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Background of the Study Ascorbic acid is essential to the body.

It serves as protection from diseases connected to the immune system, cardiovascular system, integumentary system eye and prenatal health. (Kathleen Zelman) It is essential in performing the metabolic functions in the body. Infamous diseases involving the dosage of Ascorbic Acid affects the performance of the people. Proper intake of Ascorbic Acid would result a good performance of the body.

A maximum of 2000 milligram intake of Ascorbic Acid daily is needed by the body. Bodily functions are affected by the intake of Ascorbic Acid. Supplements are made available to the market to achieve the Ascorbic Acid requirement per day but studies have shown that daily intake of a 500 milligram supplement may cause damages to a persons DNA. (Brody, 1998) Avoidance in supplements may not be a key as deficiency in Ascorbic Acid may cause damages to the different organs of the body. Citrus fruits contain Ascorbic Acid which is needed by the body.

The researchers will conduct the study on the content of a citrus fruit to avoid Ascorbic Acid deficiency and use of supplements. Citrus Aurantium (Dalandan), Citrus x Limon (Lemon), Citrofortunella mitis (Calamansi) and Citrus Sinensis (Orange) will be the source of samples. The 4 citrus fruits are the most common in the Philippines. They can grow in a climate like the Philippines. The researcher chose the 4 citrus fruits because they are widely-know for their Ascorbic Acid content. Refrigeration is a common preservation method. Refrigeration is a transfer of heat. This causes variation in temperature. This may or may not take effect on the citrus fruit. Statement of the Problem

1. What is the Ascorbic Acid content of Citrus Aurantium (Dalandan), Citrus x Limon (Lemon), Citrofortunella mitis (Calamansi) and Citrus Sinensis (Orange)? a. What is the Ascorbic Acid content of different citrus fruits exposed in temperature above 30C? b. What is the Ascorbic Acid content of different citrus fruits exposed in room temperature? c. What is the Ascorbic Acid content of different citrus fruits exposed in temperature below 20C?

Significance of the Study The researchers aim to collect samples from 4 different kinds of citrus fruits. It is to determine the Ascorbic Acid content of each. The aim of the study is to discover the change in Ascorbic Acid content when exposed to different levels of temperature. The findings of the study may result to determination of the essence of refrigeration of Citrus fruits. This will help in the control of the Ascorbic Acid requirement of the body. The findings of this study may serve as a standard in taking supplements or taking in natural sources of Ascorbic Acid.

Conceptual Framework Fruits vary in Ascorbic Acid content. (UHIS, 1999) These will explain the variation of the Ascorbic Acid content of the 4 citrus fruits to be tested. Temperature may cause variation in the Ascorbic Acid content. There was a test by J. R. Winston on the Ascorbic Acid content of different citrus fruits which varies in exposure to sunlight. The exposed citrus fruits had more Ascorbic Acid content. (Winston, 1947) Temperature is one factor that may be considered in this study

as sunlight provides heat and light. This shows that exposure to different levels of temperature on citrus fruits may have variation.

Methods Flowchart

expose 10 ml at above 30C


expose 10ml at room temperature expose 10 ml at below 20C Chemical Analysis

Citrus Fuit

Extract 30ml

References: Brody, J. (1998, April 9). Taking Too Much Vitamin C Can Be Dangerous, Study Finds. Retrieved July 28, 2012, from New York Times: http://www.nytimes.com/1998/04/09/us/takingtoo-much-vitamin-c-can-be-dangerous-study-finds.html Kathleen Zelman, M. R. (n.d.). The Benefits of Vitamin C. Retrieved July 28, 2012, from WEB MD: http://www.webmd.com/diet/features/the-benefits-of-vitamin-c UHIS. (1999). Natural food-Fruit Vitamin C Content. Retrieved July 28, 2012, from Natural Hub: http://www.naturalhub.com/natural_food_guide_fruit_vitamin_c.htm Winston, J. R. (1947). Vitamin C Content and Juice Quality of Exposed and Shaded Citrus Frutis. Retrieved July 28, 2012, from Florida State Horticultural Societ:

http://www.fshs.org/Proceedings/Password%20Protected/1947%20Vol.%2060/6367%20(WINSTON).pdf