*Tel.: #45-45-25-43-24; fax: #45-45-93-06-93.

E-mail address: afb@et.dtu.dk (A. Filippone).
Progress in Aerospace Sciences 36 (2000) 629}654
Data and performances of selected aircraft and rotorcraft
Antonio Filippone*
Department of Energy Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, Building 404, DK-2800 Lyngby, Denmark
Abstract
The purpose of this article is to provide a synthetic and comparative view of selected aircraft and rotorcraft (nearly 300
of them) from past and present. We report geometric characteristics of wings (wing span, areas, aspect-ratios, sweep
angles, dihedral/anhedral angles, thickness ratios at root and tips, taper ratios) and rotor blades (type of rotor, diameter,
number of blades, solidity, rpm, tip Mach numbers); aerodynamic data (drag coe$cients at zero lift, cruise and maximum
absolute glide ratio); performances (wing and disk loadings, maximum absolute Mach number, cruise Mach number,
service ceiling, rate of climb, centrifugal acceleration limits, maximum take-o! weight, maximum payload, thrust-to-
weight ratios). There are additional data on wing types, high-lift devices, noise levels at take-o! and landing. The data are
presented on tables for each aircraft class. A graphic analysis o!ers a comparative look at all types of data. Accuracy
levels are provided wherever available. 2000 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.
Contents
1. Introduction. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 631
2. Reliability of the data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 632
3. Aerodynamic data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 632
3.1. Drag coe$cients . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 633
3.2. Lift}drag ratio. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 635
3.3. Cruise Lift and high-lift performances . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 636
4. Selected performance data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 637
4.1. Mach number . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 637
4.2. Normal acceleration limits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 637
4.3. Rate of climb . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 638
4.4. Hover ceiling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 638
4.5. Maximum take-o! weight and other weights. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 638
4.6. Wing loading . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 638
4.7. Noise levels . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 638
5. Geometrical data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 639
5.1. Wing geometry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 639
5.2. Wing span . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 640
5.3. Aspect-ratios and shape parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 640
0376-0421/00/$- see front matter 2000 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.
PII: S 0 3 7 6 - 0 4 2 1 ( 0 0 ) 0 0 0 1 1 - 7
Nomenclature
A wing area; rotor disk area (m`)
AR wing geometrical aspect-ratio
b wing span (m)
B main rotor's number of blades (rotorcraft)
c wing/blade chord (m)
C
"
drag coe$cient
C
*
lift coe$cient
C
*
°º`
maximum lift coe$cient
C
D
skin friction coe$cient
d rotor diameter (m)
d
'º''
tail rotor diameter (m)
d' equivalent wing span (m)
D drag force (N)
e wing e$ciency factor
E maximum cargo range
g> maximum normal acceleration, g-limit
h hovering ceiling, out of ground e!ect (m)
k reduced frequency
l aircraft length, or length scale (m)
¸ lift force (N)
LE leading edge line
M Mach number
n normal load factor
P
*
max power loading"MTOW/T (kg/kN
for jets; kg/kW for propellers)
P
'
speci"c excess power (m/s)
QC quarter chord line
q dynamic pressure (kg ms`)
R aircraft range (km)
Re Reynolds number
R
'
rate of climb (m/min)
t/c wing thickness ratio
¹ take-o! thrust rating (kN), International
Standard Atmosphere (ISA)
u aircraft's speed (km/h, or m/s)
;
'
aircraft's stalling velocity with #aps
down (km/h)
=/A max wing loading"MTOW/A (kg/m`);
also equivalent disk loading
Z service ceiling in sustained horizontal
#ight (m); vertical coordinate
: angle of attack (deg)
[ dihedral angle, if '0; anhedral if (0
(deg)
z taper ratio"c
'
/c
'
wing sweep around LE or QC, as speci-
"ed (deg)
¸ angle of climb (deg)
j advance ratio
j air density (kg/m`)
o rotor solidity
Q maximum sustained rate of turn (deg/s)
Subscripts/superscripts
[ ]
°'
cruise conditions
[ ]
'
root
[ ]
'
tip
[ ]
"
at zero lift
[ ]
`
viscous
Aircraft wing specixcations
BWB blended wing body
FSW forward swept wing
SBW swept back wing
VSW variable sweep (usually discrete posi-
tions)
conventional delta wing
` double delta wing
Rotorcraft specixcations
AT attack, anti-tank, anti-submarine, ad-
vanced military vehicle
C cargo, crane, heavy lift transport (usually
military vehicle)
GE civil/military general purpose vehicle
(patrol, rescue, transport)
LC light commercial vehicle (for a few pas-
sengers and limited freight)
UT military utility vehicle (troops, freight,
mateH riel, support operations)
TW twin or tandem rotor, utility vehicle with
two rotor shafts
TR tilt rotor vehicle
Other symbols and abbreviations
AoA angle of attack
EPNdB e!ective perceived noise, measured in dB
LERX leading-edge root extension
MTOW maximum take-o! weight (kg)
OWE operating empty weight (kg)
PAY payload (kg)
P/O PAY/OWE
P/W PAY/MTOW
rpm rounds-per-minute (rotor speeds)
V/STOL vertical/short take-o! and landing
SSF single-slotted TE #ap
DSF double-slotted TE #ap
TSF triple-slotted TE #ap
SL single LE slat
SLK LE Kruger slat
USB upper surface blowing
VT vectored thrust
Aircraft designation
Aircraft and rotorcraft are identixed by company name (Antonov, Lockheed)#designation (An-124, F-117)#version
(A, B); nickname (Ruslan, Raptor) is rarely used. In the graphics the company names are added only occasionally.
Refer to the data base [1] for full information and data that for clarity are not labelled.
630 A. Filippone / Progress in Aerospace Sciences 36 (2000) 629}654
5.4. Wing sweep . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 640
5.5. Airfoil sections. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 641
5.6. Other geometrical characteristics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 642
6. Comparative analysis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 642
6.1. Helicopters. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 642
6.2. Cargo aircraft . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 646
6.3. Fighter jets. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 649
6.4. Subsonic commercial jets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 651
7. Perspectives and conclusions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 652
References. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 653
1. Introduction
The conceptual design of an aircraft and its aerody-
namic analysis may require a fair amount of independent
parameters. Quantities as essential as the wing aspect-
ratio have di!erent optima, depending on whether the
"gure of merit is the acquisition cost, the direct operating
costs, the take-o! gross weight, or the block fuel [2].
Engineers have long recognized that there is no simple
solution, and in recent years new multi-disciplinary
methods have been devised to treat design problems in
complex search spaces. Even then, "rst guess solutions
may be required, and often operation points falling o!
the known space are indication of something new.
It is estimated it took C. Lindbergh and his team at
Ryan Aircraft about 46 days to design and build the
successful Spirit of St. Louis (1927), and K. Tank one year
from conception to "rst #ight of his transatlantic Focke
Wulf Fw-200 (1935). To this day records are broken in
the opposite sense: the B2-A required 24,000 h of wind
tunnel testing, 44,000h of avionics testing, 6000 h of con-
trol systems testing, and 4000 h of #ight testing, for
a grand total of approximately 78,000 h [3]. At the same
time, some aircraft are known to consist of one million
parts, for example Lockheed-Martin F-22: `Designing
anything that complex takes more than dazzling engin-
eeringa [4].
The increasing level of technology has led to ever
increasing sophistication, while the concomitant increase
in analytical, computational and simulation capabilities
has not kept the pace. Hence the increasing development
times, that in some cases has reached the 10 year mark.
There is a general feeling that this trend must be stopped
and even reversed.
Although the initial phase of conceptual design is
rather #uid, with several ideas tested, accepted, rejected,
the use of tabulated data to compare past and current
technology is an invaluable aid. Most conceptual designs
can be de"ned as conservative whenever their operation
points fall within the range of known performances. Con-
sideration of reference data seldom can be discounted.
This paper responds to the need of a broad survey of
existing data in conventional aircraft and rotorcraft, and
provides useful information for aerospace sciences. The
presentation will stick to data and performances related
to aerodynamics and propulsion systems of full-scale
vehicles. Structures, costs and commercial issues are not
discussed. Out of the discussion are also all those para-
meters that are di$cult to de"ne with any certainty, or
are not readily available in the unclassi"ed literature, or
cannot be presented concisely. Data in this class include
all the unsteady aerodynamics characteristics, the aero-
dynamic derivatives, passenger details and most ranges
and fuel capacity. Seckel [5] in his book on dynamics and
stability reports a few interesting examples of these char-
acteristics.
The vehicles included in the analysis are organized
according to class. This selection provides maximum
order and well consistent trends. In some cases compari-
sons are performed across the whole spectrum of aircraft
and rotorcraft. There are several ways of reading the
data. One is the historical trend. This requires a selection
of design cases to be plotted against a time line (techno-
logy trends). Another option is to compare many vehicles
in the same class, to discover trends dictated by old or
new design considerations, and experimental work
(iso-technology). The curves "t are either lines or power
curves. The best "t is no minor issue, but e!orts have
been done to select the curves that best represent the raw
data.
Some aircraft classes are de"ned in a very narrow
design space (for example twin turboprops for regional
transport), while others (V/STOL vehicles, both military
and civil utility) show scattered operation points, also
due to the more complex propulsion systems. The latter
vehicles are not considered in this study. A partial review
is available in [6,7]. Some interesting data on all types of
Soviet/Russian aircraft have been published by Gurton
[8]. A systematic, analysis of aircraft size prior to 1970
was published by Cleveland [9]. Other useful data
have been published by Poisson-Quinton [10] and
Loftkin [11]. From a general point of view, there is
plenty of literature on why airplanes look the way
they do. Among the most remarkable ones, there is
KuK chemann's classical textbook [12], and Stinton's
airplane anatomy [13].
A. Filippone / Progress in Aerospace Sciences 36 (2000) 629}654 631
Fig. 1. Demonstrated wind tunnel times before "rst take o!.
The data and performances presented in this study
have been collected, elaborated, averaged and approxi-
mated from a number of sources, consisting of partial
data bases, #ight and wind tunnel data, technical draw-
ings. The references are limited to the sources of extensive
information used for the compilation of the data base.
The data that have been directly elaborated include:
rotor solidity, tip Mach numbers, advance ratios, rotor
disk loadings (rotorcraft); wing aspect-ratios, taper
ratios, thrust-to-weight ratios and some sweep angles
(around quarter-chord and leading-edge), some dihedral
angles and many lift and drag coe$cients (aircraft).
The material is arranged as follows: we "rst discuss the
aerodynamic data, then selected performance para-
meters, and "nally some essential geometric character-
istics, for all the vehicles. In the last section we analyze
vehicles in each class for selected classes only.
All the geometrical quantities have been considered as
in the aerospace practice (described for example by the
AIAA [14]), with a few additional speci"cations, as re-
ported in Section 5.
Data and performances labelled as best are restricted
to the records available in the unclassi"ed literature; they
are in no way absolute values. SI units are used through-
out (with the exception of wing loading and rotor disk
loading, for which we used the engineering units kg/m`).
The choice of the vehicles deserves a note of discussion.
While we have attempted to analyze the data, we have
collected information relative to about 300 vehicles,
mostly from the present time, and some from as far back
as the Second World War. Many aircraft had to be
excluded, because their operation points looked similar
to each other (for example, business jet aircraft and
regional transports) or because their data were incom-
plete. Some aircraft classes, such as light aircraft have
been left out of the discussion on purpose, because
we wanted to concentrate on vehicles performances that
we assumed to be outstanding.
2. Reliability of the data
All the aircraft are very likely to evolve slowly over the
years. Brand new designs, instead, are less and less likely
to land on the design board. Fig. 1 shows a historical
graphic with the number of wind tunnel hours before
maiden #ight for selected aircraft. The Wright Flyer is
believed to have required about 20 h, while the US
Shuttle over 25,000 h (all aerodynamic parts, and all
speeds of interest) in multiple test facilities.
Sometimes a major re-engineering project takes place
(like new powerplant installations, engine integration,
surface cleanup). Besides, virtually all types of aircraft
and rotorcraft are built according to customers' speci"ca-
tions, or under license, which can introduce further di!er-
entiations. Therefore, it comes to mind to say that no two
aircraft are ever the same, though no one emphasizes this
fact. For military vehicles there is often the risk of hand-
ling unconxrmed data.
For any given aircraft the data are still di$cult to read.
Take for example the C
*
°º`
: this can be for the 2D airfoil,
for the 3D wing, for the aircraft model in wind tunnel, for
the aircraft in #ight testing, at take-o! or landing, with
control surfaces fully extended, or even the certi"ed per-
formance, which is di!erent from all the above. Most of
the technical literature is not clear about the test condi-
tions (an exception is provided by Hopps and Danforth
[15]). Items are left blank wherever details could not be
obtained.
The data are sometimes well correlated, other times
rather lie in a broadband, for a number of reasons:
(1) data may be fudged by manufacturer or operator of
the aircraft; (2) data refer to operating conditions not
clearly speci"ed; (3) data indicate non-conventional
designs; (4) data are from old aircraft designs; (5) data and
performances have been erroneously interpreted.
All the data provided are subject to change, some more
rapidly than others (except, of course, for the aircraft that
are now out of production). Rapid changes can occur on
engine installations and fuselage dimensions; slow cha-
nges usually occur on wing con"gurations. The wing
system remains the core of the aircraft, even at times of
fully integrated avionics and satellite #ight control.
A new wing generally brings a new airplane.
3. Aerodynamic data
The values of the lift and drag coe$cients depend
on the operating angle of attack, :, and cruise Mach
632 A. Filippone / Progress in Aerospace Sciences 36 (2000) 629}654
Fig. 2. Generic aircraft polar, with the relevant operation
points. Two settings shown.
Fig. 3. Drag build-up on some aircraft types: 1"subsonic
transport aircraft; 2"supersonic transport; 3"executive jet;
4""ghter at subsonic speed; 5""ghter at supersonic speed;
6"civil utility helicopter. Drag causes: L"lift-induced;
V"viscous; I"interference; W"wave; O"other.
number, M. Reporting complete data would require po-
lars for all the aircraft considered. Most of these data are
not public, although some useful information is available
for selected aircraft [16}20].
Some data produced in the technical literature refer to
scale wind tunnel models, half-models, mock-up models,
research models; these are not interesting for our invest-
igation. The correlation between wind tunnel models of
any scale and #ight data is not always straightforward.
One of the reasons is attributed to the scale e!ects. It has
been noted that scaling has consequences on the largest
aircraft, whose boundary layers are fully turbulent. The
wind tunnel Reynolds numbers, in fact, are often lower
than the full-scale #ight Reynolds numbers, that creates
boundary layers that are partially laminar.
An example of aircraft polar is shown in Fig. 2
where these operation points have been denoted: (1) the
drag coe$cient at zero lift, C
"
"
, that gives an idea of
the combined viscous, wave and interference drag; (2) the
glide ratio at cruise conditions (¸/D)
°
; (3) the absolute
maximum glide ratio (¸/D)
°º`
; (4) the C
*
°º`
at 1-g (i.e.
steady-state conditions).
These polars can be derived for any #ap and slat
setting, but landing and take-o! con"gurations are the
most important ones. Other graphics of interest include
the C
*
!: map, that highlights the e!ects of the control
surfaces on the C
*
°º`
.
3.1. Drag coezcients
The technical literature on aircraft drag is vast, and is
obviously concerned with all the aspects of drag analysis
and reduction, besides issues related to aircraft design. At
any rate, drag data are particularly di$cult to gather: the
common practice is to not to show the tick labels on the
axes of drag polars, or to provide drag savings in percent
against a baseline that is not known.
The typical drag build-up on some aeronautical sys-
tems is shown in Fig. 3 (elaborated from [21,22]). The
drag components are averaged from a number of data,
and may shift a few percent on either direction, depend-
ing on aircraft and cruise conditions. This analysis serves
to show in which direction technological advances may
produce e!ective drag savings and fuel economy. There is
quite an amount of information that can be extracted
from Fig. 3. For example, the wave drag is a minor
problem in today's airliners, while the lift-induced drag
and the viscous drag make up most of the total count.
Civil utility helicopters are instead characterized by large
interference e!ects, "rst and foremost the rotor-fuselage
interaction, which accounts for an estimated 40% of
the total drag.
The analysis shows that the zero-lift drag coe$cient,
C
"
"
, for propeller-driven aircraft (light airplanes and
business turboprops) is in the range of 0.02}0.04. For
subsonic jet transports the "gures are lower:
C
"
"
&0.013}0.020, with average skin friction coe$cients
CM
'
&0.0025}0.0060 (all aircraft types). The lowest
CM
'
values are found on commercial jets, that have smooth
surfaces. Gaps around windows and doors, panel joints,
mis-rigged controls, antennas, etc., contribute to C
"
"
in
a measure of several drag counts, or up to 3}4% of the
total drag.
The surface clean-up occurred over the years is shown
in Fig. 4, that shows skin friction drag levels for selected
A. Filippone / Progress in Aerospace Sciences 36 (2000) 629}654 633
Fig. 4. Estimated viscous drag coe$cient C
"
`
at year of "rst
#ight.
Table 1
Drag and lift data of some aircraft
Aircraft C
"
C
*
M M¸/D AR Z Notes
1 Gulfstream II 0.0305 0.45 0.72 10.62 7.3 Plain wing
Gulfstream III 0.0262 0.45 0.74 12.71 7.4 W/winglets
2 Lockheed C-141A 0.0246 0.40 0.77 12.52 7.9
Lockheed C-141B 0.0228 0.40 0.77 13.51 7.9 Redesigned
3 General Dynamics YF-16 0.026 0.40 0.90 13.85 3.2 9840 Transonic
0.083 0.40 1.60 7.71 3.2 9840 Supersonic
4 North American XB-70A 0.0106 0.080 0.76 5.74 1.75 5085 Transonic
0.0223 0.115 1.21 6.22 1.75 10,630 Supersonic
0.0158 0.161 2.39 24.35 1.75 18,405 Supersonic
aircraft at year of "rst #ight. For the Airbus A-320 we
have estimated the viscous C
"
`
with surface riblets over
75% of its wetted surface [23]. The technological pro-
gress is impressive, although most of the drag reduction
methods devised (boundary layer control, suction and
blowing; large-eddy break-up devices, and not least
riblets) remain within the research domain. Current tech-
nology is reaching a plateau roughly corresponding
to the fully turbulent boundary layers. The data are
compared with the average turbulent C
"
for a #at plate
(von KaH rmaH n}SchoK nherr) at Re"10`.
The lift-induced drag is de"ned by
C
"
G
"
C`
*
eAR
. (1)
The e$ciency factor e (with respect to ideal elliptic load-
ing) is of the order 0.74}0.80 for many subsonic jet
airplanes [24]), lower for other airplanes.
Experience from the past shows that it is indeed pos-
sible to reduce the cruise C
"
of an aircraft by several
drag counts, which translates into some relevant percent
values. For example, re-engineering of the cargo C-141
Star Lifter in the early 1980s achieved a remarkable 8%
drag saving [25]). Equipping the Boeing B-747-400 with
winglets yields a 3% fuel saving over long-range cruise;
applications of surface riblets on the Airbus A340-300 in
1997 intended to reduce fuel consumption by 3}4 metric
tons/year (Jane's Information Systems, 1998 [3]). Rear
fuselage re-design can save 1% drag (ATR-42, Con-
corde). However, nearly every successful aircraft is a
design case.
Table 1 summarizes the aerodynamic data of some
important design cases. Case 1 shows the e!ects of
aerodynamic design from a base wing (the Gulfstream II
business jet), using advanced supercritical wing sections,
reduced wing sweep and winglets. The result was
a 14% drag saving at constant lift coe$cient. Case 2
shows the e!ects of aerodynamic improvements
on a military cargo aircraft (Lockheed C-141): After-
body, wing-body and landing gear hold added to
an 8% drag saving, other operating parameters being the
same. Case 3 is the e!ect of transonic drag rise on
a research "ghter aircraft, the YF-16. Case 4, the North
American XB-70A, was a high-speed research program,
and its data are compared at three di!erent operation
points.
Drag levels for the helicopter are much higher,
because of the blu! body design, fuselage}rotor interac-
tion, free standing landing gear, external stores, and
surface roughness. A good drag coe$cient in forward
#ight is C
"
&1 (Aerospatiale AS 365N). This is about
50 times higher than an average commercial jet aircraft.
The scaling of the drag forces is done with the
wing area for aircraft and rotor disk area for rotor-
craft, therefore the comparison between drag coe$cients
is not fully appropriate. A more fair comparison can be
done with the ratio D/q, where q"ju`/2 is the dynamic
pressure.
634 A. Filippone / Progress in Aerospace Sciences 36 (2000) 629}654
Fig. 5. ¸/D as a function of the cruise Mach number (all air-
craft). Dotted line is a power "t.
Fig. 6. Transonic drag rise for some supersonic "ghter aircraft.
3.2. Lift}drag ratio
The glide ratio ¸/D (also called xnesse or glide number)
is reached at C
*
&0.4}0.5 in subsonic #ight; much
lower lift values are required at supersonic speed:
C
*
&0.10}0.15. For commercial subsonic jet aircraft
(¸/D)
°º`
&17}20, that is in the same range of the best
¸/D achieved by some birds, for example the California
Condor and the Great Albatross [26]. The highest (¸/D)
°
on record is that of the Boeing B-52G, ¸/D&20.5.
While improvements are still possible with non con-
ventional designs [27], the data indicate that technology
has already achieved performances fully comparable with
those of the natural #ight.
Some aircraft ¸/D are shown in Fig. 5 as function of
the cruise Mach number. There is a large spread in the
data at all Mach numbers. The XB-70A, lowest point at
M(1 (see also Table 1), was designed for high super-
sonic speed (M"3), and shows poor performances a low
supersonic speeds. The relatively good ¸/D of this air-
craft is attributed to the compression lift generated at the
highest speeds [28]. Other low values are obtained with
supersonic "ghter jets. The operational range is noted by
a shaded box. The expression

¸
D
°
"4

1#
3
M
(2)
is generally assumed as a benchmark to de"ne a band of
state-of-the-art values at supersonic speeds [12]. Eq. (2)
yields ¸/D"19 at M"0.8, and ¸/D"10 at M"2. At
supersonic speeds the aerodynamic performances deteri-
orate sharply, due to the e!ects of the shock waves.
The transonic drag jump is usually compared by tak-
ing values at M"0.8 and 1.2. This di!erence can be of
the order C
"
&0.4}0.5, as shown in Fig. 6 (data
gathered from Poisson-Quinton and Boppe). The "gure
shows data in four bands, each consisting of an aircraft
class.
The ratio l/d' in the abscissa is the equivalent slender-
ness of the aircraft, with d'"(4S
°º`
/)¹`, and S
°º`
the
aircraft's maximum cross-sectional area. The drag jump
decreases with the increasing slenderness, and is strongly
dependent on the amount and types of external stores.
Minimum penalties are of course obtained with clean
con"gurations. For reference, also the drag of the
Sears}Haack body having the same slenderness l/d' is
shown. This is a body of minimum wave drag at super-
sonic speed, whose theoretical value is independent of
the speed [29]
C
"
`
"
9
8
`
1
(l/d')`
. (3)
The Sears}Haack body does not exhibit a drag jump
through the speed of sound (Eq. (3)). For a slender air-
craft the wave drag would be negligible at high subsonic
speeds, therefore the Sears}Haack body would be a bet-
ter reference data.
Since the aircraft cruise range is proportional to the
range factor M(¸/D) (Breguet), a relative drop in e$cien-
cy may be o!set by a correspondent increase in Mach
number. This term is useful to compare performances at
subsonic and supersonic speeds. From our data we "nd
for the B-52G M(¸/D)&16, for the Concorde &17, and
A. Filippone / Progress in Aerospace Sciences 36 (2000) 629}654 635
Table 2
High-lift systems and estimated C
*
°º`
for some aircraft
Case Aircraft LE TE C
*
°º`
Notes
1 Douglas DC-9-10 * DSF 2.50 1-g #ight data
Douglas DC-9-30 SL DSF 2.73 1-g #ight data
2 ATR-42 * DSF 1.75 1-g #ight, o
'
"03 (cruise)
2.61 1-g #ight, o
'
"153 (take-o!)
3.15 1-g #ight, o
'
"273 (landing)
3 Airbus A-340-300 SL SSF 2.54
Lockheed L-1011 SL DSF 2.48 1-g #ight data
Boeing B-747-100 SL Kruger TSF 2.43 2D multi-element
4 Lockheed C-5A SL SSF 2.27
Lockheed C-141B SL DSF 2.25
5 Boeing YC-14 SL Kruger TSF#USB 3.57 Avg. #ight data, landing
MD C-17A SL DSF#VT
6 Grumman X-29A coupled canard/FSW wing 1.34 1-g #ight, M"0.9
SAAB JS 37 coupled forewing/ wing n.a.
for the XB-70A &24. The benchmark values are found
from Eq. (2) multiplied by M.
3.3. Cruise lift and high-lift performances
Landing and take-o! speeds depend on the maximum
lift that can be produced by the aircraft through its
control surfaces. These can be unpowered multi-element
wing systems (most cases) and powered systems: over-
the-wing blowing (YC-14, An-72/74), vectored thrust
(Lockheed C-17A, Lockheed F-22A, Sukhoi S-37), pro-
pulsive (direct) lift (BAe Sea Harrier, Harrier II).
C
*
°º`
"gures for unpowered high-lift systems are in the
range 2.0}3.0; with powered systems C
*
°º`
&8}10 have
been reported, although not all systems successfully tes-
ted on experimental aircraft have been applied [7,30,31].
Table 2 summarizes the high lift systems for some
aircraft (see nomenclature for symbols). These aircraft
have complex mechanical systems that consist of several
spanwise segments.
Leading-edge elements are either rigid slats or Kruger
#aps, with a variable camber, and therefore are more
#exible. Trailing-edge devices consist of up to three ele-
ments. In some "ghter aircraft there is a leading-edge
droop (BAe Hawk 200). The function of the multi-
element wings is to increase the e!ective wing area, the
e!ective camber, the pressure suction peak, and to pro-
vide boundary layer control. Ref. [32] discusses both
aircraft design problems and state-of-the-art computa-
tional methods for high lift.
Case 1 refers to two di!erent versions of the same
commercial jet aircraft, the DC-9. In a later version, the
model -30, the Douglas corporation added a LE slat,
with a new LE design of the main wing to accommodate
the retracted slat and an extended wing chord. Vane and
#ap geometries are the same.
Case 2 is a twin turboprop for short-range transport.
The estimated C
*
°º`
at cruise, take-o! and landing con-
"gurations is shown, with the corresponding setting of
the #ap angle.
Case 3 is a selection of wide body long-range subsonic
jets with TE #ap systems of increasing complexity. In
particular, the B-747 features a variable camber Kruger
slat at the LE.
Case 4 is given by two heavy lift military transports of
the Lockheed company.
Case 5 is an example of powered lift systems (upper
surface blown #ap and vectored thrust), with estimated
average performances at landing. The YC-14 also fea-
tures a boundary layer control system at the wing's
leading edge.
Case 6 is a comparison between two supersonic mili-
tary jets, the experimental X-29A, with forward swept
wing, and the SAAB JA 37, with close-coupled fore-
plane- wing (called double ). In both cases high lift is
obtained by controlling the downstream vortex #ow on
the main wing through the canards/foreplanes, the latter
ones equipped with their own control surfaces.
Fig. 7 shows the technological progress toward im-
proved high-lift systems. The aircraft are ordered by
increasing complexity of their control systems. The only
two examples of powered systems in the graphic have
minimum limits above the best performances obtained
with triple-slotted Fowler #aps (TSF) and Kruger slats.
636 A. Filippone / Progress in Aerospace Sciences 36 (2000) 629}654
Fig. 7. C
*
°º`
versus complexity of the high lift system for selected
production aircraft (except YC-14). The graphic also shows the
boundary between mechanical systems (unpowered) and pow-
ered systems.
Fig. 8. Typical aircraft #ight envelopes: 1"MD AH-64D (heli-
copter); 2"Lockheed C-130J (cargo); 3"Airbus A-300 (sub-
sonic transport) ; 4"Lockheed F-16/C (supersonic "ghter).
¹ The data provided are reached with afterburning thrust and
a clean con"guration.
4. Selected performance data
As for the aerodynamic characteristics, full data for the
aircraft performances would require knowledge of all the
aircraft #ight envelopes. Here again we choose particular
operation points: maximum absolute speed in horizontal
#ight, cruise Mach number at altitude, stalling velocity
with control surfaces at full extension (some aircraft
types), service ceiling, hover ceiling out of ground e!ect
(rotorcraft only). Other speci"c performance parameters
are discussed in the section concerning the comparative
analysis.
An example of #ight envelopes is shown in Fig. 8,
where the critical operation points are noted for 4 types
of aircraft (these envelopes have been extrapolated from
the available data).
Envelope 4 is for clean con"guration and afterburning
thrust. For this aircraft, as well as other aircraft in the
same class, #ight envelopes are dependent of the external
stores. The actual maximum speed at maximum thrust at
given altitude is dependent on drag and aircraft gross
weight.
4.1. Mach number
The values provided depend on the type of aircraft.
For commercial aircraft (subsonic jets, twin turboprops,
business jets) M is the economic long-range cruise Mach
number ($0.02). At the operating lift coe$cient M is
close to the point where the transonic drag starts to build
up (this point is about 90}93% of the maximum absolute
speed with supercritical wing section).
For "ghter aircraft the Mach number reported is the
absolute maximum in the aircraft #ight envelope.¹ This
speed can be sustained for a short time over a narrow
range of altitudes (supersonic dash), as shown in Fig. 8
(envelope 4). Most of the aircraft in this class can #y for a
long range only at transonic speeds; a few are able of
maintaining supersonic Mach numbers at all altitudes,
including sea level (supercruise).
The reason for this apparent discrepancy in the
database is that the absolute Mach number for commer-
cial jets is of lesser interest, because the aircraft is never
operated at that speed.
4.2. Normal acceleration limits
The g>-limits are the absolute maximum centrifugal
accelerations an aircraft can sustain during transonic or
supersonic maneuver before incurring structural damage.
This limit is dependent on the type and number of ex-
ternal stores, mission set up and speed. The maximum
accelerations are obtained at transonic speeds. The nega-
tive acceleration limits, g, are much smaller. For "ghter
and attack aircraft g&g>/2; for rotorcraft (mostly
AT-vehicles) it is reasonable to assume g&g>/3. For
supersonic "ghters the best values are g>"8}9 at trans-
onic speeds, g>"6}7 at supersonic speeds. The best
rotorcraft g>-limits are g>"3. Acrobatic airplanes per-
form even better, with g>&12 or higher (see Table 6).
A. Filippone / Progress in Aerospace Sciences 36 (2000) 629}654 637
Fig. 9. Aircraft wing loading trends (selected aircraft).
` ICAO, Chapter 3, Annex 16; Far, Part 36, Stage 3.
4.3. Rate of climb
The absolute maximum rates of climb, R
'
, are pro-
vided, except for all the turboprops, whose data are for
sea level conditions. The highest R
'
are reached at alti-
tudes that depend on the aircraft, namely of the engine
thrust rates and the aerodynamic e$ciency. In steady
#ight the rate of climb assumes a simple expression
R
'
"u

¹
=cos ¸
!
D
¸
, (4)
where ¸ is the angle of climb. If the angle of climb is small
(typically less than 103), then
R
'
Ku

¹
=
!
D
¸
(5)
is a good approximation. The R
'
in Eqs. (4) and (5) is
given in m/s, but the technical practice is to express
this data in m/min. Fighter jets reach R
'
&10,000}
18,000m/min, with the MiG-29 claiming R
'
&
20,000m/min. This corresponds to a vertical climb of
about 20 body lengths per second!
For rotorcraft the values reported are obtained in
inclined forward #ight. Climb rates in vertical #ight are
lower. Typical values are R
'
&500}800m/min for state-
of-the-art AT-vehicles, lower for all other types. The AT
helicopter Kamov Ka-29 claims R
'
&890 m/min, which
corresponds to about 0.9 rotor diameter lengths per
second. If we consider average data, R
'
&0.6}0.7 dia-
meter lengths per second.
4.4. Hover ceiling
The hover ceiling of a helicopter is the altitude at
which the rate of climb is zero. This is evaluated out of
ground e!ect (OGE) and in ground e!ect (IGE), at stan-
dard atmosphere (ISA) or otherwise. Some OGE-ISA
(free #ight) data are reported in Table 4.
IGE hover data are needed to assess at which altitude
and atmospheric conditions the helicopter is able to
take-o!. Since the rate of climb is R
'
"dZ/dt, the hover
ceiling is reached when the air density (depending on
altitude and temperature) is no longer enough to extract
power from the engine. The data from#ight tests are very
scattered, with limits from 800 to 8000 m.
4.5. Maximum take-ow weight and other weights
MTOW includes the aircraft's operating empty weight
(OWE), the payload (PAY) and the fuel. Sometimes the
symbol = is used for weight, which is not necessarily
equal to MTOW. For military aircraft and rotorcraft it is
subject to speculation, because the MTOW depends on
the war-load, on the mission requirements, the operating
environments, and even on customers speci"cations.
For example, the aircraft Grumman A-6E is reported to
have a MTOW&27,400 kg for take-o! from "eld, and
MTOW"26,800 kg, if take-o! is assisted by catapult on
aircraft carrier. This MTOW is also susceptible to in-
crease in later versions of the same aircraft.
For heavy lift helicopters values of MTOW are given
for internal loads (i.e. inside the aircraft). Some vehicles
are able to operate with oversize slung loads (Mil-10 and
Boeing-Vertol CH-47D). We report only the perfor-
mances for maximum internal payload. The remaining
data are conforming with this convention.
4.6. Wing loading
The maximumwing loadings =/A are computed using
the MTOW and the wing area as de"ned above. For
VSW aircraft the area at maximum sweep has been used,
when available. Wing loading is not computed for
BWB-aircraft. Fig. 9 shows the =/A trends versus the
aircraft Mach number. If the supersonic aircraft are shif-
ted to transonic #ight condition (M"0.8}0.85) the data
are clean, with wing loadings well correlated by an ex-
ponential "t.
4.7. Noise levels
Noise emissions are expressed in e!ective perceived
noise, in dB (EPNdB), as certi"ed by the international
authorities` for each aircraft type and for speci"ed condi-
tions: take-o!, #y-over/landing, and sideline, at standard
638 A. Filippone / Progress in Aerospace Sciences 36 (2000) 629}654
Fig. 10. Noise levels at take-o! for commercial jets.
Fig. 11. Noise levels at take-o! and landing in EPNdB as certi"ed for di!erent classes of aircraft: 1"helicopters; 2"twin turboprops
for regional transport; 3"business jets; 4"regional jets; 5"subsonic commercial transports; 6"Concorde.
points in the neighborhood of the runway. These are
as follows:
E EPNdB at take-o!: measured at 6500 m from brake
release along the runway centerline.
E EPNdB at landing/approach: measured 2000 m from
landing point on runway.
E EPNdB at sideline; measured 450 m (2}3 engines air-
craft) or 570 m (4 engines) from runway centerline.
The noise levels reported are those certi"ed for stan-
dard engines. They are subject to change, as new high
by-pass engines are developed and regulations become
tighter. Fig. 10 shows a technology trend in noise emis-
sions and corresponding limits. An average reduction of
over 25 dB has been achieved over the past 30 years. The
"rst generation of Boeing 707 created a noise at take-o!
similar to that of the Concorde. As noted by Crighton
[33], this was as much noise as produced by the world
population shouting together. A Boeing 737 of 30 years
later produced as much noise as the city of New York
shouting in phase.
Fig. 11 is an iso-technology summary comparing all
classes of aircraft and rotorcraft in the year 2000. In the
data recorded, the highest noise levels are those of the
Concorde (over 120 dB at take-o!). The least noisy air-
craft are in the category of the business jets (72}82
EPNdB). Data for some light and utility helicopters are
also shown. Extensive data are reported by Lowson [34],
and Cox [35].
Sonic boom e!ects are another class of noise-related
issues. Boom overpressure on the ground is estimated at
Ap&0.51}0.78kg/m` (5.0}7.6 Pa). Data for Lockheed
SR-71A at M"1.26 are Ap&0.614kg/m` (6 Pa) at all
#ight altitudes.
5. Geometrical data
5.1. Wing geometry
The wing geometries come in a bewildering amount of
shapes and sizes. They include straight wings with a small
sweep angle (most single-engine light aircraft); conven-
tional swept back (for low and high subsonic #ight);
forward swept wing (for extreme agility and high angle of
A. Filippone / Progress in Aerospace Sciences 36 (2000) 629}654 639
Fig. 12. Typical wing geometry, with essential characteristics.
attack operation at both transonic and supersonic
speeds); conventional delta wing (for supersonic #ight);
wings with a variable sweep (only military vehicles,
"ghters and bombers); blended wing bodies (or #ying
wings). Most of these features are listed in Table 6. The
main parameters are shown in the sketch of Fig. 12.
Some "ghter wings are more complicated, because
they are designed to operate with leading-edge root ex-
tensions (LERX), adjustable canards (Dassault Rafale,
SAAB JS39), foreplane wings. In particular, SAAB JA 35
and JA 37 feature a double delta wing, with a smaller
foreplane.
The wing area is de"ned as the clean wing area projec-
ted on the ground plane, without including "llets, control
surfaces, winglets, foreplanes, canards, and LERX. For
the estimation of the maximum wing loading only this
area is considered. The ratio of foreplane wing to main
wing area generally does not exceed 10% (for example,
Euro"ghter 2000, Rockwell-DASA X-31), although it
can be as much as 20% in some V/STOL experimental
aircraft.
5.2. Wing span
The wing span, b, is the distance tip-to-tip, measured
on the horizontal line with aircraft on the ground. This
quantity excludes tip devices (canted winglets, tanks,
sails) and tip weapons (missiles or other), and is variable
in all VSW aircraft.
There is a tricky problem in the case of very large
aircraft, like the Boeing B-747-400. An aircraft on the
ground with maximum fuel has a wing span 0.48 m larger
than that of an empty aircraft. This happens because with
the de#ection of the wing created by the additional
weight, the winglets (canted outward by 223) tend to open
up, thus increasing the apparent wing span by 0.74%.
5.3. Aspect-ratios and shape parameters
There are two di!erent de"nitions: the geometrical and
the structural aspect-ratio. The geometrical aspect-ratio
is AR"b`/A; it includes the portion of the span cross-
ing through the fuselage. This is the de"nition used in the
present study, and may be di!erent from data reported
elsewhere. The structural aspect-ratio is computed from
the actual wing attachment to the tip, along speci"ed
lines (e.g. quarter-chord). This is a more precise measure
of slenderness, and is the relevant quantity for most
aeroelastic calculations.
For wings with variable sweep (VSW), AR more than
doubles by positioning the wing at minimum sweep (for
example: Sukhoi Su-24 has AR"2.1}5.6). Typical AR
are as follows: AR&2}4 for "ghter aircraft; AR&7}12
for commercial airplanes. Another parameter of interest
is the wetted aspect-ratio
f"
b`
A
`°'
"AR
A
A
`°'
, (6)
with A
`°'
the aircraft wetted area. The interest in this
parameter is at least twofold: (1) it provides an indication
of the aircraft shape, i.e. the relative size of its wings; (2) its
square root is proportional to (¸/D)
°º`
. Data for aircraft
in the Airbus family are b`/A
`°'
"1.3}1.5; f&0.6 for the
Concorde, f&2.75 for Northrop B-2 (#ying wing),
f&0.17 for Lockheed SR-71A (supersonic aircraft).
(¸/D)
°º`
data versus f have been plotted by Raymer [36].
The slenderness l/b is also important in determining
the aircraft shape. Some values are listed in Table 3 ac-
cording to increasing speed.
The slenderness is expected to increase with the Mach
number to meet the drag constraints. The Concorde is
the most slender of the aircraft in the table. Recent
studies on supersonic transport (SST) indicate similar
values of l/b to cruise at M"2.4.
5.4. Wing sweep
Wing sweep are available either at the quarter-chord
line, or at the leading-edge line. The latter de"nition
applies well to cases such as blended wing bodies, when
the leading-edge is a straight line (Northrop B-2A, Lock-
heed F-117A). Four quantities are needed to describe
completely the wing: c
'
, b, z and the sweep angle at LE or
QC, from the formula
tan
''
"tan
''
!
1
8b
c
'
(1!z). (7)
If some data are missing, then the sweep angle can be
retrieved from technical drawings. Other formulas, using
the aspect-ratio, are available [14]. The approximation
to the data reported is believed to be $13. For special
cases there is a compound sweep angle, arising from the
640 A. Filippone / Progress in Aerospace Sciences 36 (2000) 629}654
Table 3
aircraft slenderness and corresponding speed
Aircraft l/b M Notes
Piper Pa-28 0.68 0.18 Straight wing
Lockheed U2-R 0.61 0.65 Long endurance
Boeing B-747-400 1.09 0.83 Subsonic jet
Northrop B-2 2.49 0.76 Flying wing
Lockheed F-117A 1.52 Low observable
Lockheed F-22A 1.40 1.70 Supersonic "ghter
Tupolev Tu-160 1.52 1.88 VSW vehicle
Concorde 2.40 2.05 Supersonic transport
North Am. XB-70A 1.87 3.0 Experimental
Lockheed SR-71A 1.93 3.31 Supersonic recoinnassance
North Am. X-15A 2.27 6.3 Rocket powered
Shuttle Spacecraft 1.57 Hypersonic
NASA X-34 (est.) 2.21 Hypersonic
Fig. 13. Thickness ratio versus Mach number, all aircraft types.
use of cranked wings (some Dassault business jets,
Fokker F-28, Canadair RJ CL-600, Tupolev Tu-144).
Sweep angles can be de"ned also for LERX, canards,
foreplane and tailplane wings. Forward swept wings are
available only on research aircraft (Grumman X-29A,
Sukhoi S-37).
For VSW-aircraft A, b, AR, and =/A are provided at
maximum sweep angle. Sweep angles are generally pos-
sible at 3 or 4 discrete positions (for example: MiG-23,
MiG-27, Sukhoi Su-24, Tornado ADV; Tupolev Tu-22
and Tu-160). Wing sweep in continuously variable on the
GE F-111 and the Rockwell B1-B.
5.5. Airfoil sections
Many airfoil sections of low-speed aircraft (single and
twin turboprops, short-range transports) from past and
present have conventional geometry, namely standard
NACA pro"les or other pro"les from open literature,
with or without modi"cations. The most popular wing
sections are the series NACA 230xx (Cessna Citation 550,
many Beechcraft airplanes, helicopters Agusta A-109,
PZL Sokol, Mil-6), NACA 64
"
-xxx (Fokker F-27 and
F-50), NACA 64

-xxx (Lockheed C-130, F-16C; MD
F-5E), symmetric NACA 00xx (Lockheed Model 185,
rotor blades on Enstrom F-28), along with some Wor-
tmann geometries, for both aircraft wings (especially
gliders) and rotorcraft blades (Bell 209 and 222). In a few
cases of military application, the airfoil sections are
double wedges (Lockheed F-117A) and biconvex (Ching
Kuo). All the vehicles #ying at transonic speeds now have
supercritical wing sections, while high performance heli-
copters (XV-15, V-22) feature advanced technology for
reduced noise [37] or leading-edge droop (Agusta A-
109C, Eurocopter BO-105). In recent years the improved
CFD capabilities have helped design ad-hoc wing sec-
tions and three-dimensional wings (Fokker 100, Boeing
B-747, B-777). This trend is likely to be followed in the
future.
Wing thickness ratios (particularly at root) are depen-
dent of the speed range of the aircraft. Fig. 13 is a plot of
(t/c)
°
versus the cruise or maximum Mach number for all
classes of aircraft. Thickness ratios at root range from
21% of twin turboprops (commuters and short-range
transport), to 4% (supersonic "ghters); (t/c)
'
can be as low
as 3%. Thickness ratios are variable on all VSW aircraft.
Data for the Tornado ADV are (t/c)
'
variable from 12 to
6%, from minimum-to-maximum sweep. Helicopter ro-
tor blades have t/c"7}15%. Blade thickness is constant
on most LC vehicles and variable on all high perfor-
mance vehicles.
A. Filippone / Progress in Aerospace Sciences 36 (2000) 629}654 641
Fig. 14. Wing angle setting at root. Mach number is the long
range cruise for civil aircraft, and maximum absolute speed for
military vehicles. Dashed lines are power "t of the data.
Fig. 15. Taper versus sweep versus sweep angle, all aircraft
types.
5.6. Other geometrical characteristics
Dihedral and anhedral angles, [, are computed from
the wing roots at the leading edge line. The accuracy is
estimated at $30'. The [ values are very dependent on
where the reference points are taken (quarter-chord, trail-
ing-edge). Typical values are as follows: ["!5 to !23
for military cargos (high wing); ["5}73 for commercial
jet transports (low wing); ["!10 to 0 for supersonic jet
"ghters.
Boundary layer control is generally needed on the
suction side of the wing. Typical devices include fences
(F-102, BAe Hawk 200, Cessna 650) and vortex gener-
ators. The largest wings on record (Antonov An-124 and
An-225) are clean.
The wing angle settings at the root, Fig. 14, are
:
'
&1}5 for business turboprops, zero (or nearly so) for
most supersonic "ghters. Most wings aircraft have
a washout, e.g. a twist that is aimed at reducing the
e!ective angle of attack at cruise conditions, and hence
premature tip stall. Tip incidence can be negative.
The taper ratio z"c
'
/c
'
is shown in Fig. 15 in terms of
the aircraft speed. The FSW aircraft have taper ratios of
the same order as conventional supersonic wings.
The blade chord of most helicopters is constant, al-
though the airfoil section may vary and the blade may be
twisted (CH-47D, Mil-38). One notable exception is the
tilt rotor Bell-Boeing V-22, which has a variable chord:
c
'
"0.90 m, c
'
"0.56 m (this rotor has the characteristics
of a large propeller).
Tip devices are now available on all the advanced
vehicles. Typical features include winglets (most business
jets, many commercial jets, some military aircraft),
stabilizing #oats (all amphibian vehicles), tanks (Aer-
macchi SF-260 and MB-339, Learjet 35A, Piper PA-42),
Hoerner tips (some light aircraft, Fairchild A-10A). Ro-
torcraft tips are either swept back (AH-64D, Ka 52,
Mil-28, Mil-38, S-90, Bell 222) or have a sophisticated
contouring (ex. BERP tips on EH.101, NH.90, Westland
Lynx).
6. Comparative analysis
We have performed some comparative analysis for the
same class of aircraft, and across the whole spectrum of
aircraft types. While some data show a relative scatter,
others are remarkably clean. The data plotted refer only
to the aircraft and rotorcraft in the database.
Each aircraft class has its own speci"c charac-
teristics, from single-point design (most commercial
vehicles), to multi-point design (virtually all the military
vehicles).
6.1. Helicopters
The main rotor's technology comes in a number of
di!erent examples: single rotors (most vehicles), tan-
dem/twin rotors (Boeing Vertol H-46, CH-47, Piasecki
H-21), tilt rotors (Boeing-Sikorski V-22, Bell-Agusta
BA-609), intermeshing rotors (Kaman K-max 1200), co-
axial counter rotating (Kamov Ka-29, Ka-32, Ka-50,
Ka-52, Ka-115, Ka-116, Ka-226A). The latter designs are
tailless con"gurations. Tailless helicopters are also the
642 A. Filippone / Progress in Aerospace Sciences 36 (2000) 629}654
Table 4
rotorcraft data and performances (see nomenclature for symbols)º
Helicopter Type B d c u rpm o j k MTOW =/A h
Bell 209 SeaCobra AT 2 13.41 0.84 333 311 0.0798 0.424 0.148 4535 32.11
Bell 406/OH-58D AT 4 10.67 0.24 232 395 0.0573 0.292 0.077 2500 27.96 2225
Bell 407 GE 4 10.67 0.27 237 413 0.0644 0.285 0.089 2270 25.39 3170
Bell 412 UT 4 14.02 0.40 230 314 0.0727 0.277 0.103 5260 34.07 1580
Bell AH-1W SuperCobra AT 2 14.63 0.84 282 311 0.0731 0.329 0.175 6700 39.86 915
Bell 427 GE 4 11.28 0.27 250 395 0.0610 0.298 0.080 2835 28.37 4240
Bell/Boeing V-22 TR 3 11.61 0.76 185 333 0.1201 0.254 0.235 27,440 129.60 4330
BoeingVertol 114/CH-47D TW 3 18.29 0.81 260 225 0.0846 0.335 0.132 24,500 46.62 1670
MD-500E LC 5 8.05 0.17 248 492 0.0672 0.332 0.064 1360 26.74 1830
Enstrom 480 LC 3 9.75 0.24 204 334 0.0470 0.332 0.074 1300 17.32 3720
Aerospatiale 332 UT 4 15.60 0.60 266 265 0.0979 0.341 0.113 8600 44.99 2300
Aerospatiale 532 GE 4 15.60 0.60 262 265 0.0979 0.336 0.114 9000 47.09 1650
Aerospatiale 550 GE 3 10.69 0.35 248 394 0.0625 0.312 0.105 2250 25.07 2250
Aerospatiale 565N GE 4 11.94 0.40 287 350 0.0853 0.364 0.092 4250 37.96 1200
Eurocopter EC 365N GE 4 11.94 0.40 278 350 0.0853 0.353 0.095 4250 37.96 1200
Eurocopter BO 105 LC 4 9.84 0.27 240 424 0.0699 0.305 0.090 2500 32.87 455
Eurocopter EC 120B LC 3 10.00 0.26 228 415 0.0497 0.291 0.089 1700 21.65 2530
Mitzubishi BK-117 GE 4 11.00 0.32 248 383 0.0741 0.312 0.093 3350 35.25 3000
Kaman Seasprite UT 4 13.81 0.59 252 298 0.2176 0.325 0.132 6120 40.88 5845
Mil Mi-26 C 8 32.00 0.92 295 132 0.1464 0.371 0.078 56,000 69.63 1500
Mil Mi-28 AT 5 17.20 0.67 265 242 0.1240 0.338 0.115 11,400 49.06 3600
ºNotes. (1) h is the hovering ceiling OGE. (2) V-22 has c
'
"0.90m, c
'
"0.56 m; speed given in helicopter mode. (3) Bell 412:
c
'
"0.40 m, c
'
"0.22 m. (4) Average blade chord for AS 565N, AS 365N, EC 155B: c
'
"0.405m, c
'
"0.385 m. (5) Mil-26: largest
helicopter; carries payload of same weight at Lockheed C-130J.
new series of light and utility vehicles MD 520 and MD
530. The number of blades ranges from 2 (most Bell
helicopters) to 8 (Mil-26).
Rotor loadings give a measure of the aircraft size
needed to lift a given gross weight, Stepniewski and Keys
[38]. A partial list of data is presented in Table 4.
The rotor equivalent disk loading =/A is shown in
Fig. 16, where the rotorcraft are compared at constant
technology level. When exception is done for old techno-
logy (for example Sikorsky S-61 of the 1950s, Aero-
spatiale S321 of the 1960s, and a few others), the correla-
tion is impressive.
The data of Fig. 16 have been separated into rotorcraft
classes, and are well correlated by power "t curves, with
a few exceptions: the G-vehicles of the Mil family (Mil-8,
Mil-14, Mil-17, Mil-38) have unusually large diameters,
hence a relatively low disk loading. However, they are
aligned in their own design space. The T-vehicles are
correlated by a linear "t, due to the low number of items
on record. The bending of the "t curve is an indication
of disk loading increasing at a faster pace than gross
take-o! weight. The tilt rotor Bell-Boeing V-22 has
extraordinarily large disk loading, as does the heavy lift
Sikorsky S-80/CH-53E (the performance of the V-22 is
intended for helicopter mode).
Most of the data of A- , G- , U-vehicles fall within the
power "t curves
=/A&1.019=""``, =/A&0.202 ="`"`, (8)
where we assume the weight ="MTOW. The tail rotor
diameter is also well correlated to the rotor disk loading
by
D
'º''
D
&0.127 exp(8.2 10`=/A). (9)
Both data and correlation are shown in Fig. 17 (for
helicopters having a tail rotor). EC 135 and EC 365N
have a ducted tail rotor with staggered blades for reduced
noise. Their design point is eccentric, but is has been
considered in the determination of the curve "t.
The rotorcraft speed u is the maximum speed in for-
ward #ight at sea level. This is slightly lower than the
absolute maximum speed (never to exceed speed), Fig. 8
(envelope 1). With this de"nition we can compare ad-
vance ratios and tip Mach numbers for di!erent helicop-
ters. The range of maximum speeds is 200}300km/h.
Only a few helicopters are capable of operating at higher
speeds: MD AH-64D has u
°º`
"360 km/h; Lockheed
A. Filippone / Progress in Aerospace Sciences 36 (2000) 629}654 643
Fig. 16. Rotorcraft disk loading trends. Some vehicles are indicated to show extreme values of MTOW and W/A. Bell-47 was the "rst
commercial helicopter (1947); Mil 26 is the largest vehicle in terms of MTOW. The G-vehicles are both civil and military general utility
vehicles; the T-vehicles consist of tandem rotors, except the V-22 that is a tilt rotor.
AH-56 u
°º`
"407 km/h (though with compound thrust),
due to limits imposed by #ight instability, excessive
tip Mach numbers, dynamic stall e!ects on rotating
parts.
The main rotor's rpm reported in Table 4 are indicated
as either constant or variable over a narrow range. Typi-
cal rotor speeds are 120}400 rpm. Some rotorcraft fea-
ture automatic control of the speed (for example, many
helicopters of the Kamov series). Tail rotors turn at much
higher rates, 1000}3000rpm.
The computed tip Mach number is shown as a func-
tion of the maximum sea level speed (Fig. 18) and ad-
vance ratio (Fig. 19). The data are correlated by a line "t
described by
M
''º
"1.031;10` u#0.603,
M
''º
"0.661 j#0.652, (10)
where u is the sea level speed in km/h. An exception
is the relatively low M
''º
of the Enstrom 480, that
features NACA 0012 airfoils sections. This airfoil is
known for having poor transonic properties [39]:
drag divergence is estimated at M"0.7 at incidence
:"43.
644 A. Filippone / Progress in Aerospace Sciences 36 (2000) 629}654
Fig. 17. Tail rotor relative size d
'º''
/d.
Fig. 18. Tip Mach number at maximum S/L speed. The perfor-
mance for RAH-66 has been extrapolated from the maximum
absolute speed.
Fig. 19. Tip Mach number versus advance ratio j.
Fig. 20. Rotor solidity versus the diameter for all rotorcraft
types. Value for V-22 is found from average blade chord
c "0.76 m.
The rotor solidity, shown in Fig. 20 as a function of the
rotor diameter, was computed from
o"
2c B
D
. (11)
A linear "t is a good approximation, although Mi-18 and
V-22 are particularly eccentric: Mil Mi-18 is low because
of the large diameter; V-22 is high because the blades are
a compromise between helicopter rotor and aircraft pro-
peller. The solidity of the Kamov Ka-52 has been com-
puted by considering the rotor made of 6 blades (actual
con"guration is a 603 stagger between co-axial rotors).
Most of the LC vehicles have solidity below the line "t.
The main rotor's reduced frequency at maximum sea
level speed, de"ned by
k"
oc
2u
(12)
A. Filippone / Progress in Aerospace Sciences 36 (2000) 629}654 645
Fig. 21. Main rotor's reduced frequency at maximum sea level
speed.
Fig. 22. Helicopter power loading. Line "t is a power curve
through 62 operation points.
with o"2¬ rpm/60 is shown in Fig. 21. Most of the
values are in the range 0.05}0.15. The line "t excludes the
tilt-rotor V-22, which is particularly high. (This is how-
ever a limiting condition unlikely to be reached, since the
vehicle is operated in the aircraft mode.) Relatively low
forward speed is expected at high reduced frequencies,
due to fatigue and aeroelastic limits imposed by the
dynamic loadings on the rotor, even with advanced air-
foil sections.
The main rotor performance is shown in Fig. 22 for all
classes of vehicles. This is an indication of deviation from
the ideal conditions of the power required for the static-
thrust performance (hover). The rotor e$ciency upper
bound is about 0.6, with most of the rotors performing
around 0.5.
6.2. Cargo aircraft
For no other aircraft type as the cargo the useful load
fraction is so descriptive of the aircraft value. These
aircraft are also the largest vehicles built, and their sheer
size is undeniably fascinating. The data collected in
Table 5 are a summary of characteristics of military
vehicles and some vehicles re-engineered into military
utility, from the small-size transport to the largest. All
weights are expressed in metric tons (10` kg), and the
"gures of merit (described below) are for demonstrated
performances of the aircraft versions speci"ed in the
table. Better performances are reported as records (for
example, C-133) or design targets (An-225).
The Antonov An-225 is (on the design board) one and
a half times heavier than a fully loaded Boeing B-747-400,
while the Antonov An-124 is just 2% heavier. The An-
225 at its design point, with its wing barely "tting on the
long side of a football "eld (an amazing 88.40 metres),
would be equivalent to 500 compact cars taking o! at
once.
Size e!ects on aircraft have been brilliantly discussed
by Cleveland [9], who reversed an old opinion (for
example, [40]) on the square/cube law. This law states
that the structural stress increases with the characteristic
length, as long as the load is proportional to the struc-
tural weight: in a =/A to MTOW map the correlation
would be linear (this was also shown by Tennekes at all
length scales [26]). Cleveland implied that this law would
be defeated by technological advances, but this does
not seem to be the case when comparing the aircraft
of Table 5, even when larger aircraft than the Lockheed
C-5 have been built. The data shown in Fig. 23 includes
about 40 years of technology, and scaling seems ap-
propriate, if we exclude the turboprops with substan-
tially straight wing. Changes may be introduced in the
future if more e$cient engines become available, or if
relatively old concepts such as the spanloader become
a reality.
Considering the An-225 and G-222 (largest and
smallest aircraft) the ratio between wing spans is 3, the
ratio between wing areas is 9, and the ratios between
gross weights is 18, which corresponds to a factor 2 in
wing loading.
One "gure of merit is the ratio between the payload
and the empty operating weight, PAY/OWE, or the
payload to gross take-o! weight ratio, PAY/MTOW
(useful load fraction). The graphics of Fig. 23 show the
capability of each aircraft. Conventional wisdom would
646 A. Filippone / Progress in Aerospace Sciences 36 (2000) 629}654
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(
8
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(
9
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;
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n
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0
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;
P
A
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(
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)
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,
w
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(
1
1
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M
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f
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T
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a
b
i
l
i
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.
(
1
2
)
K
C
-
1
0
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:
M
T
O
W
g
i
v
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n
f
o
r
f
u
l
l
c
a
r
g
o
;
t
a
n
k
e
r
h
a
s
l
o
w
e
r
M
T
O
W
,
a
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r
c
r
a
f
t
b
a
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d
o
n
D
C
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1
0
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0
w
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g
.
(
1
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)
K
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-
1
3
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:
w
i
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b
a
s
e
d
o
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7
1
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;
M
T
O
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g
i
v
e
n
f
o
r
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c
a
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o
;
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.
A. Filippone / Progress in Aerospace Sciences 36 (2000) 629}654 647
Fig. 23. Cargo aircraft PAY/OWE and and PAY/MTOW ratios versus aircraft size. (B747-4F"Boeing 747-400F).
Fig. 24. Maximum cargo range.
suggest that it is more e$cient to lift a few large cargos
than several small ones, but relatively small airplanes,
such as the Alenia G-222 and Lockheed C-130J
have useful load fractions higher than many large
airplanes. However, also the aircraft range must be used
in the performance equation. The product PAY R (tons
km) is biased toward the large aircraft; the product
between the maximum useful load and the maximum
aircraft range
E"
PAY
MTOW
R (13)
is the maximum cargo range, and is given in km. This
analysis is shown in Fig. 24. All the correlations are
linear. There is a number of aircraft with gross wing area
A&350 m` (A300, C-17A, KC-10A, among others),
showing that this aircraft size is the most commercially
interesting. The large gap between A300-600 and KC-
10A can be attributed to the fact that A300 is designed to
carry internal oversize cargos (not necessarily bulky
ones), while the KC-10A, working either as a cargo or
tanker, can e$ciently use all of its volume. The C-17 has
operation point between A300 and KC-10A: its dimen-
sions and payload have been designed to hold large units,
like bulky military equipment.
648 A. Filippone / Progress in Aerospace Sciences 36 (2000) 629}654
Fig. 25. Thrust-to-weight data for supersonic jet "ghters. Data
elaborated from maximum thrust rating with afterburning and
MTOW at sea level.
The best "gure is that of the Boeing B747-400F, which
does not perform well in terms of absolute useful load,
(Fig. 23). By comparison, the maximum cargo range of
the Concorde is only 739 km, while the Airbus A340-300
has E"2700 km.
6.3. Fighter jets
State-of-the-art "ghters/attack aircraft are designed to
operate at a wide range of speeds, weapons, external
stores and missions. The data studied include aircraft
primarily designed for air support (Harrier, A-10, JS37)
and aircraft intended for air-to-ground operations
(F-117).
Each point in the diagrams represents an optimum
de"ning the best manoeuvring margins within costs
limits of the aircraft operator. Variable wing sweep,
transonic area rule design, low radar signature, advanced
weapons systems are peculiar problems of this class of
aircraft, that show the most scattered data and perfor-
mances.
The #ight envelope 4 of Fig. 8 is the limit performance.
The aircraft can actually operate almost anywhere within
this region. Useful references include reports of the
AGARD Fluid Dynamics Panel [41] and [42],
McMichael et al. [43], and Bradley [44].
Speci"c aerodynamic and system issues in "ghter air-
craft design include high-: performances, lateral and
directional stability, aerodynamics of #ight control,
canard-wing interference, and radar cross-section. Some
important performance parameters are the speci"c excess
power and the maximum sustained rate of turn.
Specixc excess power
P
'
"

¹!D
=
u"
¹
=
u!
jC
"
u`/2
=/A
. (14)
For a given altitude and speed (single point in the #ight
envelope diagram, Fig. 8), P
'
can be maximized by high
thrust rating, high wing loading (hence small wings) and
low C
"
. At given C
"
and #ight altitude P
'
is a function of
both ¹/=and =/A, that are considered the most impor-
tant parameters a!ecting the aircraft performance.
Fig. 25 shows the ¹/= and =/A data obtained at sea
level. For reference, also 3 lines of constant P
'
have been
computed, using a ground speed M"0.9 and a drag
coe$cient C
"
"0.4. At altitude, the ¹/=and =/A are
only a fraction of the data presented, and changes are
dependent on the particular aircraft, on the number of
external stores left for close-in-combat #ight, and engine
e$ciency.
It is easy to see using average data in Eq. (14) that
P
'
becomes a large negative number, which means the
drag rise is in excess of the available thrust. Although the
data at sea level cannot actually be scaled at altitude,
Fig. 25 gives an indication of system e!ectiveness, in
particular an indication of power available for sustained
turn rates. The "ghter Lockheed F-22A claims
¹/="1.117 at take-o!, while the maximum value is
indicated as ¹/="1.42.
There is a considerable scatter in the data. Tornado
ADV is o! scale with a theoretical wing loading of about
1000 kg/m`. At the other end there are aircraft with =/A
&350}800 kg/m`.
The maximum sustained rate of turn is
Q "
g
u
(n`!1)¹`

180
(rad/s), (15)
where n is the normal load factor. The turn is generally
performed in highly unsteady #ight. Therefore, a third
performance parameter is de"ned: the maximum instan-
taneous load factor
n
X
"
C
*
°º`
q
=/A
, (16)
which is limited by the structural resistance of the air-
craft. Evaluation of the C
*
°º`
is neither straightforward,
nor easily available in the technical literature.
The number of parameters needed to fully characterize
a "ghter/attack aircraft is in the order of several dozens.
The data available are rather sparse, because of sensitive
importance. However, they include the following: roll
rates of up to 2703/s; AoA up to 50 or 803 (FSW aircraft);
max sustained turn rates of the order of 103/s; max
instantaneous load factor up to 9g; max speci"c excess
power 150 m/s; max acceleration through the sound
barrier 0.5g in straight #ight; max rate of climb over
A. Filippone / Progress in Aerospace Sciences 36 (2000) 629}654 649
T
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º
N
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.
(
1
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V
S
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-
a
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r
c
r
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:
w
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s
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(
2
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D
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r
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(
3
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R
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a
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a
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:
A
M
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,
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a
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k
1
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A
M
C
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5
,
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.
(
4
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(
5
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T
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2
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)
;
S
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7
;
B
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.
(
6
)
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650 A. Filippone / Progress in Aerospace Sciences 36 (2000) 629}654
Fig. 26. Fighter aircraft Mach number plotted versus the wing
sweep at LE. For the VSW aircraft sweep has been considered at
fully spread wings.
Fig. 27. Ordnance-to-MTOW ratios for bombers and "ghters.
19,000m/min; max weapons load ratios of 0.25; super-
cruise at sea level M"1.2; take-o! runs assisted by
afterburning as low as 0.25 km (half of this on ramp).
Most of the data on record show a large scatter, which
is a sign that design, mission requirements and perfor-
mances change considerably from one aircraft to the
other. A quick look at the basic parameters of the wing
system (see Table 6 for reference) would suggest so. Scal-
ing is not an issue, like for the cargo aircraft discussed
above: aerodynamic characteristics, stability margins,
control surface sizing, power plants, landing gear, and
#ight controls do not scale with aircraft size.
Wind tunnel test times, as shown in Fig. 1, have been
growing to over 20,000 h (all aerodynamic sub-compo-
nents, full con"guration system, and all speed ranges),
although the experimental research aircraft Grumman
X-29A required less than 1200 h before maiden #ight in
1984 [45]. This was in the same order as the development
of the F-101 30 years earlier.
Fig. 26 shows the "ghters Mach number in supersonic
dash as function of the wing aspect-ratio. The
VSW-aircraft are plotted at the operation point corre-
sponding to maximum sweep
''
, and are placed above
the power "t line. The of F-117A is far larger than the
one required to #y at the corresponding speed. This is
due to its design for low radar signature. The wing of
NAMC Q-5 is unusually swept, while the top speed
claimed is barely above M"1. The MiG-31 claims a top
speed M"2.83. Mach"2.5 is the practical speed limit
for aero-thermodynamic heat stress of today's aircraft
(this corresponds to a stagnation temperature of about
2503C). Even at M"2.5 this aircraft covers about 32
body lengths/second (while the F-15E covers 38 body
lengths at the same speed).
Some ratios between maximum war-load weight and
MTOW have been extrapolated, although it is di$cult to
work out the details (internal and external bays, optional
loads, barrel guns, etc.). For "ghter aircraft this ratio is in
the range 0.10}0.30; for heavy bombers estimates give
0.10}0.14 (largest for Tupolev Tu-160). The maximum
ordnance to gross weight for both bombers and
"ghters/attack aircraft is shown in Fig. 27. The Lockheed
F-117A is not technically a "ghter, although it has been
classi"ed so; its maximum weapons load seems aligned
with that of the bombers.
6.4. Subsonic commercial jets
Flying faster and more e$ciently has been the main
goal since the beginning of commercial and passenger
transport. Fig. 28 shows the speed of commercial air-
planes at year of "rst #ight. The speed of piston engines
continued to grow until the late 1940s. The introduction
of the jet engines appeared before the speed reached the
intrinsic limit of propeller-driven aircraft, and the cruise
speed kept increasing. The introduction of new super-
critical wing sections has allowed a further gain of
M&0.05, but then a transonic limit of about 0.82 was
reached in the early 1970s. It has remained as such for the
past 30 years. Further increases are not expected. In-
novations such as transonic area ruling design (a relative-
ly old concept) could increase the drag divergence point
by M&0.1, but it is considered not feasible because of
the increased airframe costs.
The Boeing B-707 featured a very advanced techno-
logy, having been introduced at about the same time as
A. Filippone / Progress in Aerospace Sciences 36 (2000) 629}654 651
Fig. 30. Wing aspect-ratio of airliners at year of introduction.
Fig. 28. Demonstrated cruise speeds of airliners at year of intro-
duction.
Fig. 29. Wing sweep versus ARfor commercial subsonic trans-
port aircraft.
the Lockheed L-049 Constellation and a few other pro-
peller aircraft. The jet revolution has consolidated a phil-
osophy in aircraft design that it is di$cult to challenge:
cylindrical fuselage, swept back wings (Fig. 29), multi-
slotted control surfaces (Fig. 7).
Improvement of aerodynamic e$ciency is one of the
key aerodynamic problems in this class of aircraft. Aero-
dynamic interference, skin friction and induced drag are
the most promising areas of research.
For given span e$ciency, the induced drag is an in-
verse function of the aspect-ratio, as described by Eq. (1).
The tendency has been toward decreasing the wing sweep
and increasing the wing span (Fig. 30). This progress has
been facilitated by the introduction of supercritical wing
sections and winglets (MD-11, B-747-400, B-777, A310-
300, A340-300, Il-96, Tu-204D). Some aspect-ratios now
are around 10 (MD-90, Airbus A-340), while many others
are slightly below 9. In the early days of jet propulsion
commercial aircraft had wing aspect-ratios of the order
6}7. Poisson-Quinton [25] predicted a ¸/D for subsonic
long range cruise conditions growing with the wing span
according to
¸
D
"14
b
(A
`°'
, (17)
assuming a span e$ciency e"0.75 and a skin friction
coe$cient c
'
"0.003. The useful load fraction ratio
PAY/MTOW is in the range 0.21}0.31. In comparison,
the only supersonic transport #ying at present, the Con-
corde, has PAY/OWE &0.11.
7. Perspectives and conclusions
In this article we have presented a summary of aircraft
and rotorcraft characteristics taken from full-scale data
and from #ight performances. The vehicles selected were
mostly from the last 40 years of aircraft design.
The analysis shows that in many cases interesting
correlations can be obtained. Also, highlighted historical
trends, the e!ects of regulations on noise emissions, and
652 A. Filippone / Progress in Aerospace Sciences 36 (2000) 629}654
the state-of-the-art values for several classes of aircraft
and rotorcraft. The use of this database is expected to be
useful for aircraft design, propulsion systems analysis,
and aerodynamic benchmark. Where is aeronautics
heading?
Igor Sikorsky wrote in 1958 that `Supersonic aero-
planes have carried men at more than 2000 miles per
hour and there are reasons to believe that this speed will
be doubled by 1960 or so
2
a [46].
In 1970 Cleveland wrote that `future growth potential
looks unlimited
2
one gross weight doubling, and pos-
sibly two, is predicted by 1985; nuclear power can drive
[the aircraft's] optimumweight to 5 or 10 million pounds
before the year 2000a [9].
These and other predictions turned out to be wrong. In
truth, the increasing level of technology has also in-
creased the resilience of the industry to pursue cha-
nges, so that many alternative ideas (for example, the
oblique wing [47], the twin fuselage [48], the joined
wing [49], the blended wing body [50]) have not been
exploited.
Note to readers. The full database discussed in this arti-
cle [1] is available on request to non-pro"t institutions
committed to the advancement of aerospace sciences.
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654 A. Filippone / Progress in Aerospace Sciences 36 (2000) 629}654

630

A. Filippone / Progress in Aerospace Sciences 36 (2000) 629}654

Nomenclature A AR b B c C " C * C  * C D d d 

measured in dB leading-edge root extension maximum take-o! weight (kg) operating empty weight (kg) payload (kg) PAY/OWE PAY/MTOW rounds-per-minute (rotor speeds) vertical/short take-o! and landing single-slotted TE #ap double-slotted TE #ap triple-slotted TE #ap single LE slat LE Kruger slat upper surface blowing vectored thrust Q Aircraft designation Aircraft and rotorcraft are identixed by company name (Antonov. as speci"ed (deg) angle of climb (deg) advance ratio air density (kg/m) rotor solidity maximum sustained rate of turn (deg/s) Subscripts/superscripts []  []  []  []  []  cruise conditions root tip at zero lift viscous Aircraft wing specixcations BWB FSW SBW VSW  blended wing body forward swept wing swept back wing variable sweep (usually discrete positions) conventional delta wing double delta wing Rotorcraft specixcations AT C GE LC UT TW TR attack. anti-submarine. d D e E g> h k l ¸ LE M n P * P  QC q R Re R ! t/c ¹ u . International Standard Atmosphere (ISA) aircraft's speed (km/h. heavy lift transport (usually military vehicle) civil/military general purpose vehicle (patrol. advanced military vehicle cargo. crane. Raptor) is rarely used. out of ground e!ect (m) reduced frequency aircraft length. vertical coordinate angle of attack (deg) dihedral angle. transport) light commercial vehicle (for a few passengers and limited freight) military utility vehicle (troops. nickname (Ruslan. rotor disk area (m) wing geometrical aspect-ratio wing span (m) main rotor's number of blades (rotorcraft) wing/blade chord (m) drag coe$cient lift coe$cient maximum lift coe$cient skin friction coe$cient rotor diameter (m) tail rotor diameter (m) equivalent wing span (m) drag force (N) wing e$ciency factor maximum cargo range maximum normal acceleration. also equivalent disk loading service ceiling in sustained horizontal #ight (m). kg/kW for propellers) speci"c excess power (m/s) quarter chord line dynamic pressure (kg ms\) aircraft range (km) Reynolds number rate of climb (m/min) wing thickness ratio take-o! thrust rating (kN). g-limit hovering ceiling. if '0. or length scale (m) lift force (N) leading edge line Mach number normal load factor max power loading"MTOW/T (kg/kN for jets. anhedral if (0 (deg) taper ratio"c /c   wing sweep around LE or QC. anti-tank.  =/A Z wing area. materiel. freight. . support operations) H twin or tandem rotor. utility vehicle with two rotor shafts tilt rotor vehicle Other symbols and abbreviations AoA EPNdB LERX MTOW OWE PAY P/O P/W rpm V/STOL SSF DSF TSF SL SLK USB VT angle of attack e!ective perceived noise. F-117)#version (A. Refer to the data base [1] for full information and data that for clarity are not labelled. B). or m/s) aircraft's stalling velocity with #aps down (km/h) max wing loading"MTOW/A (kg/m). In the graphics the company names are added only occasionally. Lockheed)#designation (An-124. rescue.

. analysis of aircraft size prior to 1970 was published by Cleveland [9]. . . . . . 6. . . .A. . . . . . some aircraft are known to consist of one million parts. . costs and commercial issues are not discussed. Quantities as essential as the wing aspectratio have di!erent optima. . . . This selection provides maximum order and well consistent trends. . . . . the aerodynamic derivatives. . . . . Filippone / Progress in Aerospace Sciences 36 (2000) 629}654 631 5. . . The vehicles included in the analysis are organized according to class. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5. to discover trends dictated by old or new design considerations. . . . . . . . Airfoil sections. .5. . . . with several ideas tested. . . . . . . In some cases comparisons are performed across the whole spectrum of aircraft and rotorcraft. . Even then. . . . . . . . Perspectives and conclusions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . but e!orts have been done to select the curves that best represent the raw data. . . . . . . . . . . 6. . . . . Structures. . . . Other useful data have been published by Poisson-Quinton [10] and Loftkin [11]. . . . . It is estimated it took C. . A systematic. . . Introduction The conceptual design of an aircraft and its aerodynamic analysis may require a fair amount of independent parameters. . . . . . . . 5. . . . . There are several ways of reading the data. . . and Stinton's K airplane anatomy [13]. 7. . . . . . . . . Tank one year from conception to "rst #ight of his transatlantic Focke Wulf Fw-200 (1935). To this day records are broken in the opposite sense: the B2-A required 24. . . . . . . . . . . . References. . . . . . . . . and 4000 h of #ight testing. . . . . Among the most remarkable ones. . . . . . . . while others (V/STOL vehicles. . . . Lindbergh and his team at Ryan Aircraft about 46 days to design and build the successful Spirit of St. for a grand total of approximately 78. Although the initial phase of conceptual design is rather #uid. . . . Helicopters. . . . . . At the same time. The presentation will stick to data and performances related to aerodynamics and propulsion systems of full-scale vehicles. . . . . . Another option is to compare many vehicles in the same class. . . . . 6000 h of control systems testing. . . . . The increasing level of technology has led to ever increasing sophistication. . . . 640 641 642 642 642 646 649 651 652 653 1. that in some cases has reached the 10 year mark. . . . while the concomitant increase in analytical. This paper responds to the need of a broad survey of existing data in conventional aircraft and rotorcraft. . . . . 6. . . . . . "rst guess solutions may be required. . . . Hence the increasing development times. . . . . . . . A partial review is available in [6. . 44. . the use of tabulated data to compare past and current technology is an invaluable aid. There is a general feeling that this trend must be stopped and even reversed. both military and civil utility) show scattered operation points. . .000 h of wind tunnel testing. . . Most conceptual designs can be de"ned as conservative whenever their operation points fall within the range of known performances. . . . . there is Kuchemann's classical textbook [12]. . . . . . . . . . and provides useful information for aerospace sciences. . . . . . Some aircraft classes are de"ned in a very narrow design space (for example twin turboprops for regional transport). or the block fuel [2]. . . or are not readily available in the unclassi"ed literature. . . . .000 h of avionics testing.1. . . . .6. the take-o! gross weight. . . . . .3. The curves "t are either lines or power curves. . . . .7]. . . . . . and K. . . .4. . . . . . . . . . .2. Out of the discussion are also all those parameters that are di$cult to de"ne with any certainty. . . . . . . From a general point of view. there is plenty of literature on why airplanes look the way they do. . . . . . accepted. . . . . . . . . Comparative analysis . . depending on whether the "gure of merit is the acquisition cost. .4. . . . . . . . . . . . . . Consideration of reference data seldom can be discounted. 6. . . . The best "t is no minor issue. . . . Louis (1927). . . . . and experimental work (iso-technology). . rejected. . . . . . . . Cargo aircraft . . . . . . Other geometrical characteristics . .000 h [3]. . . . . . . . . . . . . 6. . . . . and often operation points falling o! the known space are indication of something new. . . . . . for example Lockheed-Martin F-22: `Designing anything that complex takes more than dazzling engineeringa [4]. . . . . also due to the more complex propulsion systems. . Wing sweep . . . . . . Some interesting data on all types of Soviet/Russian aircraft have been published by Gurton [8]. . . Seckel [5] in his book on dynamics and stability reports a few interesting examples of these characteristics. . . . . . passenger details and most ranges and fuel capacity. . . . . or cannot be presented concisely. . . . . . . . . . . and in recent years new multi-disciplinary methods have been devised to treat design problems in complex search spaces. . . One is the historical trend. the direct operating costs. . . . . . . . . . . The latter vehicles are not considered in this study. . . . . . . . . Fighter jets. . . . . Engineers have long recognized that there is no simple solution. . . . . . . . . . Data in this class include all the unsteady aerodynamics characteristics. . Subsonic commercial jets . . . . . . computational and simulation capabilities has not kept the pace. . . . This requires a selection of design cases to be plotted against a time line (technology trends). . . . . . . . . . . . .

All the geometrical quantities have been considered as in the aerospace practice (described for example by the AIAA [14]). For any given aircraft the data are still di$cult to read. While we have attempted to analyze the data. because their operation points looked similar to each other (for example. slow changes usually occur on wing con"gurations. or even the certi"ed performance. Items are left blank wherever details could not be obtained. Take for example the C  : this can be for the 2D airfoil. for all the vehicles. for the aircraft model in wind tunnel. we have collected information relative to about 300 vehicles. The wing system remains the core of the aircraft. virtually all types of aircraft and rotorcraft are built according to customers' speci"cations. surface cleanup). 1. #ight and wind tunnel data. some dihedral angles and many lift and drag coe$cients (aircraft). Most of the technical literature is not clear about the test conditions (an exception is provided by Hopps and Danforth [15]). as reported in Section 5. though no one emphasizes this fact. The data are sometimes well correlated. Reliability of the data All the aircraft are very likely to evolve slowly over the years. Aerodynamic data The values of the lift and drag coe$cients depend on the operating angle of attack. * for the 3D wing.000 h (all aerodynamic parts. Data and performances labelled as best are restricted to the records available in the unclassi"ed literature. The data that have been directly elaborated include: rotor solidity. 1 shows a historical graphic with the number of wind tunnel hours before maiden #ight for selected aircraft. Filippone / Progress in Aerospace Sciences 36 (2000) 629}654 The data and performances presented in this study have been collected. for which we used the engineering units kg/m). such as light aircraft have been left out of the discussion on purpose. or under license. The choice of the vehicles deserves a note of discussion. are less and less likely to land on the design board. they are in no way absolute values. Fig.632 A. because we wanted to concentrate on vehicles performances that we assumed to be outstanding. it comes to mind to say that no two aircraft are ever the same. for the aircraft that are now out of production). for the aircraft in #ight testing. rotor disk loadings (rotorcraft). at take-o! or landing. while the US Shuttle over 25. and "nally some essential geometric characteristics. wing aspect-ratios. technical drawings. thrust-to-weight ratios and some sweep angles (around quarter-chord and leading-edge). Besides. The references are limited to the sources of extensive information used for the compilation of the data base. Sometimes a major re-engineering project takes place (like new powerplant installations. consisting of partial data bases. of course. 3. 2. Many aircraft had to be excluded. then selected performance parameters. Some aircraft classes. business jet aircraft and regional transports) or because their data were incomplete. advance ratios. (2) data refer to operating conditions not clearly speci"ed. The Wright Flyer is believed to have required about 20 h. Fig. Therefore. All the data provided are subject to change. mostly from the present time. taper ratios. which can introduce further di!erentiations. In the last section we analyze vehicles in each class for selected classes only. instead. for a number of reasons: (1) data may be fudged by manufacturer or operator of the aircraft. which is di!erent from all the above. (4) data are from old aircraft designs. elaborated. some more rapidly than others (except. with a few additional speci"cations. For military vehicles there is often the risk of handling unconxrmed data. with control surfaces fully extended. Demonstrated wind tunnel times before "rst take o!. and all speeds of interest) in multiple test facilities. SI units are used throughout (with the exception of wing loading and rotor disk loading. and some from as far back as the Second World War. (5) data and performances have been erroneously interpreted. and cruise Mach . . Rapid changes can occur on engine installations and fuselage dimensions. tip Mach numbers. averaged and approximated from a number of sources. other times rather lie in a broadband. even at times of fully integrated avionics and satellite #ight control. Brand new designs. (3) data indicate non-conventional designs. A new wing generally brings a new airplane. The material is arranged as follows: we "rst discuss the aerodynamic data. engine integration.

besides issues related to aircraft design. 6"civil utility helicopter. Reporting complete data would require polars for all the aircraft considered. Generic aircraft polar. etc. Civil utility helicopters are instead characterized by large interference e!ects. Drag causes: L"lift-induced. 3"executive jet. that gives an idea of " the combined viscous. "rst and foremost the rotor-fuselage interaction. Fig. The drag components are averaged from a number of data.22]). M. the wave drag is a minor problem in today's airliners. 4. half-models. Two settings shown. mock-up models. The lowest M C values are found on commercial jets.  * steady-state conditions). W"wave. with the relevant operation points. Most of these data are not public. This analysis serves to show in which direction technological advances may produce e!ective drag savings and fuel economy. The analysis shows that the zero-lift drag coe$cient. 2 where these operation points have been denoted: (1) the drag coe$cient at zero lift. antennas. It has been noted that scaling has consequences on the largest aircraft. research models. I"interference. O"other. in fact.A. contribute to C  in " a measure of several drag counts. that creates boundary layers that are partially laminar. wave and interference drag. Drag coezcients The technical literature on aircraft drag is vast. * 3. 2. for propeller-driven aircraft (light airplanes and " business turboprops) is in the range of 0.020. with average skin friction coe$cients " C &0. 4""ghter at subsonic speed. The surface clean-up occurred over the years is shown in Fig.0060 (all aircraft types). Filippone / Progress in Aerospace Sciences 36 (2000) 629}654 633 number. (3) the absolute maximum glide ratio (¸/D) . that shows skin friction drag levels for selected . that have smooth M surfaces. depending on aircraft and cruise conditions. panel joints. which accounts for an estimated 40% of the total drag. Gaps around windows and doors. For example. C  . and may shift a few percent on either direction. The wind tunnel Reynolds numbers. are often lower than the full-scale #ight Reynolds numbers.1. There is quite an amount of information that can be extracted from Fig. For subsonic jet transports the "gures are lower: C  &0. 2"supersonic transport. (2) the glide ratio at cruise conditions (¸/D) . axes of drag polars. but landing and take-o! con"gurations are the most important ones. 3.. and is obviously concerned with all the aspects of drag analysis and reduction.0025}0. 3 (elaborated from [21.02}0. These polars can be derived for any #ap and slat setting. At any rate. drag data are particularly di$cult to gather: the common practice is to not to show the tick labels on the Fig. Drag build-up on some aircraft types: 1"subsonic transport aircraft.e. Some data produced in the technical literature refer to scale wind tunnel models. 5""ghter at supersonic speed. V"viscous. or up to 3}4% of the total drag.013}0. (4) the C  at 1-g (i. or to provide drag savings in percent against a baseline that is not known. One of the reasons is attributed to the scale e!ects. The typical drag build-up on some aeronautical systems is shown in Fig. although some useful information is available for selected aircraft [16}20].04. while the lift-induced drag and the viscous drag make up most of the total count. C  . these are not interesting for our investigation. whose boundary layers are fully turbulent. that highlights the e!ects of the control * surfaces on the C  . An example of aircraft polar is shown in Fig. 3. Other graphics of interest include the C ! map. mis-rigged controls. The correlation between wind tunnel models of any scale and #ight data is not always straightforward.

0106 0. Case 2 shows the e!ects of aerodynamic improvements on a military cargo aircraft (Lockheed C-141): Afterbody. " e AR (1) The e$ciency factor e (with respect to ideal elliptic loading) is of the order 0.2 1. therefore the comparison between drag coe$cients is not fully appropriate. although most of the drag reduction methods devised (boundary layer control. The data are compared with the average turbulent C for a #at plate " (von Karman}Schonherr) at Re"10. and surface roughness.634 A.85 7. and not least riblets) remain within the research domain.74 6. lower for other airplanes.80 for many subsonic jet airplanes [24]).21 2.40 0. Table 1 summarizes the aerodynamic data of some important design cases. Case 1 shows the e!ects of aerodynamic design from a base wing (the Gulfstream II business jet).71 12. other operating parameters being the same.0158 C * M 0.9 3.0305 0.76 1.75 1.0262 0. The result was a 14% drag saving at constant lift coe$cient. Rear fuselage re-design can save 1% drag (ATR-42. For the Airbus A-320 we have estimated the viscous C  with surface riblets over " 75% of its wetted surface [23]. was a high-speed research program. However.45 0. suction and blowing. reduced wing sweep and winglets.9 7. nearly every successful aircraft is a design case.026 0. re-engineering of the cargo C-141 Star Lifter in the early 1980s achieved a remarkable 8% drag saving [25]).74 0. Case 3 is the e!ect of transonic drag rise on a research "ghter aircraft.0246 0. using advanced supercritical wing sections. The technological progress is impressive. Concorde).0228 0. Current technology is reaching a plateau roughly corresponding to the fully turbulent boundary layers. the North American XB-70A.75 1.77 0. Table 1 Drag and lift data of some aircraft Aircraft 1 2 3 4 Gulfstream II Gulfstream III Lockheed C-141A Lockheed C-141B General Dynamics YF-16 North American XB-70A C " 0. wing-body and landing gear hold added to an 8% drag saving.080 0.90 1. This is about " 50 times higher than an average commercial jet aircraft.40 0. and its data are compared at three di!erent operation points. external stores. Case 4. which translates into some relevant percent values. Drag levels for the helicopter are much higher.4 7.77 0.72 0. large-eddy break-up devices. 1998 [3]).40 0. 4.22 24. the YF-16.405 . because of the blu! body design.51 13. Equipping the Boeing B-747-400 with winglets yields a 3% fuel saving over long-range cruise. Filippone / Progress in Aerospace Sciences 36 (2000) 629}654 Fig.62 12.083 0. H H K The lift-induced drag is de"ned by C C G" * . The scaling of the drag forces is done with the wing area for aircraft and rotor disk area for rotorcraft.630 18.161 9840 9840 5085 10.75 Z Notes Plain wing W/winglets Redesigned Transonic Supersonic Transonic Supersonic Supersonic 0.60 0.2 3. For example. aircraft at year of "rst #ight.0223 0.39 M ¸/D 10. A good drag coe$cient in forward #ight is C &1 (Aerospatiale AS 365N).52 13. where q" u/2 is the dynamic pressure.74}0.40 0. Estimated viscous drag coe$cient C  at year of "rst " #ight. fuselage}rotor interaction.45 0. applications of surface riblets on the Airbus A340-300 in 1997 intended to reduce fuel consumption by 3}4 metric tons/year (Jane's Information Systems.35 AR 7.71 5. A more fair comparison can be done with the ratio D/q. Experience from the past shows that it is indeed possible to reduce the cruise C of an aircraft by several " drag counts. free standing landing gear.115 0.3 7.

much * lower lift values are required at supersonic speed: C &0. Since the aircraft cruise range is proportional to the range factor M(¸/D) (Breguet).A. The ratio l/d in the abscissa is the equivalent slenderness of the aircraft. each consisting of an aircraft class.2. and S the   aircraft's maximum cross-sectional area. Other low values are obtained with supersonic "ghter jets.5 in subsonic #ight. Transonic drag rise for some supersonic "ghter aircraft.4}0.15. was designed for high supersonic speed (M"3). There is a large spread in the data at all Mach numbers. ¸/D&20. For reference. The XB-70A.5. Some aircraft ¸/D are shown in Fig. as shown in Fig. This term is useful to compare performances at subsonic and supersonic speeds. The highest (¸/D) on record is that of the Boeing B-52G. The operational range is noted by a shaded box. While improvements are still possible with non conventional designs [27]. and ¸/D"10 at M"2. also the drag of the Sears}Haack body having the same slenderness l/d is shown. (3)). lowest point at M(1 (see also Table 1). ¸/D as a function of the cruise Mach number (all aircraft). From our data we "nd for the B-52G M(¸/D)&16. The relatively good ¸/D of this aircraft is attributed to the compression lift generated at the highest speeds [28]. " 8 (l/d) (3) Fig.4}0. This is a body of minimum wave drag at supersonic speed. and is strongly dependent on the amount and types of external stores. The "gure shows data in four bands. that is in the same range of the best  ¸/D achieved by some birds. with d"(4S / ). a relative drop in e$ciency may be o!set by a correspondent increase in Mach number. and .8 and 1. 5 as function of the cruise Mach number. This di!erence can be of the order C &0. whose theoretical value is independent of the speed [29] 9 1 C "  . 6. The drag jump decreases with the increasing slenderness. For commercial subsonic jet aircraft * (¸/D) &17}20.5. for the Concorde &17. and shows poor performances a low supersonic speeds.10}0. The transonic drag jump is usually compared by taking values at M"0. For a slender aircraft the wave drag would be negligible at high subsonic speeds. (2) yields ¸/D"19 at M"0. due to the e!ects of the shock waves. is generally assumed as a benchmark to de"ne a band of state-of-the-art values at supersonic speeds [12]. the data indicate that technology has already achieved performances fully comparable with those of the natural #ight.2. The Sears}Haack body does not exhibit a drag jump through the speed of sound (Eq. 6 (data " gathered from Poisson-Quinton and Boppe). therefore the Sears}Haack body would be a better reference data. 5. Filippone / Progress in Aerospace Sciences 36 (2000) 629}654 635 3.8. At supersonic speeds the aerodynamic performances deteriorate sharply. Lift}drag ratio The glide ratio ¸/D (also called xnesse or glide number) is reached at C &0. Eq. The expression ¸ D 3 "4 1# M (2) Fig. Minimum penalties are of course obtained with clean con"gurations. Dotted line is a power "t. for example the California Condor and the Great Albatross [26].

vectored thrust (Lockheed C-17A. Case 6 is a comparison between two supersonic military jets. [32] discusses both aircraft design problems and state-of-the-art computational methods for high lift. the e!ective camber.0. 1-g #ight. The only two examples of powered systems in the graphic have minimum limits above the best performances obtained with triple-slotted Fowler #aps (TSF) and Kruger slats. Case 3 is a selection of wide body long-range subsonic jets with TE #ap systems of increasing complexity. In a later version.73 1. 1-g #ight. #ight data. M"0. 7 shows the technological progress toward improved high-lift systems.15 2. the experimental X-29A. 3. Case 1 refers to two di!erent versions of the same commercial jet aircraft. In particular.75 2. (2) multiplied by M. These can be unpowered multi-element wing systems (most cases) and powered systems: overthe-wing blowing (YC-14. Leading-edge elements are either rigid slats or Kruger #aps. In both cases high lift is obtained by controlling the downstream vortex #ow on the main wing through the canards/foreplanes. Filippone / Progress in Aerospace Sciences 36 (2000) 629}654 for the XB-70A &24. Case 5 is an example of powered lift systems (upper surface blown #ap and vectored thrust). The YC-14 also features a boundary layer control system at the wing's leading edge. with the corresponding setting of the #ap angle.27 2. Table 2 summarizes the high lift systems for some aircraft (see nomenclature for symbols). although not all systems successfully tested on experimental aircraft have been applied [7. the latter ones equipped with their own control surfaces. with a new LE design of the main wing to accommodate the retracted slat and an extended wing chord. with a variable camber.30. the DC-9. The estimated C  at cruise. In some "ghter aircraft there is a leading-edge droop (BAe Hawk 200).3. the Table 2 High-lift systems and estimated C Case 1 Aircraft Douglas DC-9-10 Douglas DC-9-30 ATR-42 model -30. "03 (cruise) "153 (take-o! ) "273 (landing) 2 3 Airbus A-340-300 Lockheed L-1011 Boeing B-747-100 Lockheed C-5A Lockheed C-141B Boeing YC-14 MD C-17A Grumman X-29A SAAB JS 37 SL SL SL Kruger SL SL SL Kruger SL coupled canard/FSW wing coupled forewing/ wing SSF DSF TSF SSF DSF TSF#USB DSF#VT 1-g #ight data 2D multi-element 4 5 6 1. propulsive (direct) lift (BAe Sea Harrier.25 3. Case 2 is a twin turboprop for short-range transport. with powered systems C  &8}10 have * been reported. These aircraft have complex mechanical systems that consist of several spanwise segments. *  for some aircraft LE * SL * TE DSF DSF DSF C  * 2.636 A. the pressure suction peak.34 n. Sukhoi S-37).50 2. The function of the multielement wings is to increase the e!ective wing area.61 3. Vane and #ap geometries are the same. The benchmark values are found from Eq. Harrier II).48 2.0}3. with forward swept wing.9 . and to provide boundary layer control. and therefore are more #exible.57 Avg.54 2. and the SAAB JA 37. Trailing-edge devices consist of up to three elements.a. Ref. Case 4 is given by two heavy lift military transports of the Lockheed company. Lockheed F-22A. with close-coupled foreplane. take-o! and landing con* "gurations is shown. Cruise lift and high-lift performances Landing and take-o! speeds depend on the maximum lift that can be produced by the aircraft through its control surfaces. An-72/74).43 2. C  "gures for unpowered high-lift systems are in the * range 2. with estimated average performances at landing. 1-g #ight. The aircraft are ordered by increasing complexity of their control systems. the Douglas corporation added a LE slat. Fig.wing (called double ). landing Notes 1-g #ight data 1-g #ight data 1-g #ight. the B-747 features a variable camber Kruger slat at the LE.31].

The actual maximum speed at maximum thrust at given altitude is dependent on drag and aircraft gross weight. The negative acceleration limits. Selected performance data As for the aerodynamic characteristics. as shown in Fig. full data for the aircraft performances would require knowledge of all the aircraft #ight envelopes. At the operating lift coe$cient M is close to the point where the transonic drag starts to build up (this point is about 90}93% of the maximum absolute speed with supercritical wing section). hover ceiling out of ground e!ect (rotorcraft only). 4. The graphic also shows the boundary between mechanical systems (unpowered) and powered systems. 4. twin turboprops.  The data provided are reached with afterburning thrust and a clean con"guration. Here again we choose particular operation points: maximum absolute speed in horizontal #ight. are much smaller. For "ghter aircraft the Mach number reported is the absolute maximum in the aircraft #ight envelope. For commercial aircraft (subsonic jets. 4. a few are able of maintaining supersonic Mach numbers at all altitudes. 7. For "ghter and attack aircraft g\&g>/2. Envelope 4 is for clean con"guration and afterburning thrust. cruise Mach number at altitude. because the aircraft is never operated at that speed. g\.02). Normal acceleration limits The g>-limits are the absolute maximum centrifugal accelerations an aircraft can sustain during transonic or supersonic maneuver before incurring structural damage. stalling velocity with control surfaces at full extension (some aircraft types).A. C  versus complexity of the high lift system for selected * production aircraft (except YC-14). The best rotorcraft g>-limits are g>"3. 8. 8 (envelope 4). 3"Airbus A-300 (subsonic transport) . The reason for this apparent discrepancy in the database is that the absolute Mach number for commercial jets is of lesser interest. business jets) M is the economic long-range cruise Mach number ($0. mission set up and speed. #ight envelopes are dependent of the external stores. g>"6}7 at supersonic speeds. This limit is dependent on the type and number of external stores. including sea level (supercruise). The maximum accelerations are obtained at transonic speeds. 2"Lockheed C-130J (cargo). for rotorcraft (mostly AT-vehicles) it is reasonable to assume g\&g>/3.1. where the critical operation points are noted for 4 types of aircraft (these envelopes have been extrapolated from the available data). with g>&12 or higher (see Table 6). This speed can be sustained for a short time over a narrow range of altitudes (supersonic dash). An example of #ight envelopes is shown in Fig. . 4"Lockheed F-16/C (supersonic "ghter). as well as other aircraft in the same class. 8. Typical aircraft #ight envelopes: 1"MD AH-64D (helicopter). Mach number The values provided depend on the type of aircraft.2. Most of the aircraft in this class can #y for a long range only at transonic speeds. Acrobatic airplanes perform even better. For this aircraft. service ceiling. Filippone / Progress in Aerospace Sciences 36 (2000) 629}654 637 Fig. Fig. Other speci"c performance parameters are discussed in the section concerning the comparative analysis. For supersonic "ghters the best values are g>"8}9 at transonic speeds.

with limits from 800 to 8000 m. For VSW aircraft the area at maximum sweep has been used. Since the rate of climb is R "dZ/dt. ! = cos ¸ (4) For example. R &0. R . Maximum take-ow weight and other weights MTOW includes the aircraft's operating empty weight (OWE). Noise levels Noise emissions are expressed in e!ective perceived noise. 4. The data from #ight tests are very scattered. which is not necessarily equal to MTOW. Some OGE-ISA (free #ight) data are reported in Table 4.000 m/min.  ICAO. Typical values are R &500}800 m/min for state! of-the-art AT-vehicles. We report only the performances for maximum internal payload. the payload (PAY) and the fuel.e. 4. with the MiG-29 claiming R & ! 20. . inside the aircraft). when available. If we consider average data. 9. Some vehicles are able to operate with oversize slung loads (Mil-10 and Boeing-Vertol CH-47D). This MTOW is also susceptible to increase in later versions of the same aircraft. at standard atmosphere (ISA) or otherwise.000 m/min.4. (4) and (5) is ! given in m/s. because the MTOW depends on the war-load. at standard where is the angle of climb.6. The highest R are reached at alti! tudes that depend on the aircraft.8}0. In steady #ight the rate of climb assumes a simple expression ¹ D R "u ! . Rate of climb The absolute maximum rates of climb. Sometimes the symbol = is used for weight.7. which ! corresponds to about 0. Filippone / Progress in Aerospace Sciences 36 (2000) 629}654 4.5. If the angle of climb is small (typically less than 103). Chapter 3.638 A. Wing loading The maximum wing loadings =/A are computed using the MTOW and the wing area as de"ned above. This corresponds to a vertical climb of about 20 body lengths per second! For rotorcraft the values reported are obtained in inclined forward #ight. The remaining data are conforming with this convention. For military aircraft and rotorcraft it is subject to speculation. but the technical practice is to express this data in m/min. Hover ceiling The hover ceiling of a helicopter is the altitude at which the rate of climb is zero. namely of the engine thrust rates and the aerodynamic e$ciency. Fighter jets reach R &10.85) the data are clean. the operating environments. The AT helicopter Kamov Ka-29 claims R &890 m/min. Annex 16. 4. with wing loadings well correlated by an exponential "t. Wing loading is not computed for BWB-aircraft. Fig. the aircraft Grumman A-6E is reported to have a MTOW&27. Climb rates in vertical #ight are lower.800 kg. Far. Aircraft wing loading trends (selected aircraft).000} ! 18. in dB (EPNdB). as certi"ed by the international authorities for each aircraft type and for speci"ed conditions: take-o!. if take-o! is assisted by catapult on aircraft carrier. and sideline. whose data are for sea level conditions. 9 shows the =/A trends versus the aircraft Mach number. the hover ! ceiling is reached when the air density (depending on altitude and temperature) is no longer enough to extract power from the engine. on the mission requirements.6}0.3. The R in Eqs.9 rotor diameter lengths per second. For heavy lift helicopters values of MTOW are given for internal loads (i. If the supersonic aircraft are shifted to transonic #ight condition (M"0.400 kg for take-o! from "eld. This is evaluated out of ground e!ect (OGE) and in ground e!ect (IGE).7 dia! meter lengths per second. and even on customers speci"cations. are pro! vided. Part 36. #y-over/landing. 4. Fig. then D ¹ ! R Ku ! = ¸ (5) is a good approximation. Stage 3. lower for all other types. except for all the turboprops. and MTOW"26. IGE hover data are needed to assess at which altitude and atmospheric conditions the helicopter is able to take-o!.

Data for some light and utility helicopters are also shown. 4"regional jets. the highest noise levels are those of the Concorde (over 120 dB at take-o!). 10 shows a technology trend in noise emissions and corresponding limits. Noise levels at take-o! for commercial jets. They are subject to change. 11 is an iso-technology summary comparing all classes of aircraft and rotorcraft in the year 2000. by-pass engines are developed and regulations become tighter. forward swept wing (for extreme agility and high angle of Fig. . and Cox [35]. The noise levels reported are those certi"ed for standard engines. points in the neighborhood of the runway.78 kg/m (5. 2"twin turboprops for regional transport.614 kg/m (6 Pa) at all #ight altitudes. as new high 5. Boom overpressure on the ground is estimated at p&0. 3"business jets. 5"subsonic commercial transports. As noted by Crighton [33]. measured 450 m (2}3 engines aircraft) or 570 m (4 engines) from runway centerline. The least noisy aircraft are in the category of the business jets (72}82 EPNdB). this was as much noise as produced by the world population shouting together. Fig. 11. Geometrical data 5. Sonic boom e!ects are another class of noise-related issues. Wing geometry The wing geometries come in a bewildering amount of shapes and sizes. The "rst generation of Boeing 707 created a noise at take-o! similar to that of the Concorde.1. Data for Lockheed SR-71A at M"1.51}0.26 are p&0. 6"Concorde. These are as follows: E EPNdB at take-o!: measured at 6500 m from brake release along the runway centerline. E EPNdB at sideline. conventional swept back (for low and high subsonic #ight). Fig.0}7. A Boeing 737 of 30 years later produced as much noise as the city of New York shouting in phase. An average reduction of over 25 dB has been achieved over the past 30 years. Noise levels at take-o! and landing in EPNdB as certi"ed for di!erent classes of aircraft: 1"helicopters. 10.A. Extensive data are reported by Lowson [34]. In the data recorded.6 Pa). They include straight wings with a small sweep angle (most single-engine light aircraft). E EPNdB at landing/approach: measured 2000 m from landing point on runway. Filippone / Progress in Aerospace Sciences 36 (2000) 629}654 639 Fig.

foreplane wings. 8b  (7) Fig. For wings with variable sweep (VSW). and LERX. f&2. Lockheed F-117A). The structural aspect-ratio is computed from the actual wing attachment to the tip.4. tanks. Recent studies on supersonic transport (SST) indicate similar values of l/b to cruise at M"2. AR more than doubles by positioning the wing at minimum sweep (for example: Sukhoi Su-24 has AR"2. canards. For the estimation of the maximum wing loading only this area is considered. This is the de"nition used in the present study. winglets. The ratio of foreplane wing to main wing area generally does not exceed 10% (for example. attack operation at both transonic and supersonic speeds). blended wing bodies (or #ying wings). 5. Euro"ghter 2000. i. In particular. like the Boeing B-747-400.3}1. because they are designed to operate with leading-edge root extensions (LERX). 12. quarter-chord). Aspect-ratios and shape parameters There are two di!erent de"nitions: the geometrical and the structural aspect-ratio.e.17 for Lockheed SR-71A (supersonic aircraft). foreplanes. sails) and tip weapons (missiles or other). SAAB JS39).75 for Northrop B-2 (#ying wing). and may be di!erent from data reported elsewhere. This happens because with the de#ection of the wing created by the additional weight. from the formula tan /! "tan *# 1 ! c (1! ). with essential characteristics. f&0.2. with a smaller foreplane.640 A. SAAB JA 35 and JA 37 feature a double delta wing. are available [14]. The wing area is de"ned as the clean wing area projected on the ground plane. and is the relevant quantity for most aeroelastic calculations.6). Most of these features are listed in Table 6.48 m larger than that of an empty aircraft.6 for the  Concorde. (¸/D) data versus f have been plotted by Raymer [36]. 12. 5. and is variable in all VSW aircraft. Rockwell-DASA X-31). The main parameters are shown in the sketch of Fig. The geometrical aspect-ratio is AR"b/A. Another parameter of interest is the wetted aspect-ratio A b f" "AR . Four quantities are needed to describe completely the wing: c . This quantity excludes tip devices (canted winglets. "ghters and bombers). The interest in this  parameter is at least twofold: (1) it provides an indication of the aircraft shape. Data for aircraft  in the Airbus family are b/A "1. The slenderness is expected to increase with the Mach number to meet the drag constraints. is the distance tip-to-tip.4. The approximation to the data reported is believed to be $13. Wing span The wing span. Other formulas. it includes the portion of the span crossing through the fuselage. The latter de"nition applies well to cases such as blended wing bodies. An aircraft on the ground with maximum fuel has a wing span 0. when the leading-edge is a straight line (Northrop B-2A. or at the leading-edge line. using the aspect-ratio. This is a more precise measure of slenderness. b. although it can be as much as 20% in some V/STOL experimental aircraft. conventional delta wing (for supersonic #ight). The Concorde is the most slender of the aircraft in the table. along speci"ed lines (e.g. without including "llets. and the sweep angle at LE or  QC. measured on the horizontal line with aircraft on the ground. Typical AR are as follows: AR&2}4 for "ghter aircraft. b.3. arising from the .1}5. AR&7}12 for commercial airplanes. the relative size of its wings. then the sweep angle can be retrieved from technical drawings. the winglets (canted outward by 223) tend to open up.  The slenderness l/b is also important in determining the aircraft shape. Wing sweep Wing sweep are available either at the quarter-chord line. (2) its square root is proportional to (¸/D) . wings with a variable sweep (only military vehicles. Some "ghter wings are more complicated. thus increasing the apparent wing span by 0. For special cases there is a compound sweep angle. adjustable canards (Dassault Rafale. Typical wing geometry. There is a tricky problem in the case of very large aircraft. Some values are listed in Table 3 according to increasing speed. f&0.74%. control surfaces. If some data are missing. (6) A A   with A the aircraft wetted area. Filippone / Progress in Aerospace Sciences 36 (2000) 629}654 5.5.

X-15A Shuttle Spacecraft NASA X-34 (est.0 3. PZL Sokol. Eurocopter BO-105). namely standard NACA pro"les or other pro"les from open literature. 13 is a plot of (t/c) versus the cruise or maximum Mach number for all classes of aircraft. Tupolev Tu-22 and Tu-160). Thickness ratios at root range from 21% of twin turboprops (commuters and short-range transport).A. B-777). F-16C. (t/c) can be as low  as 3%.88 2. All the vehicles #ying at transonic speeds now have supercritical wing sections. Forward swept wings are available only on research aircraft (Grumman X-29A. Blade thickness is constant on most LC vehicles and variable on all high performance vehicles. Tornado ADV. NACA 64 -xxx (Fokker F-27 and  F-50).49 1.40 1.83 0. while high performance helicopters (XV-15.76 1. Filippone / Progress in Aerospace Sciences 36 (2000) 629}654 Table 3 aircraft slenderness and corresponding speed Aircraft Piper Pa-28 Lockheed U2-R Boeing B-747-400 Northrop B-2 Lockheed F-117A Lockheed F-22A Tupolev Tu-160 Concorde North Am.61 1. Mil-6). Wing thickness ratios (particularly at root) are dependent of the speed range of the aircraft. . helicopters Agusta A-109.93 2. For VSW-aircraft A. Sweep angles are generally possible at 3 or 4 discrete positions (for example: MiG-23. many Beechcraft airplanes.87 1. This trend is likely to be followed in the future. Fokker F-28.3 Notes Straight wing Long endurance Subsonic jet Flying wing Low observable Supersonic "ghter VSW vehicle Supersonic transport Experimental Supersonic recoinnassance Rocket powered Hypersonic Hypersonic 641 use of cranked wings (some Dassault business jets. Wing sweep in continuously variable on the GE F-111 and the Rockwell B1-B.09 2. from minimum-to-maximum sweep. for both aircraft wings (especially gliders) and rotorcraft blades (Bell 209 and 222). Helicopter rotor blades have t/c"7}15%. 5. Data for the Tornado ADV are (t/c) variable from 12 to  6%. short-range transports) from past and present have conventional geometry.) l/b 0. NACA 64 -xxx (Lockheed C-130.52 2. all aircraft types. to 4% (supersonic "ghters).68 0.31 6.18 0. Thickness ratio versus Mach number. XB-70A Lockheed SR-71A North Am. Thickness ratios are variable on all VSW aircraft. Fig. V-22) feature advanced technology for reduced noise [37] or leading-edge droop (Agusta A109C.70 1. along with some Wortmann geometries.52 1. Sweep angles can be de"ned also for LERX.21 M 0. MD  F-5E).27 1.65 0. rotor blades on Enstrom F-28). Fig. AR. MiG-27. and =/A are provided at maximum sweep angle. Airfoil sections Many airfoil sections of low-speed aircraft (single and twin turboprops. symmetric NACA 00xx (Lockheed Model 185. Sukhoi S-37). Boeing B-747.05 3. 13. the airfoil sections are double wedges (Lockheed F-117A) and biconvex (Ching Kuo). In a few cases of military application. In recent years the improved CFD capabilities have helped design ad-hoc wing sections and three-dimensional wings (Fokker 100. Sukhoi Su-24. Tupolev Tu-144). foreplane and tailplane wings.40 1. b. canards.57 2. The most popular wing sections are the series NACA 230xx (Cessna Citation 550. Canadair RJ CL-600. with or without modi"cations.5.

Piasecki H-21). Fig.642 A.101. Ka-115. Cessna 650) and vortex generators. coaxial counter rotating (Kamov Ka-29. tanks (Aermacchi SF-260 and MB-339. . Bell-Agusta BA-609). Ka-52. Ka-116.6. Hoerner tips (some light aircraft. The accuracy is estimated at $30. BERP tips on EH. Each aircraft class has its own speci"c characteristics. from single-point design (most commercial vehicles). Ka-50.90 m. The largest wings on record (Antonov An-124 and An-225) are clean. Typical devices include fences (F-102. Fig. Bell 222) or have a sophisticated contouring (ex. Helicopters The main rotor's technology comes in a number of di!erent examples: single rotors (most vehicles). 15 in terms of   the aircraft speed. Fairchild A-10A). all aircraft types. The blade chord of most helicopters is constant. BAe Hawk 200. trailing-edge). which has a variable chord: c "0. others are remarkably clean. Typical features include winglets (most business jets. and maximum absolute speed for military vehicles. Mil-28. Ka-226A).g. Filippone / Progress in Aerospace Sciences 36 (2000) 629}654 Fig. Piper PA-42). The taper ratio "c /c is shown in Fig. and hence premature tip stall. 6. and across the whole spectrum of aircraft types. tilt rotors (Boeing-Sikorski V-22. 5. Other geometrical characteristics Dihedral and anhedral angles. Ka 52.56 m (this rotor has the characteristics   of a large propeller). NH. 14. to multi-point design (virtually all the military vehicles). Comparative analysis We have performed some comparative analysis for the same class of aircraft. e. intermeshing rotors (Kaman K-max 1200). "!10 to 0 for supersonic jet "ghters.90. The wing angle settings at the root. The latter designs are tailless con"gurations. Wing angle setting at root. stabilizing #oats (all amphibian vehicles). 6. a twist that is aimed at reducing the e!ective angle of attack at cruise conditions. Learjet 35A. "5}73 for commercial jet transports (low wing). Typical values are as follows: "!5 to !23 for military cargos (high wing). tandem/twin rotors (Boeing Vertol H-46. Ka-32. 14. The data plotted refer only to the aircraft and rotorcraft in the database. zero (or nearly so) for  most supersonic "ghters. Boundary layer control is generally needed on the suction side of the wing. The FSW aircraft have taper ratios of the same order as conventional supersonic wings. CH-47. Tip incidence can be negative. Mach number is the long range cruise for civil aircraft. Tailless helicopters are also the . some military aircraft). many commercial jets. Most wings aircraft have a washout. One notable exception is the tilt rotor Bell-Boeing V-22.1. 15. although the airfoil section may vary and the blade may be twisted (CH-47D. Dashed lines are power "t of the data. Westland Lynx). S-90. are &1}5 for business turboprops. Rotorcraft tips are either swept back (AH-64D. The values are very dependent on where the reference points are taken (quarter-chord. While some data show a relative scatter. c "0. are computed from the wing roots at the leading edge line. Tip devices are now available on all the advanced vehicles. Taper versus sweep versus sweep angle. Mil-38. Mil-38).

Aerospatiale S321 of the 1960s.0644 0.05 9.291 0.32 44.254 0.1201 0.405 m. Mil-38) have unusually large diameters.364 0.332 0. c "0.0470 0.84 10.202 = .24 0.60 0.0853 0.0846 0.332 0.00 17.0798 0. =/A&0.093 0.341 0.092 0.40 0.0573 0.40 m.1240 0.103 0. they are aligned in their own design space.40 0. the correlation is impressive.148 0.74 17.0625 0. Stepniewski and Keys [38].090 0. speed given in helicopter mode. The number of blades ranges from 2 (most Bell helicopters) to 8 (Mil-26).089 0.325 0. The tilt rotor Bell-Boeing V-22 has extraordinarily large disk loading.074 0.132 0.0672 0.080 0. and are well correlated by power "t curves. Mil-17.67 14.60 15.338 k 0.115 MTOW =/A 4535 2500 2270 5260 6700 2835 27. (1) h is the hovering ceiling OGE.114 0.84 0.24 0. (4) Average blade chord for AS 565N.41 10.27 0.0610 0. (2) V-22 has c "0.59 0.88 69.440 24. The T-vehicles are correlated by a linear "t.60 46. new series of light and utility vehicles MD 520 and MD 530.17 0.00 11.35 0.371 0.87 21. and a few others).63 49.298 0.424 0.292 0. A partial list of data is presented in Table 4.22 m.353 0.0741 0. Rotor loadings give a measure of the aircraft size needed to lift a given gross weight.329 0.92 0. (5) Mil-26: largest     helicopter. Filippone / Progress in Aerospace Sciences 36 (2000) 629}654 Table 4 rotorcraft data and performances (see nomenclature for symbols) Helicopter Bell 209 SeaCobra Bell 406/OH-58D Bell 407 Bell 412 Bell AH-1W SuperCobra Bell 427 Bell/Boeing V-22 BoeingVertol 114/CH-47D MD-500E Enstrom 480 Aerospatiale 332 Aerospatiale 532 Aerospatiale 550 Aerospatiale 565N Eurocopter EC 365N Eurocopter BO 105 Eurocopter EC 120B Mitzubishi BK-117 Kaman Seasprite Mil Mi-26 Mil Mi-28 Type AT AT GE UT AT GE TR TW LC LC UT GE GE GE GE LC LC GE UT C AT B 2 4 4 4 2 4 3 3 5 3 4 4 3 4 4 4 3 4 4 8 5 d 13.07 39.1464 0.07 37.86 28.90 m.064 0.76 0. U-vehicles fall within the power "t curves =/A&1. 16. c "0.28 11..99 47.32 0.81 32.175 0.94 9.A.335 0. However.20 c 0.0727 0.235 0.089 0. (8) where we assume the weight ="MTOW.0979 0.. The tail rotor diameter is also well correlated to the rotor disk loading by D  .400 32.61 18. AS 365N.095 0.2176 0.96 32.56 m.29 8.00 13.40 0. c "0.25 40.078 0. due to the low number of items on record. Mil-14.077 0.0979 0.06 h 643 2225 3170 1580 915 4240 4330 1670 1830 3720 2300 1650 2250 1200 1200 455 2530 3000 5845 1500 3600 Notes.27 0.0699 0.96 37.26 0. carries payload of same weight at Lockheed C-130J.67 10. as does the heavy lift Sikorsky S-80/CH-53E (the performance of the V-22 is intended for helicopter mode). 16 have been separated into rotorcraft classes.67 u 333 232 237 230 282 250 185 260 248 204 266 262 248 287 278 240 228 248 252 295 265 rpm 311 395 413 314 311 395 333 225 492 334 265 265 394 350 350 424 415 383 298 132 242 0.312 0. EC 155B: c "0. where the rotorcraft are compared at constant technology level.132 0.0853 0.27 0.277 0.94 11.0497 0. The data of Fig.0731 0. When exception is done for old technology (for example Sikorsky S-61 of the 1950s.81 0.09 25.000 11. The bending of the "t curve is an indication of disk loading increasing at a faster pace than gross take-o! weight.39 34.113 0.75 15.11 27.63 11. with a few exceptions: the G-vehicles of the Mil family (Mil-8. Most of the data of A.84 0.60 10.385 m.60 0.336 0. (3) Bell 412:   c "0. G. hence a relatively low disk loading.019 = .500 1360 1300 8600 9000 2250 4250 4250 2500 1700 3350 6120 56.62 26.312 0.02 14.105 0.96 25.65 35. The rotor equivalent disk loading =/A is shown in Fig.285 0.69 11.37 129.305 0.

&0. This is slightly lower than the absolute maximum speed (never to exceed speed). but is has been considered in the determination of the curve "t. The range of maximum speeds is 200}300 km/h. 8 (envelope 1).2 10\=/A). Fig. 17 (for helicopters having a tail rotor). EC 135 and EC 365N have a ducted tail rotor with staggered blades for reduced noise. Lockheed  . The rotorcraft speed u is the maximum speed in forward #ight at sea level. With this de"nition we can compare advance ratios and tip Mach numbers for di!erent helicopters. D (9) Both data and correlation are shown in Fig. Their design point is eccentric.127 exp (8. Only a few helicopters are capable of operating at higher speeds: MD AH-64D has u "360 km/h.

19).031.652. excessive tip Mach numbers. . The G-vehicles are both civil and military general utility vehicles.10\ u#0.  due to limits imposed by #ight instability. except the V-22 that is a tilt rotor. the T-vehicles consist of tandem rotors. many helicopters of the Kamov series). Tail rotors turn at much higher rates. (10)  where u is the sea level speed in km/h. The data are correlated by a line "t described by M "1. Some rotorcraft feature automatic control of the speed (for example. 1000}3000 rpm.644 A. The main rotor's rpm reported in Table 4 are indicated as either constant or variable over a narrow range. An exception is the relatively low M of the Enstrom 480. Some vehicles are indicated to show extreme values of MTOW and W/A. Typical rotor speeds are 120}400 rpm. 18) and ad- vance ratio (Fig. Mil 26 is the largest vehicle in terms of MTOW.661 #0. Filippone / Progress in Aerospace Sciences 36 (2000) 629}654 Fig.7 at incidence "43. 16.  M "0. Bell-47 was the "rst commercial helicopter (1947). The computed tip Mach number is shown as a function of the maximum sea level speed (Fig. This airfoil is known for having poor transonic properties [39]: drag divergence is estimated at M"0. Rotorcraft disk loading trends. that  features NACA 0012 airfoils sections.603. AH-56 u "407 km/h (though with compound thrust). dynamic stall e!ects on rotating parts.

 .A. Tail rotor relative size d /d. 17. Filippone / Progress in Aerospace Sciences 36 (2000) 629}654 645 Fig.

Most of the LC vehicles have solidity below the line "t. 20 as a function of the rotor diameter. The main rotor's reduced frequency at maximum sea level speed. Fig. 18. 20. Tip Mach number versus advance ratio . D (11) a compromise between helicopter rotor and aircraft propeller. although Mi-18 and V-22 are particularly eccentric: Mil Mi-18 is low because of the large diameter. Rotor solidity versus the diameter for all rotorcraft types. 19. The solidity of the Kamov Ka-52 has been computed by considering the rotor made of 6 blades (actual con"guration is a 603 stagger between co-axial rotors). shown in Fig. was computed from 2cB  " . The performance for RAH-66 has been extrapolated from the maximum absolute speed.  The rotor solidity. Fig. Fig. Tip Mach number at maximum S/L speed. V-22 is high because the blades are . de"ned by k" c  2u (12) A linear "t is a good approximation.76 m. Value for V-22 is found from average blade chord c"0.

which is particularly high. .05}0. even with advanced airfoil sections. with its wing barely "tting on the long side of a football "eld (an amazing 88. and the ratios between gross weights is 18. who reversed an old opinion (for example. 23 show the capability of each aircraft.5. Better performances are reported as records (for example. which corresponds to a factor 2 in wing loading.) Relatively low forward speed is expected at high reduced frequencies. This law states that the structural stress increases with the characteristic length. 21. The data shown in Fig. Size e!ects on aircraft have been brilliantly discussed by Cleveland [9]. Conventional wisdom would Fig. even when larger aircraft than the Lockheed C-5 have been built. 22 for all classes of vehicles. Cargo aircraft For no other aircraft type as the cargo the useful load fraction is so descriptive of the aircraft value.646 A. The rotor e$ciency upper bound is about 0. 21. Filippone / Progress in Aerospace Sciences 36 (2000) 629}654 The main rotor performance is shown in Fig. Main rotor's reduced frequency at maximum sea level speed. since the vehicle is operated in the aircraft mode. but this does not seem to be the case when comparing the aircraft of Table 5. with "2 rpm/60 is shown in Fig. Fig. These aircraft are also the largest vehicles built. and the "gures of merit (described below) are for demonstrated performances of the aircraft versions speci"ed in the table. [40]) on the square/cube law. and their sheer size is undeniably fascinating. Changes may be introduced in the future if more e$cient engines become available. with most of the rotors performing around 0. The graphics of Fig. while the Antonov An-124 is just 2% heavier. would be equivalent to 500 compact cars taking o! at once.15. The data collected in Table 5 are a summary of characteristics of military vehicles and some vehicles re-engineered into military utility. Line "t is a power curve through 62 operation points. The An225 at its design point.40 metres). Helicopter power loading. The Antonov An-225 is (on the design board) one and a half times heavier than a fully loaded Boeing B-747-400. PAY/OWE. or the payload to gross take-o! weight ratio. the ratio between wing areas is 9. Cleveland implied that this law would be defeated by technological advances. The line "t excludes the tilt-rotor V-22. due to fatigue and aeroelastic limits imposed by the dynamic loadings on the rotor. One "gure of merit is the ratio between the payload and the empty operating weight. from the small-size transport to the largest. Most of the values are in the range 0. C-133) or design targets (An-225).2. This is an indication of deviation from the ideal conditions of the power required for the staticthrust performance (hover). and scaling seems appropriate. or if relatively old concepts such as the spanloader become a reality.6. PAY/MTOW (useful load fraction). Considering the An-225 and G-222 (largest and smallest aircraft) the ratio between wing spans is 3. if we exclude the turboprops with substantially straight wing. as long as the load is proportional to the structural weight: in a =/A to MTOW map the correlation would be linear (this was also shown by Tennekes at all length scales [26]). 23 includes about 40 years of technology. All weights are expressed in metric tons (10 kg). (This is however a limiting condition unlikely to be reached. 6. 22.

00 405.04 7. 4-bladed counter-rotating propfans. C-133B. Il-96T.30 379. (7) Antonov An-70: "rst aircraft to #y on propfans alone.88 50. (9) Antonov An-225: largest aircraft ever built. vectored thrust for improved STOL capability.00 341 725 602 645 663 634 730 399 567 690 518 434 659 752 739 425 15.613 0. aircraft based on DC-10-30 wing. (8) Antonov An-124: largest production aircraft.310 0. except C-130J.92 10.00 92.40 0. with tip fences. (11) MD C-17 has NASA winglets.L 34. others are jets.00 9.80 0. design point: MTOW"600.84 47.L 37.25 7.04 12.00 41.L #2 30 5.06 73.695 0.702 0.70 64.693 0.39 76.528 0.78 0.73 190.90 129. KC-10A.320 0. C-17A.50 57. KC-135A.L 25.77 0.34 44.76 0.00 130. no vortex generators. 366 382 295 47.88 64.30 37. no fences.59 70.01 110.362 0.Q !3 !3 !3 #2 !5 !4 #4 #6 860 640 525 591 361 410 4.00 156.636 0. (2) Wing mounted high.646 0.29 47.000 kg.285 30 30 30 30 884 A.16 440 435 586 393 389 381 b MTOW PAY M P * R ! OWE P/O 0.370 0.16 6.L 28. except A300.Q 38.11 8.00 250.341 0. An-70.40 44.22 21. (13) KC-135: wing based on B717.287 0.1 8.289 0.50 0.77 0. based on A-300-600.76 0.6 7.52 5. (6) Antonov An-22: largest propeller driven aircraft.22 181.857 0.80 118.L 1.64 122.263 0.547 0. An-22.312 0.65 0.7 28.Q 30. propfans (8-bladed.00 0.00 72.00 155.67 12.30 88.30 169.00 150.L 28.70 496.40 67.628 0. Mryia Boeing KC-135A Stratolifter Boeing B-747-400F Douglas C-133B Cargomaster Ilyushin Il-76MD Ilyushin Il-96T Lockheed C-141B StarLifter Lockheed C-130J Hercules Lockheed C-5B Galaxy MD C-17A. with dihedral.66 76.66 48.55 8.75 0.770 0.308 0.59 3. B-747.623 P/W Aircraft 17. Globemaster III MD KC-10A. Beluga 25.34 396.30 10.00 47.700 0.573 0.47 0.62 155. 647 . Extender SATIC A300-600.70 28.321 0.77 50. G-222 are turboprops. no vortex generators.00 na 48.08 5.55 89.41 67.50 8.00 7. PAY"250.00 270.0 8.82 0. C-130J.Q 29.00 80. (12) KC-10A: MTOW given for full cargo.00 508. tanker version with lower MTOW. (10) A300-600: aircraft with largest internal load capability.40 39.80 175. (5) Alenia G-222: sweep at outer panels.74 40.95 86.84 0. wing mounted low. tanker has lower MTOW. G-222. (1) All swept back wings (sweep around LE or QC).Q 35.50 54. no fences. An-22.20 143. Filippone / Progress in Aerospace Sciences 36 (2000) 629}654 Alenia G-222/C-27 Antonov An-22 Antheus Antonov An-70 Antonov An-124 Ruslan Antonov An-225.00 132.247 0. (3) Winglets on Il-96T.000 kg. (4) Propulsion: C-141B. 6-bladed counter-rotating).70 114.44 54.66 265.Table 5 Data and performances of cargo and heavy lift aircraft (see nomenclature for symbols) AR =/A 4.81 0. supercritical wing. MTOW given for full cargo.35 267.56 0.65 113.48 7.20 34.Q !5 !3 30 !5 30 #7 #7 9.80 0.305 Note.40 0.265 0.3L 27.

. 23. The C-17 has operation point between A300 and KC-10A: its dimensions and payload have been designed to hold large units. All the correlations are linear.648 A. while the KC-10A. like bulky military equipment. also the aircraft range must be used in the performance equation. showing that this aircraft size is the most commercially interesting. and is given in km. Filippone / Progress in Aerospace Sciences 36 (2000) 629}654 Fig. 24. Fig. the product between the maximum useful load and the maximum aircraft range PAY E" R MTOW (13) is the maximum cargo range. This analysis is shown in Fig. but relatively small airplanes. The product PAY R (tons km) is biased toward the large aircraft. suggest that it is more e$cient to lift a few large cargos than several small ones. working either as a cargo or tanker. There is a number of aircraft with gross wing area A&350 m (A300. Maximum cargo range. 24. Cargo aircraft PAY/OWE and and PAY/MTOW ratios versus aircraft size. can e$ciently use all of its volume. (B747-4F"Boeing 747-400F). The large gap between A300-600 and KC10A can be attributed to the fact that A300 is designed to carry internal oversize cargos (not necessarily bulky ones). among others). such as the Alenia G-222 and Lockheed C-130J have useful load fractions higher than many large airplanes. However. KC-10A. C-17A.

117 at take-o!. 23). max rate of climb over . For reference. u 180 (15) For a given altitude and speed (single point in the #ight envelope diagram. max sustained turn rates of the order of 103/s. Specixc excess power P"  ¹!D ¹ C u/2 u" u! " . (14) that P becomes a large negative number. advanced weapons systems are peculiar problems of this class of aircraft. The data available are rather sparse. By comparison. Useful references include reports of the AGARD Fluid Dynamics Panel [41] and [42]. A-10.A. while the Airbus A340-300 has E"2700 km.performances. weapons. Thrust-to-weight data for supersonic jet "ghters. the maximum cargo range of the Concorde is only 739 km. At altitude. using a ground speed M"0. However. aerodynamics of #ight control. a third performance parameter is de"ned: the maximum instantaneous load factor C q n " *  .42. particular an indication of power available for sustained turn rates. that are considered the most important parameters a!ecting the aircraft performance. The maximum sustained rate of turn is g Q " (n!1) (rad/s). The "ghter Lockheed F-22A claims ¹/="1. which does not perform well in terms of absolute useful load. The number of parameters needed to fully characterize a "ghter/attack aircraft is in the order of several dozens. = = =/A (14) Fig. Fig. 25. Filippone / Progress in Aerospace Sciences 36 (2000) 629}654 649 The best "gure is that of the Boeing B747-400F. 6. and radar cross-section. which means the  drag rise is in excess of the available thrust. Fig. Tornado ADV is o! scale with a theoretical wing loading of about 1000 kg/m. the ¹/= and =/A are " only a fraction of the data presented. The data studied include aircraft primarily designed for air support (Harrier. max speci"c excess power 150 m/s. At given C and #ight altitude P is a function of " "  both ¹/= and =/A.4. lateral and directional stability. high wing loading (hence small wings) and low C . Fighter jets State-of-the-art "ghters/attack aircraft are designed to operate at a wide range of speeds. Speci"c aerodynamic and system issues in "ghter aircraft design include high. while the maximum value is indicated as ¹/="1. and engine e$ciency. 8). The #ight envelope 4 of Fig. 25 shows the ¹/= and =/A data obtained at sea level. and Bradley [44]. There is a considerable scatter in the data. Each point in the diagrams represents an optimum de"ning the best manoeuvring margins within costs limits of the aircraft operator.9 and a drag coe$cient C "0. Fig. they include the following: roll rates of up to 2703/s.3. P can be maximized by high  thrust rating. Evaluation of the C  is neither straightforward. AoA up to 50 or 803 (FSW aircraft). max acceleration through the sound barrier 0. that show the most scattered data and performances. (Fig. 8 is the limit performance. transonic area rule design. [43]. canard-wing interference. 25 gives an indication of system e!ectiveness.5g in straight #ight. At the other end there are aircraft with =/A &350}800 kg/m. also 3 lines of constant P have been  computed. Although the data at sea level cannot actually be scaled at altitude. on the number of external stores left for close-in-combat #ight. It is easy to see using average data in Eq. because of sensitive importance. and changes are dependent on the particular aircraft. * nor easily available in the technical literature. Therefore. Data elaborated from maximum thrust rating with afterburning and MTOW at sea level. max instantaneous load factor up to 9g. external stores and missions. in where n is the normal load factor. JS37) and aircraft intended for air-to-ground operations (F-117). X =/A (16) which is limited by the structural resistance of the aircraft. The aircraft can actually operate almost anywhere within this region. Variable wing sweep. Some important performance parameters are the speci"c excess power and the maximum sustained rate of turn. McMichael et al. low radar signature. The turn is generally performed in highly unsteady #ight.

49 !5 0 45 42 42 67 LE LE LE LE 9.000 11.03 2.680 45.00 3. (3) R at sea level ! for: AMX.000 33.200 19.117 0.412 0.49 3.62 8.70 14.0 52.00 2.78 2.502 0.60 8.5 6.240 18.644 0.548 0.13 10.000 23.0 9.000 .  3.95 3.87 7.000 44.80 2.70 13. (11) Dassault Rafale: movable canards.5 78.7 46.40 3.20 2.40 14.765 18. (1) VSW-aircraft: wing span.700 46.812 0.000 186 180 13.3 7.0 9.45 13.86 0.68 10.0 9.20 !3 !2 !4 !4 7.683 0.70 2.55 4.0 9.666 0. Hawk 100 NAMC Q-5.362 0. (5) Thrust vectoring on: F-22A (max de#ection 22 degs down).3 41.70 8.890 29.0 61. with aircraft on the ground.0 50.8 7.300 1830 9140 213 15.0 9. up to 203.000 19.822 0. .97 1. mounted low. because not designed for air-to-air combat.36 3.00 2.20 11.0 61.5 9. (9) JS39 Gripen: Mach number uncon"rmed.0 348 688 281 518 750 423 370 18. areas and AR given at maximum sweep angle.83 1.800 21.75 3.330 200 62.35 1.200 23.50 2.698 Note.5 19. Filippone / Progress in Aerospace Sciences 36 (2000) 629}654 AMX BAe SeaHarrier Mk2 Boeing F/A 18E Ching-Kuo (Taiwan) Dassault Mirage 2K Euro"ghter 2000 Fairchild A-10 General Dyn F111/F Grumman F-14A Lockheed F-22A Lockheed F-16C Lockheed F-117A MAPO MiG-29 MAPO MiG-31 NAMC Q-5 (China) SAAB Viggen JA37 SAAB Gripen JS39 Sukhoi Su-27 Sukhoi Su-34 Tornado ADV SB SB VSW 8.0 MTOW 31 LE 34 QC 37 LE 28 LE 58 LE 53 LE M g> R Z A =/A 619 636 645 505 415 460 482 ¹/= Aircraft Wing SB SB SB SB-V UW VSW VSW 21.000 0.30 2.950 12.47 9.712 0.650 Table 6 Selected data and performances of "ghters (see nomenclature for symbols) b AR ! 3124 177 15.600 15.65 13.360 33.20 2.80 2.40 2.800 8880 LE LE LE LE LE LE LE LE 18.80 1.830 17.582 0.60 0.250 16.350 28.95 17.0 532 715 na A.000 22.74 11.0 6.859 0.699 0. Su-27.00 0. (4) Dog-tooth LE line on Lockheed F/A 18E.5 24.0 7.00 0. (6) F-117A is not technically a "ghter.764 0.54 !2 !12 !2 30 0 0 2.35 2.270 27.00 2.631 0. SAAB JS 39.385 0.0 BWB SB SB SB  3.000 15.8 38.40 6.750 17.570 1.6 28.250 16.850 84.34 1.97 2.250 15.755 0. (2) Dihedral/anhedral angles estimated from roots.0 7. A-10.0 47. BAe Sea Harrier.200 11.000 20.5 72 69 49 39 67 42 41 57 9. (8) Euro"ghter 2000: tailess delta wing.56 9.240 15.0 62.36 13.800 19.53 9.000 13. (7) MD F-111: sweep continuously variable from 16 to 723.0 16.670 17. (10) JA37 Viggen: canards with TE #aps for aircraft control at high AoA.20 13.53 9.

Most of the data on record show a large scatter. and #ight controls do not scale with aircraft size. which is a sign that design.30.5 is the practical speed limit for aero-thermodynamic heat stress of today's aircraft (this corresponds to a stagnation temperature of about 2503C).82 was reached in the early 1970s. Wind tunnel test times. This was in the same order as the development of the F-101 30 years earlier. For "ghter aircraft this ratio is in the range 0. and are placed above *# the power "t line. Scaling is not an issue. have been growing to over 20. its maximum weapons load seems aligned with that of the bombers.). although it has been classi"ed so. For the VSW aircraft sweep has been considered at fully spread wings. power plants. and all speed ranges). Further increases are not expected.000 m/min. control surface sizing. 27. for heavy bombers estimates give 0. Innovations such as transonic area ruling design (a relatively old concept) could increase the drag divergence point by M&0. mission requirements and performances change considerably from one aircraft to the other. 28 shows the speed of commercial airplanes at year of "rst #ight.000 h (all aerodynamic sub-components. Subsonic commercial jets Flying faster and more e$ciently has been the main goal since the beginning of commercial and passenger transport. The maximum ordnance to gross weight for both bombers and "ghters/attack aircraft is shown in Fig. having been introduced at about the same time as .A. 6. The introduction of the jet engines appeared before the speed reached the intrinsic limit of propeller-driven aircraft. The introduction of new supercritical wing sections has allowed a further gain of M&0. and the cruise speed kept increasing. The Lockheed F-117A is not technically a "ghter. Fig. 27. 19. max weapons load ratios of 0. Fig. supercruise at sea level M"1.25. Filippone / Progress in Aerospace Sciences 36 (2000) 629}654 651 Fig.5 this aircraft covers about 32 body lengths/second (while the F-15E covers 38 body lengths at the same speed). like for the cargo aircraft discussed above: aerodynamic characteristics. 1. Ordnance-to-MTOW ratios for bombers and "ghters. The of F-117A is far larger than the one required to #y at the corresponding speed. 26. but it is considered not feasible because of the increased airframe costs. Mach"2. The VSW-aircraft are plotted at the operation point corresponding to maximum sweep . 26 shows the "ghters Mach number in supersonic dash as function of the wing aspect-ratio. Fig. Fighter aircraft Mach number plotted versus the wing sweep at LE.25 km (half of this on ramp). optional loads. This is due to its design for low radar signature.10}0. The speed of piston engines continued to grow until the late 1940s.4. but then a transonic limit of about 0. Even at M"2.05. It has remained as such for the past 30 years.1. The MiG-31 claims a top speed M"2. landing gear. although the experimental research aircraft Grumman X-29A required less than 1200 h before maiden #ight in 1984 [45]. The wing of NAMC Q-5 is unusually swept. A quick look at the basic parameters of the wing system (see Table 6 for reference) would suggest so. although it is di$cult to work out the details (internal and external bays.83.10}0. full con"guration system. take-o! runs assisted by afterburning as low as 0. stability margins.2. barrel guns. etc. as shown in Fig. Some ratios between maximum war-load weight and MTOW have been extrapolated.14 (largest for Tupolev Tu-160). while the top speed claimed is barely above M"1. The Boeing B-707 featured a very advanced technology.

The vehicles selected were mostly from the last 40 years of aircraft design. (1). Also. Tu-204D). Airbus A-340). multislotted control surfaces (Fig. Poisson-Quinton [25] predicted a ¸/D for subsonic long range cruise conditions growing with the wing span according to b ¸ "14 . and Fig. highlighted historical trends. Some aspect-ratios now are around 10 (MD-90. as described by Eq. swept back wings (Fig.31. 30. Il-96.003. Demonstrated cruise speeds of airliners at year of introduction. 30). A310300. . The useful load fraction ratio PAY/MTOW is in the range 0. The jet revolution has consolidated a philosophy in aircraft design that it is di$cult to challenge: cylindrical fuselage.21}0. Fig. The analysis shows that in many cases interesting correlations can be obtained. Improvement of aerodynamic e$ciency is one of the key aerodynamic problems in this class of aircraft. In comparison. (17) D (A  assuming a span e$ciency e"0. In the early days of jet propulsion commercial aircraft had wing aspect-ratios of the order 6}7. 28. B-777. Filippone / Progress in Aerospace Sciences 36 (2000) 629}654 Fig. the Concorde.75 and a skin friction coe$cient c "0. the e!ects of regulations on noise emissions.11. 29. skin friction and induced drag are the most promising areas of research. This progress has been facilitated by the introduction of supercritical wing sections and winglets (MD-11. Aerodynamic interference. B-747-400. Wing aspect-ratio of airliners at year of introduction. Wing sweep versus AR for commercial subsonic transport aircraft. 7. The tendency has been toward decreasing the wing sweep and increasing the wing span (Fig. the induced drag is an inverse function of the aspect-ratio. For given span e$ciency. has PAY/OWE &0. while many others are slightly below 9. Perspectives and conclusions In this article we have presented a summary of aircraft and rotorcraft characteristics taken from full-scale data and from #ight performances. A340-300. 29). the Lockheed L-049 Constellation and a few other propeller aircraft. the only supersonic transport #ying at present.652 A. 7).

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