (John Broomfield competition, or leisure. 1991:166); Otto Loew’s 1997, Lawlor 1991). understanding Similar claims by “transmission of neuronal numerous artists, writers impulses” while asleep and creators (e.g. vi (Broomfield 1997: 80). William Blake, Wayne Dyer). No known empirical studies. Recognition Having an intuitive sense Indian mystic No known studies

of ‘knowing’ somebody or something, without conscious awareness of having seen or met them before.

Paramahansa Yogananda’s (admittedly the subject (1979) immediate matter is difficult to recognition of his future define, let alone study). guru at first meeting while walking past him on the street.

Table 2: The Outcomes of Integrated Intelligence Cognitive Process Wisdom Potential Applications Anecdotal Exemplars Other Evidence

Having intuited underlying The life of Mohandas The links between causes, meanings & Karamchand (Mahatma) spirituality, spiritual functions of various life Gandhi. Gandhi combined guidance & wisdom processes, the individual is an austere, mundane from anecdotes & able to make intelligent existence with political & tradition choices which enhance intellectual acumen, & (Broomfield 1997, happiness, well-being & combined these with Lawlor 1991). spiritual development of selfspiritual tools, insight, & & the human collective. wisdom to forge a powerful & effective life. Personal & Optimal human & cosmic Bucke’s cosmic Field consciousness Social evolution; may include consciousness (Tart studies (Radin Transfor- aspects of all mental 1993); Hawkins’ (2002) 2006). mation applications, with purpose experience of being of evaluation of personal protected by a bright, goals & choices within a warming light while stuck greater planetary & cosmic in a snow storm; dynamic. Potential for transformative power of increased hope & meaning. near death experiences (Grof 2000); synchronicity (Jung 1973).

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There is much evidence for the extended mind, including that from studies into comparative religion and anthropology, extrasensory perception, premonitory dreams, near-death experiences, crisis visions, psychedelic experience, and so on (Combs, Arcari & Krippner 2006, Grof 2000). If we peruse the literature on mystical experience in general, endless anecdotal examples can be added. Empiricists tend to

reject anecdote, but there are some domains of human experience that are not easily studied empirically, and mystical and intuitive experience is one of them. There are simply too many extraordinary stories of premonitions, insights, inspiration and spiritual guidance for the data to be dismissed out of hand. That would be far more ‘irrational’ than any mystical experience itself. A wonderful book which outlines many of the incredible cases on record is Lawrence LeShan’s (2009) A New Science of the Paranormal. Some theorists writing outside of the boundaries of mainstream discourses on mind and intelligence believe that there is a need to develop a new paradigm of science which includes non-local exchanges of information, via a transpersonal consciousness. These researchers agree that consciousness must be incorporated into our understandings of the working of the universe (Bradley 2004, Grof 2000, Laszlo 2004, Sheldrake 2012, Wilber 2000). Of these works I highly recommend Sheldrake’s (2012) The Science Delusion as an excellent and very readable overview of some of the problems facing modern materialist science, including its understanding of consciousness. If you are interested in a more specific examination of consciousness, I can endorse none more highly than transpersonal psychiatrist Stan Grof’s (2000) Psychology of the Future, which summarizes much of the evidence for the extended mind and presents it in accessible fashion. Grof was a pioneer scientist who studied the effects of LSD on the mind during the 50s and 60s. His understandings of consciousness are almost identical to my own. However he has used psychotropic drugs and breath work, while my understandings have come from non-ordinary states of consciousness and general life experience without the aid of any drugs. Despite these progressive thinkers, modern mind science still tends to classify mystical intuition and psychic experiences as delusional, psychotic or superstitious; or they are represented as stemming from unresolved childhood conflicts and dependencies. Yet the truth is that the evidence for the extended mind invites a more open

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intellectual stance than we presently find in mainstream science. The definition of a ‘skeptic’ is one who favors deep-questioning - but has an open mind; not an inflexible philosophical standpoint of complete rejection of data which challenges the critical/rational worldview. The latter attitude is best described as dogmatism, as Rupert Sheldrake has long argued. It is my belief that in paradigmatically rejecting in toto the extended mind and psi experience, mainstream consciousness and intelligence discourses have failed to accommodate the totality of human mental abilities. We need a greater openness to alternative hypotheses, theories, models, and methods – especially if we are going to write an inspirational thesis, and have fun doing so! Finally, I emphasize that INI is a tentative theory, and requires much further development to establish itself in academic terms. Ideally, this would include testing of some sort. The theory is based on academic research, but predominantly personal experiences. Integrated Intelligence as a provocation One way to consider beginning to use integrated intelligence in your research is to think of it as a deliberate provocation. Here I use the term as employed by Edward de Bono (2009), where it refers to the employment of an idea or suggestion which lies outside our normal experience or understanding. As de Bono points out, there is a mathematical necessity for provocation in any self-organizing system (de Bono 2009: 57); otherwise the system gets stuck in equilibrium. For the researcher, “the system” is the critical/rational worldview and its self-limiting knowledge boundaries and ways of knowing. Thus the provocation becomes: “Minds extend beyond the brain and are part of an intelligent cosmos, and humans have the capacity to consciously draw information and guidance from that system.” If we are using this statement as a provocation, we do not have to insist that Integrated Intelligence is ‘real.’ We can consider it as a means of

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lateralizing our thinking, and to see what creative outcomes can be achieved. We are looking at how it can make our research better. In the world of conventional science and academia, research is conducted with the implicit assumption that knowledge is localized in a random universe without intrinsic intelligence, meaning, or purpose. When you use Integrated Intelligence, either as a ‘believer’ in INI, or as a provocation, we go about research assuming that consciousness is non-localized within an integrated, intelligent, and deeply meaningful cosmos. Therefore, it is in the accessing and processing of information that the idea of Integrated Intelligence provides unique opportunities for researchers. Integrated intelligence is an invitation to employ methods, tools, and behaviors that stretch far beyond those accepted in conventional research. In my own research and creative endeavors, I have developed specific integrated intelligence tools (INQ Tools) which can be used in the assumption that the mental applications of Integrated Intelligence are genuine.

4. The INQ Tools
Okay, enough with theorizing and philosophizing. Let’s get down to the practical side of things. Fortunately it is not necessary to wait for science to catch up with practice before you start using INI in your research. I have employed the tools of INI extensively in my own research, including during the writing of my doctoral thesis. In the remainder of this booklet I am going to relate some of my experiences in writing my thesis (and occasionally in regard to other research projects) using these tools. This will include some excerpts from my study diary, which I kept during my doctoral candidature. The ‘mystical’ components of Integrated Intelligence may well lie beyond the comfort zone of some researchers. Given this, I simply

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suggest a suspension of disbelief as you try the tools and processes I outline, below. I can report that the benefits are many, including making research more exciting, fluid, efficient, and of course, intuitive! Parapsychologist Dean Radin (2008) states that only about 0.3 per cent of university staff will publically admit to an interest in psi research. This is due to what he calls the “psi taboo.” Integrated Intelligence has obvious links with psi research, as the concept of the extended mind is related to such psi phenomena as extra-sensory perception, clairvoyance, precognition, and so on. While there are transpersonal researchers who do employ related tools formally in their research (Hart, Nelson & Puhakka 2000), in the process I am suggesting here, the five INQ Tools are not formally incorporated into research methodology, but are background tools which enhance the research process. You do not have to have any specific belief in a mystical interpretation of intuition to use the INQ Tools. It is necessary, however, to temporarily suspend doubt. After all, the suspension of doubt is the stance of the true ‘skeptic’. I see Integrated Intelligence as a means of facilitating and enhancing other ways of knowing. There is certainly no requirement to do away with critical thinking or traditional research methods. May I suggest that you begin with whichever of the INQ Tools you feel most comfortable. You can modify them according to your particular needs and preferences. I developed these tools through experimentation, and through adapting and modifying other people’s ideas. vii I continue to work and experiment with them. I invite you do the same. Here I will categorize the tools according the mental applications of the theory of Integrated Intelligence, as outlined previously (Anthony 2006, 2008a, 2008b): integrated perception, location, diagnosis, evaluation, fore-sense, and creativity and inspiration. While there are numerous ways of utilizing intuitive thinking and Integrated Intelligence in the research process, in this introductory booklet I am going to focus upon just the five tools. They are: the

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Intuitive Diary, Free-form Writing, Meditative States, Harnessing Synchronicity and The Feeling Sense. Below, I will briefly outline how you can use them in general. Then in Part 5 you will find more specific applications. Using an Intuitive Diary This is a diary where you record your intuitive feelings, images, prompts and so on. I consider it to be the most important of all the tools for those just beginning to use intuitive ways of knowing. It is the one that will most easily establish a close link between left and right-brain thinking, and get you in touch with the subtleties of the intuitive mind. You will need a large hard-cover diary. It is worth buying a good one, because you want it to last. All the things you record in it may not make sense at the time of writing, but when you look back later, maybe even years later, you may find your recordings invaluable. Alternatively you can put your Intuitive Diary on your computer, but as with all important writings, make sure you have at least one backup file saved elsewhere! I recommend that you use your Intuitive Diary to record your dreams, intuitions, the synchronicities you experience from day to day, impressions of meditations, and any auditory, visual or feeling impressions that come to you at any time during the time of your research project. I like to record not only the dreams, images and feelings about things, but my interpretations of them also. Analyzing intuitions helps you gain a conscious, intellectual understanding of them. When I started keeping an Intuitive Diary many years ago I wrote in it almost every day. It is up to you how much time you want to invest in it. But do it as often as possible. Free-form Writing
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Free-form writing is stream-of-consciousness prose, written fluidly, quickly and without immediate editing or too much conscious analytical thinking. It is essentially ‘effortless’ writing. I used Free-Form Writing extensively throughout the writing of my thesis, but particularly in the first two years. A book which inspired me greatly in developing this process was Joan Bolker’s (1998) Writing Your Dissertation in Fifteen Minutes a Day. Bolker’s book is about writing a thesis through approximately four stages: the zero draft, first draft, second draft, and beyond. In something of a synchronicity, I first came across the book while scrolling through Amazon.com. Even before I had formally enrolled in my doctoral program in Australia, a friend told me about Phillips and Pugh’s How to Get a PhD (which I also recommend for the logistical and technical aspects of obtaining a PhD). So I went to Amazon to check it out. I did in fact buy Phillips and Pugh’s book, but just happened to see Bolker’s book there too. The title looked a bit gimmicky, but I felt a strong urge to buy it (a case of The Feeling Sense). So I did It was Bolker’s concept of “the zero draft” which really me. Bolker recommends writing from day one of the doctoral enrolment. Bolker suggests writing at least fifteen minutes a day, no matter what. The principle here is basically that you condition yourself to write habitually, so that on days that you do not write you actually feel bad! The “zero draft” involves writing whatever comes to you, and without editing, proof-reading or censoring yourself. There is no going back, not even for typos! Whatever ideas come into your mind about the thesis topic – connections, distinctions, hypotheses, questions, guesses, confusions, whatever - you write it down during your daily writing time. Bolker’s argument is that inevitably, amongst all the ramblings of the mind, some useful ideas will come out. Even if the good bits represent a mere ten per cent of what you write, you will still have a lot of potentially usable writing after six months. In Bolker’s system, it is

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only later on that you begin putting together a first draft. That is when the process begins to look more like a traditional approach to writing a thesis, with a succession of drafts. I highly recommend Bolker’s book for anybody in the early stages of writing a thesis. In fact, I highly recommend it to any researcher in any discipline. Bolker does not link her idea of a “zero draft” to mystical inspiration. However I adapted Bolker’s method to my understandings of Integrated Intelligence. Previously I had used Free-Form Writing when writing poetry and stories. I just wrote whatever came to me, and went back later to see if it was any good. Bolker made me realize I could use a similar process in the early stages of thesis writing - or any academic writing for that matter. Thus when I actually began typing, I simply allowed myself to enter a fluid stream of consciousness, and let the words pour out. I typically found that there was just so much wanting to be released from my mind, that fifteen minutes was just not enough. I adapted Bolker’s system so that I set myself a goal of writing five hundred words a day, every day, first thing in the morning. Just as Bolker argues, I found that this writing process really clarified my thinking. During my Free-form Writing time ideas came together, and links between people, ideas, and historical and philosophical concepts suddenly began to make sense. I did not stop to check if the ideas were valid. I just kept writing. This is thinking as you write, not thinking before you write. As is obvious from this booklet’s subject matter, my worldview is rather mystical. I believe that there is a greater intelligence which contributes to the evolution of humanity, and indeed to the entire cosmos. So, where I differed from Bolker is that I adapted the process to my mystical/spiritual perspective. Before I started my daily writing session I began with a prayer or affirmation to Spirit. The word “Spirit”, for me, has both an impersonal and a personal dimension. The impersonal aspect emerges from the innate connectedness of all things, and is not mediated by any individual or spiritual entity. But I have also long had a strong sense of personal spiritual guidance also, and I

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believe that we can call upon spiritual guides for help – including during research! So when I engaged in my little morning prayer, it was both made to ‘the universe’ and to whatever spiritual guides may have been tuning in. At the beginning of a writing session I would say aloud something like this (using examples from my own research). Spirit, lead me through this writing process, so that this work that I am writing may be in alignment with Spirit. There were often questions I would ask, and sometimes write down, to guide the whole process. For example: • I don’t understand how Wilber’s thinking fits in with ancient thought like that of Lao Zi. Is it even the same thing? • Where can I find evidence that the mind is not localized to the brain. • Why is this psi taboo so pervasive in intelligence theory? • How can I create a schema which helps situate all these theories of intelligence into a system that will make sense to my examiners? Or the questions might be more general in nature: • I need help in turning this chapter into a coherent whole. • Please help me make sense of Eric Jensen’s “g” concept. I’m struggling with it. • I’m stuck with my writing. Please help it to flow. • Would it be best to continue to research Gardner’s theory of multiple intelligences right now, or is there more energy on investigating Sternberg’s successful intelligence?

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After putting out one or two questions (don’t ask more than a couple at one time, as it is too much for the mind to process at once) I would begin to write. Note that in the very last question I used the term “energy on”. For me this is a general term which helps me to gain a sense of where the intuitive flow is heading at any given time, so that I can move along that river of ‘energy’. Of course I use the term ‘energy’ loosely, as it doesn’t refer to any of the four known forces of physics. What this flow is in scientific terms I do not know. All that I can say is that from my long experience in working with Integrated Intelligence, consciousness can align itself with a greater intelligence, and in doing so access the path of least resistance. When I am seeking “the energy on” a particular research route, I am therefore seeking that path of least resistance. I’ll write a little more about how to tap into optimal research paths a later in this booklet. When beginning your Free-Form Writing (or any aspect of your research project which requires clarification) I suggest you use an affirmation or prayer that you feel comfortable with, one that reflects your particular worldview and belief system. And you don’t need to verbalize them, just in case you are in a public place. Due to some administrative issues, my enrolment at The University of the Sunshine Coast (Queensland, Australia) was delayed by several months. Thanks to my habit of Free-form Writing, by the time I came to my official enrolment date, I already had about forty thousand words written on my computer, all related to my thesis topic. Later I began to put the ideas into longer arguments about certain aspects of the thesis as I saw it developing. Almost all of this initial work came together easily, if not effortlessly. I emphasize that at least initially, I wrote about things that I was drawn to, to that which moved me – filled me with a sense of excitement (using The Feeling Sense – see below). In those early days I rarely even thought about what I was going to write before I sat down

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to write. Sometimes I would wake up in the morning and an idea would come into my head, and I would go with that. Other times I would begin with nothing. This may be difficult to believe, but there was not a single time in my entire period of enrolment when I had writer’s block. Just as Bolker suggests, I went through drafting phases. Without doubt I enjoyed the earlier part of the writing process more than the later stages. I am naturally creative, but not much of a natural stickler for detail! When it came to the endless editing of chapters, it became a real test of self-discipline for me. I also found that my sense of connection to Integrated Intelligence dropped off as the process became more and more left-brained. This is probably an inevitable part of the thesis writing process. Inspiration is not really needed when you are crossing endless ‘T’s and dotting endless ‘I’s! My policy of writing consistently paid off. I completed my thesis in less than four years while working as a teacher and administrator very full-time (up to twelve hours a day of working/commuting at times). When I enrolled in August 2002, I had not a single academic publication. By the time I was granted my PhD I had a total of over a dozen publication credits (either published or about to be published), including several book chapters. I had also completed the writing for my book Integrated Intelligence, which was based on my thesis research (Anthony 2008a). In Part 7, below, I outline in more detail how to move from initial Free-form Writing into successive drafts and a final thesis Meditative States Meditative States can be of great benefit to researchers. You can cultivate meditative and non-ordinary states of consciousness as a deliberate means of accessing the intuitive mind, insight and inspiration about your research topic. To utilize Meditative States you simply quiet the mind, put out questions to the greater intelligence of the cosmos (or your subconscious, if you prefer), and wait for the answers to come in any sensory modality – images, auditory prompts, subtle feelings etc.

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It is well appreciated by mystics and many parapsychologists that cultivating non-ordinary states of consciousness is invaluable in accessing intuitive and spiritual knowledge (Grof 2000, Sheldrake 2003, Radin 2006, 2008). Throughout my life after my mid-twenties I used these states very deliberately to glean data from what I believe are transpersonal sources, and my subconscious. Meditative states are an intimate part of the development of Integrated Intelligence. You can familiarize yourself with this tool through deliberate meditation, or by taking advantage of the drowsy state between sleeping and waking – the hypnogogic state. This state occurs naturally when you are falling asleep and waking up. But you can enter it deliberately through meditation also. To bring about this sleepy state, sit quietly in a chair (or sit/lay wherever you feel comfortable), and relax. Focus on your breath, and breathe deeply in and out. As thoughts move into your mind, just allow them to pass. If you like, you can imagine them being placed inside balloons and floating away. A good time to do this is when you are actually feeling tired, such as in the middle of the afternoon or just before bed. This way you will naturally tend to drift towards sleep when you sit and relax deeply. After some practice, you will be able to do it more readily even when you are feeling alert. This process is a little different from some other forms of meditation, in that you are deliberately trying to begin to fall to sleep. In most forms of meditation it is important to remain alert as you enter deep states of consciousness, and the images that come before the mind may be seen as a distraction. But not with the Meditative States process that I am referring to here. As you relax, you may find yourself becoming too drowsy or nodding off. If so, simply persist in bringing yourself awake – but not fully awake. If you practice this meditative process regularly, you will become adept at moving towards sleep, but not quite succumbing to it. When you find yourself just shy of sleep, put questions out to Spirit/the

subconscious mind (as you prefer). Then observe what comes before your awareness in the form of feelings, images, sounds and words. Be patient with this process. If you get no definite answers, simply repeat the questions every minute or so. This is a ‘receptive’ process. You might like to think of it as ‘feminine’ in nature, because it is about yielding to something that is not within immediate control, not overpowering and controlling something in the ‘masculine’ sense. So when you repeat your questions, do so gently. You are not tacking list of demands to the boss’ door! Remember, even if you get no answer during the entire meditation, one may spring into your mind at a later date, or during a dream. A synchronicity in your everyday life may answer the question for you. Regardless, your subconscious will go to work on the problem, and begin to pull information and data together, both from mundane and (I believe) spiritual sources. viii Just trust that the answer is on its way. Regardless of whether you believe in the extended mind, the brain is a self-organizing system. The mere act of asking questions persistently will activate your subconscious, and it will go about seeking answers. Keep in mind that some questions and problems have complex answers. A full understanding of them may take some time, maybe even years with some big issues (but hopefully not that long!). Many will require further physical investigation, particularly in the sciences. Some questions have no definitive answer, and merely present an opportunity for a deepening appreciation of the problem. Yet other answers may come in an instant. As you develop wisdom and come to understand how Integrated Intelligence works more fully, you will be able to discern more easily how such ‘answers’ develop, often as a process. I recommend you employ Meditative States in short bursts. These could be as short as a minute or two for ‘lighter’ questions, or could be ten to fifteen minutes for more in-depth issues. When you finish the meditation, record what you have experienced in your Intuitive Diary. This is very important. If you want, you can later analyze the meaning

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of what you have ‘seen’ or experienced. You will not be able to conduct this analysis during the meditation, because the analytical mind cannot operate effectively while in deep states of relaxation, and vice versa. There is one thing you will notice as you use Meditative States. After some time you will be able to slow the mind and access these deeper states of consciousness in very little time, perhaps even instantly. You will also become more aware of the way the subconscious mind is constantly operating, even during ‘normal’ states of waking consciousness: bits and pieces will sneak through from the deeper levels of mind even as you are going about your everyday life. The Feeling Sense Just as with using intuition in general life, you can also allow your feelings to guide you as you research. The more you become comfortable with inner worlds, the easier it will become to distinguish amongst the many subtle feelings from within. You have to learn the difference between a ‘true’ intuitive pull and other competing voices from within – the ego, desire, wishful thinking, fear of the unknown and so on. This is not something that can be learned from reading a booklet like this. It is something you learn by trial and error. I cannot emphasize how important it is to trust your intuitive feelings if you want to develop your innate Integrated Intelligence. None of the INQ Tools will work well if you do not have an intimate relationship with your emotional body. The Feeling Sense underpins everything I write here. Even understanding and interpreting images and verbal prompts you get from meditations and dreams requires a well-developed feeling sense. And here is a key point you may find difficult to manage – at first. When you develop Integrated Intelligence to a high degree, the ‘rational’ (left-brained) part of your mind will begin to cede power to the intuitive mind. In other words, you will begin to trust feelings, even when there appears to be no rational basis for it, no definitive evidence that the feeling is right. This can be a

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scary development, and will be uncomfortable. But persist with it. Use your research project as a life experiment, a way of challenging yourself! I write a little more about how the mind will resist this ‘letting go’ – and how to overcome that resistance - in the final part of this booklet. One morning while working on my doctoral thesis at home I began reading a book by Howard Gardner and two of his academic colleagues (Gardner et al 1996). However I found my mind wandering. Something just did not feel right. So I put the book down. I walked over to my bookshelf, and I immediately felt drawn to another text and pulled it down. The book, which was about postmodern thought, was totally unrelated to the first book. However, as I skimmed through the text, some key insights came to me. The study session went smoothly after that. There was a sense of flow, as if the entire process of writing a doctoral dissertation was continuing smoothly. The key question in this little anecdote is this: why continue to struggle with something that does not move you in the moment? You may simply become stuck, disinterested, and the whole flow of the research may be impeded. Unless you have been assigned the reading by a teacher, or it is an absolute ‘must read’, put it aside. You may well find that at a later point it does feel right to read. This way of approaching readings is about doing the right thing at the right time. You might protest that reading isn’t always fun, or that some academic stuff is simply as dry as a bucket of dust. This may well be the case, but my experience is that most of the time when we are reading uninspired writings just for the sake of things, or because we believe we ‘must’, putting aside those readings often has no disastrous effect on the ultimate thesis we produce. But don’t just blindly believe what I’m saying. Try it! Another way to honor the Feeling Sense is when looking through the bibliography of a text. You can allow any subtle feelings about the listed books and articles to ‘grab’ you. As with Michael Talbot in the opening anecdote of this booklet, you can walk through libraries and

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book shops and wait for books to ‘choose’ you. I have done this more times than I care to remember. A good way to begin honoring The Feeling Sense is to do the following exercise. ix Prepare a selection of, say, five books or booklets you might like to read for your research project. Sit with the books/booklets in front of you, breathe deeply and relax. Ask yourself any research questions that you are trying to answer. Then allow yourself to get a feeling about each book/booklet. You might even like to pick up the books/booklets and sense how they feel to read. Here is where I tend to allow a subtle sense of excitement to guide me. If it feels exciting, it is a good bet that the reading is going to be a productive one. This process is a little like the Romantics’ merging of subject and object. You can imagine yourself connecting with the book/article, and feel it merging with you. The more you honor your intuitive feelings, the more they will speak to you. This is too valuable an advantage for a researcher to pass up. In my opinion, you would be mad to ignore this simple tool! It can cut a lot of hassle out of the research process, save much time and energy, and lead to an invigorating experience of research and writing. Harnessing synchronicity Synchronicities are meaningful coincidences. Carl Jung (1973, 1989) is perhaps the best known theorist of synchronicity. For Jung, the cosmos was not the great machine of the modernists. His principle of synchronicity transcended the linear mechanics of the Newtonian framework. Jung was keenly interested in the developments of modern physics, as well as the paradoxical. There is not room here to explore the theory or the phenomenon itself at depth. It is sufficient to say that the idea is fully compatible with the mystical/spiritual worldview, where matter and consciousness are in interplay in an ‘intelligent’ cosmos. The Feeling Sense can really help synchronicity unfold, and the entire adventurous process can help you choose the subject of research,

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what is read, and even clarify when things are best read. During the writing of an academic paper on the same subject as How to Channel a PhD, I was walking past a small bookshop not far from my workplace in Hong Kong. This shop has no more than a few dozen English titles (almost all books are in Chinese), so I rarely went in there. However, on this occasion I felt a subtle sense of excitement as I walked past (something I have trained myself to notice). I walked in and immediately found Edward de Bono’s (2009) Think! Before It’s Too Late. I picked it up, and again felt that same sense of excitement. I knew the book was right for me. I bought it. de Bono’s book helped me clarify some crucial distinctions for the writing of that paper (and this booklet). In the instance above, trusting both The Feeling Sense and Fore-sense allowed the synchronicity to unfold. In traditional research, conducted within the critical/rational worldview, this entire scenario would be considered absurd, deluded, or perhaps even insane. Personally, I choose not to trouble myself too much with such judgments! The skeptical reader might like to think of this point as a provocation in itself. The key point to using The Feeling Sense during research is to go with what excites you. It is my experience that a serendipitous and adventurous approach to research facilitates synchronicities. A key point is the requirement of bringing the mind fully into the present moment. Mystic Leonard Jacobson describes this beautifully in the video “Bridging Heaven and Earth”, which you can see on YouTube. In the exalted state of complete presence, it is as if the cosmos comes alive. The deeper meaning and purpose of things becomes known even as they unfold, as and as if the psyche and cosmos are in open dialogue. This is somewhat akin to the state of ‘flow’, usually reported in mainstream psychology in mundane and reductionist terms (Czikszentmihalyi 1994). In Part 6 of this booklet, I present some useful tips on how to bring the mind into presence.

Being present is extremely simple, but it is a skill that most academics and researchers often have great trouble with, as they are used to living ‘in the head’. Though this point may seem trite, there is no more fulfilling experience in life than that of being fully present. This is why I encourage you to explore the art of presence. Besides enhancing your ability to sense synchronicities during your research, it will make your life immeasurably richer. The experience of synchronicity is, in its most exalted form, almost a kind of spiritual rapture. It is a direct affront to the critical/rational worldview. If the researcher can suspend disbelief, synchronicity contains serendipities which can be an invaluable aid to research.

5. Using INI in research
Now I turn my focus to some more specific applications of the five INQ Tools. I will outline ways in which you can apply the mental applications of Integrated Intelligence. Again, I emphasize that this is not an exhaustive list of potential applications. My intention here is just introduce you to some successful applications that have worked well for me. You can experiment with these. Choose the ones that draw you in. Feel free to modify them. Mental Application 1: Integrated Perception General applications: 1. Seeing the underlying order & meaning of bodies of knowledge, disciplines, schools of thought, individual thinkers and systems, including the ‘intelligence’ within those systems.
x

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Integrated Intelligence can help in coming to an understanding of the connections within fields of knowledge and specific domains of enquiry. It is important in the writing of an article, book or thesis to appreciate the way that things fit together, and to grasp the

relationships between various facets of the research problem. Such understandings often come in leaps of intuition, or “Aha!” moments. It is my experience that Integrated Intelligence can help facilitate this process. It does not necessarily require Integrated Intelligence to map out the big picture. But it can be employed to do so. A perfect example comes from medical intuitive Carolyn Myss (2001). She recounts that before the writing of her bestselling book Anatomy of the Spirit, she was struggling to come to terms with certain aspects of the proposed text. Sometime after experiencing a confusing dream, she recalls how the key insight came to her. Shortly after that dream, I was still frustrated that I had not yet found the core message of Anatomy, but as I was lecturing to a group of twenty-eight students, I turned to write something on a white flip chart and instantly “downloaded” an image that merged three great mystical traditions and their biological implications: the seven chakras of the East, the seven Christian sacraments, and the ten sefirot of the Tree of Life from the Jewish Kabbalah. In less than a second, I received, I understood, I accepted, and I started the book over again (Myss 2001 p 35). Note that Myss was able to integrate the connections amongst three mystical traditions and sense their biological implications. Her anecdote not only demonstrates the immediacy of Integrated Intelligence, but shows the importance of several other relevant aspects of this intelligence. She “received” the information, indicating that the source was not her conscious mind. Secondly she “understood it”. I suspect that her long working experience with intuitive ways of knowing allowed her to grasp the overall meaning immediately. Without this step, the following steps could not have been taken. Thirdly, Myss “accepted” the experience. Without the acceptance of the mystical experience and its knowledge, no learning could have taken place.

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Myss has a strong connection with her intuition. This kind of connection naturally improves as an individual begins to use the kinds of tools I am outlining here. The more you tap into the right brain, into the subtle intuitions and feelings within, the more the “language” of that part of your mind will become recognizable to you. Watch out for diagrams and images that come to you in dreams and meditations. August Kekule ‘saw’ the molecular configuration of the benzene ring in a dream (Kafatos & Kafatou 1991 p 166).xi Note synchronous or ‘Aha!’ moments, especially when images in books, on advertising billboards or during TV programs suddenly ‘jump out’ at you. Use your research diary to record feelings, intuitions, images etc. that come to you at any time. Although they might not mean much at the time of writing, they may later have some relevance. I also use the note-taking facility on my mobile phone to record insights that come to me in public spaces or at work. An extract from my doctoral Intuitive Diary describes one such instance where an image inspired my thinking. I awoke a little early this morning, and lay half awake. Suddenly it all came together. Everything about the education chapter and the thesis just began to weave itself into one great whole. I saw the model of integrated education, the dynamic model/diagram with self at centre, and the universal feedback loop. I saw M. Scott Peck’s ideas of synchronicity and psychotherapy as spiritual growth weaving in with James Moffett’s and Michael Peters’ ideas of healing/growth/transformation/learning. It all came together in a new vision. Notice that the entire process was quintessentially inspirational. I was following my sense of excitement. There was a sense of wonder at participating in something more expansive than my conscious mind. The diagram referred to in the extract ended up in my thesis, and also in the final chapter of my book, Integrated Intelligence.

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Another simple process you can employ is to ‘ask’ for meaning. Here you put out the problem or the question in a meditation or reflective moment, and then start writing, drawing, singing, moving (whatever you prefer). You can use Meditative States, The Feeling Sense or Free-form Writing to seek the answer. Again, the answers may not come straight away. Keep putting the question out, and trust that the answer is coming - sooner or later. Mental applications 2 & 3: Evaluation & Location Evaluation, general applications: The capacity for evaluating the wisdom of choices, and the value of competing concepts or possibilities. Location, general applications: Locating and evaluating alternative designs, methods, sources of data, research foci and strategies. Here I have combined two mental applications of my theory of Integrated Intelligence into one subject heading. This is because of the obvious overlap: location can be seen as a subset of the idea of making choices in your research. These two mental applications constitute perhaps the most obvious ways that Integrated Intelligence can be of assistance to the modern researcher. With the information explosion there is just too much knowledge out there to be properly processed in a purely rational way. As intuition experts such as Malcolm Gladwell (2005), Gary Klein (2003) Roy Rowan (1991) and (Gigerenzer 2008) xii suggest, the world today is just too complex to comprehend using only the analytical mind, based upon the data we have at hand. This is because that data will inevitably be partial, to a greater or lesser degree. Roy Rowan (1991) in his excellent book The Intuitive Manager, refers to “analysis paralysis”, where we become so obsessed with analyzing data that we lose valuable opportunities to act assertively within the present moment.

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The conclusion of all these thinkers who have researched the intuitive mind is that we can – and should - employ our intuition more often. My own perspective is that researchers can also use intuition in a number of very beneficial ways in evaluating the direction of their research, including with specific smaller choices they may make along the way. You can use intuitive insights when you have a number of research options to choose from. The following entry, taken from my Intuition Diary is a good example. This describes a time during my doctoral candidature when I was working at my computer, and had previously downloaded more than a dozen academic articles on “mind” in ancient Greece, as well as hundreds more on subjects relevant to my thesis topic. 11.01.04. I opened up the folder under Greek thought, and saw that there were about 15 files there. So I asked which one to read (I had two hours tonight to do some research). I heard “Number one”. It was a very faint voice, and I wasn’t sure where it came from, but I decided to follow it. So I went into the first file (the files are not named clearly, so I wasn’t sure what was in it). Anyway, it was perfect: about the ancient Greeks’ influence on Freud. I read that Freud selectively chose aspects from Greek thought which fitted his mechanistic prejudices (and ignored the rest.). I wrote about 900 words on the subject, and it flowed really easily. I am downloading a lot of files from the databases onto my computer at the moment. There are thousands to choose from. After I do the search, I am intuiting which ones I should save onto the computer. I am also just focusing for a moment, and going into my feelings. If I don’t get a clear sense, I usually don’t save it, although I admit sometimes things seem a bit hazy, so I just save it or not according to logic…

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Once again, it can be seen that I used a combination of more mundane and ‘rational’ research processes and some more intuitive prompts. What I had done in this instance was to go into databases and download onto my computer hundreds of articles on subjects related to my thesis. With the modern computer you can just search for a word or phrase and the links to the documents will appear. If there are a lot of documents which come up from a conventional search, you can use intuition again to select which ones you want to dip into. Of course you can also just read the name of the article – the old fashioned way! However sometimes the name might not be clear, or the precise content of the article somewhat vague. This is when intuition becomes invaluable. You could spend a long time wading through a dozen or more articles trying to find the right one. In the situation described above I used the feeling sense and an intuitive ‘measurement’ technique I call the Quick Check (see Part 6, below) to decide which articles to save. If I did not get any strong feeling, I did not save a given article. Later, when I returned to actually read articles, I used the same two intuitive methods again to select which ones to dip into to read more carefully. Notice also that the process was not perfect. The feelings and ‘measurements’ were not always clear. When this was the case, I sometimes reverted to more ‘mundane’ methods in deciding which files to save, or to read. Of course there is no guarantee that intuition will bring forward the right information. Sometimes you may not find something fruitful. However it is my experience that intuition can be developed to such a degree that the ‘hits’ far outweigh the ‘misses’. You can use INI when you have several research options to choose from. At the beginning of 2009, I was working on two books simultaneously, Sage of Synchronicity and Beyond the Frontiers of Human Intelligence. They are two quite different kinds of books. For a while I was working on Frontiers. Then I suddenly had the feeling to

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get back into writing Sage, and did so. The writing flowed well and then, just a few days after making the commitment with Sage, I awoke in the middle of the night, and there was a song playing in my head. I have learned the value of ‘listening’ to all intuitive prompts, and this includes the music in my head. The song that came to me that night was “Gold,” by the 80s pop group Spandau Ballet. The words to that song have strong personal meaning for me, and I felt strongly that this was a vindication of my decision to work on Sage. I made a commitment to follow through and complete the book, which I did. Much to my delight the book was picked up by Inner Traditions in the United States, and was released as Discover Your Soul Template. This was my first major mainstream book publication. Here are some other intuitive methods you might like to experiment with when browsing databases or multiple files/articles. These are all related to the mental applications of Evaluation and Location. • Decide upon your research focus area for the study session and state your question(s) (preferably out loud). Then bring up the files on your computer screen. Ask a question related to your question(s), and then run your finger over the screen. When you feel your finger being ‘attracted’ to a file stop, and open it. When I do this I sometimes feel a tingling in my finger, other times it feels like there is a ‘[wall’ which stops my finger moving past a particular file. The process is a bit like some divination methods, such as pendulum swinging. The key is to ‘let go’ and trust the process. Do not try too hard to determine the outcome. • Write the file names (or numbers) on pieces of booklet or cards, then turn then face down. Shuffle them so you do not know what card is where. Use the same process as above, making sure your question is clearly stated. Then allow yourself to be ‘drawn’ to
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one of the pieces of paper, and turn it over to see which file to read. • Stand back a little from the computer screen, relax and take a deep breath. When you feel very relaxed, ask the question you wish to focus upon, and wait for the “answer”. Take note of what you see, feel or hear. A document icon may “flash” at you, “come alive”, or seem to become “attractive”. Go into that file and open it, keeping the question in mind. You can use the same processes when deciding upon which books, chapters, articles web pages or even which paragraphs to read. Again, use these methods in conjunction with standard research methods and ‘rational’ processes. Be clear on what you are looking for When it comes to the mental applications of evaluation and location it is vital that you be clear about what you are looking for with your research. A clear set of questions to guide your research is crucial. During the research undertaken for my doctorate I had a clear policy that I never read anything without first writing down or repeating to myself the questions I wanted to answer. I suggest you do the same. This is even true at the very beginning of your research project. Here the questions might be quite general. • What really interests me about this topic? • What areas of this topic really require further research? • What am I truly drawn to as a possible focus of my thesis? As you clarify your research topic, the research questions should become clearer, and more specific. Eventually they should all tie together.
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In the writing of my thesis I allowed my intuitive feelings to guide much of the direction of the research. My preference for the intuitive was nowhere more apparent than when I chose my thesis topic. Here I followed my intuition fully. I was simply not prepared to focus on an area that was not of importance to me, or that I was not passionate about. I believe that intuitive intelligence works best - including the five key tools mentioned in this booklet - when we are ‘on purpose’ with our research, and indeed with our lives. I have to admit I just do not understand the mentality of many postgraduate students who choose the ‘name’ of the institution before their topic. I read recently of a mature Asian man who related that he had not enrolled in a PhD program because he had not yet found a university with ‘a prestigious name’ who would accept him. To my mind, this is pure vanity in action: the substance of knowledge and passion for subject matter become secondary to the surface packaging of institution and credential and pure human vanity. xiii This has become a genuine problem in modern education systems. In truth, it is not entirely the student’s fault in thinking this way, as education has become heavily commoditized. In turn the problem reflects the fact that many people do not develop what I call ‘spiritual maturity’. A genuinely mature individual does not establish his sense of self by elevating himself in status, gaining face, or trying to win the approval of peers. By the way, I am not suggesting you ignore market forces or institutional and cultural boundaries when selecting your research topic. You should be absolutely clear about your reasons for embarking on your thesis. If your intention is to get a specific job or go into academia, of course you must think carefully about the subject matter. There would be little point in writing up a thesis on Nepalese poetry (regardless of how much it excites you) if you want to teach at a university in Los Angeles! In such a situation I would suggest you find a subject matter that both motivates you, and has potential value in the education market place.

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Ultimately, the choice of what thesis topic and subject matter was suitable for me was actually no choice at all. I chose the topic that I had spent so much of my adult life focused upon: Integrated Intelligence. I also decided I wanted to base my research in the discipline of Futures Studies. Of course, at first I did not have the name “Integrated Intelligence.” Nor did I know exactly how it would pan out. I did not know the chapter headings, and I did not know the methodology I would employ. I did not even know the specific questions I would ask. That all came later. But let me backtrack a little, and tell you how I actually came to enroll in a doctoral program in the first place. What and where? In 2001 I was living and working in Taiwan as an English teacher. I loved Taiwan, but after a couple of years there a sense of being unfulfilled began to descend upon me. There was a nagging feeling that I simply wasn’t ‘on track’ with my life. One morning I awoke and there was a song playing in my head: “Nowhere Man”, by the Beatles. This was the intuitive prompt I needed to rouse myself into action. I was being told that I was drifting along in life and wasting my talents and abilities. I was thirty-five years old, and was entering an important phase of my life where I needed to get some clarity about my career direction. Then, during a meditation a day or two later, three letters suddenly appeared before my inner eye: “PhD”. About five years earlier, I had deferred my enrolment in a doctoral program at the University of Newcastle, and headed for New Zealand to work in an international school. Now it appeared that my intuition was nudging me towards resuming my studies. Yet it was a huge decision. Writing a doctoral thesis would take several years, and there was no guarantee that I would be awarded the degree after submission. Doubts came welling up from within. Maybe I wasn’t smart enough. I might fail. What about all the other things in life I would miss out on as I pursued a doctorate?

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Yet I knew what I had to do. After some reflection, I chose to resume my studies. But what would I focus upon? It was just a few days later, when doing some restful stretching in the morning, that a small but life-changing message came to me. I was in relaxed presence, my mind quiet, when a voice said, “bear”, and I stopped. Straight away, I remembered a book I had read a few years previously, Education for the 21st Century. It was written by two Australian academics, Hedley Beare (pronounced “bear”) and Richard Slaughter. I grabbed the book from my bookshelf, and leafed through it. The book holds a spiritual view of education, and its themes resonated deeply with me. I contacted both the authors by email. They then put me on to a futurist and academic named Sohail Inayatullah. It was Sohail who would eventually become my doctoral supervisor. Sohail is a brilliant academician, working via three different universities in Australia and Taiwan. One of them, The University of the Sunshine Coast, had a program which permitted me to research and write about the frontiers of human intelligence. The university was relatively new. It couldn’t grant me academic status, but it would enable me to pursue my Bliss. I enrolled. I could have gone with the call of ego and enrolled in the most prestigious school that would take me. I could have gone with economic forces and studied whatever the education market was demanding. Instead, I made a decision to follow my excitement. I decided to research Integrated Intelligence, including the relationship between rational and intuitive ways of knowing. Inspiration is great, but there is always the requirement to bring it into the mundane world. As it turned out, the university rejected my initial thesis proposal, and the lack of a clear methodology was significant. But that was okay – I simply went and located an appropriate method, as required. Sohail told me to use his Causal Layered Analysis (CLA) in my refurbished proposal (CLA – Inayatullah 2004 - is an analytical tool which helps break down

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discourses and identify their power structures implicit with in them). I did this, and the proposal was accepted. In life we have to deal with the rules of society, culture and institutions. We also have to deal with prevailing paradigms, traditions and protocols. Compromises are necessary. Whenever I came up against an obstacle because what I had written was considered inadequate due to methodological weaknesses or the system requirements of academia, I simply made the necessary corrections. It is no use kicking and screaming in such cases. You have to earn your stripes before you can start to command respect, or influence the systems and institutions you are working within. A dose of humility is required. Using intuition to focus your writing On a daily basis you can use intuitive feelings to guide your sense of where to focus your writing. This relates most closely to the Mental Application of evaluation, but also to location and diagnosis (see below). The following entry from my thesis research diary exemplifies this. 09.12.03. This morning I began to write up some stuff from Shapiro’s Reading the Postmodern Polity. But there was a nagging feeling within me that this wasn’t right. So I switched to writing about Grof’s arguments from Beyond the Brain. That felt a lot better. I felt like I was pushing it with Shapiro, as if I was not being guided, and had become detached from my intuition. I then wrote about the significance of the event for me. The lesson from this is to “listen” for that sense of flow, which means that I am in alignment with intuitive intelligence. The sense of being detached means that one has detached from Spirit. When this detachment occurs, one can stop, step back from the

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work, go within, while breathing deeply and relaxing. Then ask: “What is right for me to do now?” Your Intuition Diary can therefore also contain some reflections you have about the intuitive process you are employing, and any other aspect of your research that you wish to comment on. For this to work, you do not have to frame the experience into something ‘spiritual’, as I like to do. However, I find this entire process tends to become something bigger than me as an individual researcher, so I know of no better term than ‘Spirit’ to describe the intelligence that permeates it. The Feeling Sense can also be used to good effect in determining where (location) to direct your attention, as the following diary entry indicates. 20.12.03. I was sitting here this morning when I had the great urge to pick up the book The Search for the Pearl by Gillian Ross. It was sitting on top of a pile of books on the coffee table. There was a very strong sense that this was right, as if I was being compelled to go and pick it up (which I did). Anyway, the book has a section which turns out to be just perfect for chapter two of the thesis, with a great summary of the historiography of ‘scientific’ atheism since the beginnings of civilization. Once again I feel a strong sense of guidance and confidence that I can get this chapter done in good time. Here I chose to respond to a feeling, and in this case it proved to be very fruitful. You will note I had no conscious awareness of what I might find, or what the outcome would be. In other words I had no idea of why the action was required or why it might prove helpful. This is something that researchers who are used to following a linear chain of logic may find difficult to get used to. I certainly recommend having a research plan, and keeping up a careful consideration of where you are going. But using Integrated Intelligence means that you have to be open

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to being taken where you might not expect, or even want to go. The key is to listen to feelings, especially strong feelings, about what to read, how much time to put into a text or booklet, and which parts of the text to focus attention upon. This requires a certain ‘letting go’. Of course not all writing will flow like water down the mountain. Research takes time and effort. Sometimes it is quite tedious, and in the end details have to be spot on. This may not be much like fun at all! It would be a mistake to ditch a line of research completely just because you felt tired or resistant on any given day. Major decisions about research directions should be made with a combination of intuitive sense and an analytical appraisal of all the factors involved. Finally, I suggest you take full note of synchronicities, because they can guide your research. Sometimes a particular book might be sticking out of a shelf, or just lying there on the study desk where someone has left it, and it just happens to be one that resonates with your research topic. In The Road Less Traveled M. Scott Peck (1984) relates a synchronistic experience where he was studying in a friend’s library, and at a sticking point in his writing. Even as he sat there one of the women in the house came to him and handed him a book, saying she thought he might like to read it. Peck states that the book was perfect for what he needed for his research at that time, and he resumed his writing immediately.

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I hope you enjoyed these extracts from How to Channel a PhD. The complete booklet is Available as a Kindle book or PDF from Marcus ($1.99).
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Klein (2003) also uses the example of weather forecasters. This is my term. Elsewhere I have also referred to this as “the fragmented mind” (Anthony, 2008b). iii I make this observation after having taught in Asian education for many years. If anything, the problem is worse in developed twenty-first century Asian economies, as they tend to be extremely competitive, materialistic economies, and their education systems are typically relentlessly exam-focused, with little time for the development of inner worlds. iv I have extended this number over time. I also believe that ‘deep empathy’ is another valid mental application. This is a sense of empathic connection with another person, animal, plant, or place. However, I shall not discuss this in relation to Integrated Inquiry in this booklet. v For a more thorough examination of evidence for such cognitive processes, see Sheldrake (2003), Radin (2006), and McTaggart (2007). vi It is, of course, possible to attribute these two cases to mundane intuition, or subconscious incubation of data. The lack of empirical testing of this mental process is undoubtedly due to the fact that identifying the source of a creative idea is extremely difficult’ and how one might test for that source being ‘spiritual’ is even more problematic. vii Some of these influences were researchers, and some were not. The researchers include Hart et al (2000), Michael Talbot (1992) Dean Radin (2006), Rupert Sheldrake (2003, 2012), William Braud (2003), Gillian Ross (1993), Carl Jung (1973, 1989), Paul Scheele (1993) and others. Hart et al (2000) target intuitive methods specifically for research, while the others research related subject matters. Other inspirations have been mystics and spiritual teachers who write about intuitive experiences, such as the late Leonard Jacobson (2007), John Mack (1999), Brian Weiss (1985), Stuart Wilde (2001), and Elizabeth Kubler Ross (1997). Yet perhaps most influential have been the extraordinary individuals I have met and worked with in my personal life. I have worked with groups of mystics (I am not quite sure what else to call them) at various times and in different countries, and have been able to witness first-hand the reality of Integrated Intelligence. These mystics taught me how to utilise the dormant right-brained intuitive abilities that I believe we all have. In my semi-autobiographical novel, Shadow Light (Anthony 2012), I outline some of the experiences I had as a mystic in the making. It was my seeing others develop such skills relatively easily that convinced me that these are not simply special abilities only accessible to the gifted or to yogis who have lived in caves and meditated for thirty years. They are natural, commonly occurring capacities extant - though usually dormant - within us all. Rupert Sheldrake (2008) recently conducted telephone telepathy experiments, which have been successfully repeated by others, provide evidential support for my claim that integrated intelligence is widespread. viii Again, the term “spiritual” does not have specific religious connotations here. It means from a source beyond the individual’s brain – the extended mind. ix This technique has been inspired, in part, by Paul Scheele’s (1993) “PhotoReading whole mind system”. Scheele’s approach to study has many similarities to my own, although he tends to avoid references to mystical concepts. x These applications, and the supporting evidence for them, have been outlined in my book Integrated Intelligence (Anthony 2008). xi As far as I am aware, Kekule did not see this as anything mystical, but as a mundane processing of the subconscious mind. xii Gladwell (2005) and Gigerenzer (2008) construct intuition in modernist, reductionist terms and do not entertain the possibility of the extended mind or integrated intelligence. Klein (2003) is similar, with the exception of a brief foray into the “paranormal” later in his book. Rowan (1999), however, is quite comfortable with exploring intuition in the mystical sense. xiii This is not to say that market forces should not be considered when enrolling in advanced degrees, as degrees from prestigious universities will have more “clout” when you finish.
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