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2012

Dialysis Clinic, Inc.


Open House
To increase awareness of renal disease and dialysis, Dialysis Clinic, Inc. (DCI) has implemented an initiative to educate local students. Students will write an essay for a money reward. DCI will then hold an open house for the community. Enclosed in this document are potential foods and drinks to serve as well as what will be displayed at the event to further enhance peoples knowledge about renal disease and dialysis.

Amanda Arthur 3/16/2012

Table of Contents Potential Recipes ....................................................................................................................2


Spicy Trail Mix .......................................................................................................................... 2 Pineapple Cheese Balls ............................................................................................................. 2 Barbecue Meatballs ................................................................................................................. 3 Orange Pineapple Sherbet Punch.............................................................................................. 3 Pineapple Punch ....................................................................................................................... 3 Crystal Light ............................................................................................................................. 3 Ginger Ale ................................................................................................................................ 3 Water....................................................................................................................................... 3

Sample Layout ........................................................................................................................4 Materials .................................................................................................................................5 Nutritional Content of Foods: Test Tube* .............................................................................14
Sodium .......................................................................................................................................... 14 Phosphorus .................................................................................................................................... 14 Potassium ...................................................................................................................................... 14

DCI Open House


Potential Recipes
All recipes are taken from DaVita, Inc. These recipes are suitable for individuals with the following health concerns: CKD with dialysis, CKD without dialysis, and diabetes. Spicy Trail Mix Portions: 20 Renal and renal diabetic food choices: 1 starch; 1/2 fat Ingredients 4 cups Ralston Purina Rice Chex cereal 2 cups Kelloggs Crispex cereal 3 cups bite-sized oyster crackers 1 cup unsalted pretzel twists 5 tablespoons unsalted margarine 1 tablespoon chili powder Serving size: 1/2 cup

1/4 teaspoon ground cumin 1/2 teaspoon garlic powder 1/8 teaspoon cayenne pepper 1-1/2 teaspoons Worcestershire sauce 1-1/2 teaspoons lemon juice

Preparation 1. Preheat oven to 250F. 2. Melt margarine in a 10 x 15 pan. Stir in spices, Worcestershire sauce and lemon juice. 3. Add cereals, crackers and pretzels. Toss to coat evenly. 4. Bake for 45 minutes; gently mix every 15 minutes. 5. Spread on paper towels to cool. 6. Store in airtight container. Pineapple Cheese Balls Portions: 24 Renal and renal diabetic food choices: 1/2 milk; 1 fat Ingredients three 8-ounce packages cream cheese, softened one 20-ounce can crushed pineapple, well drained 1/2 cup chopped green bell pepper 1/2 teaspoon garlic powder Preparation 1. Place softened cream cheese in a large mixing bowl. 2. Add remaining ingredients to bowl and mix well to blend. (Be sure the pineapple is thoroughly drained, squeezing liquid by hand, if needed.) 3. Shape the mixture into a ball. Wrap in wax paper and chill overnight. Serving size: 2 tablespoons

Barbecue Meatballs Portions: 24 servings Serving size: 2 meatballs Renal and renal diabetic food choices: 1-1/2 meat; 1/2 fat; 1/2 high calorie Ingredients 3 pounds ground beef 1/2 cup onions, diced 2 large eggs, beaten 1 tablespoon dried thyme 1/2 cup skim milk or nondairy milk substitute 1 teaspoon dried oregano 1 cup dry oatmeal flakes (Quaker Quick Oats) 1/2 teaspoon pepper 1 cup barbecue sauce (look for the brand lowest in sodium or make your own) Preparation 1. Preheat oven to 375 F. 2. Combine all ingredients, except barbecue sauce and milk or milk substitute, in a large bowl and mix together. 3. Roll into 1 balls and place on a baking sheet. 4. Bake for 10 to 15 minutes, until meatballs are cooked through. 5. Combine barbecue sauce and water in a warming dish or crock pot on low temperature setting. Add meatballs and stir. Cover until ready to serve.

Orange Pineapple Sherbet Punch Portions: 22 Serving size: 6 ounces Renal and renal diabetic food choices: 1 fruit, low potassium; 1 high calorie Ingredients 1 cup orange pineapple juice 1/2 gallon sherbet, flavor of your choice 2 liter bottle carbonated diet lemon-lime soda, chilled Preparation 1. Combine juice and sherbet in a punch bowl. 2. Fill the rest of the bowl with the lemon-lime soda.

Pineapple Punch Portions: 12 Serving size: 8 ounces Renal and renal diabetic food choices: 1 fruit, low potassium; 1 high calorie Ingredients 1 quart pineapple juice 2 liters lemon-lime soda or ginger ale 8 oz can crushed pineapple (or to taste) Ice Preparation 1. Mix all ingredients in a large punch bowl. 2. Serve in a punch cup, or any clear glass.
Crystal Light Ginger Ale Water

Sample Layout

HOW DOES KIDNEY DISEASE AFFECT WHAT I EAT?

Hardened arteries (above) may lead to calcified organs, including the heart (pictured below)

Broken Leg

Materials

I have kidney disease. Does that mean I cant eat good food anymore?

NO!!

Kidneys have many functions in the body. In kidney disease, your kidneys dont work as well so you need to replace some of the foods you eat.

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SODIUM

o Sodium causes people to be thirsty and drink more fluids. This increases the fluid in your body and may cause edema. o Limiting your intake to 2000 milligrams will help control your blood pressure.

FLUIDS
Anything that is liquid at room temperature.
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Having too much fluids can cause your heart to work harder and can cause shortness of breath.

What should I do?

Drink only if you are truly thirsty. Chew gum, or suck on hard candy, frozen grapes or lemon wedges. Sip, dont gulp, when drinking, and use small cups. Eat less sodium!

PROTEIN

Protein is important to fight infections, heal wounds, and repair & build muscle. High quality protein sources (pictured above) have more of the essential amino acids, which humans cannot make. Getting enough protein helps maintain kidney function.

PHOSPHORUS
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Some high-phosphorus foods are cheese, milk and dairy products, cola, nuts, peanut butter, dried beans or peas and whole grains.
Phosphorus (P) is a mineral that keeps your bones strong and healthy. Normal kidneys filter extra P in the blood. If P builds up in the blood, it triggers your bones to release calcium. This can harm the heart and weaken your bones. Side effects include:

o Bone disease bones will hurt and break easily o Joint pain o Heart disease - clogged blood vessels can lead to blood clots which harden the arteries and decrease circulation. o Painful skin ulcers and more!
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Sherbet

Ice cream

With kidney disease you should eat foods low in phosphorus, like these.

Sprite, Ginger Ale

Coca-Cola, Root Beer

Caramels Take phosphorus binders immediately before or after meals or snacks they act like sponges to keep it out of your blood

Hard candies

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Hardened arteries (above) may lead to calcified organs, including the heart (pictured below)

Broken leg

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CALCIUM
If you dont get enough calcium, your body steals it from your bones. This also increases your risk for bone disease. *Many calcium-rich foods such as dairy products are high in phosphorus. *Look for foods that are enriched or fortified with calcium

POTASSIUM

Look at the test tubes below and choose fruits and vegetables low in potassium!

Potassium helps your nerves and muscles to work properly. If its too high you might experience some of the symptoms listed above.
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A kidney-friendly diet isnt that much different than the typical diet!!

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Menu Non-Kidney Disease Menu Non-K Breakfast cup milk 1 cup Raisin Bran Cereal 1 medium banana 1 boiled egg Morning Snack 1.5 oz box raisins Lunch 3 oz grilled chicken Tossed salad o 1 cup cucumbers o 1 cup carrots o 1 cup tomatoes 2 Tbsp salad dressing 2 dinner rolls 1 brownie 1 cup cola Afternoon Snack 6 cheese cubes Dinner Chicken pot pie cup cantaloupe 1 cup root beer cup boiled lima beans Bedtime Snack 6 regular saltine crackers
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Menu Kidney Disease Breakfast cup soy milk (unenriched) 1 cup Rice Krispies cereal 1 medium banana 1 boiled egg Morning Snack 1 medium tangerine Lunch 3 oz grilled chicken Tossed salad o 1 cup cucumbers o 1 cup carrots o cup tomatoes 1 Tbsp salad dressing 2 dinner rolls 1 slice lemon meringue pie 1 cup diet ginger ale Afternoon Snack 4 gum drops Dinner 3 chicken strips 10 grapes cup canned corn 1 cup diet lemon-lime soda Bedtime Snack 6 unsalted saltine crackers

Nutritional Content of Foods: Test Tube*


Sodium Hardees Bacon, Egg and Cheese Biscuit: 1190 mg Taco Bell Bean Burrito: 960 mg Large McDonalds French fries: 350 mg 1 oz Lays Classic Potato chips: 170 mg 1 C shredded cheddar cheese: 702 mg 1 slice cheddar cheese: 176 mg 1 cup frozen macaroni and cheese: 397 mg 3 crispy chicken strips: 1190 mg 1 cup celery: 81 mg 1 slice regular ham: 365 mg

Phosphorus Bacon, Egg and Cheese Biscuit: 363 mg 8 oz Personal pizza, frozen: 356 mg 1 C shredded cheddar cheese: 579 mg 1 slice cheddar cheese: 145 mg 1 oz dry roasted sunflower seeds, without added salt: 327 mg 1 twin-pack Little Debbie brownie: 62 mg 12 oz cola: 40 mg cup cooked pinto beans: 126 mg 1 Frozen waffles: 142 mg 1 cup Frozen macaroni and cheese: 163 mg

Potassium Lays Classic Potato chips: 350 mg cup Cranberry juice, cocktail: 23 mg cup fresh orange juice: 248 mg cup Pears cooked in heavy syrup: 87 mg 1 medium pear, raw: 208 mg 1 cup dried peaches: 788 mg 1 cup romaine lettuce: 81 mg Baked potato without skin: 610 mg 1 slice white bread: 30 mg 1 sweet pepper, raw: 211 mg

*Nutrient composition based on information from the USDA National Nutrient Database for Standard 13 Reference at www.ndb.nal.usda.gov. 15