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Monday July 30, 2012 Vol XII, Edition 298
SENATE CONTROL
NATION PAGE 7
IRAN URGES
BABY BOOM
WORLD PAGE 8
MICHAEL PHELPS
WINS 1ST SILVER
SPORTS PAGE 11
DEMOCRATS PUSH HARD TO KEEP SLIM
MAJORITY
Elegant Home Design Since 1952
650227 4882
FREE ESTIMATE
165 N. Amphlett
San Mateo
www.rudolphsinteriors.com
By Ashley Hansen
DAILY JOURNAL CORRESPONDENT
If you clean your house, go to
work every day or if the nearest
vending machine is a favorite hang-
out, chances are youve met San
Mateos leading lady. And if you
havent been formally introduced,
then Victor Hanna hopes youre
willing to make a new local friend.
Her name is Betty Mills and,
while she doesnt exist in the physi-
cal sense, she has most likely been a
part of your daily life since 2002.
Our mission, what weve set out
to do, is to build a great American
brand, Hanna said about Betty
Mills, a TOP 500 e-commerce com-
pany and one of the Internets lead-
ing janitorial and supply businesses
headquartered in San Mateo. Our
company evolved quite a bit along
the way. Most recently, weve
entered the industrial supply, the
ofce snack, over 2,000 organic and
all-natural snacks and thats a very
big leading differentiator of Betty
Mills. The most recent category is
medical supplies. Weve now got
over 130,000 products on the site.
Hanna, formerly of the four-per-
son startup team that founded
Onsale.com, began Betty Mills fol-
lowing the dot-com implosion in a
time when no one wanted anything
to do with the technology business.
But Hanna and his founding partner,
David Schulhof, saw potential in
bringing customers a new way to
purchase everyday household items.
Despite not knowing much about
San Mateo, Hanna was drawn to the
Meet Betty Mills
ROSIE LINARES/DAILY JOURNAL
Victor Hanna, founding partner of San Mateo-based Betty Mills, started
the business in 2002 after the dot-com bust. Now, its one of the leading
supply businesses on the Internet.
Building a great American brand in San Mateo
See MILLS, Page 19
By Bill Silverfarb
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
After hearing directly from
Bridgepointe Shopping Center of-
cials last week that the Ice Center of
San Mateo will not have its lease
renewed when it expires next year, a
group of hockey moms and other
supporters of the rink have vowed to
ght its demise.
Peter Meier, with SPI Holdings,
told a packed house at the
Harbortown Clubhouse Thursday
night that Bridgepointe will not wel-
come back the ice rink next year and
is instead asking the city to allow it
to offer a recreational amenity off
site.
When the old Fashion Island was
torn down, city ofcials mandated
that the ice rink or a similar recre-
ational amenity remain on the prop-
erty under a master plan.
Thirteen years late, SPI is looking
to maximize its prots from the cen-
ter by replacing the ice rink with
several retailers by amending its
Ice center
supporters
plan fight
By Brendan Bartholomew
DAILY JOURNAL CORRESPONDENT
Pacica residents and ofcials are
grappling with questions and con-
troversy as they decide whether to
alleviate traffic congestion by
widening Highway 1 from Sharp
Park through Rockaway Beach.
Pacifica has been considering
such a project for more than years,
but was forced to take a tentative
step forward in late June when the
citys staff received a letter from
Pacifica officials split
over Highway 1 plans
See ICE, Page 20
See SPLIT, Page 19
By Samantha Weigel
DAILY JOURNAL CORRESPONDENT
Tucked in a parking garage in
downtown San Mateo, a mural with
two musicians in mid-note greets
those who seek it and those who
happen upon it.
It is the work of Dylan Hararah, a
23-year-old native of San Mateos
Shoreview neighborhood, who is
slowly nding ways to bring his
work to life in San Mateo through
murals and other pieces of art.
Hararah believes looking at art is
an experience, one that gives people
a break from the advertisements
with which our society is inundated.
Yet in the course of our daily lives,
its a rarity to view art outside of
museums or gallery exhibitions.
Hararahs murals give the public an
artistic respite from everyday life.
Public art gives people a break, I
think, from a world of monetary
value said Hararah.
The B Street and Vine caf in
downtown San Mateo commis-
sioned Hararah to paint Jazz Duet.
The mural, nished several years
ago, is on the restaurants back wall
Bringing walls to life
ROSIE LINARES/DAILY JOURNAL
San Mateo artist Dylan Hararah stands in front of the mural in the Central Parking Garage in downtown San
Mateo he painted.The artist has also been commissioned to repaint the murals outside the Swingin Door pub
on 25th Avenue.
San Mateo muralist enlivens the city through art
See ART, Page 20
FOR THE RECORD 2 Monday July 30, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
The San Mateo Daily Journal
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Law professor
Anita Hill is 56.
This Day in History
Thought for the Day
1956
President Dwight D. Eisenhower signed
a measure making In God We Trust
the national motto, replacing E
Pluribus Unum (Out of many, one).
The fellow who says hell meet
you halfway usually thinks hes
standing on the dividing line.
O.A. Battista, Canadian-born author-scientist.
Musician is Buddy
Guy is 76.
Actress Vivica A.
Fox is 48.
In other news ...
Birthdays
REUTERS
Chinas Jingbiao Wu competes on the mens 56Kg Group A weightlifting competition at the London 2012 Olympic Games
Sunday.
Monday: Mostly cloudy in the morning
then becoming partly cloudy. Patchy fog in
the morning. Highs in the 60s. West winds
5 to 15 mph.
Monday night: Partly cloudy in the
evening then becoming mostly cloudy.
Patchy fog after midnight. Lows in the
lower 50s. West winds 5 to 15 mph.
Tuesday: Mostly cloudy. Patchy fog in the morning. Highs in
the 60s. West winds 10 to 15 mph.
Tuesday night: Mostly cloudy. Patchy fog after midnight.
Lows in the lower 50s. West winds 5 to 15 mph.
Wednesday: Partly cloudy in the morning then becoming
sunny. Patchy fog. Highs in the 60s.
Wednesday night through Thursday night: Partly cloudy.
Patchy fog. Lows in the lower 50s. Highs in the 60s.
Local Weather Forecast
Lotto
The Daily Derby race winners are No. 09 Win-
ning Spirit in rst place; No.8 Gorgeous George
in second place; and No. 03 Hot Shot in third
place.The race time was clocked at 1:45.64.
(Answers tomorrow)
GROOM THINK EFFORT MASCOT
Saturdays
Jumbles:
Answer: After three bulls-eyes in a row, his goal of winning
an Olympic gold medal was this ON TARGET
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.
THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek
Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
NIHYS
AWERF
CLUNKO
UNBEOC
2012 Tribune Media Services, Inc.
All Rights Reserved.
F
in
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A:
4 4 4
2 3 4 8 43 26
Mega number
July 27 Mega Millions
18 23 24 32 34
Fantasy Five
Daily three midday
2 2 9 9
Daily Four
8 7 2
Daily three evening
In 1942, President Franklin D. Roosevelt signed a bill creating
a womens auxiliary agency in the Navy known as Women
Accepted for Volunteer Emergency Service WAVES for
short.
In 1619, the rst representative assembly in America convened
in Jamestown in the Virginia Colony.
In 1864, during the Civil War, Union forces tried to take
Petersburg, Va., by exploding a gunpowder-lled mine under
Confederate defense lines; the attack failed.
In 1918, poet Joyce Kilmer, a sergeant in the 165th U.S.
Infantry Regiment, was killed during the Second Battle of the
Marne in World War I. (Kilmer is perhaps best remembered for
his poem Trees.)
In 1932, the Summer Olympic Games opened in Los Angeles.
In 1945, the Portland class heavy cruiser USS Indianapolis was
torpedoed by a Japanese submarine during World War II; only
316 out of some 1,200 men survived.
In 1962, the Trans-Canada Highway was ofcially opened at
Rogers Pass in British Columbia.
In 1965, President Lyndon B. Johnson signed into law the
Medicare bill, which went into effect the following year.
In 1975, former Teamsters union president Jimmy Hoffa dis-
appeared in suburban Detroit; although presumed dead, his
remains have never been found.
In 1980, Israels Knesset passed a law reafrming all of
Jerusalem as the capital of the Jewish state.
Ten years ago: President George W. Bush signed into law the
most far-reaching government crackdown on business fraud
since the Depression.
Major League Baseball Commissioner Bud Selig is 78. Movie
director Peter Bogdanovich is 73. Feminist activist Eleanor Smeal
is 73. Singer Paul Anka is 71. Jazz musician David Sanborn is 67.
Former California Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger is 65. Actor
William Atherton is 65. Blues singer-musician Otis Taylor is 64.
Actor Frank Stallone is 62. Actress Delta Burke is 56. Singer-
songwriter Kate Bush is 54. Country singer Neal McCoy is 54.
Movie director Richard Linklater is 52. Actor Laurence Fishburne
is 51. Actress Lisa Kudrow is 49. Actor Terry Crews is 44. Movie
director Christopher Nolan (The Dark Night) is 42. Actor Tom
Green is 41. Rock musician Brad Hargreaves (Third Eye Blind) is
41. Actress Christine Taylor is 41. Actress Hilary Swank is 38.
Olympic gold medal beach volleyball player Misty May-Treanor
is 35. Actress Jaime Pressly is 35. Actress April Bowlby is 32.
Actress Yvonne Strahovski (TV: Chuck) is 30.
Olympic viewing: NBC
critics loud on social media
NEW YORK In the age of social
media, NBC now has millions of televi-
sion critics who make their opinions
known about every aspect of Olympics
coverage instantly.
Theyve even set up their own hashtag
on Twitter: (hash)nbcfail. The online
complaints focused Saturday on NBCs
decision to air the marquee swimming
event won by American Ryan Lochte on
tape delay in prime time, and Friday on
the network not streaming the opening
ceremony online. Sundays critics start-
ed early: people wondering why the U.S.
mens basketball teams opening game
aired on a cable network while womens
cycling was shown on NBC.
The conversation is so active that
NBCs executive producer of the games,
Jim Bell, took to Twitter to answer crit-
ics and even change the way NBC is
doing something in response.
(hash)nbcfail is lled with a lot of
crying and snark and humor, but NBC
can actually learn something from it,
said Jeff Jarvis, a media critic who
writes the Buzzmachine.com blog.
Complaints about tape delayed cover-
age are an evergreen with Olympics held
on foreign soil. But the London Games
are the rst with Twitter, Facebook and
other social media sites in full ower, in
a mobile phone era where people carry
computers that instantly deliver news in
their pockets. It has amplied the impa-
tience of viewers who want to see events
on their large-screen TVs instantly and
havent been mollied by NBCs deci-
sion to stream the events live online.
James Poniewozik, Time magazine
TV critic, tweeted that NBC tape delay
coverage is like the airlines: its interest
is in giving you the least satisfactory
service you will still come back for.
That drew a quick response from
NBCs Bell: You do know that all
sports events are being streamed live
right?
I do, indeed! replied Poniewozik.
Have enjoyed it. Apparently a lot of
folks still prefer watching it on TV.
NBC says it saves big events for
prime-time airing because that is when
most viewers are available to watch
them and where the network makes the
bulk of its advertising revenue. Since
prime time on the U.S. East Coast coin-
cides with 1 a.m. London time, there are
no events to air live then. NBC represen-
tatives noted that there were 39 hours of
live events Sunday on NBC and its afl-
iated networks.
Jonathan Wald, who produces Piers
Morgans CNN talk show and used to
work at NBC, tweeted that the medal
for most Olympic whining goes to
everyone who complains about what
happens every four years. Tape delay.
One of those complainers, in fact, was
Morgan: He tweeted his disdain Friday
for NBCs decision not to make the
opening ceremony available live.
The advent of Twitter makes it seems
like theres a lot of unhappiness when
the majority of viewers are watching
NBC on tape delay and appear satised
with it, Wald said in an interview.
NBC can point to television ratings
justifying their approach. The Nielsen
company said the opening ceremony
drew more than 40 million people
Friday, the most ever for one of those
Olympic events. Saturdays rst night of
coverage was seen by 28.7 million,
another record, beating every other rst
night of Olympic competition. In
Beijing four years ago, 24 million
watched on the corresponding night.
14 19 22 36 40 3
Mega number
July 26 Super Lotto Plus
REUTERS
A parachutist dressed as Queen
Elizabeth is seen during the opening
ceremony of the London 2012 Olympic
Games.
I
n the 1950s, the Peninsula was booming
with construction projects involving
family houses. A number of developers
such as Henry Doelger (Westlake-Daly City),
Bohannon in San Mateo, Eichler throughout
the Peninsula and Conway, as well and many
others, were making their mark as construc-
tion kings in developing farmland throughout
the Peninsula. The Peninsula was experienc-
ing a construction boom. The population of
San Mateo County was in the 300,000 area
with many thousands a month moving into the
Peninsula.
In the early 50s, Pacica was still a series
of isolated communities without much indus-
trial base or tax base except from the county.
Although spread out along the coast for a
number of miles, it had many sparsely popu-
lated, isolated valleys such as Manor,
Vallemar, Sharp Park and, the largest, Linda
Mar, in the San Pedro Valley that had been the
home of Francisco Sanchez. The Ocean Shore
Railroad had attracted a small number of set-
tlers when it was built through the valleys and
alongside the ocean on its way to Half Moon
Bay. However, it had failed economically and
its only reminders were a few train stations
and acreage that was still owned by the rail-
road company. A San Francisco real estate
developer, Ray Higgins, had purchased land
in the San Pedro Valley, along with the adobe
built by Francisco Sanchez, from the Edward
Kirkpatrick heirs. The future city of Pacica
was still isolated and looking for an identity,
however.
Andres Oddstad, born in 1919, was a
nephew of Henry and Ellis Stoneson. His
mother was Stephanie Oddstad of San
Francisco. He did carpentry work to nance
college at the University of California. He
received his civil engineering degree from the
university at age 27 and, in 1946, he started
working carpentry jobs in San Francisco.
After marriage, his wife, Clara, bore him two
children, Sandra in 1946, and David in 1955.
He continued constructing houses with nan-
cial loans from his uncles, Henry and Ellis
Stoneson (who developed Stonestown in San
Francisco). He started by building Sterling
Park in Colma. Oddstad then acquired proper-
ty in South San Francisco and built the fol-
lowing additions: Hillside Manor, Sterling
Terrace (1949-51) and Sterling Manor (1950
surrounded by Buri Buri Addition). Many
more houses were built down the Peninsula.
In the 1950s, Oddstad bought the San Pedro
Valley land (Pacica) from Ray Higgins. He
now had a vision of building thousands of
moderately priced houses for the people who
desired to live in future Pacica. The once-
thriving artichoke elds were bulldozed for
construction of roads, shopping centers,
churches, gas stations and schools. The proj-
ect was called the San Pedro-Linda Mar
Sterling home project. He then moved to the
west of Junipero Serra in San Bruno and start-
ed construction on the Rollingwood addition
just west of the Golden Gate Cemetery. In
1955, the valleys along the coast were still
unincorporated and there and there was talk of
incorporation. It was at this time that a move-
ment to annex Linda Mar and other properties
into the city of San Bruno began. When the
citizens of the San Bruno got wind of this
movement, they went berserk. The city of San
Bruno and the unincorporated area of Pacica
were isolated from each other by the Coast
Range that was approximately 600 to 700 feet
high. San Bruno was in the throes of a great
deal of construction and its city government
was having trouble coping with this. To ade-
quately administer the coast communities, the
city had to supply infrastructure such as water
and sewer. At this time, the community of San
Bruno did not want to acquire these
headaches, and the concept of incorporation
of these properties was soundly defeated.
Oddstads next challenge was in Portola
Highlands in San Bruno, west of Skyline
Boulevard. The community that was to
become Portola Highlands had been part of
the Sneath Dairy and it had a steep hill and a
valley where they had to construct around a
creek. The creek was covered over and cul-
Andres Oddstad, house builder
3
Monday July 30, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
BELMONT
Theft. Someone stole multiple packs of beer
from the Safeway supermarket on El Camino
Real before 7:40 p.m. Sunday, July 15.
Driving under the inuence. Someone was
driving recklessly and arrested for driving
under the inuence at Ralston Avenue and
Highway 92 before 7:15 p.m. Sunday, July 15.
Hit and run. Someone reported their car had
been hit by their neighbors car on Old County
Road before 5:36 p.m. Sunday, July 15.
Theft. Items were stolen out of a yard on Villa
Avenue before 11:49 a.m. Sunday, July 15.
Vandalism. Someone broke a sign on Ralston
Avenue before 8:30 a.m. Tuesday, July 24.
FOSTER CITY
Vandalism. A persons vehicle was keyed on
Marquette Lane before 10:12 a.m. on
Wednesday, July 25.
Fireworks. Someone reported hearing re-
works on Pilgrim Drive before 12:30 a.m. on
Tuesday, July 17.
Residential burglary. Someone reported
tools valued at $160 missing from his garage
over the past two months on Eliza Court
before 1:13 p.m. Monday, July 16.
Embezzlement. A former employee turned in
$57,000 worth of fraudulent expense receipts
since 2008 at Electronics for Imaging, Inc. on
Velocity Way before 10:22 a.m. Monday, July
16.
Police reports
My taxi!
Someone was arrested for battery in a
ght between two people in a taxi at
Balboa Avenue and Carmelita Avenue in
Burlingame before 1:54 a.m. Saturday,
July 21.
PHOTO COURTESY OF THE COLMA HISTORY
MUSEUM
1950s ad in Colma newspaper.
See HISTORY, Page 19
4
Monday July 30, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Sports Teams, Clinics, Camps, Classes & Training
Serving Peninsula Youth since 2002
SPORTS CLINICS & CAMPS
Boys & Girls, Ages 1st-8th grade
Each clinic and camp includes
Sport FUNdamentals and athletic training
Basketball
Volleyball
Lacrosse
Soccer
Baseball
Football
Speed & Agility
All Sports Camp
Experienced coaching by those
who know and play the game
Featuring:
Vol l eybal l Coach Jenni f er Agresti
Lacrosse Coach Jen Lee
Free Nike T-Shirt for each participant
Beginning May 29, 2012
Daily sessions Monday through Friday
9am-12pm or 1pm-4pm or 9am-4pm
Extended hours available by reservation
Daily and weekly rates. Ask about our multiple week pricing.
650-654-4444
www.payesplace.com
595 Industrial Road, San Carlos 94070
(Mid-Peninsula at Hwy 101 & Holly Street)
5
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By Heather Murtagh
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Many lessons can be learned from sports
teamwork, condence, responsibility, relying
on others and the payoff of working hard.
Darrin Uecker is denitely a believer in
those kinds of lessons. One of his sons, August,
was going through the traditional Little League
routes. Because of watching his older son take
on the same team challenges, Uecker knew the
next year wouldnt be a t for August, who has
autism.
It took about a year for Uecker to learn Little
League has a Challenger Division for special
needs children. August joined a Foster City
team then returned to his Hillsborough home
league where a Challenger division was creat-
ed.
After two seasons, the undertaking of nding
a supportive environment for his son has blos-
somed into a multi-sport operation inviting
children with a variety of abilities to play
together. Its also been warmly embraced by
Augusts school, San Carlos-based Arbor Bay
School a nonprot non-public state accred-
ited school founded in 2003 that offers an inte-
grated program of academics and occupational
therapy for students with mild to moderate
learning difculties.
Now there are a few sporting options for
local children. Volunteers and new players are
always welcome to join the outings. Ueckers
ultimate goal isnt to boost the local group. It is
to raise awareness of the opportunities for chil-
dren with special needs.
But the idea really started with 11-and-a-
half-year-old August.
Uecker didnt want his son to miss out. Once
on the Foster City team, August really enjoyed
himself. Starting the Hillsborough Rays has
meant reaching out to families with children
with special needs. Its been a learning experi-
ence for all involved. The Challenger Division,
for example, has two-inning games. During
each inning, every child plays, hits and runs the
bases. And, whatever help a child needs to
make that happen is offered. Its that support
which Arbor Bay Principal Susan Rose loves.
Every child is successful where they are,
she said, adding the hope is to wean children
off the additional help when possible.
Uecker didnt anticipate the power of the
uniform. Once all the kids were suited up, he
noted it was magnetizing for them. The kids
dont practice. For two hours on Sunday after-
noons during the spring, they play ball.
Baseball players in other divisions are encour-
aged to join on a specic Saturday to play with
their buddies. Uecker has also been surprised at
the impact on those children who help.
With the success of baseball, the team ven-
tured into soccer this year through AYSO. Its
a bit of a different setup but the same concept.
Children come together, participate in drills to
start then play a short game.
Its organized chaos, Uecker said with a
smile.
Rose wanted to add basketball to the winter
options. Uecker obliged, then wondered if it
was making a difference. Basketball was bit
harder to be inclusive of all children. Often
kids are just running around. Rose assured him,
this is just fun and kids need fun.
Parents and siblings have also gotten into the
act by volunteering, supporting the children on
the eld, or growing a community of support-
ive fans. Its a chance for them to take an hour
to relax and share resources, which can be dif-
cult for any parent.
Regardless of the sport one watches, its not
a traditional game. But children have started to
be more independent and learn the basics
like to stay on the eld.
Rose noted one child who started with the
original baseball team would simply run off the
eld. The childs parent would focus on keep-
ing the little one on the school campus. After
taking part in the other sports, the little one
returned this summer understanding to stay
within the diamond. Its a lesson thats building
to that childs skill set, she explained.
The winners are the ones who have the most
fun, she said, adding these kids are having fun.
Thats what Uecker wants an opportunity
for children to become involved. And, regard-
less of the activity, he said there should be a
uniform. Kids love the uniform.
Those interested in becoming involved by
enrolling a player or volunteering can email
Darrin Uecker at darrin@theueckers.com or
Susan Rose at srose@arborbayschool.org. The
goal is access for all. Donations are accepted
to help cover the cost for those who need nan-
cial assistance.
Special needs children play ball
A weekly look at the people
who shape our community
August Uecker plays Little League for the Hills-
borough Rays.
Riders rescued from
top of roller coaster
A dozen riders were stuck on top
of Six Flags Discovery Kingdoms
Superman Ultimate Flight roller
coaster Sunday afternoon in Vallejo
for about an hour after it stalled near
the top, a re captain said.
The Vallejo Fire Department
responded to help rescue the riders
from the coaster that is 15-stories
tall and travels 62 mph after the
incident was reported at about 2:55
p.m., Capt. Dan Sarna said.
No injuries were reported.
The cause of the stall is being
investigated by the park, Sarna said.
Bicyclist robbed at
gunpoint on bike path
A bicyclist was robbed at gun-
point on a Palo Alto bike path earli-
er this week, police said.
The victim was commuting home
from work via bicycle on the
Embarcadero bike path behind the
Town and Country Village shopping
area around 10:30 p.m. Tuesday
when the armed suspect confronted
him.
The suspect demanded the victim
hand over the contents of his pock-
ets. The victim complied and hand-
ed over a cell phone and a small
amount of cash.
The suspect took the items and
ed northbound on foot. He exited
the bike path at Encina Avenue and
ran toward El Camino Real.
The victim reported the robbery
to police immediately and a search
of the area ensued.
Police were unable to locate the
suspect. He has been described as a
black male in his 20s. He was wear-
ing a black hooded sweatshirt and
blue jeans. He was described as
having an average height and wield-
ed a black handgun during the rob-
bery.
Anyone with information about
this incident is encouraged to con-
tact police at (250) 329-2413.
Anonymous tips can be emailed to
paloalto@tipnow.org or sent via text
message or voicemail to (650) 383-
8984.
Two dead in San Bruno crash
Two people died and several oth-
ers were injured in a multi-vehicle
crash in San Bruno Saturday after-
noon.
Police responded to reports of a
crash near the intersection of Sneath
Lane and El Camino Real at around
12:15 p.m., police said.
A vehicle traveling east on Sneath
Lane apparently struck several vehi-
cles that appeared to be stopped on
eastbound Sneath Lane near the
intersection, police said.
Two people in one of the vehicles
that was struck were pronounced
dead at the scene, according to
police. The dead have have been
identied as Arnulfo Picazo, 39, of
San Bruno, and Usbaldo Picazo
Gomez, 37, of South San Francisco,
according to the San Mateo County
coroners ofce.
Local briefs
6
Monday July 30, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SAN FRANCISCO More
people are taking the remains of
their loved ones and having them
cremated, and having the ashes
turned into other items such as dia-
monds.
The number of cremations in the
U.S. has jumped to 41 percent of all
deaths, up from 30 percent eight
years ago, and up from four percent
in the 1960s.
With that increase comes rising
demand for finding alternatives
for what do with the ashes. The
newspaper reported in its Sunday
edition that some of the more cre-
ative options
were unheard
of just a few
years ago.
In Palo
Alto, a funer-
al home
offers a serv-
ice that
allows family
members to
turn the cre-
m a t e d
remains into a diamond. For
$3,000, the Alta Mesa Funeral
Home will take the remains and,
using the services of Illinois-
based LifeGem, have the ashes
turned into a genuine diamond of
about a quarter carat.
LifeGem will, according to its
website, produce a high-quality
diamond that can serve as a
memorial to their unique life.
Some people say, Oh no, I
would never do that! And others
say, I absolutely want that, Alta
Mesa co-owner Don van Straaten
said. Its a very special way of
remembrance.
Some grieving loved ones are
also turning to Eternal Reefs, a
Georgia-based company that
offers to create permanent living
legacies by taking cremated
remains and placing them in arti-
ficial reefs. The so-called cre-
mains are placed in a cement
mixture, designed to create artifi-
cial reef formations.
The memorial reefs are then
placed in a permitted ocean loca-
tion selected by the individual,
friend or family member, accord-
ing to the companys website.
Other options for cremated
remains include using the services
of Celestis, Inc., which through its
afliate company of Space Services,
Inc., will launch the remains into
space, or, for $10,000, send the
ashes onto the moons surface.
Theres also Eternity Message,
which offers a service where the
someday-to-be-departed can send
mourners emails up to 60 years after
death.
The changes in the $12 billion
funeral industry are attributable to a
number of factors, said Ron Hast,
the publisher of Mortuary
Magazine, a trade publication for
the funeral service industry.
People are increasingly looking
for simple methods of honoring the
departed, not more elaborate ones,
said Hast. The big funerals in big
churches, we just dont see them as
much as we used to. And because
cremations are so common now,
that has led to fewer people needing
graves.
Companies get creative with cremains
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
ANAHEIM More than 300
demonstrators rallied Sunday to
denounce two fatal police shootings
and to issue a call for community
peace.
Some 200 vocal protesters rallied
in front of police headquarters while
a separate group of about 100 peo-
ple marched along a two-mile
stretch of a main thoroughfare, The
Orange County Register reported.
The vocal group started marching
toward Disneyland, but a police line
had formed to stop the group.
Whats going on here in Orange
County is symbolic of a problem with
the system, Eduardo Perez, a 21-
year-old student, told the Register.
This wouldnt happen to white peo-
ple. This is racism, simple as that.
The other marchers dressed in
white and remained silent as part of
their call for peace. City
Councilwoman Kris Murray and
state Sen. Lou Correa, a Democrat
who represents Anaheim, were
among the marchers.
The demonstrations occurred just
hours before a scheduled evening
memorial service for Manuel Diaz,
a 25-year-old man who was shot
dead July 21. Police said Diaz, who
had a criminal record, failed to heed
orders and threw something as he
ed police. He was unarmed.
The following night, police shot
to death Joel Acevedo, a suspected
gang member they say red at of-
cers after a pursuit.
The shootings ignited four days of
violent protests, culminating Tuesday
night in hundreds of demonstrators
surging through downtown. Police
said some in the crowd smashed the
windows of 20 businesses, set trash
can res, threw rocks and bottles at
police and damaged City Hall and
police headquarters. Two dozen peo-
ple were arrested.
Hundreds march against police violence
Suspect killed in gunre
with police in Ventura
SANTA PAULA A 25-year-old
Ventura County man has been shot
dead by police ofcers in a gunre
exchange that also wounded an ofcer.
It was reported that 25-year-old
Edgar Garcia was shot Saturday
shortly after 8 p.m. in the backyard
of his Santa Paula home.
Police were called to the house to
investigate reports of a man display-
ing a handgun. They were met with
gunre when they arrived.
Garcia was shot in the upper
torso. An ofcer was injured, but the
wound was not life-threatening.
Amber Alert issued for
Monterey County girl
SAN ARDO Authorities have
issued an Amber Alert for a missing
16-year-old girl after two men were
found dead in a Monterey County
home. Investigators say 16-year-old
Eunice Serrato disappeared after the
bodies of the two men were discov-
ered in a home in San Ardo around
10 p.m. Saturday.
Monterey County authorities have
identied two men theyre terming
persons of interest in the case.
Sheriffs Sgt. Dave Murray says
besides the girl, authorities are also
looking for 19-year-old Juan
Manuel Salazar Jr. and his father,
39-year-old Juan Manuel Salazar Sr.
State briefs
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THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON Democrats
have their thumbs on Republican
scales in Senate primaries in
Missouri and Wisconsin this sum-
mer, hoping to improve their own
chances of maintaining a majority
in November.
The idea isnt quite as far-fetched
as it might sound.
Two years ago, Senate Majority
Leader Harry Reids allies invested
heavily in an effort to help Sharron
Angle win a contested GOP pri-
mary in Nevada after deciding she
would be the easiest Republican to
defeat in the fall. She won the nom-
ination, but ultimately lost to Reid.
Now Democratic Sen. Claire
McCaskill of Missouri is running a
series of television advertisements
that strategists in both parties say
indicates a preference for Rep.
Todd Akin over primary rivals John
Brunner and Sarah Steelman.
At the same time, Majority PAC,
a group with ties to Reid, has run
television commercials selectively
attacking Republican contenders in
Missouri and Wisconsin, where pri-
maries are set for next month.
At rst glance, each of the three
ads run by McCaskills campaign
appears to be an attack, one at each
of her potential rivals.
Yet one calls Akin too conserva-
tive to be a senator and says he
once referred to President Barack
Obama as a complete menace to
our civilization characteristics
that seem more likely to appeal to
Republican primary voters than to
repulse them.
In a brief interview in the
Capitol, McCaskill said she decid-
ed to advertise before the primary
because she has been attacked
heavily by Republican outside
groups and didnt want to wait any
longer before telling voters how
extremist, how awed the GOP
eld is.
She sidestepped when asked if
she has a preferred opponent, say-
ing they were three of a kind, one
and the same.
Republicans as well as some
Democrats said the ad relating to
Akin was running more often than
the others, and one GOP ofcial,
citing detailed advertising informa-
tion, said it was shown about ve
times for each airing of the others.
McCaskills campaign declined
to discuss the issue, except to say
that all ads are airing statewide.
Democrats now hold a 53-47
majority in the Senate, including
the support of two independents.
Republicans must gain four seats
this fall to be assured of winning
control, although a pickup of three
would be sufcient if Republican
presidential candidate Mitt Romney
defeats Obama.
Beginning with a Republican
runoff Tuesday in Texas, there are
Senate primaries in 15 states
through mid-September.
Most of the contested races
involve Republicans, although
Democrats have a competitive pri-
mary in Hawaii on Aug. 11 between
Rep. Mazie Hirono and former
Rep. Ed Case. The campaign is
notable for the cross-party endorse-
ment Hirono recently received from
Republican Rep. Don Young of
Alaska, a rarity in a hyperpartisan
political environment.
Former Gov. Linda Lingle is the
Republican in the race.
Missouri and Wisconsin gure to
be among the most competitive
Senate races this fall, and
Republicans have unpredictable
multi-candidate primaries in both.
McCaskill has trailed in many pub-
lic polls and has been hit with more
than $8 million in attack ads so far
by the U.S. Chamber of Commerce
and other Republican-aligned
groups.
In Wisconsin, surveys suggest
Democratic Rep. Tammy Baldwin
faces a difcult campaign to win
the seat long held by retiring
Democratic Sen. Herb Kohl. She,
too, has been under attack.
It is fairly common for a candi-
date of one party to criticize the
challenger of another before pri-
maries are held in which there is no
doubt about the outcome. But it is
relatively rare in other cases, and
even rarer that the strategy suc-
ceeds.
Two years ago, Reids allies
attacked then-front-runner Sue
Lowden in the Nevada Republican
primary in an attempt to prevent her
from advancing to the general elec-
tion. Im hoping that people see
through it, she said not long before
she lost to Angle.
GOP, Dems have sights on Senate control
By Jesse Washington
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
PHILADELPHIA Ask
Americans how race relations have
changed under their rst black pres-
ident and they are ready with
answers.
Ashley Ray, a white woman,
hears more people debating racial
issues. I know a lot of people who
really thought we were OK as a
nation, a culture, and now they
understand that were not, she says.
Karl Douglass, a black man, sees
stereotypes easing. White people
deal with me and my family differ-
ently, he says.
Jose Lozano, who is Hispanic by
way of Puerto Rico, believes preju-
dice is emerging from the shadows.
Now the racism is coming out, he
says.
In the after-
glow of Barack
Obamas his-
toric victory,
most people in
the United
States believed
that race rela-
tions would
improve. Nearly
four years later,
has that dream come true?
Americans have no shortage of
thoughtful opinions, and no consen-
sus.
As the nation moves toward the
multiracial future heralded by this
son of an African father and white
mother, the events of Obamas rst
term, and what people make of
them, help trace the racial arc of his
presidency.
Shortly before the 2008 election,
56 percent of Americans surveyed
by the Gallup organization said that
race relations would improve if
Obama were elected. One day after
his victory, 70 percent said race
relations would improve and only
10 percent predicted they would get
worse.
Just weeks after taking office,
Obama said, There was justiable
pride on the part of the country that
we had taken a step to move us
beyond some of the searing legacies
of racial discrimination.
By July 2009, the black Harvard
professor Henry Louis Gates was
arrested for yelling at a white police
officer who questioned whether
Gates had broken into his own
home. Asked to comment, Obama
said he didnt know all the facts, but
Gates was a personal friend and the
ofcer had acted stupidly.
In Obama era, have race relations improved?
Rev. Jesse Jackson: No
timetable on sons recovery
CHICAGO The Rev. Jesse
Jackson said there is no timetable
as his son, U.S. Rep. Jesse Jackson
Jr., recovers from depression and
gastrointestinal issues at the Mayo
Clinic in Minnesota.
The elder Jackson spoke to
reporters Saturday outside a down-
town Chicago movie theater. The
civil rights leader was with protest-
ers in support of a ban on assault
weapons.
House Ways and Means
chairman ghting cancer
WASHINGTON The chair-
man of the Houses tax-writing
committee says hes been diagnosed
with a very early, highly treatable
and curable type of cancer.
GOP Rep. Dave Camp of
Michigan says in a statement that
doctors found non-Hodgkin lym-
phoma during a recent physical.
Camp says hell continue in
Congress and retain his committee
chairmanship during chemotherapy.
Non-Hodgkin lymphoma is a can-
cer that begins in the cells of the
immune system. The 59-year-old
Camp says he has large B-cell lym-
phoma. B-cells are a type of white
blood cell that helps ght infections.
Man who lost hand
charged with feeding gator
EVERGLADES CITY, Fla. A
Florida airboat captain whose hand
was bitten off by a 9-foot alligator
faces charges of feeding of the animal.
Collier County Jail records show
63-year-old Wallace Weatherholt
was charged Friday with unlawful
feeding of an alligator and later
posted $1,000 bond.
Nation briefs
Barack Obama
WORLD 8
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By Paul Schemm
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
BEIRUT Syrian tanks and
artillery pounded rebel-held neigh-
borhoods in the commercial hub of
Aleppo on Sunday in a bid to retake
control as President Bashar Assads
regime accused regional powerhous-
es Saudi Arabia, Qatar and Turkey
of trying to destroy the country.
Activists say opposition ghters
control large swathes of territory
across Syrias largest city. The gov-
ernment has been struggling for a
week to beat back their assault and
stem the tide of recent rebel
advances in the civil war.
The head of the main opposition
group, the Syrian National Council,
called for international help in arm-
ing the rebels to face the regimes
heavy weaponry, particularly tanks.
If the international community
cannot act, they should support the
opposition with anti-tanks missiles
and anti-aircraft rockets, Abdel
Basset Sida told the Gulf News dur-
ing a stopover in Abu Dhabi. We
seek international supporters to arm
our uprising against the regime.
Saudi Arabia and Qatar have
expressed willingness to help fund
the rebels and they are believed to be
funneling money through Turkey to
the opposition, which is using it to
purchase arms and equipment.
Syrian Foreign Minister Walid al-
Moallem railed against interference by
the regions Sunni powers in a rare pub-
lic criticism of his Middle East neigh-
bors. He accused them of supporting
the rebels at the behest of Israel.
Israel is the mastermind of all in
this crisis, he said during a joint
news conference in Tehran with his
Iranian counterpart Ali Akbar Salehi
. They (Qatar, Saudi Arabia and
Turkey) are ghting in the same
front.
Syrias Sunni majority forms the
backbone of the uprising while the
regime is dominated by Assads
minority Alawite sect, an offshoot of
Shiite Islam. Iran is Syrias only
remaining ally in the Middle East,
standing by Damascus throughout
the 17-month uprising. Amid fears of
a massacre or a bloody nal battle in
Aleppo, civilians have been eeing
the city in ever greater numbers.
Life in Aleppo has become
unbearable. Im in my car and Im
leaving right now, said a Syrian
writer as he got ready to drive away.
Theres shelling night and day,
every day, he said over the tele-
phone on condition of anonymity for
fear of reprisals.
Syria pounds rebel neighborhoods
REUTERS
A Free Syrian Army member aims his weapon after hearing shelling at
Aleppos district of al Sukkari Sunday.
By Kasie Hunt
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
JERUSALEM Standing on Israeli soil,
U.S. presidential candidate Mitt Romney on
Sunday declared Jerusalem to be the capital of
the Jewish state and said the United States has
a solemn duty and a moral imperative to
block Iran from achieving nuclear weapons
capability.
Make no mistake, the ayatollahs in Iran are
testing our moral defenses. They want to
know who will object and who will look the
other way, he said. We will not look away
nor will our country ever look away from our
passion and commitment to Israel.
The presidential election hovered over the
speech. The Old City formed a made-for-televi-
sion backdrop behind Romney, while some of
his campaign donors listened in the audience.
Romneys declaration that Jerusalem is
Israels capital was matter-of-fact and in keep-
ing with claims made by Israeli governments
for decades, even though the United States, like
other nations, maintains its embassy in Tel Aviv.
He did not say if he would order the embassy
moved if he wins the White House, but strong-
ly suggested so in a CNN interview.
My understanding is the policy of our nation
has been a desire to move our embassy ulti-
mately to the capital (Jerusalem), he said,
adding, I would only want
to do so and to select the
timing in accordance with
the government of Israel.
His remarks on the sub-
ject during his speech drew
a standing ovation from his
audience, which included
Sheldon Adelson, the
American businessman
who has said he will donate
millions to help elect Romney to the White
House.
Romneys embrace of Israel was on display
throughout the day when he met with Prime
Minister Benyamin Netanyahu and other lead-
ers. He also visited the Western Wall, Judaisms
holiest site, where he was mobbed by worship-
pers. In addition, Romney met with Palestinian
Prime Minister Salam Fayyad.
In his remarks, Romney steered clear of overt
criticism of President Barack Obama, even
though he said the threat of a nuclear-armed
Iran has only become worse in the past ve
years.
In an unspoken rebuttal to Obama and other
critics, Romney said, It is sometimes said that
those who are the most committed to stopping
the Iranian regime from security nuclear
weapons are reckless and provocative and invit-
ing war.
In Israel, Romney declares
Jerusalem to be the capital THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
TEHRAN, Iran Irans new message to
parents: Get busy and have babies.
In a major reversal of once far-reaching fam-
ily planning policies, authorities are now slash-
ing its birth-control programs in an attempt to
avoid an aging demographic similar to many
Western countries that are struggling to keep up
with state medical and social security costs.
The changes announced in Iranian media
last week came after Supreme Leader
Ayatollah Ali Khamenei described the coun-
trys wide-ranging contraceptive services as
wrong. The independent Shargh newspaper
quoted Mohammad Esmail Motlaq, a Health
Ministry ofcial, as saying family planning
programs have been cut from the budget for the
current Iranian year, which began in March.
Its still unclear, however, whether the high-
level appeals for bigger families will translate
into a new population spike. Irans economy is
stumbling under a combination of international
sanctions, ination and double-digit unemploy-
ment. Many young people, particularly in
Tehran and other large cities, are postponing
marriage or keeping their families small
because of the uncertainties.
Ali Reza Khamesian, a columnist whose
work appears in several pro-reform newspa-
pers, said the change in policy also may be an
attempt to send a message to the world that Iran
is not suffering from sanctions imposed over
the nuclear program that the West suspects is
aimed at producing weapons something
Tehran denies.
Iran urges baby boom
Mitt Romney
OPINION 9
Monday July 30, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Bigger mess
Editor,
Having read a recent column by Paul
Krugman, a columnist for the New
York Times, about manufactured goods
sold within the United States, he never
took this calamitous practice to the next
step.
Krugman wrote that 86 percent of
goods manufactured in the United
States are sold in the United States,
while 14 percent are exported. That g-
ure is damning enough but take it one
step further. The jobs big businesses
have outsourced for the good of their
stockholders have another devastating
effect on our economy. The tens of bil-
lions of dollars that big businesses pay
to other countries in the form of wages
stay in those countries and are used to
purchase products manufactured in
those countries; less than 14 percent of
that money may trickle back to the
United States. So not only are we los-
ing jobs to greed, we are losing GNP to
big businesses greed. Then, they have
the nerve to keep their money in off-
shore accounts waiting for a sweetheart
tax deal from the government just like
the 29 percent tax break they got from
the Bush/Cheney administration.
Big businesses continue to use all our
infrastructure for their personal greed
but do everything they can to avoid
paying their fare share to maintain it.
Thats what we 99 percenters are for.
Mike Turturici
San Carlos
Failed repeal of Obamacare
Editor,
Republican House representatives
again, for the 33rd time, unsuccessfully
tried to repeal the Patient Protection
and Affordable Care Act (otherwise
known as Obamacare) knowing full
well that it wont pass the Senate and
that President Obama would veto any
part reaching his desk anyway. Nothing
else to do, like creating a better job
environment?
Republican House Speaker John
Boehner keeps chanting where are the
jobs? and that the American people
do not want Obamacare! despite the
vast majority being in favor of
improved health care coverage for more
people.
Who is Boehner talking about when he
refers to the American people? Since
even most Republicans have now turned
around and realized that Obamacare will
benet the nation, the only American
people Boehner refers to must be the
health insurance industry, riding prof-
itably on people need for health care
without contributing anything but addi-
tional cost. Why is he so protective of
this group at the expense of the rest of
the people he is supposed to represent?
Couldnt be a hefty bribe, could it?
Jorg Aadahl
San Mateo
Letters to the editor
Ottawa Citizen
T
he drought hitting parts of
North America illustrates why
its never a good idea for any
region to become dependent on a hun-
dred-mile diet or protectionist trade
policy.
The hot, dry weather is affecting
about 61 per cent of the contiguous
United States, which means staple
crops such as corn and soybeans are
suffering. Here in Canada, many farm-
ers are also worrying over their elds,
but the damage so far isnt as wide-
spread.
Indeed, some Canadian farms and
related industries, such as potash are
likely to benet from the U.S. drought,
as it creates higher world demand and
higher prices. The prices will trickle up
through the food chain, so the world
prices for meat and dairy will likely
rise, too.
Nobody likes to pay higher prices at
the grocery store, but the scenario
would be much worse if there were no
trade if a hundred-mile diet were
enforced on everyone. If consumers in
the U.S. had no access to imported
food, a drought there would be even
more disastrous, and the costs of food
there would go even higher while
having no effect on food prices here in
Canada, and thus creating no reward for
our farmers or incentive for them to
grow more food.
This is why trade works. It helps con-
sumers in one country access products
they otherwise couldnt access at all, or
at least not without paying exorbitant
prices.
From a food-security perspective,
policies that aim to protect local
farmers from international competition
are a double-edged sword. Isolation
makes regions vulnerable to drought,
ood and disease. There is no protec-
tionism strong enough to protect
against nature. Well-designed risk man-
agement programs can and should
reduce the damage for farmers, but con-
sumers need some consideration too.
The global food system is more
resilient when it has more sources of
supply, and more avenues of trade.
Food security
More questions
about special
districts
S
ome special districts have been making headlines
recently. Mosquito Abatement and Vector Control
was in trouble, not because of its work in the eld,
but because of poor management at home. The general man-
ager failed to vet and oversee the new nance director who
allegedly embezzled $450,000 under his nose and the noses
of 21 board members. The district has survived a call for dis-
solution but questions persist over the management skills of
the director and the board who extended the general manag-
ers contract even after they learned of the embezzlement.
Each of the 21 members receives $100 for attending a meet-
ing so each meeting costs
well over $2,000. As the
Local Agency Formation
Commission (LAFCo)
report explained in recom-
mending dissolution, Given
the large size of the board
and the legislative require-
ment that trustees be
appointed by city councils
and not directly elected by
voters, the districts visibili-
ty and responsiveness to the
public is constrained.
Meanwhile, one of the
countys two health care dis-
tricts, Peninsula, was amassing reserves of over $43 million
and turning down the countys request for $4 million to help
with indigent care. This is one of several cases which
prompted an California Assembly committee to investigate
health care districts. At Sequoia, we have just learned of a
conict of interest of two of its board members. One voted
to approve a grant to a nonprot where his wife worked,
while another held stock in two banks with district ties.
No one is questioning the work of mosquito abatement.
Just faulty management. In the case of the health care dis-
tricts, the concern is whether they have outlived their pur-
pose. They were originally established to create hospitals.
The hospitals were built and are no longer the responsibility
of the districts. Still the districts continue to collect a tax to
promote community health which they do by giving grants
to various charities and the countys health system. They act
as philanthropic agencies but should they be using our tax
dollars to do so?
***
What are special districts? Why do we have them? What
do they do? Who pays for them? How do they serve the tax-
payers? And why dont we know more about them? Some of
the answers are on the San Mateo County LAFCo website
and the League of Women Voters online guide on special
districts. You will discover the numerous districts in the
county. Space limits listing them all. They include re,
water, recreation, sanitary; a harbor district, two health care
districts and the mosquito abatement and vector control dis-
trict.
Special districts are units of local government created by
residents of an area to provide a service not provided by the
county or city. LAFCos were created by the state to regulate
boundaries of cities and special districts and to monitor and
evaluate the performance of special districts. Our LAFCo
oversees 23 special districts.
Both mosquito abatement and the two health care districts
are independent special districts. Each has its own source of
revenue and own governing board. They are funded by prop-
erty tax owners in their spheres of inuence. Because these
districts levied a tax before Proposition 13, they get a share
of the 1 percent property tax. For mosquito abatement, that
originally included south county to Millbrae. Then after rev-
enue reductions after Proposition 13, the district successfully
levied a $3.74 parcel tax in the original boundaries. In 2003,
in response to West Nile virus, the district annexed the rest
of the county. The new area pays a benet assessment to
approximate the per parcel revenue paid elsewhere. The hos-
pital districts, in addition to property taxes, receive revenue,
some quite substantial, from other sources. The two health
care districts have elected boards whereas each city and the
county appoint a representative to mosquito abatement.
***
Its difcult to make changes to these special districts, but
it can be done. In the case of the health care districts, they
no longer serve a purpose for which they were created. They
need to be dissolved . The taxes they collect should be trans-
ferred to the county to help pay for indigent care. As for
mosquito abatement, its work needs to continue. Joining the
county was the best nancial answer for the taxpayers and
could have resulted in a consolidation of services. If that is
not going to happen, there needs to be a smaller board and
more responsible management.
Sue Lempert is the former mayor of San Mateo. Her column
runs every Monday. She can be reached at sue@smdailyjour-
nal.com.
Other voices
Fort Worth (Texas) Star-Telegram
T
heres compelling evidence
from credible sources that
voter rolls around the country
are generally littered with bad informa-
tion.
Its wrong to jump from there to the
conclusion that voting fraud is rampant.
But in a tensely competitive presiden-
tial election year, protecting the integri-
ty of elections and protecting voting
rights seem to have become competing
interests.
Its a false conict with destructive
consequences.
The latest episode involves whether
states can use a federal database,
known as SAVE (Systematic Alien
Verication for Entitlements Program),
to help determine whether noncitizens
are erroneously registered as voters.
SAVE allows government agencies to
verify whether legal immigrants qualify
for benets and licenses. Those listed in
the database have typically been
assigned an identifying number, such as
through a visa or green card. The sys-
tem isnt designed to track whether ille-
gal immigrants are improperly listed on
voter rolls maintained at the state level
...
Now that the Homeland Security
Department has agreed, after months of
sparring, to give Florida access to
SAVE, other states are asking for it,
too, to help purge wrongly registered
noncitizens. ...
Its unclear whether any changes
could be made based on SAVE before
November balloting. ...
Republicans act as though this tool is
critical; Democrats argue that
Republicans risk disenfranchising large
numbers of minority voters.
The reality is that election ofcials,
academics and technology specialists
have argued for years that our state-
based voter registration system is cost-
ly, inefcient and desperate for modern-
ization.
Voter rolls
Other voices
Follow us on Twitter and Facebook:
facebook.com/smdailyjournal
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BUSINESS 10
Monday July 30, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
By Joshua Freed
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Nobody in Corporate America wants
to go back to 2009, but by one measure
companies are there right now.
Based on the 291 companies in the
Standard & Poors 500 that have report-
ed earnings so far along with esti-
mates for the rest S&P Capital IQ
expects overall prots to decline by half
a percent from the same period a year
ago. That would be the rst time that
prots have shrunk since the third quar-
ter of 2009, just after the Great
Recession. Analysts are predicting that
earnings will shrink 0.3 percent for the
third quarter, too.
Revenue for those 291 companies has
increased just 2.3 percent, compared
with a 10-year average of 7.1 percent,
according to S&P Capital IQ.
Worse, companies are getting more
pessimistic about the rest of the year.
Companies that should benet from a
recovery are instead getting ready for a
slowdown. UPS, the worlds largest
package delivery company, said it
expects the global economy to get worse
before it gets better. It lowered its prot
forecast for 2012. Cisco Systems said it
will lay off 1,300 people and warned that
revenue for the current quarter will grow
much less than expected. Chemical
maker DuPont said this years prots
will be at the low end of its expectations
because of uncertainty about the eco-
nomic outlook.
The last recession ended in June 2009,
but the U.S. economy remains unusually
sluggish this far into the recovery. It
grew at an annual rate of just 1.5 percent
from April through June.
Unemployment remains above 8 per-
cent.
The economy is bordering on stall
speed, said Kurt Reiman, a strategist at
UBS.
To be sure, some companies are
reporting profit growth. Caterpillars
quarterly prot jumped 67 percent, and
the maker of big construction equipment
boosted its outlook for the year. Boeing
reported a better-than-expected 3 per-
cent increase in prots as it delivers
more planes.
But outlooks overall are very cautious.
In a survey by data provider FactSet, 47
out of 60 companies lowered the earn-
ings guidance they gave investors for the
third quarter. And investors often trade
more on outlooks than on the last quar-
ters results.
Shares of online game-maker Zynga
plummeted nearly 40 percent on
Thursday after it slashed its prot guid-
ance for the year to between 4 cents and
9 cents per share, from 23 cents to 29
cents previously. UPS lost 5 percent of
its value the day after cutting its full-
year earnings forecast by 25 cents per
share, to a range of $4.50 to $4.70. Its
stock regained some of that loss later in
the week.
Starbucks shares plummeted 9.4 per-
cent on Friday after it cut its outlook for
the current quarter and said it is still
struggling in Europe.
Indeed, Europes problems are caus-
ing slowdowns for others. U.S. airlines
are cutting ying to Europe this fall.
Chinas growth is slowing, in part
because its hard to sustain the torrid
pace of the past few years, and in part
because of less spending from Europe.
Dow Chemical has a good window
into the worlds economies because its
materials are used in televisions, paint
and agricultural products. CEO Andrew
N. Liveris, for example, has visited
China four times in the last four months.
Every single visit, to customers and
to governments, they were seeing a
decline and the decline was the domino
effect of Europe, he said on Dows
earnings conference call on Thursday.
Earnings expected to shrink
By Paul Elias
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SAN FRANCISCO Two tech titans
will square off in federal court Monday
in a closely watched trial over control of
the U.S. smart phone and computer
tablet markets.
Apple Inc. filed a lawsuit against
Samsung Electronics Co. last year alleg-
ing the worlds largest technology com-
panys smartphones and computer
tablets are illegal knockoffs of its popu-
lar iPhone and iPad products. The
Cupertino-based company is demanding
$2.5 billion in damages, an award that
would dwarf the largest patent-related
verdict to date.
Samsung counters that Apple is doing
the stealing and that some of the tech-
nology at issue such as the rounded
rectangular designs of smart phones and
tablets has been industry standards
for years.
The U.S. trial is just the latest skir-
mish between the two over product
designs. A similar trial began last week,
and the two companies have been ght-
ing in courts in the United Kingdom and
Germany.
The case is one of some 50 lawsuits
among myriad telecommunications
companies jockeying for position in the
burgeoning $219 billion market for
smartphones and computer tablets.
In the United States, U.S. District
Judge Lucy Koh in San Jose last month
ordered Samsung to pull its Galaxy 10.1
computer tablet from the U.S. market
pending the outcome of the trial, though
the judge barred Apple attorneys from
telling the jurors about the ban.
Thats a pretty strong statement from
the judge and shows you what she thinks
about some of Apples claims, said
Bryan Love, a Santa Clara University
law professor and patent expert. Love
said that even though the case will be
decided by 10 jurors, the judge has the
authority to overrule their decision if she
thinks they got it wrong.
Apple, Samsung start iBattle
Union Bank, N.A. announced the opening of a new branch in
Burlingame, located at 1410 Howard Ave. This is the second
Union Bank branch in Burlingame. The full-service banking
ofce is overseen by vice president and branch manager Roberto
Pineda, who is responsible for cultivating an overall customer
base, developing new relationships with consumers and small
businesses in Burlingames community, and leading the team of
locally based bankers with many years of service in the industry.
***
Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage recently
announced that 12 agents from its Peninsula ofces ranked
among the top 1,000 Realtors in the United States for home
sales last year in a new report by The Wall Street Journal and
REAL Trends, a national communications and real estate con-
sulting company.
The annual ranking listed the top 250 agents and teams in
four separate categories: individual sales volume, individual
transaction sides, team sales volume and team transaction sides.
Of the top 250 sales professionals by transaction volume,
Keri Nicholas (Menlo Park-Santa Cruz) ranked 25th, Hugh
Cornish (Menlo Park-El Camino) ranked 41st, Tom LeMieux
(Menlo Park-Santa Cruz) ranked 52nd, Erika Demma
(Woodside) ranked 103rd, Hanna Shacham (Menlo Park-El
Camino) ranked 134th, Jim Arbeed (Burlingame) ranked
149th, Zach Trailer (Palo Alto Downtown) ranked 182nd,
David Young (Redwood City-San Carlos) ranked 231st, Mike
Amaroli (Burlingame North) ranked 236th, and Scott Dancer
(Woodside) ranked 239th. Of the top 250 teams by transaction
volume, Susie Dews (Palo Alto Downtown) ranked 64th, and
The Patty Dwyer Group (Burlingame North) ranked 229th.
***
For the fth consecutive year, Numis International was
selected for the 2012 Best of Millbrae Award in the Coin
Dealers category by the U.S. Commerce Association.
The USCA Best of Local Business Award Program recog-
nizes outstanding local businesses throughout the country.
***
Patelco Credit Union, a full-service nancial institution with
40 branches throughout Northern California, recently opened its
newest branch in San Bruno Monday, July 9. It is located at
1050 Admiral Court, across from The Shops at Tanforan.
On the move
<< Rhode wins medal in fth-straight Olympics, page 16
As fall to Orioles 6-1 in Baltimore, page 12
Monday, July 30, 2012
FOOTBALL: NINERS EXCITED ABOUT NEW OFFENSIVE WEAPONS; NEW RAIDERS COACH READY FOR FIRST CAMP >>> PAGE 15
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT
As the 2012 season approaches,
the Menlo College football team is
adding depth to their roster.
The Oaks unveils its second wave
of signees of over the weekend,
welcoming 12 new players to the
football team.
This is a group we have very
high hopes for, said head coach
Marc Speckman via press release.
Potentially, they have a chance at
making an immediate impact and
we as coaches are very excited
about the talent this group has.
Diversity and depth is a key factor
in the Oaks new group of 12. The
newest wave of players features
seven offensive players and five
defensive talents.
From an offensive standpoint the
Oaks welcome in three forces to
their offensive line. Bryce
Howard, Moosa McClean and
Brandon Rauth show promise after
enjoying remarkable success at the
high school level.
A four-year varsity starter at St.
Genevieve High School in
Panorama, Calif., McClean was a
two-time 1st Team All-League
recipient. Rauth boasts similar
accolades while suiting up for Mark
Morris High School in Longview,
Wash. The 6-2, 250-pound tackle
was a two-time Greater St. Helens
League 1st teamer. Howard is a
native of Los Banos, Calif. and was
highly touted coming out of high
school with his imposing 6-5, 265-
pound frame.
Other offensive potential lies in
Mykel Block, Ray Burney and
Dominic Mercurio as all three fea-
ture blazing speed at crucial skill
positions.
Block, a wide receiver and kick
returner is the younger brother of
former Oak Keoni Block, who
transfers into his Menlo tenure from
College of San Mateo. Burney
comes over from Jefferson High
School in Portland, Ore., while
Mercurio brings a star-studded
resume after playing running back
at Corona Del Sol High School in
Tempe, Ariz.
Mercurio was a 2011 All-State
Honorable Mention, a 2nd Team
All-Region running back and the
MVP of his 2011 Varsity team. The
impressive achievements earned
Menlo College adds new wave of signees to roster
See MENLO, Page 14
Giants
swept
at AT&T
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SAN FRANCISCO Ryan Vogelsong
thinks his teammates will get a little angry
not shell shocked from getting swept by
the Los Angeles Dodgers.
We cant afford to think too much about
this one, Vogelsong said after the San
Francisco Giants lost 4-0 to the Dodgers on
Sunday and fell into a virtual rst-place tie in
the NL West. If anything, it makes us a little
mad and we can take it out on the Mets, the
next team coming in.
Clayton Kershaw pitched a ve-hitter for
his second shutout of the season, continuing
his dominance over the Giants, who he has
beaten seven times, including ve in San
Francisco.
Thats what happens when you face one of
the best pitchers in the game right now,
Vogelsong said. One mistake, one run, can
cost you the game.
The Dodgers (56-47) closed within one per-
centage point of the Giants (55-46) after
returning the favor from being blanked in a
three-game series at San Francisco from June
25-27. Los Angeles outscored the Giants 19-3
in this series and didnt give up a run during
the nal 20 innings.
San Francisco, which has lost four straight,
didnt get a runner past second and managed
only three hits in the nal seven innings. The
Giants were swept at home by the Dodgers for
the rst time since June 28-30, 2010.
I dont care who you are, sometimes you
are just going to get it handed to you, Giants
manager Bruce Bochy said. The important
thing is how we handle it. Were still in a great
situation.
Kershaw (8-6) struck out seven and walked
By Michael Marot
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
ANDERSON, Ind. Andrew
Luck drew praise from his new
coach, his new team owner and the
usually reserved Tony Dungy after
his rst full-speed workout.
The Indianapolis Colts new fran-
chise quarterback completed 27 of
32 attempts Sunday, and made it
looking easy, too.
I think thats
what impressed
me the most, to
see the decision-
making and the
lack of any inde-
cisiveness, said
Dungy, the for-
mer Colts coach.
He looked like
a third or fourth-
year guy in this rst practice. Ive
seen him play twice, Oregon against
Stanford, and so I saw it from that
perspective and you feel like, Well
hes been running this offense that
hes been comfortable with. But to
see it here, and knowing that hes
had a condensed offseason program
too because of the schools set up
there, it was very impressive.
Nobody expected Luck to be per-
fect on Day 1. He wasnt.
The former Stanford star, drafted
rst overall, threw two intercep-
tions, one off a tipped ball. He also
overthrew a wide open Donnie
Avery, who got behind two defend-
ers and was sprinting down the side-
line.
Given the circumstances, it was
still a solid debut. Luck looked
relaxed and precise throughout the
two-plus hour workout and showed
no sign of being behind after miss-
ing so many mini-camp workouts.
NFL rules do not permit rookies to
practice at the team complex, except
for a three-day rookie mini-camp,
until the schools semester ends. It
kept Luck away from Indy until
early June.
But Luck performed like he had-
nt missed a thing. At times, he
zinged balls over the outstretched
ngertips of defenders and drew
Colts Luck eases into camp with light workout
See GIANTS, Page 14
Andrew Luck
See LUCK, Page 14
Phelps
tastes
silver
By Paul Newberry
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
LONDON Ryan Lochte
grabbed at the edge of the pool, head
down, staring at the water. Michael
Phelps glared at the scoreboard, try-
ing to digest the rst silver medal of
his Olympic career.
Right beside them, the French cel-
ebrated.
It was just like 2008 but with the
roles reversed.
This time, it was France chasing
down the United States and
Lochte, no less to win another
riveting relay at the Olympics.
We got our revenge, French
swimmer Clement Lefert said.
With Phelps looking much
stronger than he did the night
before, the Americans built a com-
manding lead over the rst three legs
of the 4x100-meter freestyle relay
Sunday and never really had to
REUTERS
Michael Phelps makes a turn during the mens 400m individual medley nal at the London 2012
Olympic Games at the Aquatics Centre Sunday.
See SWIM, Page 14
French get revenge
for 2008 relay loss
to United States
12
Monday July 30, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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By David Ginsburg
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
BALTIMORE A marvelous
July for Oakland was interrupted by
a rookie pitcher who appears to be
at his best against the Athletics.
Wei-Yin Chen struck out a career-
high 12, Matt Wieters hit a three-run
homer, and the Baltimore Orioles
averted a three-game sweep with a
6-1 victory Sunday.
It was a rare setback for the As,
who fell to 18-4 this month and 12-
3 since the All-Star break. The
Athletics need to win one of their
next two games to complete the best
July in franchise history.
Chen (9-6) allowed one unearned
run, three hits and four walks in 5 2-
3 innings against a torrid Oakland
team that had scored 40 runs in its
previous four games. In two games
this season against the As, Chen is
2-0 with a 0.71 ERA.
Well, he was really good. Weve
seen him twice and hes been good
against us twice, Oakland manager
Bob Melvin said. Today, he was
just throwing his fastball by us. He
wasnt afraid to use it. He was
throwing it to both sides of the plate
and using breaking balls to keep us
off balance.
Chen struck out every As starter
except No. 9 hitter Brandon Hicks.
His fastball had good life on it. It
was pretty deceptive, said Chris
Carter, who fanned twice. Halfway
through, it seemed like it picked up
speed. His slider and changeup
were also working well.
Chen, who pitched four seasons
in Japan before coming to
Baltimore, set a major league record
for strikeouts by a Taiwanese-born
pitcher. The old mark was 10 by
Chien-Ming Wang in 2007. The last
time an Oriole pitcher had as many
as 12 strikeouts was in July 2007,
when Erik Bedard fanned 15 against
Texas.
As starter Travis Blackley (3-3)
gave up ve runs, six hits and a sea-
son-high four walks in ve innings.
He was 3-0 in six starts since June
10.
It was kind of a rough one,
Blackley said. I just couldnt seem
to nd the groove. I just couldnt
gure it out today. You cant be
awesome every time out.
Omar Quintanilla had three hits,
including a homer, to help
Baltimore win for only the second
time in seven games.
This was real big. Chen came
out and he did his thing,
Quintanilla said. He threw real
well, and overall it was a great team
effort. Weve just got to keep it up.
Lew Ford, whose contract was
purchased from Triple-A Norfolk
before the game, went 0 for 3 with a
walk in his rst big league game
since 2007. But the Orioles left
elder contributed a strong throw to
cut down Yeonis Cespedes, who
was trying to stretch a second-
inning hit into a double.
After going 0 for 6 with runners
in scoring position in a 6-0 loss
Saturday night, the Orioles got two
such hits in a four-run fourth. With
runners at rst and second and one
out, Adam Jones doubled in a run.
Wieters then ended a 1-for-31 skid
with a drive into the left-eld seats,
only the third homer allowed by
Blackley in 67 innings this season.
Athletics fall to Chen, Orioles 6-1
By Tom Withers
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
LONDON The hiccups out-
numbered the highlights, and for a
while the U.S. racked up fouls faster
than points.
The opener wasnt artistic.
However, it was enough easily
enough.
Kevin Durant scored 22 points in
his Olympic debut, Kevin Love
added 14 and LeBron James had
eight assists as the American mens
basketball team overcame some
sloppy moments with a 98-71 win
Sunday over France.
We know everybody else expects
us to win by 40 points, said
Carmelo Anthony. For us, a wins a
win. We expect every game to be
like this one.
Seeking a second straight gold
medal to
match the
r e d e mp t i ve
one they cap-
tured in
Beijing four
years ago, the
Ame r i c a n s
expected a tough test from a French
team featuring San Antonio guard
Tony Parker and ve other NBA
players. And although the U.S. was
never in real trouble it only led
22-21 after one quarter there
were enough aws (14 turnovers, 26
fouls) to keep coach Mike
Krzyzewski and his staff busy and
this superstar-laden squad from
feeling too comfortable.
It wasnt perfect, said James,
who only took six shots while set-
ting up his teammates. Weve still
got room for improvement. We had
too many turnovers, too many fouls
and we had a couple of defensive
rebounds we could have come up
with. But overall, we played a pret-
ty good game for as close to 40 min-
utes as possible.
Kobe Bryant had said this team
could beat the 1992 Dream Team
that changed international hoops
forever at the Barcelona Games.
That matchup is mythical, but the
London Games arent and this U.S.
team will have to play much better
in upcoming games if it plans to
maintain American dominance.
We know we have to keep going
for 40 minutes and play hard, said
Bryant, who only played 12 min-
utes.
Afterward, Parker, who nearly
missed these games after undergo-
ing surgery for a freak eye injury,
didnt want to concede anything to
the Americans. But when asked if
the U.S. team can be beat, he took a
contemplative pause before
responding.
Theyre going to be very, very
tough to beat, Parker said.
At times, the Americans offense
was erratic. The U.S missed its rst
six 3-pointers and settled too quick-
ly for jump shots instead of driving
to the basket. But France wasnt
able to capitalize as the U.S. turned
up its pressure on defense and
forced 18 turnovers.
With rst lady Michelle Obama
on hand to cheer on the U.S.,
Durant, Anthony and Tyson
Chandler added nine rebounds
apiece for the Americans, who will
next play Tuesday against Tunisia,
beaten 60-56 by Nigeria in the tour-
nament opener.
As they left the oor, the U.S.
players stopped to hug Mrs. Obama,
who can report back to her com-
mander in chief husband that his
favorite team has taken its rst step
toward gold.
Parker, playing with goggles to
protect a surgically repaired left
eye, scored 10 points but France fell
to 0-5 in Olympic competition
against the USA. Ali Traore scored
12 points to lead France, which got
few uncontested looks from the out-
side and missed 20 of 22 3-pointers.
They pressured us from the start
until the end, said France coach
Vincent Collet.
With the U.S. leading 52-36 at
halftime, Durant opened the second
half with a 3-pointer, Bryant
dropped one from long range and
after James dunked an alley-oop
pass from Deron Williams, the
Americans led 64-43.
U.S. men rout France 98-71 in Olympic basketball
SPORTS 14
Monday July 30, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Amy Brooks Colin Flynn Hal Coehlo Al Stanley Jim Esenwen
Family Owned & Operated
Established: 1949
Mercurio an opportunity to participate in
the nationally televised football combine
put on by the U.S. Marines and Jr. Rank
in last January. According to
Maxpreps.com, Mercurio scored 11
touchdowns last season and averaged
nearly seven yards a carry.
Joining the new signees is quarterback
Nathan Dodson, a gunslinger who led
Palisades Charter High School to their
rst playoff appearance in over ten years.
On defense, linebackers Matthew
Lewis and Visa Thach are two to keep an
eye on. Lewis earned a 1st-Team All-
District distinction while playing his
high school ball at Friendswood High
School in Friendswood, Tex. and is
overzealous at the prospects of hitting
the gridiron at Menlo. Im very excit-
ed to join the Menlo Oaks, Lewis said.
I cant wait to start playing football
again and I know Menlo is going to have
a great team this year.
Thach brings as much promise as any-
one into his rst season in Menlo blue
and white. While suiting up at
Kentridge High School, Thach was an
All-State linebacker, All-State fullback,
Team MVP, Rotary Athlete of the Year
and a Scholar Athlete.
Austin Baker has the skill set to be a
stellar defensive lineman after success at
Brea Olinda High School. A three-year
varsity starter, Baker was an All-League
selection for both his junior and senior
campaigns.
In the secondary the Oaks welcome in
Greg Danese and Gabriel Deol. Danese,
who played his high school ball at
Newberg High School in Newberg, Ore.,
was a Pac 9 Conference Honorable
Mention, in addition to earning an invite
to the All-Star combine in Los Angeles
as one of the Top 100 recruits in the
northwest area. Deol was a three-sport
star for Livingston High School. Last
year Deol was the schools football, bas-
ketball and track MVP, while earning
All-Conference recognition as a defen-
sive back.
This second wave of 12 signees should
help bolster a Menlo squad that is ready
to go for the start of the 2012 season.
We are pleased with our geographic
diversity, and the size, speed, and com-
petitiveness of this group, Speckman
said.
Continued from page 11
MENLO
one in his fth career shutout, beating
the Giants for the rst time in three starts
this season. He lost both previous out-
ings despite allowing just four earned
runs in 14 innings.
He kept the ball down and over the
plate, Giants outelder Angel Pagan
said. He didnt make a lot of mistakes
and worked his pitches. When hes on
like that its tough to get runs.
Vogelsong (8-5), who had won both of
his prior matchups against Kershaw this
year, allowed two runs one earned
and six hits in six innings with ve
strikeouts and three walks. He lowered
his ERA to a major league-leading 2.22.
Los Angeles went ahead with two runs
in the fourth following singles by Juan
Rivera and Kemp. With runners at the
corners and one out, newly acquired
Hanley Ramirez grounded to third and
beat second baseman Ryan Theriots
relay throw to avoid a double play as
Rivera scored. After Marco Scutaro
dropped Loneys popup to third for an
error, Luis Cruz hit an RBI double.
Vogelsong struck out Kershaw with
the bases loaded to end the sixth. The
Dodgers added a pair of runs in the
eighth against Jeremy Affeldt following
a one-out double by Loney. Cruz and
Mark Ellis hit RBI singles.
NOTES: LHP Madison Bumgarner
goes for his team-leading 12th win for
San Francisco in the series opener
against the Mets on Monday. ... The
Giants were shut out in back-to-back
games by the Dodgers for the rst time
in San Francisco history.
Continued from page 11
GIANTS
loud roars from a crowd estimated to be
roughly 3,000. At other times, he simply
read the coverage and connected with
open receivers. In all, only three balls
during seven-on-seven and 11-on-11
drills hit the ground and the offense
looked sharp.
Thats a credit to the offensive guys,
the offensive coaches, rst-year coach
Chuck Pagano said. You can see from
today the offense obviously stayed in
their playbook, the retention has been
excellent and they came out here and
moved the ball up and down the eld
pretty much at will today.
The positive reviews were a stark con-
trast from Saturday night when veterans
instructed the No. 1 overall draft pick to
stand up and sign a song, a rookie tradi-
tion in Indy.
Luck chose the John Denver hit
Country Roads because he said it was
the only song he knew the words to.
Teammates werent so sure he knew any-
thing about music after hearing the ren-
dition, which by all accounts was booed
mercilessly. Punter Pat McAfee, who
played at West Virginia where Lucks
father, Oliver, is the athletic director,
even tried to help.
That didnt work, either.
It was awful, Pagano said. Im glad
hes not doing that for a living because
he wouldnt have gotten the signing
bonus he got here. It was a great effort,
though.
Luck started his rst day at training
camp with a light walkthrough that
served as little more than a warm-up act
for the afternoon, the rst workout the
public could attend.
Some came to Anderson University, a
Division III school about 30 miles north-
east of the team complex, wearing No. 12
jerseys. Afterward, hundreds scrambled
to the 50-yard line seeking an autograph
from a quarterback covered in sweat on
another 90-degree day in Central Indiana.
Luck signed for about 20 minutes.
In between, he put on a memorable
performance. While the challenges are
bound to get tougher when he starts fac-
ing exotic blitzes and new defenses,
those standing inside the Colts rope line
liked what they saw.
My impression with him is that he is
just very strong and steady and is work-
ing toward limiting the turnovers, the
interceptions, working toward really
being patient and not feeling he has to do
it all on his own, team owner Jim Irsay
said after watching his newest multi-mil-
lion dollar investment. He is not expect-
ed to win it all on his own. I think when-
ever Peyton struggled and had his worst
periods of interception streaks or what-
ever is when he tried to do too much.
Nobody has a tougher crowd to please
than Luck, who must replace the long-
time face of the Colts franchise.
While the Stanford grad has been
billed as the most NFL-ready quarter-
back since Indy took Peyton Manning
with the No. 1 overall pick in 1998, its
easy to forget that Mannings record-set-
ting rookie season also included only
three victories and a rookie record 28
interceptions.
Continued from page 11
LUCK
worry about the defending world champions from Australia.
When Lochte dove into the water on the anchor leg, he was
a half-body length ahead of the eld and looking to add
another gold to his dominating victory Saturday in the 400
individual medley.
Not so fast.
Or, should we say, not fast enough.
Yannick Agnel, playing the chaser role that Jason Lezak
did for the Americans four years ago in this same event,
sliced through the water and was right on Lochtes shoulder
as they made the ip at the far end of the pool. With about 25
meters to go, they were stroke for stroke. But Lochte, who
had already competed in 1,200 meters of racing over the rst
two days, simply didnt have enough left to hold off the tow-
ering, 20-year-old Frenchman, one of the sports real rising
stars.
I gave everything in the last 50 until he cracked, Agnel
said. In the last 10 meters, I saw that he was really crack-
ing.
Agnel touched in 3 minutes, 9.93 seconds, having gone
exactly 1 second faster than Lochte over the last two laps.
Lochte and the Americans dropped to silver in 3:10.38, while
Australia the favorite didnt even get a medal. Russia
took the bronze in 3:11.41, edging the team from Down
Under by 0.22.
Continued from page 11
SWIM
SPORTS 15
Monday July 30, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SANTA CLARA The San
Francisco 49ers loaded up on explo-
sive new weapons for offensive coor-
dinator Greg Roman during the off-
season. Hes already having a blast
deciding how to use them.
The 49ers put on full pads Sunday
for the rst time in training camp,
and everywhere Roman looked, he
saw newcomers who promise to add
fresh dimensions to San Franciscos
offense and what Roman can do with
it this season.
Wide receivers Randy Moss,
Mario Manningham and A.J. Jenkins
darted around catching passes.
Running backs Brandon Jacobs and
LaMichael James brought new
bursts of power and speed out of the
backeld.
All gure to have an impact this
year in an upgraded San Francisco
offense that nished 26th last season
in the NFL rankings, lagging behind
the teams outstanding defensive and
special teams units that carried the
49ers to the NFC championship
game.
Now its up to Roman to determine
who goes where and who does what.
Hes letting the competition thats
playing out in practice decide for
him.
Theres denitely always some
competitive excitement when you
start thinking about how this is all
going to look together and how its
going to piece together, Roman said
Sunday. Whats going to be best for
our team, and were trying to create
depth at the same time. Adding those
news guys, it denitely adds a differ-
ent dimension to things.
Roman is getting a different per-
spective now that the competition
has gone to the next level after the
49ers began summer camp with two
days of practices without pads.
There is a certain urgency for San
Francisco to take the next step as an
offense and improve on last years
performance when the team strug-
gled in the red zone and ranked 29th
in the league in passing yards.
Thats why practically all of San
Franciscos top offseason acquisi-
tions play offensive skill positions.
Roman and coach Jim Harbaugh
raved about all the newcomers dur-
ing the teams spring workouts. But
this stage of summer camp is when
the true evaluations really begin.
Its real football now and you
start to get an indication of things,
Roman said. Were not running
around in our underwear. Now
everybody reveals themselves on the
eld because of the contact. This is
when you really, really start to get to
evaluate players. Its very exciting,
and well evaluate it as we go.
Theres a noticeable upgrade in
team speed provided by Moss and
Manningham, who joined the team
as free agents, and Jenkins and
James, San Franciscos first two
selections in the
NFL draft.
Moss already
is being consid-
ered the teams
No. 1 receiver
a l o n g s i d e
holdover starter
M i c h a e l
Crabtree, San
F r a n c i s c o s
leading receiver last season with 73
catches. Manningham appears to
have the inside track as the No. 3
receiver. And while Jenkins at this
point is just battling to nd his niche
in the rotation, Harbaugh made it
clear what the teams expectations
are for its rst-round draft pick.
Harbaugh made an unscheduled
and unusual trip to the podium dur-
ing Sundays interview session, a
move he felt was necessary
because of a perceived slow start
by Jenkins and some criticism the
young receiver has received recent-
ly in the media.
To update you on the status of
A.J. Jenkins and that topic,
Harbaugh began. A.J. Jenkins was
an outstanding football player before
he got here, and his progress has
been very, very good and exceeded
expectations. For those scribes, pun-
dits, so-called experts who have gone
as far as to say that hes going to be
a bust . should just stop. Theyre
making themselves look more fool-
ish. Ill go on record: A.J. Jenkins is
going to be an outstanding football
player.
There certainly is room for
improvement among San Franciscos
wide receivers, who combined had
just one catch for 3 yards in
Januarys overtime loss to the New
York Giants in the NFC title game.
The new repower at the position
could also help the team in other
areas, as will the addition of Jacobs,
James and free-agent fullback Rock
Cartwright in the backeld.
49ers excited about explosive new offense
By Josh Dubow
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NAPA After spending a decade as
an assistant in the NFL, Oakland Raiders
coach Dennis Allen is excited for his
rst training camp as the man in charge.
Jacked up about it, Allen said.
Were ready. Its a start of a long jour-
ney.
The Raiders held mandatory meetings
and a conditioning test Sunday as they
prepare for their rst training camp prac-
tice Monday. The Raiders and Cowboys
will be the nal teams to start practicing
at training camp because they will be the
last teams to open the preseason on
Aug. 13.
The hiring of Allen as coach was part
of the major change that went on with
the Raiders in the rst offseason since
the death of longtime owner Al Davis.
Reggie McKenzie was hired as general
manager and made Allen the teams rst
defensive head coach since John
Madden.
The front ofce and scouting depart-
ments were overhauled and many veter-
ans were let go as the Raiders look to
overcome a nine-year run without a win-
ning record or a playoff berth.
There will be new systems on both
offense and defense but Allen said the
biggest change has to come from the
players and coaches themselves.
At the end of the day, change is going
to come because people decide to
change, Allen said. We might have a
change in philosophy or a change in
ideas but if people dont change their
actions. If you keep doing the same
thing over and over again, youll keep
getting the same results. We have to
change our actions. Thats coaches,
players the organization, whatever the
case may be.
Allen also said he was surprised by
assistant offensive line coach Steve
Wisniewskis decision to step down for
personal reasons and explained his rea-
soning for not hiring a replacement to
help line coach Frank Pollack.
We just felt like at this point, this late
in the game, that the right thing for us to
do is to stick with the coaches that we
have and go forward, Allen said. I got
every condence in the world in Frank
Pollack as an offensive line coach, being
able to watch him throughout the OTAs
and minicamp he did a great job and
hell do a great job coaching the offen-
sive line.
Allen said he hadnt gotten reports
from the training staff on if everyone
would be healthy enough to practice but
he expected center Stefen Wisniewski to
practice for the rst time since offseason
shoulder surgery and receiver Denarius
Moore to be back out after injuring his
hamstring during minicamp last month.
The day started with the Raiders
reaching a deal with their nal unsigned
draft pick, receiver Juron Criner. Criner
signed the deal in time to be at the rst
mandatory meeting.
The two sides were reportedly hag-
gling over a $14,000 difference in
Criners signing bonus.
Criner was drafted with a compensa-
tory pick at the end of the fth round in
Aprils draft. He immediately became a
star of offseason workouts and is being
counted on to contribute immediately to
the Raiders, especially after the recent
trade of receiver Louis Murphy to
Carolina.
Despite lacking the breakaway speed
the Raiders traditionally seek in their
receivers, Criner was an extremely pro-
ductive player in college at Arizona. He
had 209 catches for 2,858 yards and 32
touchdowns in 50 games for the
Wildcats.
Raiders coach ready for first camp
Randy Moss
16
Monday July 30, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
SPORTS
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East Division
W L Pct GB
Washington 61 40 .604
Atlanta 57 44 .564 4
New York 49 53 .480 12 1/2
Miami 47 54 .465 14
Philadelphia 45 57 .441 16 1/2
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Cincinnati 61 40 .604
Pittsburgh 58 43 .574 3
St. Louis 54 48 .529 7 1/2
Milwaukee 45 56 .446 16
Chicago 42 58 .420 18 1/2
Houston 35 68 .340 27
West Division
W L Pct GB
San Francisco 55 46 .545
Los Angeles 56 47 .544
Arizona 51 51 .500 4 1/2
San Diego 43 60 .417 13
Colorado 37 63 .370 17 1/2
SaturdaysGames
Chicago Cubs 3, St. Louis 2
L.A. Dodgers 10, San Francisco 0
Pittsburgh 4, Houston 3
Atlanta 2, Philadelphia 1
Miami 4, San Diego 2
Washington 4, Milwaukee 1
Cincinnati 9, Colorado 7
Arizona 6, N.Y. Mets 3
SundaysGames
Miami 5, San Diego 4, 10 innings
Atlanta 6, Philadelphia 2
Houston 9, Pittsburgh 5
Washington 11, Milwaukee 10, 11 innings
Chicago Cubs 4, St. Louis 2, 10 innings
Cincinnati 7, Colorado 2
L.A. Dodgers 4, San Francisco 0
N.Y. Mets 5, Arizona 1
MondaysGames
Miami (Buehrle 9-9) at Atlanta (Hanson 11-5),4:10
p.m.
San Diego (Volquez 6-7) at Cincinnati (Leake 4-6),
4:10 p.m.
Pittsburgh (Bedard 5-11) at Chicago Cubs (Ger-
mano 0-1), 5:05 p.m.
Houston (B.Norris 5-8) at Milwaukee (Estrada 0-4),
5:10 p.m.
Arizona (Cahill 8-9) at L.A. Dodgers (Harang 7-5),
7:10 p.m.
East Division
W L Pct GB
New York 60 40 .600
Baltimore 53 49 .520 8
Tampa Bay 53 49 .520 8
Toronto 51 50 .505 9 1/2
Boston 50 51 .495 10 1/2
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Chicago 55 46 .545
Detroit 54 48 .529 1 1/2
Cleveland 50 52 .490 5 1/2
Minnesota 43 58 .426 12
Kansas City 41 60 .406 14
West Division
W L Pct GB
Texas 59 41 .590
Oakland 55 46 .545 4 1/2
Los Angeles 55 47 .539 5
Seattle 47 57 .452 14
SaturdaysGames
Toronto 5, Detroit 1
Boston 8, N.Y.Yankees 6
Seattle 4, Kansas City 3
Oakland 6, Baltimore 1
Minnesota 12, Cleveland 5
Chicago White Sox 5,Texas 2
Tampa Bay 3, L.A. Angels 0
SundaysGames
Detroit 4,Toronto 1
Baltimore 6, Oakland 1
Minnesota 5, Cleveland 1
Tampa Bay 2, L.A. Angels 0
Seattle 7, Kansas City 6
Texas 2, Chicago White Sox 0
Boston at N.Y.Yankees, late
MondaysGames
Baltimore(Mig.Gonzalez2-2) at N.Y.Yankees(F.Gar-
cia 4-4), 4:05 p.m.
L.A. Angels (E.Santana 4-10) at Texas (Oswalt 3-1),
4:05 p.m.
Detroit (Scherzer 10-5) at Boston (Buchholz 8-3),
4:10 p.m.
Chicago White Sox (Quintana 4-1) at Minnesota
(De Vries 2-2), 5:10 p.m.
NL STANDINGS AL STANDINGS
7/29
vs.Seattle
7:30p.m.
CSN-CAL
8/11
@Montreal
4:30p.m.
CSN-BAY
8/18
vs.Rapids
7:30p.m.
CSN-CAL
8/25
vs.Chivas
6p.m.
NBCSN
9/2
@Chivas
7:30p.m.
CSN+
9/15
vs.Timbers
7:30p.m.
CSN-CAL
9/19
7/28
7/28
vs. Toronto
7:05p.m.
CSN-CAL
8/2 7/28
vs. Toronto
7:05p.m.
CSN-CAL
8/3
vs.Mets
7:15p.m.
CSN-BAY
7/30
7/29
vs.Rays
7:05p.m.
CSN-CAL
7/30
vs.Mets
7:15p.m.
CSN-BAY
7/31
vs. Mets
7:15p.m.
CSN-BAY
8/1
vs.Mets
12:45p.m.
CSN-BAY
8/2
vs.Rays
7:05p.m.
CSN-CAL
7/31
@Rockies
5:40p.m.
CSN-BAY
8/3
vs. Rays
12:35p.m.
CSN-CAL
8/1
EASTERN CONFERENCE
W L T Pts GF GA
New York 11 6 5 38 38 32
Houston 10 5 7 37 33 25
Kansas City 11 7 4 37 27 21
D.C. 10 7 3 33 34 27
Chicago 9 7 5 32 23 23
Columbus 8 7 4 28 20 20
Montreal 8 13 3 27 33 43
Philadelphia 7 10 2 23 22 22
New England 6 10 5 23 26 27
Toronto FC 5 12 4 19 24 38
WESTERN CONFERENCE
W L T Pts GF GA
San Jose 13 5 5 44 45 28
Real Salt Lake 13 7 3 42 35 27
Seattle 9 5 7 34 27 22
Vancouver 9 7 7 34 26 28
Los Angeles 10 10 3 33 39 35
Chivas USA 7 8 5 26 14 21
Colorado 7 14 1 22 28 32
FC Dallas 5 11 7 22 25 31
Portland 5 12 4 19 19 36
NOTE: Three points for victory, one point for tie.
Saturdays Games
Houston 2, Toronto FC 0
Montreal 3, New York 1
Los Angeles 1, FC Dallas 0
Columbus 2, Sporting Kansas City 1
Seattle FC 2, Colorado 1
San Jose 1, Chicago 1, tie
Chivas USA 1, Portland 0
Sundays Games
Philadelphia 2, New England 1
Friday, Aug. 3
New York at Houston, 5 p.m.
Saturday, Aug. 4
Columbus at D.C. United, 4:30 p.m.
MLS STANDINGS
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
LONDON Step aside, Carl
Lewis.
You, too, Jackie Joyner-Kersee
and Al Oerter.
M e e t
K i m b e r l y
Rhode, the rst
American with
i n d i v i d u a l
medals in five
s t r a i g h t
Olympics, after
a golden, record-
setting, nearly
perfect perform-
ance.
Rhode won the womens skeet
shooting Sunday, tying a world
record and setting the Olympic
mark with 99 points meaning she
missed once in 100 shots. She was
eight targets better than silver
medalist Wei Ning of China and
nine better than Slovakias Danka
Bartekova, who topped Russias
Marina Belikova in a shootout for
the bronze.
Rhode won in double trap at
Atlanta as a teenager in 1996, took
bronze in that event four years later
at Sydney, re-claimed the gold at
Athens in 2004 and won the silver in
skeet at Beijing in 2008.
Its just been an incredible jour-
ney, said Rhode, strands of glitter
intertwined with her blonde hair.
And ultimately, I couldnt be hap-
pier for bringing home the gold for
the United States.
Lewis, Oerter, Joyner-Kersee and
Bruce Baumgartner are the other
Americans recognized as individual
medal-winners in four straight
Summer Olympics.
Kimberly Rhodes drive for 5
capped by skeet gold medal
Kimberly
Rhode
DATEBOOK 17
Monday July 30, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Visit DoodyCalls.com
for a free quote or
sign up for service or
contact us at:
1.800.366.3922
H
ave the recent animal stories in the
news been dragging you down? A
few weeks ago, the buzz was about
a stray pit bull shot in the face by police.
Days later, it was the poodle allegedly
smashed in the head by a neighbor for tres-
passing. After that, we saw a report about a
squirrel in Menlo Park that tested positive for
West Nile virus. And, to make it a grand slam
of downer animal news, we had a few dozen
emaciated and hypothermic brown pelicans
make their way to our wildlife care center.
Whats next? I see John Belushis character,
Jake, in The Blues Brothers screaming
locusts! Sorry for the obscure reference, but
thats how were feeling. Theres a cure. Its
free, its happening tomorrow and will only
take an hour of your time. Im betting our
TAILS graduation ceremony might be the feel
good hit of the summer. TAILS (Transitioning
Animals Into Loving Situations) is a partner-
ship between the Peninsula Humane Society
& SPCA and the San Mateo County Sheriffs
Ofce. Shelter dogs with a behavioral issue or
two preventing them from quick adoptions are
placed with inmates in the sheriffs minimum
security facility for eight weeks. Our trainer
teaches a weekly obedience class for the inmate
handlers and their dogs; outside of this class,
inmates are responsible for homework from
class, exercise, socialization, grooming and
cleanup. When one class graduates, we choose
another group of dogs to take their place.
Tomorrows event at 10 a.m. marks the pro-
grams third anniversary. Rather than the usual
low-key graduation, were going big, but with-
out speeches from us humans. The four-legged
grads will demonstrate what theyve learned,
followed by a reception in front of the Hall of
Justice in Redwood City; this is between 400
and 450 County Center. Our four grads will be
available for adoption. Bring a hankie. These
ceremonies have been known to make inmates
misty-eyed.
Scott oversees PHS/SPCAs Adoption,
Behavior and Training, Education,
Outreach, Field Services, Cruelty
Investigation, Volunteer and Media/PR pro-
gram areas and staff from the new Tom and
Annette Lantos Center for Compassion.
By Christy Lemire
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
LOS ANGELES The Dark Knight
Rises stayed atop the box ofce for the sec-
ond straight weekend, making just over $64
million. But its lagging behind the staggering
numbers of its predecessor, 2008s The Dark
Knight.
The final piece in Christopher Nolans
Batman trilogy has now grossed more than
$289 million in its rst 10 days in theaters. It
dropped 60 percent from its opening weekend
of $160.9 million.
By comparison, The Dark Knight took a
53 percent drop in its second weekend with a
gross of nearly $75.2 million and a 10-day
cumulative gross of $313.8 million.
Dan Fellman, head of distribution for
Warner Bros., declined to comment on the
Sunday estimates again out of respect for the
victims of the Aurora, Colo., shooting that left
12 people dead and another 58 injured at a
midnight showing of the lm on opening
night.
But people are still going to the movies, and
they did so even last weekend, said
Hollywood.com analyst Paul Dergarabedian.
If anything hurt the numbers for all movies
this weekend, he said, it was Friday nights
opening ceremony of the 2012 Summer
Olympics in London, which drew a record-
setting 40.7 million viewers in the United
States.
For a lm that opened as big as this did,
considering the situation and what happened
last weekend and all that, I would say this is a
very strong showing, Dergarabedian said.
Its made almost $300 million in North
America and its mid-week (attendance) is
very strong. It made $19 million last
Monday.
In second place this weekend was the ani-
mated family film Ice Age: Continental
Drift, which is still going strong in its third
week. It made $13.3 million for a domestic
total of nearly $114.9 million. The fourth
movie in the 20th Century Fox franchise fea-
tures the voices of Ray Romano, Denis Leary
and Queen Latifah.
Both of the new movies in wide release
opened weakly. The 20th Century Fox come-
dy The Watch came in third place with $13
million. Big-name comic actors Ben Stiller,
Vince Vaughn and Jonah Hill play a group of
guys who come together to form a neighbor-
hood watch; despite the star power, the lm
was panned critically, receiving only 14 per-
cent positive reviews on the Rotten Tomatoes
website.
Dark Knight stays atop box office
1. The Dark Knight Rises, $64 million.
($122.1 million international.)
2.Ice Age: Continental Drift,$13 million.
($49.4 million international.)
3.The Watch,$13 million.
4.Step Up Revolution,$11.8 million.
($5.2 million international.)
5.Ted,$7.4 million. ($2.7 million interna-
tional.)
6.The Amazing Spider-Man,$6.8 million.
7.Brave,$4.2 million.
($9.6 million international.)
8.Magic Mike,$2.6 million.
($5.3 million international.)
9.Savages,$1.8 million.
($2 million international.)
10.Moonrise Kingdom,$1.4 million.
Top 10 movies
Charlie Sheen sitcom poised for 90-episode pickup
BEVERLY HILLS, Calif. Charlie Sheen says hes not
insane anymore.
Instead, these are good days for the Anger Management
star, he declares, with his FX sitcom half-way through its ini-
tial 10-episode run and poised to get an order for 90 more.
Sheen told reporters Saturday that the prospect of continuing
is as exciting as hell, and added cheerily, I dont think 90s
gonna be enough.
With the expected pickup, FX plans to bring aboard Sheens
dad, Martin Sheen, as a recurring cast member. He will play
the father of Charlie Goodson, the anger-management therapist
played by Charlie Sheen. The veteran movie actor, who also
played President Jed Bartlet on the drama series The West
Wing, is guest-starring on an Anger Management episode
that airs Aug. 16.
I think that was the best episode we did, his son said.
People in the news
18
Monday July 30, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Birth announcements:
Scott and Gracy Carpenter,
of La Honda, gave birth to a baby
boy at Sequoia Hospital in
Redwood City July 11, 2012.
Mychall and Martha Morris,
of Fremont, gave birth to a baby
boy at Sequoia Hospital in
Redwood City July 11, 2012.
Paul and Vanessa Liberati, of
Redwood City, gave birth to a
baby girl at Sequoia Hospital in
Redwood City July 12, 2012.
David and Allison Fujimoto,
of Redwood City, gave birth to a
baby boy at Sequoia Hospital in
Redwood City July 12, 2012.
Maxime and Andrea
Roucoule, of Palo Alto, gave
birth to a baby girl at Sequoia
Hospital in Redwood City July
12, 2012.
Noah and Roxanne Kolling, of
Belmont, gave birth to a baby boy
at Sequoia Hospital in Redwood
City July 12, 2012.
Richardo James and Marie
Antoinette Abinader-Jaime, of
Redwood City, gave birth to a
baby girl at Sequoia Hospital in
Redwood City July 13, 2012.
Avel Mendez and Ruby
Santos, of Redwood City, gave
birth to a baby boy at Sequoia
Hospital in Redwood City July
13, 2012.
Noel Johnson-Alexandre and
Joanna Botheras, of Burlingame,
gave birth to a baby girl at
Sequoia Hospital in Redwood
City July 13, 2012.
Jose and Michelle Casillas, of
San Jose, gave birth to a baby girl
at Sequoia Hospital in Redwood
City July 13, 2012.
Juan and Sara Fernandez, of
Palo Alto, gave birth to a baby
girl at Sequoia Hospital in
Redwood City July 14, 2012.
Jason Hagberg and Christina
Le, of Santa Clara, gave birth to a
baby girl at Sequoia Hospital in
Redwood City July 14, 2012.
Jeremy and Michelle
Schoales, of San Mateo, gave
birth to a baby boy at Sequoia
Hospital in Redwood City July
15, 2012.
Dony Unardi and Irene
Susanti, of Union City, gave birth
to a baby boy at Sequoia Hospital
in Redwood City July 15, 2012.
Jeromey and Kelin Ingalls, of
Belmont, gave birth to a baby boy
at Sequoia Hospital in Redwood
City July 16, 2012.
Isaac and Jenna Stahlhut, of
Belmont, gave birth to a baby boy
at Sequoia Hospital in Redwood
City July 17, 2012.
Luis Martinez and Gabriela
Saavedra, of Redwood City, gave
birth to a baby girl at Sequoia
Hospital in Redwood City July
18, 2012.
Andrew and Kristen Sevillia,
of San Mateo, gave birth to a
baby girl at Sequoia Hospital in
Redwood City July 18, 2012.
Amado Garcia and Ashley
Goodrum, of Neward, gave birth
to a baby girl at Sequoia Hospital
in Redwood City July 18, 2012.
Narvel and Lauren Brooks, of
Palo Alto, gave birth to a baby
girl at Sequoia Hospital in
Redwood City July 19, 2012.
Mark Gordon and Lauren
Paxton, of Santa Clara, gave
birth to a baby girl at Sequoia
Hospital in Redwood City July
21, 2012.
Steven and Marlo Stroud, of
San Mateo, gave birth to a baby
boy at Sequoia Hospital in
Redwood City July 22, 2012.
Keith and Lisa Zehm, of
Redwood City, gave birth to a
baby girl at Sequoia Hospital in
Redwood City July 22, 2012.
Brett and Vanessa Leonard, of
San Carlos, gave birth to a baby
boy at Sequoia Hospital in
Redwood City July 22, 2012.
Jisheng Wang and Yangyang
Tang, of Belmont, gave birth to a
baby girl at Sequoia Hospital in
Redwood City July 23, 2012.
Arnel Damian and Ariana
Flores, of East Palo Alto, gave
birth to a baby boy at Sequoia
Hospital in Redwood City July
23, 2012.
Joseph Ravella and Sarah
Gertz, of San Carlos, gave birth
to a baby boy at Sequoia Hospital
in Redwood City July 23, 2012.
Joshua and Tara Berta, of
San Carlos, gave birth to a baby
girl at Sequoia Hospital in
Redwood City July 24, 2012.
Stanley Li and Nhi Huynh, of
San Mateo, gave birth to a baby
girl at Sequoia Hospital in
Redwood City July 24, 2012.
DAVID ALLEN
Lynne Herrick of Burlingame (right) and her cousin Ali Van Zee enjoyed the
July 18 opening night of Cavalia in San Jose. Van Zee has attended Cav-
alia 19 times in cities across America.
CAVALIA OPENING
LOCAL 19
Monday July 30, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
2
0
1
2
2
0
1
2
Senior Showcase
FREE
ADMISSION
Presented by Health Plan of San Mateo and The Daily Journal
Senior Resources and Services
from all of San Mateo County
over 40 exhibitors!
For more information call 650-344-5200
* While supplies last. Some restrictions apply. Events subject to change.
Free Services include
Refreshments
Door Prizes and Giveaways
Blood Pressure Check
Ask the Pharmacist
by San Mateo Pharmacists Assn.
FREE Document Shredding
by Miracle Shred
and MORE
Senior Showcase
Information Fair
Saturday, August 25 from 9:00am to 1:00pm
Little House, 800 Middle Avenue, Menlo Park
Free Admission, Everyone Welcome
verts put in place to divert the water under what
was to become Sneath Lane. The rst grading
proceeded up Monterey Avenue, and stopped
before reaching the top of the hill. Monterey
Avenue was laid out for houses and this section
was to be completed before moving to more
rugged western sections. At the same time, land
was being prepared for future construction of at
least 10 10-story apartments (site of Portola
Highlands Elementary School and along Sneath
Lane) similar to Park Merced in San Francisco.
At least 10 of these 10-story buildings were
planned, but he needed permission from the San
Bruno Planning Commission in San Bruno to
build them. On Jan. 22, 1964, at 8:30 a.m.,
Andres Oddstad was involved in a head-on auto-
mobile collision that killed him.
That night he was to have attended a Planning
Commission hearing to get the nal permission
to build the 10-story apartment complex. His
son did not pursue this project and the plans
were changed. Single-family houses were then
constructed on Sneath Lane and the Portola
Highlands Elementary school was built on the
originally planned apartment site on the hill.
At the time of his death, his company had
built over 14,000 houses and 2,500 apartment
units plus three shopping centers, a youth center
and two churches in the San Francisco area.
Rediscovering the Peninsula by Darold Fredricks
appears in the Monday edition of the Daily
Journal.
Continued from page 3
HISTORY
Caltrans informing the city it would
need to choose a favored design
before the projects nal environ-
mental impact report could be com-
pleted.
The City Council voted June 25 to
go with a design that includes a
landscaped median, which the
council felt would be in keeping
with its goal of beautifying Pacica.
It also voted to nominate the project
for funding under the San Mateo
County Transportation Authoritys
call for Measure A projects. Neither
vote was unanimous, with
Councilwoman Sue Digre abstain-
ing and Mayor Pete DeJarnatt vot-
ing against the landscaped median,
and Digre being the sole dissenter in
the decision to pursue funds.
Twenty-four citizens addressed
the council, some arguing passion-
ately for the freeway widening, with
others dead set against it.
Courtney Conlon, CEO of
Pacicas Chamber of Commerce,
advocated moving forward
[The City] Council must not sup-
port requests for unnecessary delays.
It will be very difcult to attract busi-
ness to Pacica if we have horric
trafc problems, she said.
Residents who attended the meet-
ing expressed concern about Caltrans,
the timing and the process. Bill
Collins argued the project wouldnt
give any trafc relief for at least ve
years. Peter Loeb completely support-
ed applying for the Measure A funds,
but urged the council not to make a
decision on whether to include a land-
scaped median without further public
hearings on the issue. Rich Campbell
said Caltrans was trying to have
Pacica make a decision before the
nal impact report is done.
Though Digre and Councilwoman
Mary Ann Nihart were on the oppo-
site ends of the vote, both said the
situation felt coerced.
When your choice is between a
three bean salad and a lethal injec-
tion, Nihart said, what are you
gonna choose?
Nihart explained Highway 1 is
substandard because it doesnt have
shoulders or a median.
Our rush hour trafc is nonexist-
ent compared to [Highway] 101, that
by itself doesnt drive the change.
Its an issue of accessibility to emer-
gency vehicles and breakdowns ...
Caltrans does not build shoulders
they build highways, she said.
Councilman Len Stone shares
Niharts concern about the ability of
emergency vehicles to navigate
Highway 1.
We know that central highway is
the only thing connecting the north
and south ends of Pacica. Its a big
safety issue, he said. What we have
right now is inadequate. Some people
are saying the project is a freeway; its
not a freeway its an extra lane in
each direction.
Digre, however, has several issues
starting with her concern that the
project might not be compliant with
an order signed by Gov. Arnold
Schwarzenegger in 2008 that all
new projects which are vulnerable
to sea level rise associated with cli-
mate change must be planned in
such a way that the expected risks
are reduced. Digre also feels pedes-
trian safety and other options, like
improving public transportation,
arent being discussed enough.
How many years have we been at
this, and we havent really had a pub-
lic forum to discuss it? The pedestrian
part isnt being talked about. Its
already hard enough for pedestrians
to get across the highway, she said.
Furthermore, Im talking about tak-
ing a really serious look at public
transportation on the coast. Ride shar-
ing isnt happening because we dont
have consistent, convenient, reliable
public transportation. The main goal
is trafc management, not widening
freeways.
She also sympathizes with those
who fear the project will fundamen-
tally alter the character their town.
Caltrans is saying it wouldnt
change our community because
theres already a freeway running
through it, Digre said, and to me
thats kind of lame, because theyre
talking about really widening the
freeway, and its not even clear what
businesses would be affected.
Though many Pacificans have
expressed concerns that businesses
along Highway 1, such as Gorilla
BBQ and the P-Town Cafe, would
have to be relocated, Nihart asserts
that this is not the case.
Continued from page 1
SPLIT
city and thought it was a good place
to launch his new company.
It was very retro in 2002, Hanna
said of the place his company has
always called home. It still is. It
has an old-fashioned vibe to it. Back
then there was a drugstore on the
corner. Slowly but surely this old-
fashioned retro-ness really rubbed
off on me and I fell in love with San
Mateo. So when we went to the
branding of Betty Mills, the old-
fashioned nature of San Mateo
rubbed off.
Wide range of products
Initially a janitorial supply com-
pany, Betty Mills has grown to
encompass a wide range of products
people use in their daily lives. From
hand sanitizer to toilet paper, vacu-
ums to AA batteries, Red Bull to
Bubballoo chewing gum. The com-
pany has recently branched out into
the medical industry and on its web-
site a shopper will nd generic med-
icines, wheelchairs and rst aid kits.
Were a lifestyle brand for your
business, Hanna said.
Despite the fact it is entirely an
online business, Betty Mills knows
she still has plenty of people to
meet. The company hired Rana
Hannoush in early July as director
of search engine marketing and is
branching out into the social media
realm as part of their attempt to
reach out to new customers.
Search engine marketing is prob-
ably the most important aspect of
our company, Hanna said. Social
for us has bit a little much of an
experiment. Our belief early on was
that people did not want to be social
regarding cleaning supplies, as
weve moved on toward food,
organic food and also as you get into
the medical supplies category peo-
ple have more interest to understand
the nature of those products.
Change
California currently makes up just
14 percent of Betty Mills business
but Hanna is hoping to change that.
Weve made it very clear to a
number of our friends locally that
were a San Mateo company, and
theres a lot about San Mateo thats
in our roots, Hanna said. For
many years, weve been unknown in
San Mateo. If you were asking me
three years ago, Whos Betty
Mills? I would say were the lead-
ing cleaning and janitorial supply
company on the Internet. The brand-
ing has kind of evolved over time, it
was more about a category before,
now its about a brand.
For more information on Betty
Mills visit www.bettymills.com.
Continued from page 1
MILLS
LOCAL 20
Monday July 30, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
MONDAY, JULY 30
Foster City Village Update
Meetings. 1 p.m. to 2 p.m. Wind
Room above the Foster City Library,
1000 E. Hillsdale Blvd., Foster City.
Updates for seniors and others on the
Village progress. For more
information call the Foster City Village
at 378-8541.
Jazz on Main: Anton Schwartz
Quintet. 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. 2600
Broadway, Redwood City. Free. For
more information call 780-7340.
Free Film: Whats on Your Plate? 6
p.m. to 7 p.m. New Leaf Community
Markets, 150 San Mateo Road, Half
Moon Bay. This short film is a witty
and provocative documentary
produced and directed by award-
winning Catherine Gund about kids
and food politics. Filmed over the
course of one year, the film follows
two 11-year-old multiethnic city kids
as they explore their place in the food
chain. Free. For more information
email info@newleaf.com.
Dance Connection with music by
DJ Colin Dickie. 6:30 p.m.-7 p.m. with
open dance 7 p.m.-9:30 p.m.
Burlingame Womans Club, 241 Park
Road, Burlingame. Free dance lessons
Admission is $6 members, $8 guests.
Light refreshments, mixers and rafes.
Join the club for half price, $10 for the
remainder of the year. For more
information call 342-2221.
Mondays Group Series Dance
Classes. 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. Boogie
Woogie Ballroom, 551 Foster City
Blvd., Suite G, Foster City. Includes
beginning Lindy, American Smooth
level one Tango, American Smooth
level II Tango and American Rhythm,
Rumba I. For more information call
627-4854.
TUESDAY, JULY 31
Annual Variety Show. Noon. Twin
Pines Senior and Community Center,
20 Twin Pines Lane, Belmont.
Performers will include young
aspiring actors, dancers and singers.
Free. For more information call 595-
7444.
Live Bat Presentation. 6:30 p.m. San
Mateo Public Library, Oak Room, 55
W.Third Ave., San Mateo. Live bats will
be presented by Corky Quirk of
Northern California Bats. Free. For
more information call 522-7838.
Family Fun Night. 7 p.m. Burlingame
Main Library, 480 Primrose Road,
Burlingame. Puppet Art Theatre. Free
tickets available at Burlingame Public
Library Childrens Desk beginning the
Saturday prior. Space is limited.
WEDNESDAY, AUG. 1
Fratello Marionettes. 3 p.m. 800
Alma St., Menlo Park. For more
information visit
www.menloparklibrary.org.
Master DanceWorkshops. 3 p.m. to
5 p.m. Barrett Community Center,
Room A, 1835 Belburn Drive, Belmont.
Tap Class for dancers who want to
improve their technique and expand
their skills. $30. For more information
call 595-7441.
Master DanceWorkshops. 5 p.m. to
7 p.m. Barrett Community Center,
Room A, 1835 Belburn Drive, Belmont.
Hip Hop class for dancers who want
to improve their technique and
expand their skills. $30. For more
information call 595-7441.
Free Movie: Sin Nombre. 6:30 p.m.
Community Room of the Downtown
Redwood City Library, 1044
Middlefield Road, Redwood City. In
Spanish with English Subtitles. A story
of a woman from Honduras venturing
toward a better life in the United
States. For more information call 780-
7305.
Movers in the Sky: Comets, Meteors
and Asteroids. 7 p.m. Millbrae
Library, 1 Library Ave., Millbrae.
Presented by astrophysicist Kevin
Manning. What differentiates these
small bodies as remnants of the solar
systems formation? Interesting
pictures and illustrations serve to
uncover these mysteries. Free. For
more information call 697-7607.
Successful LinkedIn Proles. 7 p.m.
to 8 p.m. Burlingame Public Library,
480 Primrose Road, Burlingame.
Lecture on how to use LinkedIn for
career development. Free. For more
information call 558-7400, ext. 2.
THURSDAY, AUG. 2
Master DanceWorkshops. 3 p.m. to
5 p.m. Barrett Community Center,
Room A, 1835 Belburn Drive, Belmont.
Contemporary class for dancers who
want to improve their technique and
expand their skills. $30. For more
information call 595-7441.
Master DanceWorkshops. 5 p.m. to
7 p.m. Barrett Community Center,
Room A, 1835 Belburn Drive, Belmont.
Ballet Technique class for dancers
who want to improve their technique
and expand their skills. $30. For more
information call 595-7441.
My Liberty San Mateo Meeting. 6
p.m. to 7:30 p.m. American Legion
Post No 82. 130 South Blvd., San
Mateo. Presentation on Obamacare.
Free. For more information call 345-
7388.
Esthers Pledge Substance Abuse
Preventino Workshops. 6 p.m. to
7:30 p.m. 1717 Embarcadero Road,
Suite 4000, Palo Alto. Young adults,
parents and teens welcome. Takes
place the first Thursday of every
month. Will cover warning signs, how
to talk to your kids and steps for
getting help. Must RSVP. Free to
public. For more information call 424-
0852 ext. 200.
Dayna Stephens Quartet Jazz
Show. 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. Stanford
Shopping Center, 660 Stanford
Shopping Center, Palo Alto. Free. For
more information visit sfjazz.org.
Central Park Music Series. 6 p.m. to
8 p.m. Central Park, downtown San
Mateo, corner of Fifth Avenue and El
Camino Real, San Mateo. Enjoy Big
Band party music by The Bud E. Luv
Orchestra. Free. For more information
call 522-7522, ext. 2767.
Star Gazing Program. 6:30 p.m. to
8:30 p.m. South San Francisco Main
Library, 840 W. Orange Ave., South San
Francisco. Free. For more information
call 829-3860.
M.L. Steadman will read from The
Light Between. 7 p.m. Belmont
Library, 1110 Alameda de las Pulgas,
Belmont. Light refreshments to be
served. Open to public. Free.
Movies on the Square: Hugo. 8:45
p.m. Courthouse Square, 2200
Broadway, Redwood City. This movie
is rated PG. Free. For more information
call 780-7340 or visit
www.redwoodcity.org/events/movies
.html.
FRIDAY, AUG. 3
Free First Fridays. 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.
The San Mateo County History
Museum, 2200 Broadway, Redwood
City. At 11 a.m., preschool children can
learn about baseball and at 2 p.m.,
museum docents will lead a tour of
the museum for adults. Free. For more
information call 299-0104 visit
historysmc.org.
The Great Big Garden Bonanza. 10
a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Filoli, 86 Caada
Road, Redwood City. $15 for adult
non-members. There will be tours,
demos, food and more. $12 for senior
non-members. $5 for children non-
members. Free for ages four and
under. For more information call 364-
8300.
The Local Coastal Potters Show.
Noon to 5 p.m. The Coastal Arts
League Museum, 300 Main St., Half
Moon Bay. Every Friday through
Monday during the same hours until
Aug. 27. For more information call
726-6335.
Free Wine and Beer Tastings Friday
Happy Hours. 3 p.m. to 5 p.m. New
Leaf Community Markets, 150 San
Mateo Road, Half Moon Bay. A
different selection will be offered
each week.We will feature local wines
and brews, wines that offer
exceptional value and limited-
quantity, hand-crafted wines. Meet
knowledgeable vendors and educate
your pallet. Must be 21 years of age
or older. No registration required. Free.
For more information email
www.newleaf.com.
Two-story Rummage Pre-sale. 5:30
p.m. to 8:30 p.m. Congregational
Church of Belmont, 751 Alameda de
las Pulgas, Belmont. $10 per person.
For more information contact Micki
Carter at mickicartr@aol.com.
Pacic Art League's Opening. 5:30
p.m. to 8 p.m. Pacic Art League, 668
Ramona St., Palo Alto. Join Pacic Art
League for its August Art Exhibitions
opening reception featuring Figures
& Faces, Zhao Nan Duan's solo
exhibition and Ray Mendieta's
students. For more information
contact
marketing@pacicartleauge.org.
Teen Read-In. 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. 800
Alma St., Menlo Park. For more
information visit
www.menloparklibrary.org.
August Move Nights: The Lorax.
Dusk (around 8 p.m.). Twin Pines Park
Meadow, 1225 Ralston Ave., Belmont.
Free. For more information call 595-
744.
Dave Matthews Blues band. 9 p.m.
Menlo Hub, 1029 El Camino Real,
Menlo Park. Live blues music. Free. For
more information call 321-6882
SATURDAY, AUG. 4
Family Sale. 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Clothing
for Kids, Men and Women, Tools,
Electronics, Kitchen Items, Bikes
,Outdoor Gear, Toys, and Furniture.
Coffee and Bake Sale. Profits help
benefit Troop 44. For more
information call 357-1876.
Calendar
For more events visit
smdailyjournal.com, click Calendar.
in the parking garage on B Street
between Third and Fourth avenues.
Vibrant saxophone and stand-up bass
players in Hararahs street scene come to
life and lighten up the garages drab con-
crete walls.
An art teacher of Hararahs recom-
mended him to Steve Spieller, the owner
of B Street and Vine. Spieller looked
through Hararahs portfolio then told
him he was looking for a music scene
that would liven up the garage. Hararah
took the brief direction, infused his cre-
ativity and gave the public a work of art.
Friends of his who played music at the
cafe inspired him to depict a jazz duet,
Hararah said.
And Spieller was thrilled.
Hararah was great to work with, very
meticulous. If I had more space Id hire
him again, Spieller said.
The appropriately named David
Bowie and Winston Churchill mural
surrounds the front entrance of the
Swingin Door pub on 25th Avenue. The
two British grenadier guards stand near-
ly 8 feet tall and are impossible for the
passing public to miss. Hararah contact-
ed the owner, Warren Chapman, about
nishing the poorly painted incomplete
guards a previous artist abandoned.
Chapman told Hararah he wanted the
guards to have recognizable celebrity
faces. Hararahs grasp of the gurative
created the two British celebrities that
now stand guard at the pubs entrance.
Hararah has been ne-tuning his skills
for many years. Artistic even as a child,
Hararah said he picked up a paint brush
for the rst time in 2002. It was a high
school art assignment that introduced
Hararah not only to painting, but to
murals as well. Along with his class-
mates, they created a large painting for
their schools library, said Hararah.
It was during his time at the College of
San Mateo that he began to focus on a
career as an artist, said Hararah. The sole
artist in his family, Hararah went against
his traditional parents ideal profession
for their son. Yet regardless of familial
encouragement, he cant imagine nding
fulllment in another career path, said
Hararah. Hararah considers his job with
humor.
When Im making art, its not neces-
sarily like working, its more like high-
stakes play, he said.
As a gurative artist, Hararah said he
typically paints from photographs he
takes on the streets of San Francisco.
The diverse culture of a large city
attracted Hararah and led him to paint
portraits of the economically disadvan-
taged. The figures in his paintings
emerge from an intensely colorful back-
ground. These abstract backgrounds
convey a sense of movement while high-
lighting the detail of his subjects faces.
Abstract goes into play with the gu-
rative, they live in this symbiotic rela-
tionship on the canvas, said Hararah.
Hararah describes his paintings as
psychological, relating to both subject
and audience. He believes viewing art is
a momentary experience and hopes that,
in seeing his art, people will take away
insight to the world and themselves.
Although he prefers to paint murals
accessible to the public, Hararah knows
they dont come easily, or often. He
works with graphic design on the com-
puter to provide artistic advertising for
clients. Hararah also paints signs for
local businesses such as Otter Books and
Talbots Toyland. Even though xing
signs doesnt require much imagination,
Hararah still nds enjoyment. Painting
signs while atop a high ladder is danger-
ous, yet still entertaining, said Hararah.
Each commission creates new chal-
lenges he nds both enjoyable and edu-
cational, said Hararah. Communication
between him and his clients is crucial
and valuable. Listening to what a client
wants and adding his own unique artistic
perspective is essential, he said.
Although Hararah nds his work per-
sonally rewarding, he delights in the
effect his art has on others.
For me, the satisfaction of the client
and of the public is [my] number one
priority, and I really enjoy that, when
people are genuinely happy about the
work Ive done, he said.
Hararahs portfolio and contact infor-
mation can be found at
dylanhararah.wordpress.com.
Continued from page 1
ART
master plan. In return, SPI has offered
the city a brand-new turfed athletic eld
at a cost of nearly $800,000. SPI has also
offered to replace the turf in 10 years at
an additional cost of about $440,000.
The company has also offered to
install rest room facilities at Mariners
Island Park in the amount of $200,000.
But opponents of the plan, who stood
in a long line Thursday night to hear
Meiers proposal, said Bridgepointe
needs to stick to the promise it made to
the city when Fashion Island was torn
down.
The promise, however, was not to
maintain an ice rink, Meier said, but
rather an ice rink or similar recreational
amenity.
The phrase similar recreational
amenity is a sticking point for hockey
mom Julie McAuliffe, who thinks it
could lead to the rinks survival.
She plans to follow Bridgepointes
request until it makes it to the City
Council for nal approval after being
considered by the Planning
Commission.
Meiers presentation to the crowd, she
said, strengthened the group.
Many wore hockey jerseys with save
the rink stickers on them Thursday
night.
The issue is the wording and intent,
McAuliffe said about Bridgepointes
master plan.
Meier, when asked what the company
would do if the city did not allow it to
place the recreational amenity off site,
did not answer.
He instead said the companys intent
was to get the city to allow it to move the
amenity to another location.
Some early suggestions for what could
replace the rink include a yoga studio,
gym, judo studio, dance studio or climb-
ing wall, among others.
McAuliffe does not think any of these
alternatives match the benets the ice
rink currently gives the community.
It is busy all day long, she said, from 5
a.m. until midnight and is used by boys,
girls and adults.
New retail uses where the ice rink now
sits could produce $28.2 million in retail
sales annually and $282,000 in sales tax
revenue for the city, Meier said.
Brisbane resident Mike Chaple has
been taking his son to the ice center for
more than ve years now to play hockey
and admits turf elds are great.
However, he thinks the owners of
Bridgepointe need to honor the commit-
ment it made to the city to keep the ice
rink, which is used by families all over
the Peninsula and Bay Area.
Pacica resident Dee Watt has two
children who have grown up playing
hockey at Bridgepointe.
Local high schools offer nothing like
hockey and those who go to the Ice
Center value every minute they have in
this rink, Watt said.
The Ice Center of San Mateo also has
a gure skating team that travels the
state and places well in competitions.
The teams supporters say closing the
rink will dash the hopes of many young
gure skaters, who may not be able to
travel elsewhere to skate.
Ice Center ownership told the Daily
Journal business is good and that it
wants to stay put.
At Thursday nights meeting, many
questioned whether a turfed eld was a
good tradeoff saying they are often cur-
rently underutilized.
Most, though, said the battle to save
the rink was more than 10 years ago and
that it should not have to be fought
again.
This battle was fought already and
ownership needs to stick to its obliga-
tion, McAuliffe said with her hockey-
playing son beside her.
Bill Silverfarb can be reached by email: sil-
verfarb@smdailyjournal.com or by phone:
(650) 344-5200 ext. 106.
Continued from page 1
ICE
MONDAY, JULY 30, 2012
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) -- Onlookers might believe
you to be a better talker than a doer. This can easily
be corrected, however, if you act frst and leave the
conversation until later.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) -- Exercise restraint in your
commercial dealings and dont jump on the frst offer
you receive. Thoroughly study all that is involved,
both the obvious points and the subtleties.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) -- Friends and associates
will quickly become rattled about a critical situation if
you are too indecisive. Once youve studied the mat-
ter, make your best judgment call and abide by it.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) -- Manage the people in
your charge with a gentle hand, because they will
respond more favorably to kindness than to demands
or anger.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) -- Instead of
handling your resources with prudence, you could
easily succumb to your more extravagant impulses.
Remember, what you waste now wont be there
when you really need it.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) -- Be extremely care-
ful not to play favorites in your involvements with
friends. If you do, knowingly or unknowingly, you
wont like the results one bit.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) -- Theres a chance
youll become involved in an endeavor in which all the
real power will reside in the hands of another. Should
this happen, dont fght what you cant change.
PISCES (Feb. 20-March 20) -- Historically, when
you spend impulsively, you seldom walk away with
a good deal. If youre not careful, it could be one of
those times when youll repeat this pattern.
ARIES (March 21-April 19) -- Friends who want to
support you might turn reluctant if you come off as
too self-serving. Do unto others as you would do
unto yourself.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20) -- The biggest thing you
might have to overcome is a lack of belief in your
capabilities. If you dont have any faith in yourself,
why should others?
GEMINI (May 21-June 20) -- Not everyone with
whom youll be involved will be in accord with your
way of thinking, but show a willingness to have a
meeting of the minds and good things will happen.
CANCER (June 21-July 22) -- If youre not careful,
you could fnd yourself in the unenviable position of
having others making all the decisions for you. Once
you lose control, it could be diffcult to regain it.
COPYRIGHT 2012 United Feature Syndicate, Inc.
COMICS/GAMES
7-30-12
wEEkENDS PUZZLE SOLVED
PREVIOUS
SUDOkU
ANSwERS
Want More Fun
and Games?
Jumble Page 2 La Times Crossword Puzzle Classifeds
Tundra & Over the Hedge Comics Classifeds
kids Across/Parents Down Puzzle Family Resource Guide


Each row and each column must contain the numbers 1
through 6 without repeating.

The numbers within the heavily outlined boxes, called
cages, must combine using the given operation (in any
order) to produce the target numbers in the top-left corners.

Freebies: Fill in single-box cages with the number in the
top-left corner.
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ACROSS
1 Refrain syllables
4 Cleopatras wooer
8 Flu-ridden
11 Ego ending
12 Meads island
13 -- Paulo
14 Silence, in a way (2 wds.)
16 Pt. of GPA
17 Rah-rah speech (2 wds.)
18 Emphatic refusal (2 wds.)
20 Creeping vine
21 Pro vote
22 Chili server
25 Boom
29 Toward shelter
30 Good times
31 -- Tzu
32 Funny Charlotte --
33 Switch positions
34 I -- -- man with seven
wives
35 Vacillates
38 Bricklayer
39 Fine (hyph.)
40 Carbondale sch.
41 Column type
44 Alfalfa and clover
48 Part of TNT
49 First appearance
51 Moose kin
52 48 Hrs. lead
53 Vocalist -- Sumac
54 Deli bread
55 Grabs a bite
56 Showery mo.
DOwN
1 Speech problem
2 Late tennis great
3 Traffc sign
4 Like crazy
5 On a rampage
6 Noisy dispute
7 Kitchen hisser
8 -- -- Her Standing There
9 Volcanic emission
10 Sluggish
12 Barrel part
15 Serviceable
19 Boat rower
21 Itches
22 Pie crust ingredient
23 Jai --
24 Bug repellent
25 Grayish horses
26 Dots in la mer
27 Noted Roman censor
28 Zen riddle
30 Branch off
34 Bea Arthur sitcom
36 Bali --
37 Time of the mammals
38 Gnat
40 Varieties
41 Livys route
42 Monsieurs airport
43 Reebok rival
44 Hat material
45 Gaelic pop star
46 Sgt. Prestons group
47 Dry up
50 Extinct bird
DILBERT CROSSwORD PUZZLE
fUTURE SHOCk
PEARLS BEfORE SwINE
GET fUZZY
Monday July 30, 2012 21
THE DAILY JOURNAL
22
Monday July 30, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
104 Training
TERMS & CONDITIONS
The San Mateo Daily Journal Classi-
fieds will not be responsible for more
than one incorrect insertion, and its lia-
bility shall be limited to the price of one
insertion. No allowance will be made for
errors not materially affecting the value
of the ad. All error claims must be sub-
mitted within 30 days. For full advertis-
ing conditions, please ask for a Rate
Card.
105 Education/Instruction
CALVARY
PRESCHOOL
OPEN
ENROLLMENT
Little Learners: age 2.5-3.5
Big Explorers: age 3.5-5
calvarypreschoolmillbrae.com
(650)588-8030
106 Tutoring
TUTORING
Spanish, French,
Italian
Certificated Local
Teacher
All Ages!
(650)573-9718
110 Employment
APPLY NOW- F/T WORK
Up to $900 wk
PAID TRAINING
INCENTIVE
IMMEDIATE START
No experience needed
Full Training provided
1-866-363-9895 1-866-363-9895
CHILDCARE/ HOUSEKEEPER -
Live in position (private room, bath, and
TV), English speaking. Good salary. San
Mateo, (650)678-6737.
110 Employment
GENENTECH in South San Francisco
seeks:
- Study Data Manager. Work with
clinical development team to set up data
collection process and to ensure data
quality for the analysis. Reqs Master or
foreign equivalent in Biotechnology, Biol-
ogy, Chemistry or rel sci field & 3 yrs
exp. (88-00402451)
- Process Engr: Provide tech solu-
tions for assigned process syst or areas
for process engg in delivery of capital
projects & eng serv for comm & clinical
mfg related facilities. Reqs Bach or for
equiv in Chem Eng, Biotech or rel. fld. &
2 yrs. of exp. Significant travel required.
Position located in South San Francisco,
CA but will work at various mfg plants
throughout North & South America. (88-
00401156)
- Programmer Analyst. Responsible
for guiding internal customer groups
(Drug Safety) and providing technical
hands-on expertise while delivering solu-
tions to the business group. Reqs Bach-
elor or foreign equivalent in Computer
Science or related & 5 yrs. of prog. exp.
(88-00402181)
Please mail your resume specifying the
position requisition number to Genen-
tech, c/o SB MS-829A, 1 DNA Way,
South San Francisco, CA 94080.
Genentech is an Equal Opportunity Em-
ployer
HOME CARE AIDES
Multiple shifts to meet your needs. Great
pay & benefits, Sign-on bonus, 1yr exp
required.
Matched Caregivers (650)839-2273,
(408)280-7039 or (888)340-2273
RESTAURANT -
Experienced line, Night / Weekends.
Apply in person,1201 San Carlos Ave.,
San Carlos.
110 Employment
YOURE INVITED
Are you: Dependable
Friendly
Detail Oriented
Willing to learn new skills
Do you have: Good English skills
A Desire for steady employment
A desire for employment benefits
If the above items describe you,
please call (650)342-6978.
Immediate opening available in
Customer Service position.
Call for an appointment.
Crystal Cleaning Center
San Mateo, CA 94402
110 Employment
NEWSPAPER INTERNS
JOURNALISM
The Daily Journal is looking for in-
terns to do entry level reporting, re-
search, updates of our ongoing fea-
tures and interviews. Photo interns al-
so welcome.
We expect a commitment of four to
eight hours a week for at least four
months. The internship is unpaid, but
intelligent, aggressive and talented in-
terns have progressed in time into
paid correspondents and full-time re-
porters.
College students or recent graduates
are encouraged to apply. Newspaper
experience is preferred but not neces-
sarily required.
Please send a cover letter describing
your interest in newspapers, a resume
and three recent clips. Before you ap-
ply, you should familiarize yourself
with our publication. Our Web site:
www.smdailyjournal.com.
Send your information via e-mail to
news@smdailyjournal.com or by reg-
ular mail to 800 S. Claremont St #210,
San Mateo CA 94402.
SALES -
WellnessMatters Magazine is seeking
independent contractor/advertising
sales representatives to help grow
this new publication for the Peninsula
and Half Moon Bay. WellnessMatters
has the backing of the Daily Journal.
The perfect contractor will have a pas-
sion for wellness and for sharing our
message with potential advertisers,
supporters and sponsors. Please
send cover letter and resume to: in-
fo@wellnessmattersmagazine.com.
Positions are available immediately.
SALES/MARKETING
INTERNSHIPS
The San Mateo Daily Journal is looking
for ambitious interns who are eager to
jump into the business arena with both
feet and hands. Learn the ins and outs
of the newspaper and media industries.
This position will provide valuable
experience for your bright future.
Email resume
info@smdailyjournal.com
203 Public Notices
NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE TS No.
12-0013135 Title Order No. 12-0021760
APN No. 042-236-120-4 YOU ARE IN
DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST,
DATED 05/18/2006. UNLESS YOU
TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR
PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A
PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EX-
PLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE
PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU
SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. Notice
is hereby given that RECONTRUST
COMPANY, N.A., as duly appointed
trustee pursuant to the Deed of Trust
executed by KAREN GRIGORIAN AND
IRINA KHACHATOURIAN, HUSBAND
AND WIFE JOINT TENANTS, dated
05/18/2006 and recorded 5/19/2006, as
Instrument No. 2006-075983, in Book ,
Page , of Official Records in the office of
the County Recorder of San Mateo
County, State of California, will sell on
08/06/2012 at 12:30PM, At the Marshall
Street entrance to the Hall of Justice,
400 County Center, Redwood City, San
Mateo County, CA at public auction, to
the highest bidder for cash or check as
described below, payable in full at time of
sale, all right, title, and interest conveyed
to and now held by it under said Deed of
Trust, in the property situated in said
County and State and as more fully de-
scribed in the above referenced Deed of
Trust. The street address and other
common designation, if any, of the real
property described above is purported to
be: 88 WEST 41ST AVENUE, SAN MA-
TEO, CA, 94403. The undersigned
Trustee disclaims any liability for any in-
correctness of the street address and
other common designation, if any, shown
herein.The total amount of the unpaid
balance with interest thereon of the obli-
gation secured by the property to be sold
plus reasonable estimated costs, ex-
penses and advances at the time of the
initial publication of the Notice of Sale is
$715,519.98. It is possible that at the
time of sale the opening bid may be less
than the total indebtedness due. In addi-
tion to cash, the Trustee will accept
cashier's checks drawn on a state or na-
tional bank, a check drawn by a state or
federal credit union, or a check drawn by
a state or federal savings and loan asso-
ciation, savings association, or savings
bank specified in Section 5102 of the Fi-
nancial Code and authorized to do busi-
ness in this state.Said sale will be made,
in an ''AS IS'' condition, but without cove-
nant or warranty, express or implied, re-
garding title, possession or encumbran-
ces, to satisfy the indebtedness secured
by said Deed of Trust, advances there-
under, with interest as provided, and the
unpaid principal of the Note secured by
said Deed of Trust with interest thereon
as provided in said Note, plus fees,
charges and expenses of the Trustee
and of the trusts created by said Deed of
Trust. If required by the provisions of
section 2923.5 of the California Civil
Code, the declaration from the mortga-
gee, beneficiary or authorized agent is
attached to the Notice of Trustee's Sale
duly recorded with the appropriate Coun-
ty Recorder's Office. NOTICE TO PO-
TENTIAL BIDDERS If you are consider-
ing bidding on this property lien, you
should understand that there are risks in-
volved in bidding at a trustee auction.
You will be bidding on a lien, not on a
property itself. Placing the highest bid at
a trustee auction does not automatically
entitle you to free and clear ownership of
the property. You should also be aware
that the lien being auctioned off may be a
junior lien. If you are the highest bidder
at the auction, you are or may be respon-
sible for paying off all liens senior to the
lien being auctioned off, before you can
receive clear title to the property. You
are encouraged to investigate the exis-
tence, priority, and size of outstanding
liens that may exist on this property by
contacting the county recorder's office or
a title insurance company, either of
which may charge you a fee for this infor-
mation. If you consult either of these re-
sources, you should be aware that the
lender may hold more than one mort-
gage or deed of trust on the property.
NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER The
sale date shown on this notice of sale
may be postponed one or more times by
the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a
court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the
California Civil Code. The law requires
that information about trustee sale post-
ponements be made available to you and
to the public, as a courtesy to those not
present at the sale. If you wish to learn
whether your sale date has been post-
poned, and, if applicable, the resched-
uled time and date for the sale of this
property, you may call 1-800-281-8219
or visit this Internet Web site www.recon-
trustco.com, using the file number as-
signed to this case 12-0013135. Infor-
mation about postponements that are
very short in duration or that occur close
in time to the scheduled sale may not im-
mediately be reflected in the telephone
information or on the Internet Web site.
The best way to verify postponement in-
formation is to attend the scheduled sale.
RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. 1800
Tapo Canyon Rd., CA6-914-01-94 SIMI
VALLEY, CA 93063 Phone/Sale Informa-
tion: (800) 281-8219 By: Trustee's Sale
Officer RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A.
is a debt collector attempting to collect a
debt. Any information obtained will be
used for that purpose. FEI #
1006.163184 7/16, 7/23, 7/30/2012
23 Monday July 30, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Tundra Tundra Tundra
Over the Hedge Over the Hedge Over the Hedge
SAN FRANCISQUITO CREEK JOINT POWERS AUTHORITY
NOTICE OF AVAILABILITY
Draft Environmental Impact Report for the San Francisquito Creek
Flood Protection Project -
East Bayshore Road to San Francisco Bay
The San Francisquito Creek Joint Powers Authority (SFCJPA) has prepared a Draft
Environmental Impact Report (DEIR) for the San Francisquito Creek Flood Protection and
Ecosystem Restoration Project - East Bayshore Road to San Francisco Bay (Project) and is
making this document available for public review.
PROJECT DESCRIPTION: The Project would ultimately protect properties and infrastructure
between East Bayshore Road and the San Francisco Bay from San Francisquito Creek (Creek)
flows resulting from 100-year fluvial flood flows occurring at the same time as a 100-year tide,
accounting for projected sea level rise through 2067. The Project would reduce local fluvial flood
risks in the Project area during storm events, provide the capacity needed for future upstream
improvements, increase and improve ecological habitat, and provide for improved recreational
opportunities. The Project components proposed to improve management of flood flows along
the Creek from East Bayshore Road to San Francisco Bay include opening the Creek channel to
flow into the Baylands Preserve, reconfiguring and raising levees, creating a marshplain terrace
to convey high flows, installing floodwalls, widening the Creek channel, and constructing access
roads for maintenance purposes. The majority of the Project elements would occur on properties
in Palo Alto and East Palo Alto and owned by the City of Palo Alto, or within Santa Clara Valley
Water District or City of East Palo Alto rights-of-way.
PROJECT IMPACTS: Pursuant to the California Environmental Quality Act, the SFCJPA, as the
lead agency for the Project, has prepared a DEIR to evaluate environmental impacts of the
proposed Project. The DEIR identifies potentially significant environmental impacts associated
with aesthetics, air quality, biological resources, cultural and paleontological resources, geology
and soils, greenhouse gases, water resources, noise and vibration, public health, recreation, and
traffic. Most of the impacts were determined to be less than significant after the implementation
of mitigation measures proposed for the Project.
Construction impacts related to air quality were determined to be significant and unavoidable
even after implementation of traffic and air quality mitigation measures. Additionally, because
implementation of the mitigation measures proposed to compensate for recreational impacts to
the Palo Alto Golf Course are outside the lead agencys jurisdiction and fulfillment cannot be
guaranteed, a significant and unavoidable impact on the Golf Course is also assumed. SFCJPAs
judgment is that the flood control benefits to residents in East Palo Alto and Palo Alto outweigh
the identified significant and unavoidable impacts.
DOCUMENT AVAILABILITY: The DEIR will be available for public review at the following
locations:
San Francisquito Creek Joint Powers Authority
615 B Menlo Avenue
Menlo Park, CA 94025
City of Palo Alto Main Library
1213 Newell Rd.
Palo Alto, CA 94303
City of East Palo Alto Library
2415 University Ave.
East Palo Alto, CA 94303
A limited number of copies of the DEIR are available on a first request basis, by contacting the
San Francisquito Creek Joint Powers Authority at the address, telephone number, or electronic
mail address indicated herein. It is also available at on the SFCJPA website at
http://sfcjpa.org/web/documents/san-francisquito-creek-jpa/. The public comment period on the
DEIR closes at 5 p.m. on September 13th, 2012.
PUBLIC MEETING: In conjunction with public review, the SFCJPA will also conduct two public
hearings to take comments on the DEIR on August 15th and August 29th, 2012, both occurring
at 6:00 p.m. at East Palo Alto City Hall (2415 University Avenue).
COMMENT PERIOD:. The public is encouraged to ask questions and provide comments on the
DEIR by email, direct mail or fax. Comments and feedback received between July 30th and
September 13th, 2012 will be reviewed and incorporated into the Final EIR, as appropriate.
Comments on this document should be directed to:.
Kevin Murray, Project Manager
San Francisquito Creek Joint Powers Authority
615-B Menlo Avenue
Menlo Park, California 94025
650-324-1972
email: kmurray@sfcjpa.org
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #251223
The following persons are doing busi-
ness as: Yi Yuan Szechuan Restaurant,
1711 EL Camino Real, MILLBRAE, CA
94030 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owners: Eugene Jin Su and Wenjun
Hu, 178 Country Club Dr., San Francis-
co, CA 94132. The business is conduct-
ed by a General Partnership. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on N/A
/s/ Eugene Jin Su /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 07/03/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
07/09/12, 07/16/12, 07/23/12, 07/30/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #251164
The following person is doing business
as: Guitar Center #219, 53 W. Hillsdale
Blvd. #A, SAN MATEO, CA 94403 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Guitar Center Stores, INC., CA. The
business is conducted by a Corporation.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on
/s/ John W. Unger /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 07/02/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
07/09/12, 07/16/12, 07/23/12, 07/30/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #250903
The following person is doing business
as: Akarshan Designs, 1149 Millbrae
Ave,, MILLBRAE, CA 94030 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Akar-
shan Designs Incorporated, CA. The
business is conducted by a Corporation.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on 01/01/2012
/s/ Harminder Bajaj /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/14/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
07/09/12, 07/16/12, 07/23/12, 07/30/12).
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #251406
The following person is doing business
as: Mark Hunter Construction, 1038 Ter-
minal Way, SAN CARLOS, CA 94070 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Mark Hunter, 3403 CSM Dr., San Mateo,
CA 94402. The business is conducted by
an Individual. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on.
/s/ Mark Hunter /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 07/17/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
07/23/12, 07/30/12, 08/6/12, 08/13/12).
210 Lost & Found
FOUND - Evan - I found your iPod, call
(650)261-9656
LOST - SET OF KEYS, Has HONDA
CAR KEY. San Mateo. Reward. 650-
274-9892
LOST - 2 silver rings and silver watch,
May 7th in Burlingame between Park Rd.
& Walgreens, Sentimental value. Call
Gen @ (650)344-8790
LOST - Small Love Bird, birght green
with orange breast. Adeline Dr. & Bernal
Ave., Burlingame. Escaped Labor Day
weekend. REWARD! (650)343-6922
LOST SIAMESE CAT on 5/21 in
Belmont. Dark brown& tan, blue eyes.
REWARD! (415)990-8550
LOST: SMALL diamond cross, silver
necklace with VERY sentimental
meaning. Lost in San Mateo 2/6/12
(650)578-0323.
294 Baby Stuff
B.O.B. DUALLIE STROLLER, for two.
Excellent condition. Blue. $300.
Call 650-303-8727.
BABY CAR SEAT AND CARRIER $20
(650)458-8280
295 Art
WALL ART, from Pier 1, indoor/outdoor,
$15. Very nice! (650)290-1960
296 Appliances
HAIR DRYER, Salon Master, $10.
(650)854-4109
HUNTER OSCILLATING FAN, excellent
condition. 3 speed. $35. (650)854-4109
MIROMATIC PRESSURE cooker flash
canner 4qt. $25. 415 333-8540
RADIATOR HEATER, oil filled, electric,
1500 watts $25. (650)504-3621
RONCO ROTTISERIE - New model,
black, all accessories, paid $150., asking
$65., (650)290-1960
ROTISSERIE GE, US Made, IN-door or
out door, Holds large turkey 24 wide,
Like new, $80, OBO (650)344-8549
SHOP VACUUM rigid brand 3.5 horse
power 9 gal wet/dry $40. (650)591-2393
SMALL SLOW cooker. Used once, $12
(650)368-3037
SUNBEAM TOASTER -Automatic, ex-
cellent condition, $30., (415)346-6038
VACUUM CLEANER Eureka canister
like new, SOLD!
VACUUM CLEANER excellent condition
$45. (650)878-9542
WASHER AND Dryer, $200
(650)333-4400
WATER HEATER $75, (650)333-4400
297 Bicycles
BIKE RACK Roof mounted, holds up to
4 bikes, $65 (650)594-1494
THULE BIKE rack, for roof load bar,
Holds bike upright. $100 (650)594-1494
298 Collectibles
1936 BERLIN OLYMPIC PIN, $99.,
(650)365-1797
298 Collectibles
"STROLLEE" WALKING Doll in Original
Box Brunette in Red/white/black dress,
1970s/1980s, $25, (650)873-8167
1982 PRINT 'A Tune Off The Top Of My
Head' 82/125 $80 (650) 204-0587
2 FIGURINES - 1 dancing couple, 1
clown face. both $15. (650)364-0902
3 MADAME ALEXANDER Dolls. $40 for
all. SOLD!
67 OLD Used U.S. Postage Stamps.
Many issued before World War II. All
different. $4.00, (650)787-8600
AMISH QUILLOW, brand new, authen-
tic, $50. (650)589-8348
ANTIQUE TRAIN set, complete in the
box from the 50s, $80 obo
(650)589-8348
ARMY SHIRT, long sleeves, with pock-
ets. XL $15 each (408)249-3858
BAY MEADOWS bag - $30.each,
(650)345-1111
BEANIE BABIES in cases with TY tags
attached, good condition. $10 each or 12
for $100. (650) 588-1189
BEAUTIFUL RUSTIE doll Winter Bliss w/
stole & muffs, 23, $90. OBO, (650)754-
3597
COLLECTIBLE CHRISTMAS TREE
STAND with 8 colored lights at base / al-
so have extra lights, $50., (650)593-8880
COLLECTIBLES: RUSSELL Baze Bob-
bleheads Bay Meadows, $10 EA. brand
new in original box. (415)612-0156
COLORIZED TERRITORIAL Quarters
uncirculated with Holder $15/all,
(408)249-3858
COMIC BOOK Collection, Many Titles
from 60s, 70s, & 80s, $75 obo,
(650)271-0731
GAYLORD PERRY 8x10 signed photo
$10 (650)692-3260
GUMBIE AUTOGRAPH Newsletter Art
and Gloria Clokey, $40., (650)873-8167
JIM BEAM decorative collectors bottles
(8), many sizes and shapes, $10. each,
(650)364-7777
JOE MONTANA signed authentic retire-
ment book, $39., (650)692-3260
MARK MCGUIRE hats, cards, beanie
babies, all for $98., (650)520-8558
ORIGINAL SMURF FIGURES - 1979-
1981, 18+ mushroom hut, 1 1/2 x 3 1/2,
all $40., (650)518-0813
RAT PACK framed picture with glass 24"
by 33" mint condition $60. SOLD!
STACKING MINI-KETTLES - 3
Pots/cover: ea. 6 diam; includes carry
handle for stacking transit. Unique.
Brown speckle enamelware, $20.,
(650)341-3288
TIME LIFE Art books collection. 28 Vols.
$75 all (650)701-0276
VINTAGE HOLLIE HOBBIE LUNCH-
BOX with Thermos, 1980s, $25., Call
Maria 650-873-8167
WANTED:
OLDER PLASTIC MODEL KITS.
Aurora, Revell, Monogram.
Immediate cash.
Pat 650-759-0793.
299 Computers
HP PRINTER Deskjet 970c color printer.
Excellent condition. Software & accesso-
ries included. $30. 650-574-3865
300 Toys
BILINGUAL POWER lap top
6 actividaes $18 650 349-6059
LEGO'S (2) Unopened, NINJAGO, La-
sha's Bite Cycle, 250 pieces; MONSTER
FIGHTERS, Swamp Creature, ages 7-14
$27.00 both, SOLD!
302 Antiques
1912 COFFEE Percolator Urn. perfect
condition includes electric cord $85.
(415)565-6719
ANTIQUE ITALIAN lamp 18 high, $70
(650)387-4002
302 Antiques
ANTIQUE WASHING machine, some
rust on legs, rust free drum and ringer.
$45/obo, (650)574-4439
CHINA CABINET - Vintage, 6 foot,
solid mahogany. $300/obo.
(650)867-0379
303 Electronics
3 SHELF SPEAKERS - 8 OM, $15.
each, (650)364-0902
32 TOSHIBA Flat screen TV like new,
bought 9/9/11 with box. $300 Firm.
(415)264-6605
46 MITSUBISHI Projector TV, great
condition. $400. (650)261-1541.
BIG SONY TV 37" - Excellent Condition
Worth $2300 will Sacrifice for only $95.,
(650)878-9542
FLIP CAMCORDER $50. (650)583-2767
H/P WINDOWS Desk Jet 840C Printer.
Like New. All hookups. $30.00
(650)344-7214
HP COLOR Scanner, Unopened box,
Scan, edit, organize photos/documents
480 x 9600 DPI, Restores colors,
brightness, $40.00 (650)578-9208
LEFT-HAND ERGONOMIC keyboard
with 'A-shape' key layout Num pad, $20
(650)204-0587
LSI SCSI Ultra320 Controller + (2) 10k
RPM 36GB SCSI II hard drives $40
(650)204-0587
NINTENDO NES plus 8 games,Works,
$30 (650)589-8348
304 Furniture
2 DINETTE Chairs both for $29
(650)692-3260
2 END Tables solid maple '60's era
$40/both. (650)670-7545
4 DRAWER metal file cabinet, black, no
lock model, like new $50 (650)204-0587
ARMOIRE CABINET - $90., Call
(415)375-1617
CAST AND metal headboard and foot-
board. white with brass bars, Queen size
$95 650-588-7005
CHAIR MODERN light wood made in Ita-
ly $99 (415)334-1980
CHANDELIER WITH 5 lights/ candela-
bre base with glass shades $20.
(650)504-3621
COFFEE TABLE - 30 x 58, light oak,
heavy, 1980s, $40., (650)348-5169
COMPUTER DESK from Ikea, $40
(650)348-5169
COUCH-FREE. OLD world pattern, soft
fabric. Some cat scratch damage-not too
noticeable. 650-303-6002
DESK SOLID wood 21/2' by 5' 3 leather
inlays manufactured by Sligh 35 years
old $100 (must pick up) (650)231-8009
DINING ROOM SET - table, four chairs,
lighted hutch, $500. all, (650)296-3189
DISPLAY CASE wood & glass 31 x 19
inches $30. (650)873-4030
DRUM TABLE - brown, perfect condi-
tion, nice design, with storage, $45.,
(650)345-1111
DUNCAN PHYFE Mahogany china
cabinet with bow glass. $250, O/B.
Mahogany Duncan Phyfe dining room
table $150, O/B. Round mahogany side
table $150, O/B.SOLD!
END TABLES (2) - One for $5. hand
carved, other table is antique white mar-
ble top with drawer $40., (650)308-6381
END TABLES (2)- Cherry finish, still in
box, need to assemble, 26L x 21W x
21H, $100. for both, (650)592-2648
FOLDING PICNIC table - 8 x 30, 7 fold-
ing, padded chairs, $80. (650)364-0902
HAND MADE portable jewelry display
case wood and see through lid $45. 25 x
20 x 4 inches. (650)592-2648.
HAWAIIAN STYLE living room chair Re-
tton with split bamboo, blue and white
stripe cushion $99 (650)343-4461
KITCHEN/BAR STOOL wooden with
high back $99 (650)343-4461
304 Furniture
KITCHEN TALE walnut with chrome
legs. 36x58 with one leaf 11 1/2. $50,
San Mateo (650)341-5347
LOUNGE CHAIRS - 2 new, with cover &
plastic carring case & headrest, $35.
each, (650)592-7483
MODULAR DESK/BOOKCASE/STOR-
AGE unit - Cherry veneer, white lami-
nate, $75., (650)888-0039
OFFICE LAMP, small. Black & white with
pen holder and paper holder. Brand new,
in the box. $10 (650)867-2720
PAPASAN CHAIRS (2) -with cushions
$45. each set, (650)347-8061
PEDESTAL DINETTE 36 Square Table
- $65., (650)347-8061
RECLINER CHAIR very comfortable vi-
nyl medium brown $70, (650)368-3037
ROCKING CHAIR - excellent condition,
oak, with pads, $85.obo, (650)369-9762
ROCKING CHAIR - Traditional, full size
Rocking chair. Excellent condition $100.,
(650)504-3621
SMALL STORAGE/ Hutch, Stained
Green, pretty. $40, (650)290-1960
STEREO CABINET walnut w/3 black
shelves 16x 22x42. $30, 650-341-5347
STORAGE TABLE light brown lots of
storage good cond. $45. (650)867-2720
TEA CHEST , Bombay, burgundy, glass
top, perfect cond. $35 (650)345-1111
TRUNDLE BED - Single with wheels,
$40., (650)347-8061
TWIN BEDS (2) - like new condition with
frame, posturepedic mattress, $99. each,
SOLD!
VANITY ETHAN Allen maple w/drawer
and liftup mirror like new $95
(650)349-2195
VINTAGE UPHOLSTERED wooden
chairs, $25 each or both for $40. nice
set. (650)583-8069
VINTAGE WING back chair $75,
(650)583-8069
306 Housewares
"PRINCESS HOUSE decorator urn
"Vase" cream with blue flower 13 inch H
$25., (650)868-0436
28" by 15" by 1/4" thick glass shelves,
cost $35 each sell at $15 ea. Five availa-
ble, Call (650)345-5502
6 BOXES of Victorian lights ceiling & wall
$90., (650)340-9644
CANDLEHOLDER - Gold, angel on it,
tall, purchased from Brueners, originally
$100., selling for $30.,(650)867-2720
CEILING FAN multi speed, brown and
bronze $45. SOLD!
DINING ROOM Victorian Chandelier
seven light, $90., (650)340-9644
DRIVE MEDICAL design locking elevat-
ed toilet seat. New. $45. (650)343-4461
FANCY CUT GLASSWARE-Bowls,
Glasses, Under $20 varied, SOLD!
IRONING BOARD $15 (650)347-8061
KITCHEN FAUCET- single handle,
W/spray - not used $19 (650)494-1687
PERSIAN TEA set for 8. Including
spoon, candy dish, and tray. Gold Plated.
$100. (650) 867-2720
SOLID TEAK floor model 16 wine rack
with turntable $60. (650)592-7483
307 Jewelry & Clothing
BRACELET - Ladies authentic Murano
glass from Italy, vibrant colors, like new,
$100., (650)991-2353 Daly City
GALLON SIZE bag of costume jewelry -
various sizes, colors, $100. for bag,
(650)589-2893
LADIES GOLD Lame' elbow length-
gloves sz 7.5 $15 New. (650)868-0436
24
Monday July 30, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
ACROSS
1 Captain after a
white whale
5 Former Idol
judge Paula
10 Glove
compartment
items
14 Pro __: free, as
legal work
15 Mild cigar
16 Juans water
17 Vacillates
20 Gossip spreader
21 Americas
national bird
22 Belief: Suff.
24 __ the land of the
free ...
25 Goes out with
periodically
32 Make a mistake
33 __ be sorry!
34 Porcine sniffer
37 Name of 12
popes
39 Trick alternative
41 The __-bitsy
spider ...
42 Florida coastal
city
44 __ at em!
46 www connection
co.
47 Acts nervously in
the waiting room
50 B&O et al.
51 Gun lobby org.
52 A __ Named
Desire
58 Smells
62 Searches all over
64 Drink buyers
words
65 Use at mealtime,
as dishes
66 When tripled, a
story shortener
67 Lay eyes on
68 Martinis partner
in vermouth
69 Bakery appliance
DOWN
1 Dear columnist
2 Golfers target
3 Soon, to
Shakespeare
4 Neckwear with a
tux
5 Coblenz
complaint
6 Oozy horror film
menace
7 Number-
crunchers input
8 Russian river
9 Big Bens city
10 Tubes with cheese
11 Eagerly excited
12 Yank
13 One-named
Nigerian singer
18 Back-talking
19 Owners
documents
23 No longer at issue
25 Mens or
Womens, e.g.:
Abbr.
26 Opera highlight
27 Noted TV firer
28 Rolls up, as a flag
29 Admirals
command
30 Car rental giant
31 __ I have
anything to say
about it
35 Cold War country:
Abbr.
36 Teh for The,
say
38 One may be
hidden in a fake
rock
40 IRS employee
43 Farm size units
45 2000s Houston-
based scandal
subject
48 Bible book named
for a woman
49 Bro, to a beatnik
52 Blackthorn fruit
53 Heavy weights
54 Play friskily
55 So long, signore
56 FBI personnel
57 Letters after pis
59 Norwegian saint
60 Went on
horseback
61 Tchaikovskys __
Lake
63 Star Wars saga
nickname
W E S T E R N U S A P P A L
I P H O N E A P P S A L T I
T E A R S I N T O H Y A T T
S E R I O G O T A L I G H T
C U D M E N I A L
N O D L E A P D A Y A T E
O N U S A R R O Z E R R S
T E R I D O O N E V I A L
T M A X C A P E D A S T A
H A N C A R S E A T M E M
E N D A L L T A J
B R U N O M A R S L E G I T
E U R O S Q U I C K T I M E
S L A D E U M B R E L L A S
T E N E T A S S Y R I A N S
By Vanessa Michaels
(c)2012 Tribune Media Services, Inc.
07/30/12
07/30/12
ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE:
Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle
Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Nichols Lewis
xwordeditor@aol.com
307 Jewelry & Clothing
WE BUY GOLD
Highest Prices Paid on
Jewelry or Scrap
Michaels Jewelry
Since 1963
253 Park Road
Burlingame
(650)342-4461
308 Tools
CIRCULAR SAW, Craftsman-brand, 10,
4 long x 20 wide. Comes w/ stand - $70.
(650)678-1018
CLICKER TORQUE Wrench, 20 - 150
pounds, new with lifetime warranty and
case, $39, 650-595-3933
CRAFTSMAN 3/4 horse power 3,450
RPM $60 (650)347-5373
CRAFTSMAN ARC-WELDER - 30-250
amp, and accessories, $275., (650)341-
0282
DAYTON ELECTRIC 1 1/2 horse power
1,725 RPM $60 (650)347-5373
FMC TIRE changer Machine, $650
(650)333-4400
GENERATOR 13,000 WATTS Brand
New 20hp Honda $2800 (650)333-4400
LAWN MOWER reel type push with
height adjustments. Just sharpened $45
650-591-2144 San Carlos
SCNCO TRIM Nail Gun, $100
(650) 521-3542
STADILA LEVEL 6ft, $60
(650) 521-3542
TABLE SAW 10", very good condition
$85. (650) 787-8219
309 Office Equipment
ELECTRIC TYPEWRITER Smith Corona
$60. (650)878-9542
309 Office Equipment
EPSON WORKFORCE 520 color printer,
scanner, copier, & fax machine, like new,
warranty, $30., (650)212-7020
310 Misc. For Sale
1 PAIR of matching outdoor planting pots
$20., (650)871-7200
10 PLANTS (assorted) for $3.00 each,
(650)349-6059
14 SEGA genius games 2 controllers
$20 (650)589-8348
2 CANES 1 Irish Shillelagh 1 regular $25
SOLD
20 TRAVEL books .50 cents ea
(650)755-8238
21 PIECE Punch bowl glass set $55.,
SOLD!
30 NOVEL books $1.00 ea,
(650)755-8238
3D MOVIE glasses, (12) unopened,
sealed plastic, Real 3D, Kids and adults.
Paid $3.75 each, selling $1.50 each
(650)578-9208
4 IN 1 STERO UNIT. CD player broken.
$20., (650)834-4926
40 ADULT VHS Tapes $100,
(650)361-1148
5 PHOTOGRAPHIC CIVIL WAR
BOOKS plus 4 volumes of Abraham Lin-
coln books, $90., (650)345-5502
6 BASKETS with handles, all various
colors and good sizes, great for many
uses, all in good condition. $15 all
(650)347-5104
7 UNDERBED STORAGE BINS - Vinyl
with metal frame, 42 X 18 X 6, zipper
closure, $5. ea., (650)364-0902
9 CARRY-ON bags (assorted) - extra
large, good condition, $10. each obo,
(650)349-6059
AMERICAN HERITAGE books 107 Vol-
umes Dec.'54-March '81 $99/all
(650)345-5502
ARTIFICIAL FICUS Tree 6 ft. life like, full
branches. in basket $55. (650)269-3712
310 Misc. For Sale
ARTS & CRAFTS variety, $50
(650)368-3037
BARBIE BEACH vacation & Barbie prin-
cess bride computer games $15 each,
(650)367-8949
BEADS - Glass beads for jewelry mak-
ing, $75. all, (650)676-0732
BEAUTIFUL LAMPSHADE - cone shap-
ed, neutral color beige, 11.5 long X 17
wide, matches any decor, never used,
excellent condition, Burl, $18.,
(650)347-5104
BOOK "LIFETIME" WW1 $12.,
(408)249-3858
BOOK - Fighting Aircraft of WWII,
Janes, 1000 illustrations, $65., SOLD!
BOOK NATIONAL Geographic Nation-
al Air Museums, $15 (408)249-3858
BOOKS 20 HARDCOVER WW2 USMC
Korea, Europe. $50 (650)302-0976
BROADWAY by the Bay, Chorus Line
Sat 9/22; Broadway by Year Sat. 11/10
Section 4 main level $80.00 all.
(650)578-9208
CAR SUITCASES - good condition for
camping, car, vacation trips $15.00 all,
SOLD!
CEILING FAN - Multi speed, bronze &
brown, excellent shape, $45.,
SOLD!
CLASSIC TOY Train Magazines, (200)
mint condition, SOLD!
CLEAN CAR Kit, unopened sealed box,
7 full size containers for leather, spots,
glass, interior, paint, chamois, $25.00
(650)578-9208
DELONGHI-CONVENTION ROTISSER-
IE crome with glass door excellent condi-
tion $55 OBO (650)343-4461
DOOM (3) computer games $15/each 2
total, (650)367-8949
DVD'S TV programs 24 4 seasons $20
ea. (650)952-3466
ELECTRONIC TYPEWRITER good con-
dition $50., (650)878-9542
310 Misc. For Sale
FREE DWARF orange tree
SOLD!
FULL QUEEN quilt $20 SOLD!
GAME "BEAT THE EXPERTS" never
used $8., (408)249-3858
GEORGE Magazines, 30, all intact
$50/all OBO. (650)574-3229, Foster City
HARDCOVER MYSTERY BOOKS -
Current authors, $2. each (10), (650)364-
7777
HARLEY DAVIDSON black phone, per-
fect condition, $65., (650) 867-2720
ICE CHEST $15 (650)347-8061
JAMES PATTERSON BOOKS - 3 hard-
back @$3. each, 5 paperbacks @$1.
each, (650)341-1861
JEWELRY DISPLAY CASE - Hand-
made, portable, wood & see through lid
to open, 45L, 20W, 3H, $65., SOLD!
JOHN K KENNEDY Mementos, Books,
Magazines, Photos, Placards, Phono-
graph Records, Ect. $45 all
SOLD!
LIMITED QUANTITY VHS porno tapes,
$8. each, (650)871-7200
MASSAGER CHAIR - Homedics, Heat,
Timer, Remote, like new, $45.,
(650)344-7214
MENU FROM Steam Ship Lurline Aug.
20 1967 $10 (650)755-8238
MIRROR, ETHAN ALLEN - 57-in. high x
21-in. wide, maple frame and floor base,
like new, $95., (650)349-2195
NATURAL GRAVITY WATER SYSTEM
- Alkaline, PH Balance water, with anti-
oxident properties, good for home or of-
fice, brand new, $100., (650)619-9203.
NELSON DE MILLE -Hardback books 5
@ $3 each, (650)341-1861
NEW LIVING Yoga Tape for Beginners
$8. 650-578-8306
OBLONG SECURITY mirror 24" by 15"
$75 (650)341-7079
OLD 5 gal. glass water cooler bottle $20
(650) 521-3542
OUTDOOR SCREEN - New 4 Panel
Outdoor Screen, Retail $130 With Metal
Supports, $80/obo. (650)873-8167
PICTORIAL WORLD History Books
$80/all (650)345-5502
PLANT - Beautiful hybrodized dahlia tu-
bers, $3 to $8 each (12 available), while
supplies last, Bill (650)871-7200
QUEEN SIZE inflatable mattress with
built in battery air pump used twice $40,
(650)343-4461
SESAME STREET toilet seat excellent
condition $12 650 349-6059
SF GREETING Cards (300 w/envelopes)
factory sealed $20. (650)207-2712
SHOWER DOOR custom made 48 x 69
$70 (650)692-3260
STEP 2 sandbox Large with cover $25
(650)343-4329
STUART WOODS Hardback Books
2 @ $3.00 each. (650)341-1861
TABLECLOTH - Medium Blue color rec-
tangular tablecloth 70" long 52" wide with
12 napkins $15., (650)755-8238
TIRE CHAINS - brand new, in box, never
used, multiple tire sizes, $25., (650)594-
1494
TIRE CHAINS - used once includes rub-
ber tighteners plus carrying case. call for
corresponding tire size, $20.,
(650)345-5446
TO THE MOON The 1969 story in pic-
tures, text and sound. $35
SOLD!
TOILET SINK - like new with all of the
accessories ready to be installed, $55.
obo, (650)369-9762
TOTE FULL of English novels - Cathrine
Cookson, $100., (650)493-8467
VAN ROOF rack 3 piece. clamp-on, $75
(650)948-4895
VASE WITH flowers 2 piece good for the
Holidays, $25., (650) 867-2720
VICTORIAN DAYS In The Park Wine
Glasses 6 count. Fifteenth Annual $10
b/o (650)873-8167
VIDEO CENTER 38 inches H 21 inches
W still in box $45., (408)249-3858
VOLVO STATION Wagon car cover $50
650 888-9624
WALKER - never used, $85.,
(415)239-9063
310 Misc. For Sale
WALL LIGHT fixture - 2 lamp with frost-
ed fluted shades, gold metal, great for
bathroom vanity, never used, excellent
condition, $15., Burl, (650)347-5104
WOOD PLANT STAND- mint condition,
indoor, 25in. high, 11deep, with shelves
$15.00, SOLD!
311 Musical Instruments
12 STRING epiphone guitar. New, with
fender gig bag. $150 firm SOLD!
2 ORGANS, antique tramp, $100 each.
(650)376-3762
3 ACCORDIONS $110/ea. 1 Small
Accordion $82. (650)376-3762.
BONGO DRUM with instruction $30
(650)341-8342
HAMMOND B-3 Organ and 122 Leslie
Speaker. Excellent condition. $8,500. pri-
vate owner, (650)349-1172
HOHNER CUE stick guitar HW 300 G
Handcrafted $75 650 771-8513
JENCO VIBRAPHONE - Three Octave
Graduated Bars, vintage concert Model
near mint condition, $1,750.,
(650)871-0824
PIANO ORGAN, good condition. $110.
(650)376-3762
312 Pets & Animals
HAMSTER HABITAT SYSTEM - 2 cage
system with interconnecting tunnels,
Large: 9 1/2 x 19 1/2; Small 9 1/2 x 9
1/2, with water bottles, food bowls, exer-
cise wheel, lots of tunnels & connectors
makes varied configurations, much more.
$25., (650)594-1494
PET CARRIER Excellent Condition
Large size 36L x 24W x 26H Firm $25
(650)871-7200
REPTILE CAGE - Medium size, $20.,
(650)348-0372
SMALL DOG wire cage; pink, two doors
with divider $50.00 (650) 743-9534.
315 Wanted to Buy
GO GREEN!
We Buy GOLD
You Get The
$ Green $
Millbrae Jewelers
Est. 1957
400 Broadway - Millbrae
650-697-2685
316 Clothes
2. WOMEN'S Pink & White Motocycle
Helmet KBC $50 (415)375-1617
A BAG of Summer ties $15 OBO
(650)245-3661
BATHROBE MENS navy blue plush-ter-
ry and belt. Maroon piping and trim, 2
pockets. Medium size. $10., (650)341-
3288
BLACK Leather pants Mrs. size made in
France size 40 $99. (650)558-1975
BLACK LEATHER tap shoes 9M great
condition $99. (650)558-1975
BLOUSES SWEATERS and tops. Many
different styles & colors, med. to lrg., ex-
cellent condition $5 ea., have 20,
(650)592-2648
BOOTS - purple leather, size 8, ankle
length, $50.obo, (650)592-9141
EUROPEAN STYLE nubek leather la-
dies winter coat - tan colored with green
lapel & hoodie, $100., (650)888-0129
HARDING PARK mens golf dress shirts
(new) asking $25 (650)871-7200
LADIES BOOTS, thigh high, fold down
brown, leather, and beige suede leather
pair, tassels on back excellent, Condition
$40 ea. (650)592-2648
LADIES COAT Medium, dark lavender
$25 (650)368-3037
LADIES FAUX FUR COAT - Satin lining,
size M/L, $100. obo, (650)525-1990
LADIES JACKET size 3x 70% wool 30%
nylon never worn $50. (650)592-2648
LEATHER COAT medium size (snake
skin design) $50 (650)755-8238
MEN'S SUIT almost new $25.
650-573-6981
316 Clothes
LEATHER JACKETS (5) - used but not
abused. Like New, $100 each.
(650)670-2888
LEVIS MENS jeans - Size 42/30, well
faded, excellent condition, $10.,
(650)595-3933
MENS DRESS SHOES - bostonian cas-
ual dress tie up, black upper leather, size
8.5, classic design, great condition,
$60.,Burl., (650)347-5104
MENS PANTS & SHORTS - Large box,
jeans, cargos, casual dress slacks,
34/32, 36/32, Burl, $85.all,
(650)347-5104
MENS SHIRTS - Brand names, Polos,
casual long sleeve dress, golf polo,
tshirts, sizes M/L, great condition, Burl,
$83., (650)347-5104
NEW BROWN LEATHER JACKET- XL
$25., 650-364-0902
REVERSIBLE, SOUVENIR JACKET
San Francisco: All-weather, zip-front,
hood. Weatherproof 2-tone tan.; Inner:
navy fleece, logos SF & GG bridge.
$15.00 (650)341-3288
SNOW BOOTS, MEN'S size 12. Brand
New, Thermolite brand,(with zippers),
black, $18. (510) 527-6602
TUXEDOS, FORMAL, 3, Black, White,
Maroon Silk brocade, Like new. Size 36,
$100 All OBO (650)344-8549
VINTAGE CLOTHING 1930 Ermine fur
coat Black full length $35 650 755-9833
WOMENS SUMMER 3 pc.SUIT:
blue/white stripe seersucker, jacket,
slacks, shorts, size 12, $10., (650)341-
3288
317 Building Materials
50 NEW Gray brick, standard size,
8x4x2 $25 obo All, (650)345-5502
FLUORESCENT LIGHT Fixture, New in
Box, 24, $15 (650)341-8342
TILES, DARK Red clay, 6x6x1/2 6
Dozen at 50 ea (650)341-8342
WHITE STORM/SCREEN door. Size is
35 1/4" x 79 1/4". Asking $50.00. Call
(650)341-1861
318 Sports Equipment
"EVERLAST FOR HER" Machine to
help lose weight $40., (650)368-3037
13 ASSORTED GOLF CLUBS- Good
Quality $3.50 each. Call (650) 349-6059.
BASKETBALL RIM, net & backboard
$35/all 650-345-7132 Leave message.
BOOGIE BOARD, original Morey Boogie
Board #138, Exc condition, $25
(650)594-1494
BOYS BICYCLE with Helmet. Triax,
Good Condition, $50, San Mateo
(650)341-5347
COLEMAN "GLO-MASTER" 1- burner
camp stove for boaters or camping. Mint
condition. $35.00 (650)341-3288
COMPLETE PORTABLE BASKET-
BALL SYSTEM - by Life Time, brand
new, $100., Pacific, (650)355-0236
DARTBOARD - New, regulation 18 di-
meter, Halex brand w/mounting hard-
ware, 6 brass darts, $16., (650)681-7358
EXERCISE MAT used once, lavender
$12, (650)368-3037
GIRLS BIKE, Pincess 16 wheels. $50
San Mateo (650)341-5347
GOLF BALLS - 155+, $19., SOLD!
ICE SKATES, Ladies English. Size 7-8
$50 Please call Maria (650)873-8167
NORDIC TRACK Treadmill, Model
ESP2000 Fold Up, space saver Perfect
condition $100, (650)284-9345
ONE BUCKET of golf balls - 250 total,
various brands, $25., (650)339-3195
PING CRAZ-E Putter w/ cover. 35in.
Like New $75 call(650)208-5758
THULE BIKE rack. Fits rectangular load
bars. Holds bike upright. $100.
(650)594-1494
TREADMILL PROFORM 75 EKG incline
an Staionery Bike, both $400. Or sepa-
rate: $150 for the bike, $350 for the
treadmill. Call (650)992-8757
TWO YOGA Videos. Never used, one
with Patrisha Walden, one by Rebok with
booklet. Both $6 (650)755-8238
WATER SKI'S - Gold cup by AMFA Voit
$40., (650)574-4586
322 Garage Sales
THE THRIFT SHOP
BAG SALE !!!
July 14, 21, 28
10-2 pm Thurs. & Fri.
10-3 pm Saturday
Episcopal Church
1 S. El Camino Real
San Mateo 94401
(650)344-0921
25 Monday July 30, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
322 Garage Sales
GARAGE SALES
ESTATE SALES
Make money, make room!
List your upcoming garage
sale, moving sale, estate
sale, yard sale, rummage
sale, clearance sale, or
whatever sale you have...
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500 readers
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200
340 Camera & Photo Equip.
HONEYWELL PENTAX 35mm excellent
lens, with case $65. (650)348-6428
SONY CYBERSHOT DSC-T-50 - 7.2 MP
digital camera (black) with case, $175.,
(650)208-5598
345 Medical Equipment
FOUR WHEEL walker with handbrakes,
fold down seat and basket, $50.
(650)867-6042
379 Open Houses
OPEN HOUSE
LISTINGS
List your Open House
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500
potential home buyers &
renters a day,
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200
380 Real Estate Services
HOMES & PROPERTIES
The San Mateo Daily Journals
weekly Real Estate Section.
Look for it
every Friday and Weekend
to find information on fine homes
and properties throughout
the local area.
440 Apartments
BELMONT - prime, quiet location, view,
1 bedroom $1550. 2 bedroom $1900.,
New carpets, new granite counters, dish-
washer, balcony, covered carports, stor-
age, pool, no pets. (650) 591-4046
470 Rooms
HIP HOUSING
Non-Profit Home Sharing Program
San Mateo County
(650)348-6660
Rooms For Rent
Travel Inn, San Carlos
$49-59 daily + tax
$294-$322 weekly + tax
Clean Quiet Convenient
Cable TV, WiFi & Private Bathroom
Microwave and Refrigerator
950 El Camino Real San Carlos
(650) 593-3136
Mention Daily Journal
620 Automobiles
93 FLEETWOOD Chrome wheels Grey
leather interior 237k miles Sedan $ 2,500
or Trade, Good Condition (650)481-5296
CHEVY HHR 08 - Grey, spunky car
loaded, even seat warmers, $9,500.
(408)807-6529.
MERCEDES 06 C230 - 6 cylinder, navy
blue, 60K miles, 2 year warranty,
$18,000, (650)455-7461
HONDA 10 ACCORD LX - 4 door se-
dan, low miles, $19K, (650)573-6981
TOYOTA 07 Corolla, 38k miles, one
owner, sliver, $10895, SOLD!
620 Automobiles
Dont lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!
Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journals
Auto Classifieds.
Just $3 per day.
Reach 76,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
625 Classic Cars
DATSUN 72 - 240Z with Chevy 350, au-
tomatic, custom, $3,600 or trade.
(415) 412-7030
635 Vans
NISSAN 01 Quest - GLE, leather seats,
sun roof, TV/DVR equipment. Looks
new, $15,500. (650)219-6008
640 Motorcycles/Scooters
BMW 03 F650 GS, $3899 OBO. Call
650-995-0003
HARLEY DAVIDSON 83 Shovelhead
special construction, 1340 ccs,
Awesome! $5,950/obo
Rob (415)602-4535.
VARIOUS MOTORCYCLE parts USED
call for what you want or need $99
(650)670-2888
645 Boats
BANSHEE SAILBOAT - 13 ft. with ex-
tras, $750., (650)343-6563
PROSPORT 97 - 17 ft. CC 80 Yamaha
Pacific, loaded, like new, $9,500 or trade,
(650)583-7946.
650 RVs
94 COACHMAN Motor home 95k Miles,
$18,500 (650)726-8623 Leave Message
650 RVs
73 Chevy Model 30 Van, Runs
good, Rebuilt Transmission, Fiber-
glass Bubble Top $1,795. Owner
financing.
Call for appointments. (650)364-1374.
670 Auto Service
MB GARAGE, INC.
Repair Restore Sales
Mercedes-Benz Specialists
2165 Palm Ave.
San Mateo
(650)349-2744
SAN CARLOS AUTO
SERVICE & TUNE UP
A Full Service Auto Repair
Facility
760 El Camino Real
San Carlos
(650)593-8085
670 Auto Parts
2 RADIAL GT tires 205715 & 2356014
$10 each, (650)588-7005
2 SNOW/CABLE chains good condition
fits 13-15 inch rims $10/both San Bruno
650-588-1946
5 HUBCAPS for 1966 Alfa Romeo $50.,
(650)580-3316
67-68 CAMERO PARTS - $85.,
(650)592-3887
ALUMINUM WHEELS - Toyota, 13,
good shape, Grand Prix brand. Includes
tires - legal/balanced. $100., San Bruno,
SOLD!
CAMPER/TRAILER/TRUCK OUTSIDE
backup mirror 8 diameter fixture. $30.
650-588-1946
MAZDA 3 2010 CAR COVER - Cover-
kraft multibond inside & outside cover,
like new, $50., (650)678-3557
TRUCK RADIATOR - fits older Ford,
never used, $100., (650)504-3621
670 Auto Parts
SHOP MANUALS 2 1955 Pontiac
manual, 4 1984 Ford/Lincoln manuals, &
1 gray marine diesel manual $40 or B/O
(650)583-5208
672 Auto Stereos
MONNEY
CAR AUDIO
We Sell, Install and
Repair All Brands of
Car Stereos
iPod & iPhone Wired
to Any Car for Music
Quieter Car Ride
Sound Proof Your Car
31 Years Experience
2001 Middlefield Road
Redwood City
(650)299-9991
680 Autos Wanted
Dont lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!
Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journals
Auto Classifieds.
Just $3 per day.
Reach 82,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
680 Autos Wanted
DONATE YOUR CAR
Tax Deduction, We do the Paperwork,
Free Pickup, Running or Not - in most
cases. Help yourself and the Polly Klaas
Foundation. Call (800)380-5257.
Wanted 62-75 Chevrolets
Novas, running or not
Parts collection etc.
So clean out that garage
Give me a call
Joe 650 342-2483
ADVERTISE
YOUR SERVICE
in the
HOME & GARDEN SECTION
Offer your services to 76,500 readers a day, from
Palo Alto to South San Francisco
and all points between!
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
Cabinetry
Contractors
RISECON
NORTH AMERICA
General Contractors / Building
& Design
New construction, Kitchen-Bath Re-
models, Metal Fabrication, Painting
Call for free design consultation
(650) 274-4484 www.risecon.com
L#926933
Contractors
SOMOZA
CASEWORK INSTALLATION
Interior, kitchen cabinets,
counter tops, Crown molding,
Trim, Windows & Doors.
Our Number One Concern is
Customer Satisfaction.
(415) 724- 4447
scc.jsomoza@gmail.com
Cleaning
Cleaning
MORANAS
HOUSECLEANING
Homes and Apartments
Excellent Service
30 Years Experience
Great Rates
(650)375-8149
Concrete
POLY-AM
CONSTRUCTION
General Contractor
Free Estimate
Specializing in
Concrete Brickwork Stonewall
Interlocking Pavers Landscaping
Tile Retaining Wall
Bonded & Insured Lic. #685214
Ben: (650)375-1573
Cell: (650) 280-8617
Construction Construction
De Hoyos
Framing Foundations
(650) 387-8950
General Framing
Doors & Windows
Siding
(Hardy Plank Specialist)
Dry Rot & Termite
Additions
Finely Crafted Decks
Repairs
Lic# 968477 Ins/Bons
Decks & Fences
MARSH FENCE
& DECK CO.
State License #377047
Licensed Insured Bonded
Fences - Gates - Decks
Stairs - Retaining Walls
10-year guarantee
Quality work w/reasonable prices
Call for free estimate
(650)571-1500
Electricians
ALL ELECTRICAL
SERVICE
650-322-9288
for all your electrical needs
ELECTRIC SERVICE GROUP
ELECTRICIAN
For all your
electrical needs
Residential, Commercial,
Troubleshooting,
Wiring & Repairing
Call Ben at (650)685-6617
Lic # 427952
26
Monday July 30, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Gardening
Servicing Hillsborough,
Burlingame, Millbrae,
and San Mateo
We are a full service
gardening company
650 218-0657
Quality
Gardening

Weekly Lawn Care
Hedges, Fertilizing,
Leaf Blowing
Rose Care
Get ready for
Fall planting

J.B. GARDENING SERVICE


Maintenance, New Lawns,
Sprinkler Systems, Clean Ups,
Fences, Tree Trimming,
Concrete work, Brick Work,
Pavers, and Retaining Walls.
Free Estimates
Cell: (650) 400- 5604
Flooring
DHA
WOODFLOORING
Wood Flooring
Installation & Refinishing
Lic.# 958104
(650)346-2707
SHOP
AT HOME
WE WILL
BRING THE
SAMPLES
TOYOU.
FLOORING
Call for a
FREE in-home
estimate
FLAMINGOS
FLOORING
CARPET
VINYL
LAMINATE
TILE
HARDWOOD
650-655-6600
Handy Help
ADW SERVICES
Small Jobs, Hauling, Car-
pentry, Flooring, Decks,
Dry Rot Repair, Siding,
Bathrooms
(650)438-0454
Lic. 968619
DISCOUNT HANDYMAN
& PLUMBING
Carpentry Plumbing Drain
Cleaning Kitchens Bathrooms
Dry Rot Decks
Priced for You! Call John
(650)296-0568
Free Estimates
Lic.#834170
FLORES
HANDYMAN
Serving you is a privilege.
Painting-Interior & Exterior Roof Re-
pair Base Boards New Fence
Hardwood Floors Plumbing Tile
Mirrors Chain Link Fence Window
Glass Water Heater Installation
Bus Lic# 41942
Call today for free estimate.
(650)274-6133
HONEST HANDYMAN
Remodeling, Plumbing.
Electrical, Carpentry,
General Home Repair,
Maintenance,
New Construction
No Job Too Small
Lic.# 891766
(650)740-8602
HOUSE REPAIR & REMODELING
HANDYMAN
Plumbing, Electrical, Carpentry,
Kitchen & Bath Rem, Floor Tile,
Wood Fences,Painting Work
Free Estimates
PLEASE CALL
(650)504-4199
SENIOR HANDYMAN
Specializing in Any Size Projects
Painting electrical
Carpentry Dry Rot
Carpet Installation
40 Yrs. Experience
Retired Licensed Contractor
(650)201-6854
Hardwood Floors
KO-AM
HARDWOOD FLOORING
Hardwood & Laminate
Installation & Repair
Refinish
High Quality @ Low Prices
Call 24/7 for Free Estimate
800-300-3218
408-979-9665
Lic. #794899
Hauling
AM/PM HAULING
Haul Any Kind of Junk
Residential & Commercial
Free Estimates!
We recycle almost everything!
Go Green!
Call Joe
(650)722-3925
CHEAP
HAULING!
Light moving!
Haul Debris!
650-583-6700
INDEPENDENT HAULERS
$50 & Up HAUL
Since 1988 Free Estimates
Licensed/Insured
A+ BBB rating
(650)341-7482
JONS HAULING
Serving the Peninsula since 1976
Free Estimates
Junk and debris removal,
Yard/lot clearing,
Furniture, appliance hauling.
Specializing in hoarder clean up
(650)393-4233
Hauling
Interior Design
REBARTS INTERIORS
Hunter Douglas Gallery
Free Measuring & Install.
247 California Dr., Burl.
(650)348-1268
990 Industrial Blvd., #106
SC (800)570-7885
www.rebarts.com
Landscaping
Moving
Bay Area
Relocation Services
Specializing in:
Homes, Apts., Storages
Professional, friendly, careful.
Peninsulas Personal Mover
Commercial/Residential
Fully Lic. & Bonded CAL -T190632
Call Armando (650) 630-0424
Painting
CRAIGS PAINTING
Interior & Exterior
Quality Work w/
Reasonable Rates
Free Estimates
(650)553-9653
Lic# 857741
GOLDEN WEST PAINTING
Since 1975
Interior/Exterior,
Complete Preparation.
Will Beat any
Professional Estimate!
CSL#321586
(415)722-9281
JON LA MOTTE
PAINTING
Interior & Exterior
Pressure Washing
Free Estimates
(650)368-8861
Lic #514269
LEMUS PAINTING
650.271.3955
Interiors / Exteriors
Residential / Commercial
Free Estimates
Reasonable Rates
Lic#913961
MTP
Painting/Waterproofing
Drywall Repair/Tape/Texture
Power Washing-Decks, Fences
No Job Too Big or Small
Lic.# 896174
Call Mike the Painter
(650)271-1320
Plumbing
Home Improvement
CINNABAR HOME
Making Peninsula homes
more beautiful since 1996
* Home furnishings & accessories
* Drapery & window treatments:
blinds & shades
* Free in-home consultation
853 Industrial Rd. Ste E San Carlos
Wed Sat 12:00- 5:30pm, or by appt.
650-388-8836
www.cinnabarhome.com
Tile
CUBIAS TILE
Marble, Stone & porcelain
Kitchens, bathrooms, floors,
fireplaces, entryways, decks,
tile, ceramic tile
repair, grout repair
Free Estimates Lic.# 955492
Mario Cubias
(650)784-3079
JZ TILE
Installation and Design
Portfolio and References,
Great Prices
Free Estimates
Lic. 670794
Call John Zerille
(650)245-8212
Window Coverings
RUDOLPHS
INTERIORS
Satisfying customers with world-
class service and products since
1952. Let us help you create the
home of your dreams. Please
phone for an appointment.
(650)685-1250
Window Washing
Notices
NOTICE TO READERS:
California law requires that contractors
taking jobs that total $500 or more (labor
or materials) be licensed by the Contrac-
tors State License Board. State law also
requires that contractors include their li-
cense number in their advertising. You
can check the status of your licensed
contractor at www.cslb.ca.gov or 800-
321-CSLB. Unlicensed contractors taking
jobs that total less than $500 must state
in their advertisements that they are not
licensed by the Contractors State Li-
cense Board.
Attorneys
* BANKRUPTCY *
Huge credit card debt?
Job loss? Foreclosure?
Medical bills?
YOU HAVE OPTIONS
Call for a free consultation
(650)363-2600
This law firm is a debt relief agency
Attorneys
Law Office of Jason Honaker
BANKRUPTCY
Chapter 7 &13
Call us for a consultation
650-259-9200
www.honakerlegal.com
Beauty
GRAND OPENING
SPECIALS:
Facials , Eyebrow Waxing ,
Microdermabrasion
Full Body Salt Scrub &
Seaweed Wrap
Le Juin Day Spa & Clinic
155 E. 5th Avenue
Downtown San Mateo
(650) 347-6668 (650) 347-6668
Beauty
KAYS
HEALTH & BEAUTY
Facials, Waxing, Fitness
Body Fat Reduction
Pure Organic Facial $48.
1 Hillcrest Blvd, Millbrae
(650)697-6868
Dental Services
DR. SAMIR NANJAPA DDS
Family Dentistry &
Smile Restoration
UCSF Dentistry Faculty
Cantonese, Mandarin &
Hindi Spoken
650-477-6920
320 N. San Mateo Dr. Ste 2
San Mateo
27 Monday July 30, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Divorce
DIVORCE CENTERS
OF CALIFORNIA
Low Cost
non-attorney service
UNCONTESTED
DIVORCE
650.347.2500
520 So. El Camino Real #650
San Mateo, CA 94402
www.divorcecenters.com
Se habla Espaol
I am not an attorney.
I can only provide self help services
at your specic directions
Food
AYA SUSHI
The Best Sushi
& Ramen in Town
1070 Holly Street
San Carlos
(650)654-1212
BROADWAY GRILL
Express Lunch
Special $8.00
1400 Broadway
Burlingame
(650)343-9733
www.bwgrill.com
FIND OUT!
What everybody is
talking about!
South Harbor
Restaurant & Bar
425 Marina Blvd., SSF
(650)589-1641
GOT BEER?
We Do!
Steelhead Brewing Co.
333 California Dr.
Burlingame
(650)344-6050
www.steelheadbrewery.com
Food
GULLIVERS
RESTAURANT
Early Bird Special
Prime Rib Complete Dinner
Mon-Thu
1699 Old Bayshore Blvd. Burlingame
(650)692-6060
JACKS
RESTAURANT
Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner
1050 Admiral Ct., #A
San Bruno
(650)589-2222
JacksRestaurants.com
NEALS COFFEE
SHOP
Breakfast Lunch Dinner
Senior Meals, Kids Menu
www.nealscoffeeshop.com
1845 El Camino Real
Burlingame
(650)692-4281
RED CRAWFISH
CRAVING CAJUN?
401 E. 3rd Ave.
@ S. Railroad
San Mateo
redcrawfishsf.com
(650) 347-7888
SUNDAY CHAMPAGNE
BRUNCH
Crowne Plaza
1221 Chess Dr., Hwy. 92 at
Foster City Blvd. Exit
Foster City
(650)570-5700
SUNSHINE CAFE
Breakfast Lunch Dinner
1750 El Camino Real
San Mateo
(Borel Square)
(650)357-8383
THE AMERICAN BULL
BAR & GRILL
19 large screen HD TVs
Full Bar & Restaurant
www.theamericanbull.com
1819 El Camino, in
Burlingame Plaza
(650)652-4908
Food
THE MELTING POT
Dinner for 2 - $98.
4 Course Fondue Feast &
Bottle of Wine
1 Transit Way San Mateo
(650)342-6358
www.melting pot.com
Financial
RELATIONSHIP BANKING
Partnership. Service. Trust.
UNITED AMERICAN BANK
Half Moon Bay, Redwood City,
Sunnyvale
unitedamericanbank.com
San Mateo
(650)579-1500
Fitness
DOJO USA
World Training Center
Martial Arts & Tae Bo Training
www.dojousa.net
731 Kains Ave, San Bruno
(650)589-9148
Furniture
Bedroom Express
Where Dreams Begin
2833 El Camino Real
San Mateo - (650)458-8881
184 El Camino Real
So. S. Francisco -(650)583-2221
www.bedroomexpress.com
Health & Medical
BACK, LEG PAIN OR
NUMBNESS?
Non-Surgical
Spinal Decompression
Dr. Thomas Ferrigno D.C.
650-231-4754 650-231-4754
177 Bovet Rd. #150 San Mateo
BayAreaBackPain.com
General Dentistry
for Adults & Children
DR. ANNA P. LIVIZ, DDS
324 N. San Mateo Drive, #2
San Mateo 94401
(650)343-5555
Health & Medical
SLEEP APNEA
We can treat it
without CPAP!
Call for a free
sleep apnea screening
650-583-5880
Millbrae Dental
STRESSED OUT?
IN PAIN?
I CAN HELP YOU
Sessions start from $20
Call 650-235-6761
Will Chen ACUPUNCTURE
12220 6th Ave, Belmont
www. willchenacupuncture.com
TOENAIL FUNGUS?
FREE Consultation for
Laser Treatment
(650)347-0761
Dr. Richard Woo, DPM
400 S. El Camino Real
San Mateo
Home Care
CALIFORNIA HOARDING
REMEDIATION
Free Estimates
Whole House & Office
Cleanup Too!
Serving SF Bay Area
(650)762-8183
Call Karen Now!
Insurance
AARP AUTO
INSURANCE
Great insurance
Great price
Special rates for
drivers over 50
650-593-7601
ISU LOVERING
INSURANCE SERVICES
1121 Laurel St.,
San Carlos
BARRETT
INSURANCE
www.barrettinsuranceservices.net
Eric L. Barrett,
CLU, RHU, REBC, CLTC, LUTCF
President
Barrett Insurance Services
(650)513-5690
CA. Insurance License #0737226
HEALTH INSURANCE
Paying too much for COBRA?
No coverage?
.... Not good!
I can help.
John Bowman
(650)525-9180
CA Lic #0E08395
Jewelers
KUPFER JEWELRY
We Buy
Coins, Jewelry,
Watches, Platinum,
& Diamonds.
Expert fine watch
& jewelry repair.
Deal with experts.
1211 Burlingame Ave.
Burlingame
www.kupferjewelry.com
(650) 347-7007
Legal Services
LEGAL
DOCUMENTS PLUS
Non-Attorney document
preparation: Divorce,
Pre-Nup, Adoption, Living Trust,
Conservatorship, Probate,
Notary Public. Response to
Lawsuits: Credit Card
Issues,Breach of Contract
Jeri Blatt, LDA #11
Registered & Bonded
(650)574-2087
legaldocumentsplus.com
"I am not an attorney. I can only
provide self help services at your
specific direction."
Loans
REVERSE MORTGAGE
Are you age 62+ & own your
home?
Call for a free, easy to read
brochure or quote
650-453-3244
Carol Bertocchini, CPA
Marketing
GROW
YOUR SMALL BUSINESS
Get free help from
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Massage Therapy
A+ DAY SPA MASSAGE
$60 one hour
body massage + table shower
45 mins $50, Half hour $40
Open every day, 9:30am to 9:30pm
(650)299-9332
615 Woodside Rd #5
Redwood City
ASIAN MASSAGE
$48 per Hour
New Customers Only
For First 20 Visits
Open 7 days, 10 am -10 pm
633 Veterans Blvd., #C
Redwood City
(650)556-9888
GRAND OPENING
ASIAN MASSAGE
$50 for 1 hour
Angel Spa
667 El Camino Real, Redwood City
(650)363-8806
7 days a week, 9:30am-9:30pm
GRAND OPENING!
CRYSTAL WAVE SPA
Body & Foot Massage
Facial Treatment
1205 Capuchino Ave.
Burlingame
(650)558-1199
HAPPY FEET
Massage
2608 S. El Camino Real
& 25th Ave., San Mateo
(650)638-9399
$30.00/Hr Foot Massage
$50.00/Hr Full Body Massage
HEALING MASSAGE
SPECIAL $10 OFF
SWEDISH MASSAGE
2305-A Carlos Street
Moss Beach
(On Hwy 1 next to Post office)
(650)563-9771
SUNFLOWER MASSAGE
Grand Opening!
$10. Off 1-Hour Session!
1482 Laurel St.
San Carlos
(Behind Trader Joes)
Open 7 Days/Week, 10am-10pm
(650)508-8758
Massage Therapy
TRANQUIL
MASSAGE
951 Old County Road
Suite 1
Belmont
650-654-2829
YOU HAVE IT-
WELL BUY IT
We buy and pawn:
Gold Jewelry
Art Watches
Musical Instrument
Paintings Diamonds
Silverware Electronics
Antique Furniture
Computers TVs Cars
Open 7 days
Buy *Sell*Loan
590 Veterans Blvd.
Redwood City
(650)368-6855
Needlework
LUV2
STITCH.COM
Needlepoint!
Fiesta Shopping Center
747 Bermuda Dr., San Mateo
(650)571-9999
Real Estate Loans
REAL ESTATE LOANS
We Fund Bank Turndowns!
Direct Private Lender
Homes Multi-family
Mixed-Use Commercial
WE BUY TRUST DEED NOTES
FICO Credit Score Not a Factor
PURCHASE, REFINANCE,
CASH OUT
Investors welcome
Loan servicing since 1979
650-348-7191
Wachter Investments, Inc.
Real Estate Broker #746683
Nationwide Mortgage
Licensing System ID #348268
CA Dept. of Real Estate
Real Estate Services
ODOWD ESTATES
Representing Buyers
& Sellers
Commission Negotiable
odowdestates.com
(650)794-9858
Seniors
AFFORDABLE
24-hour Assisted Living
Care located in
Burlingame
Mills Estate Villa
&
Burlingame Villa
- Short Term Stays
- Dementia & Alzheimers
Care
- Hospice Care
(650)692-0600
Lic.#4105088251/
415600633
LASTING IMPRESSIONS
ARE OUR FIRST PRIORITY
Cypress Lawn
1370 El Camino Real
Colma
(650)755-0580
www.cypresslawn.com
STERLING COURT
ACTIVE INDEPENDENT &
ASSISTED LIVING
Tours 10AM-4PM
2 BR,1BR & Studio
Luxury Rental
650-344-8200
850 N. El Camino Real San Mateo
sterlingcourt.com
28
Monday July 30, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
There Is
New Hope!
A Health Center
Dedicated to
Severe Disc
Conditions
Youve seen the ads and heard the
radio commercials about my Non-
Surgical Spinal Decompression
treatment. At Crossroads Health
Center, Ive created an entire facility
dedicated to patients with severe disc
conditions that have not responded
to traditional care. My revolutionary,
Crossroads Method, provides a very
high success rate to patients with
serious back, neck, leg and arm pain
even when all else has failed. This
FDA cleared; non-surgical treatment
allows us to rehabilitate your
herniated or degenerative disc(s)
by reversing internal pressure and
enabling your disc(s) to heal from the
inside out. We succeed where other
treatments have failed by removing
the pressure that is causing pain to
your disc(s) and nerves without
drugs, injections, invasive surgery or
harmful side effects.
The only ofce to have
The Crossroads Method
This method which includes
computerized true disc
decompression is considered by
many doctors to be the most
advanced and successful non-
invasive treatment of serious back,
neck, leg or arm pain.
This procedure allows for a much
higher success rate by increasing
hydration of your discs, fexibility,
relaxation of muscles and ligaments
along with improving muscle and
core strength, balance and posture.
This results in a more effective and
lasting solution to your pain. There
are no side effects and no recovery
time is required.
This gentle and relaxing treatment
has proven to be effective even
when drugs, epidurals, traditional
chiropractic, physical therapy
and surgery have failed The
Crossroads Method has shown
dramatic results.
Patient Testimonials
During the 1 1/2 years of having
constant daily lower back pain and
spasms, I took anti-infammatory
and pain medication, but nothing
helped lessen the pain. When
an MRI showed that I had two
degenerative discs, I went through a
series of lumbar epidural injections
without success. The only thing
that made the pain and spasms go
away was Spinal Decompression
treatments at Crossroads Health
Center. Four years later and I am
still pain-free!
Lisa K.
My severe low back and sciatica
pain have been reduced signifcantly
since receiving spinal decompression
therapy at Crossroads Health Center.
I am now able to walk, golf, and do
things that I havent been able to do in
years! I would also like to say thanks
to Dr. Ferrigno and the offce staff as
they went above and beyond to make
sure my back problem was resolved. I
couldnt be happier!!
C.M. Allard
How Will I Know If I Qualify
for Treatment?
When you come in for a
complimentary consultation we will
ask a series of questions and perform
a comprehensive examination to
determine exactly where the pain is
coming from. If x-rays are necessary,
we can take them in our offce. Once
we determine the cause of your
pain we will let you know if we can
help you and if you qualify for our
treatment protocol.
If we dont feel like we can help we
will refer you to someone who can.
Serious Back or Neck Trouble?
Leg/Arm Pain or Numbness?
Have You Been Diagnosed With a
Bulging, Herniated or Degenerative Disc?
Crossroads Health Center
San Mateo: 177 Bovet Rd. #150 San Mateo, CA 94402 (in the NeuroLink offces) 650-231-4754
Campbell: 420 Marathon Dr., Campbell, CA 95008 408-866-0300 www.BayAreaBackPain.com
2011 Best Chiropractor in Campbell Nominee
CALL NOW
Free
Consultation
and
Examination
with
Dr. Thomas Ferrigno D.C.
Crossroads Health Center
San Mateo 650-231-4754
Campbell 408-866-0300
www.BayAreaBackPain.com
Free visit cannot be used with Medicare or
Federal Insurance Plans.
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