“!Viva Colombia!

” chant-
ed the yellow-, blue- and
red-clad crowd gathered at
the annual Colombian Inde-
pendence Day Festival on
July 29 at Foschini Park in
Hackensack.
From arepas (corn pat-
ties with cheese), to pinchos
(shish kebabs), to maíz asa-
do (roasted corn), one of the
event’s highlights was the
country’s native foods. The
other was the steady sounds
of Colombian music. For
the young ones, boardwalk-
style games and rides such
as a carousel were set up
alongside vendors display-
ing traditional clothing, jew-
elry and drinks for all ages to
enjoy.
Julio Salcedo, president
of Club Colombia USA, the
Hackensack-based group
which has organized the
event since 1969, was proud
to say that this was the 43
rd
annual festival.
“Colombians raised a fag
in this park, and we’ve had
a festival every year since,”
Salcedo said.
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Community Calendar ............19
Dining Out ...............................6
Games ................................. 22
Health ...................................14
Main Street ............................12
Inside
Obits .....................................23
Police Briefs ............................5
Real Estate ............................27
Service Directory ..................25
Town News Begins ..................2
Continued on Page 18
The highest quality meats, exquisite seafood
and the most exotic Colombian cuisine
Catering for All Occasions
Bohemia Restaurant • 287 Main St. • Hackensack, NJ 07601
Tel. (201) 488-1010 • 201 488-1393
Colombian Pride on Display
Photos Courtesy: Elina Tarkazikis
Alan Morales, Laura Morales and Ashly Vergara
dressed for the occasion.
by ELINA
TARkAZIkIS
For the frst time, mobile
phone users can provide
anonymous crime tips to
the Hackensack Police De-
partment. The service, Tip-
Soft, allows citizens to send
anonymous tips online, by
iPhone or Android mobile
apps (search tip submit, se-
lect public engines) or by
sending a text message to
“CRIMES” (274637) with
the keyword “HACKPD”
from a mobile phone.
“The widespread use of
text messaging makes it
easy for the public to help
law enforcement agencies
fght crime,” said Police
Chief Tomas Padilla. “And
with TipSoft, they know that
it’s safe for them to do the
right thing without ever dis-
closing their identity.”
TipSoft, which is made by
PublicEngines, allows agen-
cies and members of the
public to have a two-way
dialog that is completely
secure and anonymous. The
service specifcally allows
text message providers to
remain anonymous by en-
crypting the text messages,
assigning them a unique ID,
and routing them through
secure servers, protecting
the personal details of the
information provider.
“The Hackensack Police
Department is demonstrat-
ing its commitment to the
public and to public safety
by using technology to
prevent, reduce and solve
crime,” said William Kilm-
er, CEO, PublicEngines.
“With TipSoft, agencies can
invite the public to take an
active role in making their
communities safer.”
To date, TipSoft has re-
ceived more than 2 million
tips; 145,000 arrests have
been made; 55,000 fugitives
have been caught; more than
$5.3 billion has been recov-
ered in drugs and property;
11,000 vehicles recovered;
and 22,000 weapons recov-
ered.
Citizens are encouraged
to use TipSoft to report in-
formation about any non-ur-
gent illegal activity, such as
unsolved cases, vandalism,
theft, the sale and distribu-
tion of drugs or information
about crimes that are being
planned in the community or
in schools.
The system cost approxi-
mately $2,000 for the frst
year and was purchased en-
tirely through forfeiture funds.
“In this day and age, tech-
nology and social media is
how people communicate,
said Padilla. “By allowing
them to use this new system,
they are able to easily com-
municate with us and feel
comfortable their identity is
protected.”
The Hackensack Police
Department is also work-
ing with PublicEngines to
integrate the notices with
the department’s Facebook
and Twitter pages. Follow-
ers will receive alerts on
upcoming events and im-
portant notices through both
their apps and the social me-
dia sites.
Michael Melf is once
again Hackensack’s mayor.
The former Marine was ap-
pointed to a one-year sting
in the mayor’s offce during
the July 2 reorganization
meeting of the Hackensack
City Council.
Jorge Meneses, who will
return to his role as coun-
cilman, thanked all of the
department heads and mu-
nicipal employees for sup-
porting him during his year
as the city’s leader. Meneses
spoke about what a hectic
year it had been and said he
was happy with the plans to
revitalize Main Street.
City Manager Steve Lo
Iacono said Meneses’ term
“could be considered an
enigma, but you leave on
a high note with the Main
Street rehabilitation.”
“I’m outta here,” said
Meneses.
The council members
then voted to appoint the
next mayor. The current
council, now in its second
four-year term, has been us-
ing a rotating mayoral for-
mat since taking offce in
2005. Melf, most recently
serving as deputy mayor,
was selected despite Coun-
cilman John Labrosse’s op-
position to the system.
Rep. Scott Garrett admin-
istered the oath of offce to
Melf, who was joined by
his wife, Tracey, and sons,
Ryan and Michael.
Melf, who also served as
mayor for a year during his
previous term, thanked his
family for supporting him
and promised “to do my
best to make Hackensack a
better place for its 44,000
residents. It is a true honor
to serve as mayor again.”
Melf spoke about the
council’s accomplishments
during the past seven years.
He listed new shared ser-
vices agreements, park
improvements and the am-
bitious plan to rehabilitate
Main Street.
Councilman Marlin
Towns was then sworn in
as deputy mayor by his son,
Marlin Townes III, an attor-
ney.
Townes admitted that
he usually writes out what
he wants to say but chose
to “say it from my heart
tonight.” He thanked his
family, the city workers and
residents and pledged to
“continue to give 100 per-
cent.”
“You are what makes
Hackensack what it is,” said
Townes. “You are here sup-
porting us, and we all sup-
port each other.”
Bergen County Execu-
tive Kathleen Donovan
congratulated both Melf
and Townes. “Under the au-
thority of the people, we get
along and move forward.
I look forward to working
with all of you.”
Jerry Some, the owner of
Some’s Uniforms, a long-
time staple on Main Street,
presented Melf with a la-
pel pin signifying the U.S.
Marine Corps. He also pre-
sented the new mayor with
Publisher
Gail Marie Zisa
Editor-in-Chief
Lauren Zisa
Art Director
Donald Hatcher
Deputy Editor
Melody Travisano
Sales Managers
Karen Burke
Avis LoVecchio
Writers
Yasmeen Al-Shehab
Sonali Basak
Michael Cohen
Samantha Inzalaco
Kathleen Kane
Patti McNamara
Elina Tarkazikis
Gail Vachon
Juliann Weston
The County Seat
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We welcome the submission of manuscripts,
photographs, art and poetry for editorial
consideration. Photographs will not be returned
unless arrangements are made. All submissions must
have your name, address, and telephone number on it
or it will not be considered. All material supplied shall
become the property of The County Seat. The County
Seat, L.L.C. assumes no fnancial responsibility
for typographical errors in advertisements if it
is our error. Advertisers must notify the editor
within seven days of publication of any error.
Serving Hackensack, South Hackensack,
Maywood, Rochelle Park, Paramus,
Teaneck, and Little Ferry
77 Hudson Street
Hackensack, NJ 07601
www.cntyseat.com
Tel: 201-488-5795 • Fax: 201-343-8720
info@cntyseat.com
Volume 9 Issue 12
Elisa Coccia
Tax Collector
City of Hackensack
EVENING HOURS
Tuesday Aug. 28, 2012
Open until 6:00 PM
The 2012 Final/2013 Preliminary Tax Bills will be mailed by 8/01/12.
If you do not receive your bill by 8/15/12, please call the Tax Offce
at (201) 646-3927 between 9am-4pm. Per NJSA 54:4-64, non-receipt
of a tax bill does not release you from payment. The last day to pay
to avoid interest is Thursday 8/30/12. Postmark IS NOT accepted
per state statute.
ATTENTION HACKENSACK RESIDENTS
TRY OUR SECURE DRIVE-THRU PAYMENT BOX OPEN
24/7 located in the driveway next to Police Dept. exiting State Street.
The County Seat newspa-
per is thrilled to announce
the redesign of its Web
site, www.cntyseat.com.
The new format offers a
more interactive and user-
friendly online resource for
our readers. The Web site
includes general informa-
tion about the Hackensack-
based monthly newspaper,
a copy of the current issue,
opportunities to advertise
and much more. The site
also has an archives section
and a Spanish language
link to cater to our diverse
audience. It is also easier to
navigate than ever before.
Visit www.cntyseat.com
regularly for breaking local
news and updates between
issues.
County Seat Newspaper Launches
New Web Site
Photo Courtesy: Patti McNamara
Michael Melf being sworn in by Rep. Scott Garrett, as his
wife, Tracey, looks on.
Melf Takes the Helm Again
by PATTI MCNAMARA
Continued on Page 21
Hackensack P.D. Seeks Tips
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After a series of meetings,
the state’s School Ethics Com-
mission recently decided that
a complaint fled by Hack-
ensack Board of Educa-
tion Trustee Carol Martinez
against Trustees Frank Albo-
lino and Mark Stein had no
merit.
Martinez’s complaint was
based on whether Albolino
and Stein should have been al-
lowed to review candidates for
the position of school superin-
tendent as they both have rela-
tives working for the Hack-
ensack public school system.
At the time when Raymond
Gonzalez, the former acting
superintendent, applied for the
permanent position last sum-
mer, Martinez claimed Gonza-
lez was indirectly supervising
Albolino’s wife and Stein’s
daughter.
Albolino and Stein were ac-
cused of violating the School
Ethics Act, which forbids
school offcials from acting in
a manner that “creates some
beneft to the school offcial
or member of his immediate
family” or “impairs his objec-
tivity or sense of judgment.”
Albolino and Stein argued
that their judgment was never
impaired because of their rela-
tives’ employment with the
Hackensack Board of Educa-
tion.
After a screening of all the
applicants, eight were chosen
for a frst round interview. Six
out of 10 board members vot-
ed to invite Gonzalez back to a
frst round.
“Even if Mr. Stein and I had
recused ourselves, Interim Su-
perintendent Gonzalez would
have still been invited for an
interview,” argued Albolino.
Gonzalez ended up rescind-
ing his application for the
superintendent post after ac-
cepting the same position in
Wayne. Hackensack’s search
was eventually abandoned
when the board could not de-
cide on a candidate.
On May 19, the state’s
School Ethics Commission
found no probable cause to
credit Martinez’s complaint.
School Trustee’s Complaint
Labeled Meritless
by SoNALI bASAk
LoPiccolo Leaving Longtime Post
South Hackensack Town-
ship Clerk Linda LoPiccolo
is leaving the post she’s held
for the past 27 years, effec-
tive Sept. 1.
The South Hackensack
Township Committee ac-
cepted LoPiccolo’s retire-
ment notice during its July
12 public meeting. LoPic-
colo has also served as the
township’s registrar of vital
statistics, purchasing agent,
insurance fund commis-
sioner, municipal housing
liaison, personnel offcer,
compliance offcer, board of
health secretary and storm
water coordinator.
Mayor Gary Brugger pre-
sented LoPiccolo with fow-
ers and wished her well as
she transitioned into retire-
ment and “grandmahood.”
Brugger praised LoPic-
colo for her professionalism
through the years.
“You are so dependable
and prepared,” he said. “You
are right up there. It was tru-
ly a joy working with you.
Thank you from the bottom
of my heart.”
The committee members
agreed that LoPiccolo will
certainly be missed.
“You were the person
to go to for the facts,” said
Committeeman Frank Ca-
gas.
Jim Anzevino, a former
mayor and longtime com-
mitteeman, applauded
LoPiccolo for remaining
neutral despite some intense
Photo Courtesy: Patti McNamara
Township Clerk Linda LoPiccolo with South Hacken-
sack Mayor Gary brugger.
by PATTI MCNAMARA
Plans by the Bergen County
Board of Chosen Freeholders
to consider consolidation of the
county police with the sheriff’s
department were derailed Aug.
1 when Freeholders Robert
Hermansen and Maura DeNic-
ola walked out of a hearing.
Their absence prevented a
quorum from being assembled
and a vote putting the question
on a referendum from being
carried out.
“This reminds me of the
time when I was in kindergar-
ten playing in the sandbox that
a playmate said, ‘If you don’t
want to do it my way, I’m go-
ing to take my toys and go
home,’” said Freeholder David
Ganz. “I don’t recall this ever
happening before on the free-
holder board.”
Freeholder Joan Voss was
equally disappointed.
“I would have rather fought
verbally than to see two people
walk away from their constitu-
ents and the numerous resolu-
tions and ordinances pending
before the board,” she said.
The frst stop on this tour
will be in Oakland on Aug. 27.
Hermansen, who chairs
the Public Safety Committee,
and DeNicola, who served on
a recent county commission
designed to explore the good
and bad points of a merger,
participated in earlier discus-
sions that took place in the
freeholder work session that
day, but both left before the
vote.
“I haven’t made up my
mind about whether or not to
approve or oppose the merger
of the county police with the
sheriff’s department,” Voss
said, “but I want to be sure
that we have the opportunity to
hear from the people by refer-
endum and also to show con-
stituents what the ordinance
we will be considering would
look like.”
Freeholders Leave Merger Meeting
Aphasia Not Stopping Them
Photo Courtesy: Adler Aphasia Center
Avi Golden jumping out of a plane.
Adler Aphasia Center’s
members are reaching new
heights daily in their recov-
ery. One of the Maywood
Center’s youngest members,
Avi Golden, suffered a stroke
almost fve years ago.
Today, it’s hard to believe
Avi suffers any disabilities
related to his stroke and
aphasia. He is currently an
emergency medical techni-
cian for the State of New
York. Call 201-368-8585 or
visit www.adleraphasiacen-
ter.org.
At 8:04 a.m. on July 1,
Hackensack frefghters
were called to a fre at the
Bloomingdale’s depart-
ment store at the Shops at
Riverside. The frst men
on the scene immediately
detected a smell of smoke
outside the store and traced
it to an exterior wall on the
Hackensack Avenue side of
the building. While some
frefghters were using
hoses to extinguish the fre,
Ladder 1 and Rescue 1 be-
gan searching the building
and ventilating the fre area.
The main body of fre was
knocked down and brought
under control at 8:32. The
store, which was closed at
the time, did not suffer any
damage, but a minor smoke
condition was reported.
The cause has not been de-
termined.
A stunning transforma-
tion will soon occur at a
dormant field along South
River Street in Hacken-
sack thanks to the efforts
of PSE&G and Gov. Chris
Christie.
On July 31, Christie trav-
eled to Hackensack and
joined PSE&G CEO Ralph
Izzo and union workers to
break ground on what will
become the one-megawatt
PSE&G Hackensack Solar
Farm, a renewable energy
project.
“Many years ago, there
was an industrial facility
here using coal to manu-
facture gas, a process that
once helped power New
Jersey’s economy,” Izzo
said. “But those operations
ended long ago. Today, we
inaugurate a project that
will turn this site from
brown to green as a solar
farm, generating clean en-
ergy and jobs.”
Christie has made renew-
able energy a focal point of
his platform, and Izzo com-
mended the governor for
taking action.
“Every time we reclaim
a landfill or brownfield site
with solar panels, it’s a win
for the people of New Jer-
sey,” Izzo said.
PSE&G is carrying out
an energy conversion pro-
gram known as “Solar 4
All,” which transforms un-
derutilized space into green
areas that produce solar en-
ergy, and “Solar Loan III,”
which funds these green
initiatives. PSE&G has
also recently proposed an
$883 million expansion of
these programs throughout
New Jersey.
“We can now say that
1 percent of New Jersey’s
energy comes from solar
power. Few states can make
this claim,” said Christie.
Christie said he hopes the
color green will continue to
replace the color brown all
over New Jersey. Projects
such as the one in Hack-
ensack have already been
completed in Trenton, Edi-
son, Linden and Kearny.
Site preparation is un-
derway and construction is
expected to be completed
later in the year. J. Fletcher
Creamer and Sons is man-
aging the project.
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printing • copying • design
big color posters • t-shirts
giveaways • blueprints
222 River Street • Hackensack, NJ 07601
201.343.3343
Flames Destroy Three Apartments
At 9:08 p.m. on July
9, Hackensack frefght-
ers responded to a 9-1-1
call reporting a fre at a
two-story garden apart-
ment at 45 First St. Upon
arrival, Deputy Fire Chief
Steve Kalman reported
heavy fre in the rear of
complex and transmit-
ted a second alarm. While
some frefghters attacked
the fames with hose lines,
the ladder company began
to vent the roof and search
the second foor and ad-
joining apartments. Due to
the heavy fre conditions,
two additional engines and
one ladder company were
brought to the scene to as-
sist in fre extinguishment
and overhaul. The fre was
deemed under control by
10:11 p.m.
Residents of seven
apartments were displaced
by the fre. They were as-
sisted by the American
Red Cross. A total of three
apartments were gutted
and four others suffered
moderate damage. Two
residents were treated for
smoke inhalation. The
cause was of the fre was
determined to be the stove
in the original apartment.
Minor Fire at bloomingdale’s
Photo Courtesy: Mike Williams
Hackensack Police offcer Mike Gutierrez escorting residents from 45 First St.
Christie Unveils PSE&G Solar Farm
Photo Courtesy: Lauren Zisa
Gov. Chris Christie with PSE&G employees at the
groundbreaking of the River Street Solar Farm.
by SAMANTHA
INZALACo
Holley Center Supervisor
On July 23, members of
the Hackensack Police De-
partment and the Bergen
County Prosecutor’s Of-
fce Special Victims Unit
arrested a 39-year-old em-
ployee at the YCS/Holley
Center in Hackensack for
allegedly sexually abusing
a patient, offcials said.
Authorities zeroed in
on Daniel Blathers, of Pa-
terson, after the victim re-
ported that she was abused
while she was a full-time
patient at the treatment
facility in 2010. Blathers
is employed as a unit su-
pervisor responsible for
checking on the status of
residents. He allegedly en-
gaged in inappropriate sex-
ual activities with the girl.
Following the report,
county investigators and
Hackensack detectives
conducted a month-long
investigation resulting in
Blathers’ arrest. He was
charged with aggravated
criminal sexual contact and
endangering the welfare of
a child.
The Holley Center, lo-
cated on Union Street, of-
fers intensive residential
treatment and is operated
by Youth Consultation Ser-
vices.
Sweeps End Dice Games
On July 15, a total of 13
men were arrested as part
of a gambling sweep in
Hackensack’s city parks.
The Hackensack Police
Department conducted
three separate sweeps as a
response to residents’ com-
plaints about illegal dice
games, according to Lt.
Jaime Barrios.
At Carver Park, offcers
arrested seven men for al-
legedly gambling at rough-
ly 1 p.m. and three others
an hour later. At approxi-
mately 4:45 p.m., police
hit Johnson Park where
they arrested an additional
three men.
The following men were
arrested at Carver Park:
Donald Somerville, 42, of
Teaneck; Donald Bush, 22
of Hackensack; Kahn Cart-
er, 40, of Garfeld; James
Irby, 33, of Rochelle Park;
Kevin Taylor, 34, of Hack-
ensack; Tristan Colquhoun,
19, of Hackensack; Bran-
don Brown, 21, of Pas-
saic; Evedge Moore, 42, of
Hackensack; John Basile,
42, of Hackensack; and
Jeff Mansilla, 37, of Hack-
ensack.
The following men were
arrested at Johnson Park:
Manuel Valderama-Gonza-
lez, 54, homeless; Alvaro
Rincon, 48, of Hackensack;
and John Ferdinand, 23, of
Hackensack. In addition
to gambling, Rincon was
charged with consuming
alcohol in public, and Fer-
dinand was charged with
possession of marijuana.
“At the time of the ar-
rests, we confscated in
total $1,473.28 from the
players,” Barrios said.
The Hackensack Police
Department will continue
to monitor these parks.
Police briefs
August 13-17
9am-noon
Mon
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Fri
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Maligned Prosecutor Fires back
On July 16, Hackensack
Municipal Prosecutor Rich-
ard Salkin fled a civil lawsuit
against Hackensack resident
Steven Gelber for allegedly
spreading false information
about him.
The suit, fled at Superior
Court of Bergen County, is
based on a letter written by
Gelber and distributed to a lo-
cal newspaper plus members
of the Hackensack City Coun-
cil. Gelber wrote that Salkin
“consorted and commiserated
with criminals.” Gelber al-
legedly blames Salkin for his
brother’s resignation from his
job at the Hackensack Board
of Education.
Salkin’s suit accuses Gelber,
a resident of Clinton Place, of
making these statements with
an “evil motive and malice,
with intent to injure, disgrace
and defame plaintiff, with
intent to cause plaintiff emo-
tional distress.” Salkin said
the statements falsely depicted
him as a corrupt public offcial.
“My reputation is my stock
and trade and I need to defend
it when it is inappropriately at-
tacked,” said Salkin.
The complaint further states
that Gelber “negligently, will-
fully, wantonly and recklessly
caused the false information to
be published and distributed.”
“Words have consequences.
People have to understand
that they cannot recklessly
and indiscriminately publish
false, malicious and slander-
ous statement about others,”
said Laura Kirsch, Salkin’s at-
torney.
Salkin is demanding puni-
tive damages and legal fees. It
also requests any further relief
that the court deems equitable
and just.
by kATHLEEN kANE
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On July 26, members,
staff, and volunteers of the
YMCA of Greater Bergen
County in Hackensack
gathered at a wine and
cheese reception in recog-
nition of Keith Zebroski,
vice president of opera-
tions. Zebroski is leaving
the Y to pursue a new ca-
reer opportunity.
Dr. Angel Carrion,
YMCA board member,
thanked Zebroski for his
service to the Y, and Nel-
son Louis, president and
CEO presented him with
a service award. Zebroski
worked at the YMCA for
more than eight years and
held various positions in-
cluding wellness director
and membership director.
A local supermarket do-
nated wraps and cheese
platters and another donat-
ed fruit platters.
For more than 100 years,
the YMCA of Greater Ber-
gen County, located in an
historic building in Hack-
ensack, has been a vital
part of the central Bergen
County community.
Each year, the Hackensack
Regional Chamber of Com-
merce hosts a gala to honor
members of the community.
On Sept. 23, guests are in-
vited to enjoy a night of fne
food and dancing and the
presentation of the chamber’s
Distinguished Citizen of the
Year Awards.
This year’s honorees are
Charlotte Catrillo Sodora,
administrator at CareOne at
Wellington, and Dr. David
Bikoff, a physician and police
surgeon.
Sodora studied social work
at Seton Hall University and
New York University and has
spent the past 25 years serv-
ing the State of New Jersey
at both long-term care facili-
ties and rehabilitation centers.
In the past, Sodora has been
named Citizen of the Year
and CareOne’s Administrator
of the Year and was awarded
CareOne’s Innovation Award
for Employee Relations.
Sodora is a devoted mother
and fundraiser who is always
looking for new ways to
make a contribution.
Bikoff completed his resi-
dency at Kings County Hos-
pital in Brooklyn and current-
ly practices at Hackensack
University Medical Center.
The board-certifed plastic
and reconstructive surgeon
has been recognized by the
HealthGrades Honor Roll. He
has been serving the commu-
nity for more than 35 years.
The gala will take place on
Sept. 23 from 5 to 10 p.m. at
the Stony Hill Inn of Hack-
ensack. For more informa-
tion, tickets or advertising in
the journal, contact Darlene
Damstrom at 201-489-3700.
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Hackensack
Chamber
Hosts Gala
Wine and Cheese, Farewells and Warm Wishes
Photo Courtesy: yMCAof Greater bergen County
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Established in 1923, the
Square Club of Maywood
No. 594, a member of the
National League of Ma-
sonic Clubs, is disbanding.
During the past nearly 90
years, the club has donated
extraordinary generously to
the community. As a fnale
good deed, the Square Club
of Maywood has donated
$10,000 to the Maywood
Public Library toward the
renovation of the lower
level. The renovation will
include refurbishing the
Wolfson Reading Room
and the foyer outside the
Hackbarth Auditorium.
This foyer is where the li-
brary plans a new space for
the archives and oversized
books. Improving and ex-
panding the historical ar-
chives and oversized book
collection is also a consid-
eration.
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Paramus Teen Sings
of Peace
For Victoria Marchlewski,
13, peace is a cause worthy
of singing. A seventh grader
at East Brook Middle School
in Paramus, Victoria was in-
spired by a classroom discus-
sion on poverty and current
world events to write a song
entitled “Help the World.” She
frst composed the melody,
then added the lyrics, which
helped her sort out her feel-
ings about her wish for world
peace.
Music is a passion for her.
She started piano lessons in
frst grade at the Paramus
Community School and has
been studying for about two
years with Lisa Carleo, a mu-
sician and piano instructor in
Maywood. For the past year,
she has also been taking voice
lessons with Barbara Merkle,
a vocalist and voice/acting
coach from Paramus.
Victoria performed “Help
the World” with Michael Car-
leo, David Ricco and Jon Jon
Caparas, members of the band
Break the Atmosphere, at the
Paramus Rotary Peace Pole
celebration on June 10. The
celebration, which was held
in the Rotary Peace Park on
the grounds of the Paramus
Public Library, recognized the
community’s diversity with
music, dance, stories, crafts
and refreshments. Featured in
the park, which is dedicated
to global peace, multi-cultural
understanding and confict
resolution, is the Peace Pole
with the words “May Peace
Prevail on Earth” in seven
languages. There are currently
some 200,000 similar Peace
Poles around the world.
Photo Courtesy: Laura Daly
barbara Merkle, Victoria Marchlewski and Lisa Carleo.
Musician Headed to
Princeton
A recent graduate of
Bergen County Acad-
emies, Dana Ramirez of
South Hackensack was
awarded three signifcant
music awards, totaling
$4,000, during her senior
year. She won frst prize
in the annual competition
sponsored by the Profes-
sional Music Teachers’
Guild of New Jersey. She
also received the Florence
Reinauer Memorial Music
Award for both piano and
violin. Ramirez was also
one of the prize winners in
the Walter Engel Festival
in March. Ramirez is the
daughter of Graciela and
Juan Ramirez and has been
studying both instruments
for 11 years. Ramirez is
headed to Princeton Uni-
versity in September.
Photo Courtesy: Dorothy Schroth
Dana Ramirez
Square Club
Donates $10k
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FOR ALL YOUR BACK
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Photo Courtesy: Maywood Square Club
Photo Courtesy: George Trapp
Maywood boy Scout Troop 1200 recently visited Camp Rodney’s Scout Reservation
North East in Maryland. The camp, located on the Chesapeake bay, offered sailing,
motor boating and Jet Skiing. Scouts enjoyed shot gun shooting, rife shooting, ar-
chery, handicrafts and swimming in the camp pool.
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Photo Courtesy: Howard Acker
The Saints, Zion Maywood Lutheran Church’s co-ed softball team, is now participat-
ing in its ffth season in the bergenfeld-Dumont Church Softball League. Pictured,
front row: Chris Acker, Megan Abrams, Judy Mitchell, Matt Acker and Nolan Woo-
ten; back row, Manager Howard Acker, Mike Poggioli, Assistant Coach Rob Engel-
brecht, John buttterworth, bob bauer, Pete Mitchell, Jeanette Wooten and Glenn
Lindhurst. Not pictured: Jessica Abrams, kaitlin Abrams, Patrick Abrams, Scott Da-
vidson, Jose Granados, brittany Mei and Chelsea Mei.
Saints Ready to Play
Camping on the Chesapeake bay
Photo Courtesy: George Trapp
boy Scout Troop 1200 of Maywood recently visited baltimore’s Inner Harbor where
the members slept aboard the Sloop of War Constellation. The Scouts experienced
the rigors of tasks such as gun drills and more.
baltimore’s Inner Harbor
Girls Rock the National Mall
Photo Courtesy: Vincent Headley
Englewood Girl Scout Troop 4757 visited Washington, D. C. on June 9 as part of the
organization’s Rock the Mall 100
th
anniversary sing-along celebration. The Engle-
wood group joined more than 200,000 girls who gathered on the National Mall for
the world’s largest sing-along. on June 24, the troop hosted a fundraising pool party
at the yMCA of Greater bergen County in Hackensack. The girls are raising money
to travel to Costa Rica next year.
The Aviators Soccer Club’s
U19 girls’ team was founded
just a few years ago and has
already enjoyed some major
successes. The team started
with a core group of girls from
Hasbrouck Heights playing
recreational soccer at age 5. At
frst, the girls played in town
and then in a travel league. As
the years passed and the girls
played together, their love for
soccer intensifed.
The girls expressed a desire
to their coaches to play soccer
year round, to have more prac-
tices and play against highly
competitive teams. The team
joined the Northern Counties
Soccer Association League,
comprised clubs from across
New Jersey and New York.
As the team entered high
school, some of the play-
ers decided to hang up their
cleats. The remaining players
entered competitive play as
a U19 team. The team had a
tough time fnding replace-
ments but eventually found
some girls willing to make the
necessary commitment.
They faced some tough
challenges this year, losing
several key players right be-
fore the season and losing oth-
ers to injuries. Despite these
obstacles the Aviators lost
only three games and fnished
in the top three in the division.
The Aviators are comprised
of several girls who also play
at the varsity high school lev-
el. Some players have been
scouted by college teams,
one received a full four-year
scholarship to play Division 1
college soccer. One girl com-
peted internationally for the
United States at the U18 level.
The current roster is com-
prised of players from all over
the county.
Aviators Team Enjoying Success
Photo Courtesy: Rich Cannici
The Aviators Soccer Club U19 girls’ team.
The Hackensack High
School Italian language
program recently induct-
ed fve students into the
Dante Alighieri Chapter
of the Italian Honor So-
ciety. The induction was
held at Solari’s Restaurant
in Hackensack under the
sponsorship of the Hack-
ensack Chapter of UNICO.
This is the second year
in a row that the Italian-
American service organi-
zation, led by District Gov.
Ralph Contini, has hosted
the event. The Hackensack
chapter has also funded the
AP Italian program at the
high school.
Salley Christie Meier
and John Meier - friends
since their elementary
school days in Hacken-
sack - celebrated 70 years
of marriage on Aug. 1.
It all began in frst grade
when John Meier came
home from school and de-
clared that he was going to
marry Salley Christie when
he grew up. That’s exactly
what he did on Aug. 1,
1942 with fellow classmate
Henry “Count” Von der
Osten as his best man.
John Meier, now 93, is a
World War II veteran who
enlisted in the U.S. Army
Air Force soon after Pearl
Harbor. Two days after
his wedding, Meier was
deployed with the 328
th

Headquarters Squadron,
as an aerial photographer,
to Bovington Field in
England. After three years
of service, John returned
home to Salley Christie
and the rest of his family in
Hackensack on Christmas
Eve 1944. The Meiers now
reside in Quinlan, Texas.
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Italian Honor Society Celebrates
Photo Courtesy: karelia Tejada
Seated, Donald onorato, secretary, Hackensack Chapter of UNICo; Carl Ricca,
president; Michael D’Arminio, past national president; Ralph Contini, district gov-
ernor, UNICo National District VII; Albert Ferrante, frst vice president; and Mi-
chael D’Arminio, Jr., treasurer; and standing, Michael Mariniello Jr., past national
president, with the inductees and Hackensack High School Italian teachers karelia
Tejada and bernardo Petrocelli.
UNICo Supports Children’s
Hospital
Photo Courtesy: Lou Pandolf
Following a very successful year, UNICo’s New Jersey District VII recently donated
$1,035 to the Tomorrows Children’s Fund at the Joseph Sanzari Children’s Hospital
of Hackensack University Medical Center. Pictured: UNICo members Carl Esposi-
to, Jimmy Herd and Celeste Pandolf with kathy Ambrose, administrative director,
Tomorrows Children’s Fund, and NJ VII District Gov. Ralph Contini.
Anna’s Hair Afair
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Hackensack Couple Celebrates
70
th
Anniversary
Photo Courtesy: Salley Christie Meier
Salley Christie and John Meier as students in 1925 at Union Street School in Hackensack.
by SAMANTHA
INZALACo
youth Academy
Graduates 100 Teens
“Honor – Respect – Com-
mitment” is the motto of the
Bergen County Youth Po-
lice Academy, and that was
exactly the focus of the two-
week summertime program
designed for local high stu-
dents.
“It’s meant to be a ju-
nior version of a police
academy,” said Maureen
Parenta, communications
director, Bergen County
Prosecutor’s Offce. “They
don’t just learn about law
enforcement, though. They
learn about life lessons, dis-
cipline, respect and how to
think about the decisions
they make each day.”
A group of 100 cadets
graduated during a ceremo-
ny at Bergen County Acade-
mies in Hackensack on July
20 after training in various
areas of law enforcement.
The cadets reported to the
Bergen County Law and
Public Safety Institute in
Mahwah each day and spent
time shadowing the men
and women of the prosecu-
tor’s offce. They visited the
Crime Scene Investiga-
tion Unit, 9/11 Memorial
at Ground Zero, Intrepid
Museum, and U.S. Military
Academy at West Point.
The cadets also participated
in a mock trial at Superior
Court of Bergen County and
learned about fre safety.
The academy was started
by Prosecutor John Moli-
nelli eight years ago and has
grown signifcantly each
year. Now, due to increased
interest in the program, ca-
dets must apply for the pro-
gram in January. It is funded
through confscated funds
made available through the
prosecutor’s offce
During the two weeks,
each cadet keeps a “cadet
log” to hand in at the end
of his or her session, which
serves as feedback used by
organizers to improve the
program each year.
“I came to this program
because my sister did it last
year and she said I’d really
regret it if I didn’t do it. I’m
glad I did it,” said Monica
Torres of Waldwick.
Photo Courtesy: Sonali basak
Cadets lined up for training drills.
by SoNALI bASAk
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excitingtimes
for hackensack’s upper main alliance
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201-498-1690 visit us at: www.uppermain.org
The YMCA of Greater Ber-
gen County in Hackensack
recently welcomed Ashley
Mallette as its new aquatic
director. Mallette grew up in
Massachusetts where she be-
came a lifeguard and swim in-
structor at the age of 15. She’s
been working at YMCAs ever
since, most recently at the Har-
lem YMCA Aquatic Depart-
ment where she assisted the
aquatic director. Mallette was
also the program manager at
Take Me to The Water in New
York. Mallette may be contact-
ed at 201-487-6600, ext.213 or
amallette@ymcagbc.org.
y Welcomes New Aquatic Director
Photo Courtesy: Julie Morrow
Ashley Mallette
201-880-0076
(FORMERLY AREK OF RIVER EDGE)
Mari’s
MARKET
MEDITERRANEAN SPECIALTIES
NOW OPEN!
331 Main St., Hackensack
FREE No Obligation Hearing Evaluation
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Bob Salvesen, Audioprosthologist
Call for an Appointment
Evening & Saturday Appointments Available
183 Main Street, Hackensack • 201.343.8181
44 N. Central Ave., Ramsey • 201.880.1300
www.bobsalvesen@optonline.net
NJ Lic. Hearing Aid Dispenser # 551 • Board Certifed – Hearing Instrument Sciences
273 Main Street
Hackensack, NJ 07601
Office: 201.530.1400
Fax: 201.621.6900
Marjorie@miller-company.com
Marjorie A. Miller, Broker/Owner
Miller
&Co
Real Estate
Residential ~ Commercial ~ Rentals
www.millerandcorealestate.com
The seventh annual
Hackensack Street Festi-
val, sponsored by the Upper
Main Alliance and the City
of Hackensack, is scheduled
for Saturday, Oct. 6. The
festival will be held along
Main Street, between Atlan-
tic and Passaic streets, from
10 a.m. to 6 p.m.
At last year’s Hackensack
Street Festival, more than
25,000 visitors lined Main
Street to peruse wares dis-
played by more than 250
merchants, entertainment
and food. This year, Larry
Graham, former member of
the iconic band Sly and the
Family Stone and founder
of Graham Central Station,
will be performing. Also,
DJ Kenny Fiesta will be
spinning a mix of every-
body’s favorites.
There will be featured
entertainment, rides for the
children and adults, includ-
ing a dinosaur attraction,
fossil dig, Ferris wheel and
castle bounce. In addition,
there will be a costume
character revue and more.
“Every year, the Hack-
ensack Street Festival gets
more and more exciting,”
said Jerry Lombardo, chair-
man, Upper Main Alliance.
“This year, we are going
to have more attractions,
a plethora of vendors and
some of the best entertain-
ment of any festival in New
Jersey.”
Sponsorship opportuni-
ties available at all levels.
For more information call
the Upper Main Alliance at
201-498-1690 or visit www.
uppermain.org.
Save the Date,
Saturday, oct. 6
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Saturday, October 6, 2012 10 AM to 6 PM
Main Street between Atlantic and Passaic Street. (Rain or Shine)
Larry Graham & Graham Central Station
Sponsorships Available At All Levels Call: 201.498.1690
2012 Street Festival County Seat Ad_Layout 1 8/3/12 10:31 AM Page 1
Ron and Nima Durso, of
Maywood are happy to an-
nounce the birth of their
daughter, Ruhi Susan Dur-
so. Ruhi was born on March
26 at 6:23 a.m. She weighed
6 pounds, 14 ounces and
measured 20 inches long.
Ruhi joins her two-year-old
big brother, Zachery. Her
excited grandparents include
Ron and Claire Durso, of
Maywood, and Fred and Su-
san Abrary, of West Caldwell.
The Hackensack Volunteer
Ambulance Corps success-
fully executed the onboard
delivery of a healthy baby
boy on June 20.
Early that morning, emer-
gency medical technicians
were dispatched to a child-
birth emergency. Upon ar-
rival at the home, EMTs met
Blanca Rodriguez, who was
at full-term pregnancy, and
her husband, Tito Lema, who
said his wife’s water had bro-
ken. EMTs placed Rodriguez
into the ambulance and com-
pleted an assessment, which
revealed signifcant crown-
ing. Within 10 minutes, EMT
Claudia Moran delivered and
treated the baby, later named
Randy Sebastian Lema. EMT
Brian Doughty completed an
APGAR assessment of the
child while EMT Brendan
Tracey transported the fam-
ily to Hackensack University
Medical Center.
For Moran, of Lyndhurst,
this was her second OB/
GYN emergency and frst
delivery since obtaining her
EMT certifcation in June
2011.
“This experience was ab-
solutely amazing,” she said.
“To be entrusted by God for
such a signifcant miracle is a
blessing all in its own. I feel
so honored to have delivered
such a healthy and beautiful
baby boy.”
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baby Randy onboard
Photo Courtesy: Rory Sutherland
Anayelly Lema (sister), Claudia Moran and Randy Sebas-
tian Lema.
Rosemarie Sorce and a
group of her friends vis-
ited Hackensack University
Medical Center on June 28
to celebrate the Fourth of
July holiday with children at
the Joseph M. Sanzari Chil-
dren’s Hospital as well as
the elderly patients. The vol-
unteers distributed coloring
books, crayons, puzzles and
Sudoku books to these pa-
tients as well as those in the
emergency room and pre-op/
surgery and admissions.
Sherma Andrews, a pro-
fessional singer, led the
group in a performance of
patriotic music. “The pa-
tients gladly joined in,” said
Sorce. “It was a very reward-
ing experience for all con-
cerned.”
Sorce and her group visit
HackensackUMC patients
fve times a year - Hallow-
een, Christmas, St. Patrick’s
Day, Easter and the Fourth
of July. They always bring
gifts and sing songs of the
season.
Photo Courtesy: Rosemarie Sorce
Pasqualina bikoff, Peter Vallas, Sherma Andrews,
Rosemarie Sorce and Cono Spinelli as Captain Amer-
ica.
Patriotic Hospital Volunteers
Spread Joy
Welcome Ruhi Durso
Photo Courtesy: Ron Durso
Ruhi Durso
Columbus Parade Plans Underway
Plans for the ffth annual
Columbus Day Parade of
North Jersey are in full swing.
The parade will take place at
noon on Sunday, Sept. 30 and
wind its way through Hack-
ensack, ending with a festival
outside the Bergen County
Court House.
“I am so excited to be
marking our ffth anniversary
for the parade,” said Lauren
Zisa Samulka, a parade com-
mittee member and lead or-
ganizer. “We will once again
showcase the diversity and
the uniqueness of Hackensack
and our surrounding areas.”
As in past years, the parade
will feature marching bands,
both high school and profes-
sional, from across New Jer-
sey playing their various styles
of music through the streets of
Hackensack. Student organi-
zations and recreational teams
will lineup as well as police
and fre departments. Musi-
cal groups and dance troupes
will also bring the traditional
sounds and dances from parts
around the world.
Vendors are invited to at-
tend. The registration fee of
$75 is due by Sept. 14, and
checks should be made pay-
able to the Columbus Day
Parade of North Jersey. Late
vendor registrations will carry
a fee of $125. All vendors
must be set up by 11 a.m.
on the parade day. Anyone
selling food must apply for
permits with the Hackensack
Health Department prior to
the event and must follow all
city rules and regulations. No
alcohol is permitted. Although
non-drinking water and elec-
tricity is available, vendors
must supply their own equip-
ment such as tables and exten-
sion cords.
Anyone interested in par-
ticipating, exhibiting or
volunteering should visit
www.columbusdayparadeof-
northjersey.org or call 201-
488-5795.
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The Learning Experience
in Hackensack opened its
Academy of Early Educa-
tion on Oct. 5, 2011 and has
raised the bar as a premier
preschool and early child-
hood academic center for
families who live and work
in Hackensack and the sur-
rounding communities.
TLE provides an ex-
tremely safe and clean en-
vironment for children aged
6 weeks to 6 years old and
helps them prepare for suc-
cess in kindergarten and el-
ementary school, developing
children intellectually, social-
ly and physically. The center
is located at 30 Woodridge
Ave., at University Plaza, just
off River Road, across from
Target, and adjacent to the
Fairleigh Dickinson Univer-
sity campus.
ownership and Staff
The Learning Experience
is owned by Christine and
Michael Pane, lifelong resi-
dents of Bergen County and
parents of three boys.
“Our dream was to bring
high quality education and
care to children that benefts
our friends and neighbors.
Our anticipated enrollment
for the September 2012
school year is already over
100 students and classrooms
are flling up,” said Christine
Pane. “We could not be more
proud of our teachers and
educational staff. Every day,
our staff demonstrates our
strong commitment to our
students by educating them
with TLE’s proprietary cur-
riculum in our safe state-of-
the-art facility.”
The Panes knew that they
needed a strong educational
management team to sup-
plement their combined 35
years of business experience
and passion for education.
Monica Mustacchio, center
director, and Stacy Ramos,
assistant center director,
manage the educational cur-
riculum for the children and
staff. Combined, Mustacchio
and Ramos bring more than
25 years of training and ex-
perience in education and re-
lated felds. Their education
includes a Master in Early
Childhood and Elementary
Education, a Bachelor of Arts
in Psychology and a Bach-
elor of Science in Speech
Language Therapy and Audi-
ology. In addition, they have
held positions at several pres-
tigious childcare ce nters.
“Our staff is comprised
of the most loving, caring
and fun women you will
ever meet,” said Mustacchio.
“They each bring a unique
special quality to our center
with various training and
education, including college
degrees, previous early child-
hood experience, young cre-
ative minds, motherly love
and lots of charm. Our staff
works diligently to offer a
stimulating experience to
each and every student at our
center.”
Curriculum
TLE teaches children
through a proprietary curric-
ulum called L.E.A.P. - Learn-
ing Experience Academic
Program. All children partici-
pate in a variety of programs
that stimulate the mind and
body. TLE’s specialized en-
richment programs, which
are part of the tuition, in-
clude Sign Language, Fun
With Phonics, Yippee-4-
Yoga, Marvelous Math, Tal-
ent Sprouts, Dancing Feet,
Suddenly Science, Music 4
Me and Movin’n Grovin’.
TLE also has an indoor play-
ground, Make Believe Bou-
levard, which is a great way
for children to learn social-
ization skills.
State-of-the-Art Facility
Classes are taught in a safe,
clean, colorful and inviting
environment. Entrances to
the TLE center are locked at
all times, and the emergency
exit doors can only be opened
from inside. A sophisticated
computer system is used at
the main entrance to ensure
only staff and parents of en-
rolled children can enter the
center. Additionally, all class-
rooms are equipped with vid-
eo monitoring systems.
The Learning Experience
of Hackensack believes in
providing the tools and en-
vironment that will allow
children every opportunity
to develop to their greatest
potential at their own pace.
The Learning Experience
is not just a daycare facility,
but also a complete academic
childcare center and pre-
school with a dynamic and
fun environment.
Visit and Take a Tour
The center is open from
6:30 a.m. to 6:30 p.m., Mon-
day through Friday. Inter-
ested parents are urged to
register their child prior to
September to secure a posi-
tion for the upcoming school
year.
“We pride ourselves on
making our center a home
away from home for each
of our cherished students,”
said Ramos. “Please stop in
for a tour to meet our warm,
dedicated and talented staff
and learn about our fabulous
programs and our extra spe-
cial events that make TLE
Hackensack unique and ir-
resistible!”
For additional information
or to register, call 201-546-
8304, or visit hackensack.
tlechildcare.com.
The Learning Experience Center
Raises the Educational bar
Academy of Early Education
Academy of Early Education
Academy of Early Education
Academy of Early Education
Enroll Today
to receive
your child’s tuition.
25% OFF
MUST REGISTER BY SEPTEMBER 12, 2012 AND PRESENT
THIS AD. DISCOUNT GOOD FOR 25% OFF OF ONE MONTH
OF TUITION AFTER THE FIRST FULL MONTH OF CONTINUOUS
ENROLLMENT. NOT REDEEMABLE FOR CASH. DISCOUNT
CANNOT BE COMBINED WITH ANY OTHER OFFERS.
hackensack.tlechildcare.com
Hackensack, NJ • 30 Woodridge Avenue
201-546-8304
At The Learning Experience®, we build a strong foundation for each
child to grow emotionally, socially and cognitively at his/her own pace.
Nearly 90% of children graduate preschool reading at a Kindergarten
or greater level thanks to TLE's cutting·edge proprietary curriculum.
Visit our center to learn more about our innovative programs for
children six weeks to six years old.
DISCOVER OUR ....
• Dynamically Fun L.E.A.P.®
curriculum - Including Sign
Language and Technology
• New and Exciting Spanish
Language Program - L.E.A.P.®
into Spanish
• Interactive Early Reading Program -
Fun With Phonics®
Photo Courtesy: Gabriela Trias
Stacy Ramos, Christine Pane, Michael Pane and Mon-
ica Mustacchio.
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Aggressive attorneys defending
your legal rights

• Divorce
• Child Custody
• Child Support
• Domestic Violence
• Complex Property Division
• Post Judgment Modifcation
• and more
You never have to fght
for your rights alone
201.342.1103
77 Hudson Street, Hackensack NJ 07601
ZISA
HITSCHERICH
&
Attorneys At LAw
Se Habla Español
Joseph C. Zisa, Jr.
Hackensack City Attorney
Robert J. Hitscherich
Craig M. Pogosky
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FREE OUTDOOR CONCERT
Presented By Hartz Mountain and the Town of Secaucus
Free face painting and balloons for kids!
JIMMY
AND THE
PARROTS
Performing songs by Jimmy Buffett, the Beach Boys, Paul Simon, Harry Belafonte, Bob Marley, and many others.
Thursday, September 6
:
7:00pm - 8:30pm
Harmon Meadow Plaza Courtyard (near Houlihan’s), Secaucus, NJ
Harmon Meadow
700 Plaza Drive I Secaucus, New Jersey
Shops, Services, Hotels, Restaurants & Kerasotes ShowPlace 14 Theatres I www.kerasotes.com I NJ Transit 973.275.5555 I www.njtransit.com
All events are subject to change. Please call 201.348.4780 for schedule updates and rain dates. Visit our website for directions: www.harmonmeadow.com
Route 3 West Service Rd. to Harmon Meadow Blvd Exit. Route 3 East Service Rd. to Harmon Meadow Blvd Exit. NJ Turnpike to Exit 16E or 17 straight into Harmon Meadow.
shop. dine. play. stay. 7 days a week.
The annual Hackensack
Summer Concert Series is
in full swing and has already
featured some local artists
performing live at the his-
toric Court House Green.
On July 10, The Hitmen,
always a crowd favorite, en-
tertained hundreds of music
lovers who traveled from all
parts of Bergen County to
gather on the lawn and enjoy
the timeless sounds. Three
of the band’s six members
played with Frankie Valli and
the Four Seasons in the 60s,
70s and 80s. The bandmates
have also played with Carly
Simon, The Critters, Tommy
James and the Shondells, Cat
Stevens, and Elton John,
It was the sounds of these
accomplished artists’ music
that flled the Green with the
sounds of yesteryear in a spe-
cial tribute performed by The
Hitmen. Some hits included
“Oh What a Night,” “Who
Loves You” and “Can’t Take
My Eyes off of You” and the
always popular “Sherry.”
On July 17, The Happen-
ings featuring Bob Miranda
played some classic tunes
such as “See You In Septem-
ber,” “Go Away Little Girl”
and “I Got Rhythm.”
The concert on July 24
featured Ray Sepúlveda and
Hhis Orchestra who have
been inspiring young Latin
singers and musicians since
the 1970s.
The 70s Project appeared
on July 31, rounding out a
trip through memory lane in
Hackensack.
On Aug. 7, the fnal con-
cert of the season will feature
Fillet of Soul, a band with
ties to Hackensack High
School. The evening will
be held in conjunction with
National Night Out Against
Crime hosted by the Hack-
ensack Police Department.
The event celebrates the
freedom gained by Colombia
from Spain on July 20, 1810.
Hackensack’s is only one of
fve organized Colombian
Independence Day festivals
annually staged in the United
States, Salcedo said.
For the past decade, Café
y Orquidea, a children’s Co-
lombian dance troupe, has
been performing at the festi-
val. The group was founded
by Betty Rodriguez.
“This year, we had only
two weeks of dance practice
due to a program change,”
said Rodriguez, “but typi-
cally we practice for much
longer. We had to improvise
and they still pulled it off.”
Many festival-goers were
decked out in Colombia-
themed jerseys and colors to
support their country.
This year was the frst time
Marlene Abreu brought her
family to the festival.
“I’m not Colombian but I
come here to enjoy and see
something more diverse and
cultured. It’s pretty cool and
very family oriented, I like
it. I’m always up for a good
festival.”
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JOIN
US
YMCA of Greater Bergen County
360 Main Street, Hackensack, NJ 07601
201-487-6600, www.ymcagbc.org
Register the week of August 19
Art, Dance, Sports, Wellness, Swim

Smooth Sounds Serenade Concert-Goers
Photos Courtesy: Gail Vachon and Jesse D’Amore
The Hit Men - Lee Shapiro, Gerry Polci, Don Ciccone,
Jimmy Ryan, Larry Gates and Russ Velazquez.
The Happenings - George Rizzi, bob Miranda, bob
Payne on Drums and bob kulick.
Ray Sepúlveda and his orchestra.
The 70s Project
Colombian Pride on Display
Continued from Page 1
Luis Perez cooking carne a la llanera.
Stephania bermeo and kevin Ramos performed.
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AT THE LIbRARIES
JoHNSoN LIbRARy
LIbRARy CLoSED
GALLERy AND CASES: Display
cases: “Souvenirs From My Homeland
of Turkey” by G. Barbara Ocal. Gallery
“The Color and Fantasy of Colombia”
Monica A. Chavarria Piedrahita.
FRIDAy AFTERNooN AT THE
MoVIES Aug. 24 at 1:30 p.m. Call
the library for flm information.
book DISCUSSIoN GRoUP Aug.
18 at 10 a.m. at Java’s Brewin’. Book
Swap with members only. Call 201-
343-4781.
LEARN To PLAy THE GUITAR
Sept. 8 – Nov. 3, no class on Oct. 6.
Saturdays from 10 – 11 a.m. Concert
on Nov. 10 at 2:30 p.m. Children 8 – 18
welcome to register. Must participate
all 8-weeks and material fee of $50
required. Hackensack residents only.
PRESCHooLSToRyHoURS
For ages 3 and up on Wednesdays and
Thursdays at 10 a.m. Pre-registration
required.
MoTHER GooSE TIME for
children under 3 on Wednesdays and
Thursdays at 11:15 a.m.
SUPREME STARGAZERS
Tuesdays at 2:30 p.m. and Thursdays
at 2 p.m.
JUNIoR DREAMERS Tuesdays at
1:15 p.m.
ARTS AND CRAFTS Mondays at 2
and 3 p.m. and Tuesdays at 10 a.m.
bEADy bUDDIES Fridays at 10 a.m.
SLEEPy TIME TALES Aug 20 at
7 p.m.
“THE PLAy’S THE THING”
DRAMAWoRkSHoP Thursdays
beginning Aug. 9 at 3:30 p.m.
MAGICALMySTERy kITCHEN
Aug. 13 at 10 a.m.
WEDNESDAy AFTERNooN AT
THE MoVIES at 2:30 p.m.
book bINGo Fridays at 2:30 p.m.
DREAM bIG – READ Summer
Reading Program Through Aug. 28.
Pick up your 2012 Summer Reading
Brochure for preschool through
sixth grade. Programs include prizes,
certifcates, books, treasure chest
goodies. Story hours, toddler programs,
reading clubs, and more.
TEEN TUESDAyS AT JPL Open to
students in grades 7 – 12 only. Come
in! Sign up! Volunteer to become a
book buddy. Join “Talk it Up” for
grades 7-12 Week 5 reading Elsewhere
by Gabrielle Zevin and Week 6
reading After Ever After by Jordan
Sonnenblick. Tuesdays from 4-5 p.m.
Amazing Summer Events: Trivia day
Aug. 7, 2:30 – 4 p.m. Cooking Class,
Aug. 10, 2:30 – 4 p.m.; Game Day:
Dance Central, Aug. 14, 2:30 – 4
p.m.; Arts and Crafts: Dream Pillows
and Monster Bookmarks, Aug. 17,
2:30 – 4 p.m.; Summer Reading Teen
Party, Aug. 21, 2 – 4 p.m. Pick up
your Young Adult Summer Reading
Brochure. Bring your library card and/
or permission slip for Internet access.
LEARN ENGLISH oR SPANISH
USING RoSETTASToNE for
Hackensack residents only. Ages 14
and up. By appointment only. Call 201-
343-4169 ext. 34 or e-mail michelle.
acosta@bccls.org.
FREEGAL, FREADING AND
VIDEo GAMES offers free music,
free new e-books and video games
available from Hackensack.bccls.org.
Contact Catherine Folk-Pushee for
complete information.
Museum passes are back! For the
Children’s Museum of Manhattan and
the Intrepid Museum. These are free to
Hackensack residents and families with
a valid adult Johnson Library Card and
a deposit for the pass.
Library Hours: Adult: Monday
- Thursday from 9 a.m. – 9 p.m.
Friday and Saturday from 9
a.m. – 5 p.m. Junior Department:
Monday – Tuesday 9 a.m. – 9 p.m.
Wednesday - Thursday 9 a.m. – 6
p.m. Friday and Saturday 9 a.m. – 5
p.m. Registration is required for all
special programs. Facebook.com/
JohnsonPublicLibrary. Call 201-
343-4169 ext. 14 or visit Hackensack.
bccls.org.
MAyWooD LIbRARy
EXHIbITS: Bill Cantor’s photos of
his world travels through Aug. 30.
Paula Cantor soft watercolors through
Aug. 30. Maywood Avenue School art
exhibit outside the children’s room.
Victorian Fans by Norma Boorstein.
Flower Pressing by Maywood Girl
Scout Troop 825.
PIANo STyLES oF SHELLy
HoRN Aug. 14 from 6:30 – 7:45 p.m.
All ages are encouraged to come.
GIFT Abook FUNDRAISER
dedicate and donate a Children’s/
Young Adult book or books. All books
are $5. Each patron will be allowed
and is encouraged to write a dedication
page that will be included in the book.
FAX 24 Public service fax machine is
located in the lobby and accepts debit
and check cards: Visa, Master Card,
Amex and Discover. $1.50/frst page,
$1/ each additional to USA, Canada
and Caribbean. International rates:
$4.95/frst page, $3.45/additional
pages.
iPADS available for checkout to
Maywood residents with valid library
card.
yoGASATURDAyS Aug. 18, 25.
Free one-hour beginner classes for ages
16 and older on Saturdays at 10:30 a.m.
Registration required.
ADULT book CLUb second Friday
of the month at 11 a.m. Aug. 10 with
A Tree Grows in Brooklyn. Book title,
schedule and registration available at
the front desk. Book club is lead by
Louise Feulner.
CIRCLE TIME on Tuesdays from 2 –
2:45 p.m. Free program for Maywood
residents. All ages welcome.
oUTDooR CIRCLE TIME
Thursdays from 10:30 – 11:15 a.m.
bring lawn chair or blanket. Lemonade
will be served.
SUMMER READING PRoGRAM
registration at the front desk. Listeners
ages newborn to 6; Page Turners
ages 7 – 13 or Book Bunch ages 14
– 18. Reading, weekly programs and
activities plus chances to win fabulous
prizes. through – August 31. End of
Summer Reading Party Aug. 31 from
12:30 – 2:30 p.m. with a Sand Art Craft
and a show with Dolly and Lickerish
as they perform, “Dream Big and
Read Show.” Balloon sculpting and
face painting and more. Pizza and ice
cream. Register at the front desk. Party
for Listeners, Book Bunch and Page
Turners.
CGI ANIMATED MoVIES AT
THE LIbRARy Mondays at 3 p.m.
Free popcorn will be served. Aug. 6,
“Planet 51” Aug. 13, “Ratatouille.”
Aug. 20, “Wall-E.” Aug. 27, “Over the
Hedge.”
FINGERPAINT bUSy bEES
CRAFT for the Listeners Club on Aug.
16 at 2 p.m.
DESIGN yoUR oWN bIRD
FEEDER for the Listeners Club on
Aug. 19 at 2 p.m.
WANTED: Singers trainees between
9 – 18 for Hansel and Gretel
opera. The Kaliope Music Society is
looking for children for the upcoming
performance on Sept. 22. Lessons
start at the library on Aug. 11. Sign
up at the front desk or e-mail Jenna at
maywoodlibrary@gmail.com.
LoRD oF THE RINGS TRILoGy
all-day movie viewing from 9 a.m. – 9
p.m. Date TBA.
MAyWooD LoCALHISToRy
RooM By appointment only; for
group tours call Carol Dass at 201-845-
8830 or visit maywoodhistory.com.
Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday
from 10 a.m. – 8 p.m. Thursday and
Friday from 10 a.m. – 5:30 p.m.
Saturday from 10 a.m. – 4:30 p.m.
and Sunday from 1:30 – 4:30 p.m.
Call 201-845-2915.
PARAMUS LIbRARy
ACTIVITIES open to Paramus
residents only.
SToRyTIMES: for Paramus residents
at Main Branch: Baby Lapsit for 0 –
12 months with caregiver, Tuesdays
at 9:30 a.m. Little Bookworms for
walkers-18 months with caregiver
Thursdays at 10:45 a.m. Teeny Time
for ages 12 – 24 months with caregiver,
Wednesdays and Thursdays at 9:45
a.m. Tell Me a Story for ages 2 – 3.5
with caregiver on Tuesdays at 10 a.m.
and Wednesdays at 11 a.m. Picture
Book Parade for ages 3.5 – 5 on
Tuesdays at 11 a.m. and Thursdays at
1:15. Reid Branch: Tell Me a Story
for ages 2 – 3.5 with caregiver on
Tuesdays or Thursdays at 10:30 a.m.
Picture Book Parade for ages 3.5 – 5
on Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays
at four different times. Registration
required on all.
Main Library at 116 E. Century Rd.
Monday – Thursday, 9:30 a.m. – 9
p.m. - Friday and Saturday, 9:30
a.m. – 5 p.m. and Sunday 1 – 5 p.m.
The Reid branch at 239 W. Midland
Ave. Monday – 1 – 9 p.m. Tuesday
- Friday, 10 a.m. – 6 p.m. Call 201-
599-1300 or visit paramuslibrary.
org.
AT FLAT RoCk bRook
NATURE CENTER
5k Run for the Wild at 1-Mile
Family Walk Aug. 19 at 8:30 a.m.
Flat Rock is located off Route 4 at
443 Van Nostrand Ave., Englewood.
Call 201-567-1265 or visit
fatrockbrook.org.
ARTS AND ENTERTAINMENT
Aug 7. HACkENSACk
National Night out with Fillet
of Soul performing on the Court
House Green courtesy of the City of
Hackensack and Hackensack Police
Department at 7:30 p.m. Bring chairs
and blankets. Visit Hackensack.org.
Aug. 7 PARAMUS
National Night out with The Hit
Men as part of Berkley College Terrifc
Tuesdays Summer Concert Series
presented by the Paramus Cultural Arts
Council at the Paramus Band Shell,
behind the main library at 7:30 p.m.
National Night Out starts at 5 p.m. Call
201-599-2787.
Aug. 8 PALISADES PARk
Summer Concert Series with
Palisades “Swing” Park big band from
7 – 9 p.m. on the municipal walk, 275
Broad Ave. Free refreshments, open to
the public. Chairs available. Call 201-
585-4100.
Aug. 8, 15 HACkENSACk
Cardenio presented by the Hudson
Shakespeare Company and the City of
Hackensack at Staib Park, 459 Davis
Ave., at 7:30 p.m. Bring a chair or
blanket. Call 973-449-7443 or visit
hudsonshakespeare.homestead.com.
Aug. 17 ENGLEWooD
Mickey Hart at the bergenPAC Center,
38 N. Van Brunt St. Call 201-227-1030
or bergenpac.org.
Aug. 18 HACkENSACk
Show of Champions starring Johnny
Wier at Ice House, 111 Midtown
Bridge Rd. at 1 p.m. Tickets $25, or
$50/star reception. Call 201-487-8444
ext. 210.
Sept. 14 ENGLEWooD
.38 Special at the bergenPAC Center,
38 N. Van Brunt St. Call 201-227-1030
or bergenpac.org.
Sept. 28 – 30 FAIR LAWN
Cabaret presented by Skyline Theatre
Company at the George Frey Center for
the Arts at the Fair Lawn Community
Center. $28/adults, $20/seniors, $18/
students. Call 800-474-1299 or visit
skylinetheatrecompany.org.
bUSINESS AND NETWoRkING
Every Thursday HACKENSACK
Hackensack Rotary Club meets at
Rudy’s, 107 Anderson St. Thursdays
at 12:15 p.m. Focus on community
service and information through
weekly programs. Contact Amanda
Missey, membership chairwoman
at 201-281-8587 or amissey@
bergenvolutneers.org.
Every Thursday MAyWooD
Maywood Rotary Club meets at
Maywood Inn for lunch on Thursdays.
Oct. 3, 58
th
Annual Len Rubin Golf
Outing at Spook Rock Golf Club, call
201-845-6993. Call 201-843-8763.
HACkENSACk
Regional Chamber of Commerce
Events Sept. 23, Chamber Gala. Sept.
27, Bergen Fest 2012 Party Expo
presented by Bergen Health and Life
at the Sheraton Mahwah Hotel from
5 – 9 p.m. 201-489-3700 or visit
hackensackchamber.org.
MEADoWLANDS
Meadowlands Regional Chamber
events Aug. 16, monthly membership
meeting, 8 a.m. Bring a guest. Aug.
23, ELN Bowling for a Cause at
Wallington Lanes from 5:30 – 8 p.m.
Sept. 13, Transportation Summit. Sept.
16, Spectrum for Living Northerly
NJ Walk. Oct. 11, International
Symposium. Oct. 19, Awards Gala.
Oct. 29, ELN’s Mini Golf Outing
in Paramus from 3:30 – 5:30 p.m.
with reception to follow from 6 – 8
p.m. Oct. 30, Mdest 2012. Visit
meadowlands.org.
CIANJ
Commerce and Industry Association
of NJ events: Aug. 13, eighth annual
EBC Golf Outing, Knob Hill Golf
Club, Manalapan. Oct. 26, 85
th
annual
luncheon, Hilton Woodcliff Lake. Nov.
6, PENPAC Election Night Beefsteak
Dinner, The Brownstone, Paterson.
CLASSES FoR ADULTS AND
CHILDREN
Mondays HACkENSACk
Citizenship Classes at the Johnson
Library from 10 – 11 a.m. Call 201-
343-4169 ext. 21.
HACkENSACk
Internet Classes offered by the
Johnson Public Library. Hackensack
residents only. Call for details. 201-
343-4781.
Thursdays HACkENSACk
Argentine Tango Classes Thursdays
from 8:30 – 10 p.m. at Center for
Modern Dance Education, 84 Euclid
Ave. $20/person. Call 201-444-2249 or
visit 2fortango.org.
Saturdays TEANECk
Salsa Aerobic Dance Classes with
dancer/choreographer Donay at
ClubFit, 444 Cedar Lane, from noon
– 1 p.m. For men and women, no
partners required. $10/person. Call
201-894-0138.
Fourth Sunday MAyWooD
Square Dancing presented by
Maywood Recreation and FAD (Fun at
Dancing) held at the Maywood Senior
Recreation Center from 7:30 – 9:30
p.m. Free. Children frst grade and
older may attend with an adult. First
and third Thursday at 7:30 p.m. Call
Jim at 201-712-1853 squaredance2@
yahoo.com.
oct. 15 – 29 PARAMUS
Learn to Make your own Weather
Forecast three sessions with Dr. Bill
Evans, senior meteorologist, WABC-
TV offered by Bergen Community
College from 6 – 8 p.m. Call 201-447-
7488.
LECTURES AND INFoRMATIoN
Aug. 12 PARAMUS
blood Drive sponsored by Community
Blood Services at 970 Linwood Ave
West from 8 a.m. - 2 p.m. Get an Easy-
Fold Chair as a thank you for donating
blood. Call 201-705-1617.
oct. 19 PARAMUS
Mary Higgins Clark “Unlocking
the Mysteries Within” presented by
the Women’s Institute Fourth Annual
Conference at Bergen Community
College, Moses Center TEC 128 from
8 a.m. – 2 p.m. Call 201-447-7488 or
visit bccwomensconference2012.
oRGANIZATIoNS
Third Sunday RoCHELLE PARk
Pancake breakfast starting Sept. 16
from 8 – 11a.m. Sponsored by the
American Legion Post 170, 33 W.
Passaic St. $4/adults, under 10/free.
Oct. 21 sell items at the Breakfast and
Flea Market from 8 – 1 p.m. Tables $15
by calling 201-843-9683. Call 201-
843-9683 or visit alpost170.us.
Thursday TEANECk
Teaneck Farmer’s Market from noon
– 6 p.m. Weather permitting. Held at
the Cedar Lane municipal parking lot,
corner of Garrison Ave and Beverly
Rd.
Wednesdays through Sept 26
PARAMUS
Farmer’s Market presented by
Paramus Environmental Commission
at Petruska Park, 475 Farview Ave.
from 3-7 p.m. call 201-265-2100 ext.
898.
Aug. 8 GARFIELD
Cocktail Reception with the 200 Club
of Bergen and 200 Club of Passaic
County at the Venetian, 546 River
Drive, at 6 p.m. Call 201-229-0600 or
visit 200club.org.
Aug. 12 TEANECk
Town Wide Garage Sale from 8
a.m. – 8 p.m. with rain date on Aug.
19. Call 201-837-1600 ext. 1003 for
sign-up information or visit teanecknj.
gov/residents. Alist of participating
residents will be available to the public
on the township’s Web site.
Aug. 18 RoCHELLE PARk
Car Wash Fundraiser presented by
the American Legion Post 170 Riders
from 10 a.m. – 3 p.m. for the American
Legion Legacy Scholarship Fund.
Held at 33 West Passaic Street. Visit
webmaster@alpost170.us.
Sept. 8 MAyWooD
Holiday Market presented by Our
Lady Queen of Peace Church, 400
Maywood Ave., from 9 a.m. – 3 p.m.
Vendors wanted for both handmade
items and regular merchandise,
including crafters, local organizations
and businesses. Visit olqpmaywood.
org or e-mail olqpholidaymarket@
gmail.com.
Sept. 8 RoCHELLE PARk
Annual picnic presented by the
Rochelle Park American Legion Post
1710 at 33 West Passaic St. from 12 – 5
p.m. Food, fun, live entertainment and
more. Open to the public. $30 with
food and beer, $25/food/soda. $10/
children 10 and up. Under 10/free. Call
201-843-9683.
Sept. 20 HAMbURG
13
th
Annual Golf Tournament
presented by CBHCare at Ballyowen.
Call 201-775-6300 or visit CBHCare.
com. Sponsorships available.
Sept. 23 PARAMUS
Walk/Run for Hope presented by
CancerCare, at Bergen Community
College with registration beginning at
7:30 a.m. and walk/run at 9 a.m. Cost
for participants 13 and up is $35, $10/
children 12 and under. Pre-registration
suggested. Visit cancercare.org/walknj.
Sept. 24 PARAMUS
Felician College Golf Classic held
at Arcola Country Club in Paramus.
Registration at 11 a.m. Shotgun tee off
at 1 p.m. Cocktail reception and awards
dinner at 6:30 p.m. $550. Sponsorships
and ad journal available. Call 201-355-
1304 or visit felician.edu.
oct. 11 GARFIELD
Salute to Community Service
Awards Dinner presented by the Boys
and Girls Club of Lodi/Hackensack at
the Venetian, 546 River Dr. from 6 – 11
p.m. Visit bgcofodi.org for complete
list of honorees. 973-473-7410.
oct. 19 MAyWooD
Tricky Tray presented by Our Lady
Queen of Peace, 400 Maywood Ave.
Donations will be accepted until Oct. 1.
Please call Joyce Capitanello at 201-
880-5011 to arrange pick-up of your
donation or mail it to the church.
oct. 25 GARFIELD
Retirement Party for Det. kenneth
J. Martin presented by his friends
and family at the Venetian, 546 River
Dr. from 6 – 11 p.m. $60. Deadline
for tickets is Oct. 15. Make checks
payable to Julio Morel, 26 Ridge Rd.
Hawthorne, NJ 07506.Call 201-646-
7732.
RECREATIoN AND CAMPS
Tuesdays MAyWooD
Mah Jongg for new or experienced
players offered by Maywood
Recreation at the Maywood Recreation
Center on Tuesdays from 1 – 3 p.m.
Call 201-845-2900 ext. 208.
August HACkENSACk
Flag Football offered by the
Hackensack Jr. Comets for ages 6-12
with registration at the Hackensack
Recreation Center, 116 Holt St. $50.
Register Monday through Friday from
9 a.m. – 4 p.m. call 201-646-8042.
August HACkENSACk
Hackensack Junior Football offered
by the Hackensack Jr. Comets for
ages 7-14 with registration at the
Hackensack Recreation Center, 116
Holt St. $50. Register Monday through
Friday from 9 a.m. – 4 p.m. call 201-
646-8042.
Aug. 8 – 17, 20 – 24 HACkENSACk
Summer Skate Camps offered by
Ice House, 111 Midtown Bridge Rd.
mornings. For times, cost and details
call 201-487-8444 ext. 210.
Aug. 10 HACkENSACk
Parent’s Night out sponsored by the
Continued on Page 21
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Photo Courtesy: Hackensack High School
on May 2, Hackensack High School’s music depart-
ment presented its annual spring concert. The con-
cert band began the show with fve pieces including
John Philip Sousa’s “The Thunderer” and music
from the movie “Pirates of the Caribbean.” The
mixed chorus followed, singing a variety of selections
in English, Greek and Hebrew. The jazz band, which
played fve jazz standards including “25 or 6 to 4,”
which was arranged for the group by Mike MacVicar,
instrumental music teacher, closed the show. The con-
cert and jazz bands are led by Lisa MacVicar, and
the mixed chorus is led by Julie Platte. Following the
success of the spring concert, both the jazz band and
the mixed chorus participated in the bergen Coun-
ty Teen Arts Festival at bergen Community College
on May 18. The concert band and mixed chorus will
perform during the high school’s commencement cer-
emony on June 26.
Photo Courtesy: Cynthia ortiz
Jennifer Cece-bellon and Cathy Schmidt of
Peace4Paws visited the Ani-Pals Club of Hackensack
High School on May 21. Cece-bellon spoke about ani-
mals used in research for cosmetic and personal care
products, and the students met Puddy, a beagle res-
cued after being used in laboratory research for years.
Ani-Pals members learned of these animals’ plight and
the need to fnd homes for them after their research
time is done as they would otherwise be destroyed.
Most of these animals are adoptable and make great
pets. They just require some socialization and tender
loving care. Ani-Pals members learned that they can
help reduce animal research by buying products not
tested on animals and supporting companies that do
not use animal-tested ingredients.
Ani-Pals Support
Lab Animals
Making Music Together
Photo Courtesy: Marybeth berndt
The Hackensack High School Art Department, led by teach-
ers Marybeth Berndt and Sonya Kypreos, participated in a
variety of art exhibits and contests this past school year. For
the frst time, students were invited to exhibit works at
a Black History Month celebration at the Bergen County
Court House. Students attended the opening reception and
were presented with certifcates. Students also partici-
pated in the Hackensack Art Club Spring Show in April.
Two students, Brian Cole and William Valentin, received
frst place awards in their category. Two student artists
submitted pieces for a Congressional art contest. Their
artwork was chosen to be exhibited at a special gallery
show. The following art students were commended: Tyler
Chisenhall, Saniya Vovra, Chanel Williamson, Khristian
Ochoa, Shannon Mcvey, Jackie Bravo, Michaela Staiano,
Genesis Suriel, Romario Thompson, Catherine Alcantara,
and Xenia Pico.
High School
Artists Excel
Photo Courtesy: Paramus Catholic High School
Paramus Catholic High School honored numerous local
students during its annual Underclassmen Awards Cer-
emony on May 23. The following students from Hacken-
sack received awards for academic excellence and/or out-
standing participation in extracurricular activities: Sydney
bland, Samantha Campbell, Tiffany Chandler, kyla Con-
tent, Reashelle Magpayo, Caitlyn McNair, Daniela Negron,
Sean o’Driscoll, Stephanie orlando, Amandeep Singh,
Michael Tracy and Nia Watson.
Underclassmen Awards
Shakespeare Comes
Alive
On May 16, students in
Elizabeth Murray’s Pre-AP
English class at Hacken-
sack High School experi-
enced the bard live. Courte-
sy of a grant funded by the
National Endowment of the
Arts, students enjoyed at a
rollicking performance of A
Midsummer Night’s Dream
by Shakespeare Live, the
educational touring group
of the New Jersey Shake-
speare Theatre. From the
Hackensack High School
auditorium, freshmen were
transported to the play’s
mythical Athens to revel
by the sight of classically
trained actors fitting across
the stage in black and white
costumes accented by pops
of vibrant colors. A troupe
of eight actors wowed audi-
ences as they transformed
into 30 roles effortlessly,
from the dour King The-
seus to the imposing King
Oberon who moved adroit-
ly on stilts.
For Cielo Vertiz, the play
“was an unforgettable ex-
perience that expressed a
wonderful side of Shake-
spearean literature.” An-
other student, Emily An-
drade, was impressed by
the seamless transitions the
actors made between roles.
For many students, this
was not only the frst time
they experienced Shake-
speare live, but also the frst
time they witnessed profes-
sional theater.
“I had never seen a pro-
fessional live performance,
so the experience was a
great sight,” said Allie
Marut. For many, the im-
pression was lasting. As a
result of the performance,
Taylor Valdes said she
wanted “to see a lot more
Shakespeare plays live.”
The experience was
capped off by a Q & A ses-
sion with the actors, allow-
ing students a glimpse into
a touring theater group.
by ELIZAbETH
MURRAy
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YMCAof Greater Bergen County,
360 Main Street from 6 – 9 p.m. Fun
night for kids while parents have a
night out. Adult and Teen Leaders Club
supervision. For ages 3 – 12. Family
Members/free, members/$5, non-
members/$10. Call 201-487-6600 ext.
220 or visit ymcagbc.org.
SPECIALEVENTS
MAyWooD
Maywood Station Museum Open
Houses, Sunday, Sept. 30 and Nov. 4
from noon – 3 p.m. Wednesday, Aug.
15 from 7-9 p.m. with a concert by
Blue Plate Special. Alimited number
of 4” X 8” bricks are still available for
$75. Visit maywoodstation.com.
Aug 7. HACkENSACk
National Night out with Fillet
of Soul performing on the Court
House Green courtesy of the City of
Hackensack and Hackensack Police
Department at 7:30 p.m. Bring chairs
and blankets. Visit Hackensack.org.
Aug. 19 MAyWooD
Maywood Street Fair on West
Pleasant Avenue.
Aug. 24, 25 HACkENSACk
American Girl Model Search to
beneft Hackensack University Medical
Center held at The Shops at Riverside
on Aug. 24 from 10 a.m. – noon and
Aug. 25 from 1 – 3 p.m. Girls 6 – 12
are encouraged to audition. Only
costumes in sizes 6X and 10 are
available. Call 551-996-5614 or visit
hackensackeducationfoundation.org.
Sept. 23 PARAMUS
Antique Autos and Trucks Show
presented by Maywood Rotary at the
Bergen Town Center, Route 4 side
from 10 a.m. – 4 p.m. Call 201-843-
8763.
Sept. 30 MAHWAH
bergen bike Tour presented by
the County of Bergen at Darlington
County Park. Schedule: 50-miles/
check-in at 7:30 a.m. Ride at 8 a.m.
25-miles/check-in at 8:30 a.m. Ride
at 9 a.m. 10-miles/check-in at 10 a.m.
Ride at 10:30 a.m. Kids’ ride (under
age 10) at 10:45 a.m. Lunch/Picnic at
11 a.m. Visit bergenbiketour.org.
TRIPS
Aug. 17 ALLENToWN PA
Pines Dinner Theatre presented by
the Rochelle Park Senior Citizens
Club. $50. Call 201-843-9243.
oct. 16 PARAMUS
oktoberfest presented by the Senior
Citizens No. 1 Club of Paramus. Call
201-445-6545.
Nov. 8 – 9 LANCASTER PA
overnight Lancaster Trip presented
by the Americas Unidas Multicultural
Senior Activity Center departing
from the center on Hudson Street at 9
a.m. Deluxe motor coach, overnight
accommodations at Fulton Steamboat
Inn, breakfast, Christmas show at the
American Music Theatre, dinner at
Millers Smorgasbord, shopping at
Reading outlets and visit to Sands
Casino. $215/double occupancy, $263/
single occupancy. Taxes and gratuities
included. Call 201-336-3320. $50/
deposit required.
Nov. 9– 16 EURoPE
Prague, Vienna and budapest
presented by the Meadowlands
Regional Chamber for $1,999. Call
201-939-0707.
Nov. 27 NyC
Radio City Christmas Spectacular
presented by the Maywood Recreation
Department. Bus available departing
Maywood Pool at 3:15 p.m. for the 5
p.m. show. $63. Make checks payable
to the Borough of Maywood, 15 Park
Ave. 3
rd
foor, Maywood, NJ 07607.
Call 201-845-2900 ext. 208.
WoRSHIP
Weekly MAyWooD
Lutheran Church of the Redeemer
471 Maywood Ave. Summer Worship
on Sunday at 9:15 a.m. Sunday School
registration now open for ages 3 – grade
6. Starts Sept. 16. Education hour is
from 10:30 – 11:30 a.m. Sept. 9, Rally
Day at 10:30 a.m. on the Redeemer front
lawn. Outdoor worship, picnic, petting
zoo, pony rides, food and more. Sept.
16, sermon series starts on Sundays with
Letters of James: God’s grace and Faith’s
Response. Wednesday evenings in Oct:
Coming Faithfully with a simple meal at
6:30 p.m. and Conversation from 7 – 8:30
p.m. at Holy Trinity. Jan. 6 at 11 a.m. at
Holy Trinity. Calling all youth as Stars,
Angles, Shepherds and Kings, ages 4 – 18.
Practices Saturday mornings from 10 – 11
a.m. from Dec.1 – Jan 5. Call 201-845-
8779 or visit redeemermaywoodnj.com.
Thursday in August TEANECk
Café St. Paul presents Summer Meal
and Bible Study at St. Paul’s, 61 Church
St at 7 p.m. Soup and salad followed by
bible study. Afree will offering will be
collected. Call 201-837-3189 or visit
stpaulsteaneck.com.
Aug. 20 – 24 MAyWooD
Vacation bible School presented by Zion
Lutheran Church, 120 E. Pleasant Ave.
from Monday – Friday from 7 – 9 p.m.
Offered for children grades 1 – 5. $5. Call
201-843-5916.
Sept. 9 MAyWooD
Sunday Hebrew School starts at the
Reconstructionist Temple Beth Israel, 34
West Magnolia Ave. for grades 1 - 7, 9:15
a.m. - 12:30 p.m. 201-845-7550 ext 4.
Continued from Page 19
political rivalries in the
township.
“Linda was always the
straight line, never let poli-
tics get in the way,” he said.
“She gave you your options,
she guided you. There is no
way that someone will fll
your seat. God bless you,
Grandma.”
In other meeting business,
Police Chief Michael Frew
requested to use confscated
funds to purchase automatic
vehicle locators and install
them in all police vehicles.
Brugger tabled the request
until the September work
session. The purchase of a
new patrol car was approved.
Brugger alerted the com-
mittee that Bergen County
Community Development
grant applications are due by
Oct. 5, for fscal year 2013.
However, a specifc project
to fund has not yet been se-
lected. The 2012 funding
was used to construct a new
bathroom at the senior citi-
zens center.
“There is a narrow scope
for what it can be used for,”
Brugger said of the grant.
The committee also dis-
cussed a request by Hacken-
sack Interim Superintendent
Joseph Abate Jr. to broadcast
school programs on Channel
77 in South Hackensack.
Abate explained in a letter
that the Hackensack Board
of Education has launched
an ambitious public rela-
tions initiative to improve
the image of its schools.
This includes broadcasting
school programming to its
sending districts of South
Hackensack, Rochelle Park
and Maywood. The com-
mittee accepted the request.
Brugger apologized to the
residents of South Hacken-
sack for what he described
as “severe problems with
the new garbage company.”
Brugger urged all residents
to call township hall if they
have a problem with gar-
bage pick-up. Brugger also
apologized for the delays
and inconveniences that
have been incurred by resi-
dents waiting to use the new
playground. He announced
that the missing equipment
has arrived and the sprin-
klers are functioning prop-
erly.
Committeeman Bill Regan
said the costs to operate the
volunteer ambulance service
are skyrocketing. He said
different avenues must be ex-
plored to raise money includ-
ing the possibility of billing
insurance carriers for the
service, an option that many
surrounding municipalities
have implemented. Regan
also congratulated the Little
Ferry/South Hackensack
girls’ softball team for win-
ning the championship.
Cagas updated residents
about the bridge on Saddle
River Road, explaining that
Gov. Chris Christie vetoed
funding the bridge repairs.
The next time it foods, Ca-
gas pledged to wave a sign
thanking Christie for his
help.
“When this bridge backs
up, everyone is affected in-
cluding South Hackensack,
Lodi, Fair Lawn, Saddle
Brook, Rochelle Park and
others,” Cagas said.
Brugger remained op-
timistic that one day the
bridge would be repaired.
“It didn’t work out this
time, but we will push on.”
LoPiccolo Leaving Longtime Post
Continued from Page 3
Melf Takes Helm Again
a sculpture of a Marine,
which Some claimed looked
very much like the mayor.
“If anyone comes to you
and sees the statue, they
will know that they are up
against a fghting Marine,”
said Some.
Well wishers, including
department heads, elected
offcials and citizens packed
the meeting room, each ea-
ger to congratulate Melf.
Fire Chief Tom Free-
man thanked Meneses for
his support in the past and
said he knew both Melf
and Townes would be in
his corner going forward.
Police Chief Tomas Padilla
spoke about the “newfound
partnership between the fre
department and the police
department” and thanked
the council for having faith
in his leadership abilities.
Garrett also applauded
Melf and Townes.
“What is so great about
America is not what comes
out of Washington but what
comes out of small towns
like this. God bless you.”
Amid hugs, handshakes
and pats on the back, Melf
closed the meeting.
“With the redevelopment
ordinance that we recently
passed, we will make this
city as great as it can be.”
Continued from Page 2
Marlin Townes is sworn in by his son, Marlin Townes III,
with his wife, ojetta, and daughter, Chelsea, at his side.
To those who have touched our lives during this most difficult and
challenging time...thank you for your prayers, good wishes and
support. You will be in our hearts forever.






Love, Erin Kelly and family
Across
1. No matter which
4. Plunge
7. Auctioneer’s sale
collection
10. Shelter
11. Tenn. neighbor
12. “___ you nuts?”
13. Gangster gun
14. Storage container
15. Roofng material
16. Callas’ forte
18. German city
20. Summer squash
22. Receive enthusiastically
25. Headings
26. Spend too much money
from an account?
28. Biological classifcations
29. Delump four
33. Crumb
34. Busy activity
36. Draw
37. Cable network
38. Smart dresser
39. Joanne Woodward
Oscar-winning role
40. Turner of TV channels
41. Nobel invention
42. __ In Black, ‘97 Smith
flm
Down
1. Kelp
2. Come close to
3. Bigfoot’s cousin
4. Pat lightly
5. First series of
supercomputers
6. Cure-all
7. Indian police stick
8. Get situated
9. Court contest
17. Sky color
19. Chews on tobacco
21. Flow of air rising
22. Leave the computer
23. Opposed
24. Five years
27. Gas that can be a health
hazard
30. Account entry
31. Hawaii ___-O
32. Young one
35. Go (for)
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Each Sudoku Puzzle consists of a 9 x 9 grid that has been subdivided in grids of 3 x 3 squares.
To solve the puzzle each row, column and box must contain the numbers 1 to 9.
Answers on Page 25
Crossword
Sudoku
Crossword by Myles Mellor
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9
10 11 12
13 14 15
16 17 18 19
20 21
22 23 24 25
26 27
28 29 30 31 32
33 34 35 36
37 38 39
40 41 42
Across
No matter which 1.
Plunge 4.
Auctioneer's sale collection 7.
Shelter 10.
Tenn. neighbor 11.
"___ you nuts?" 12.
Gangster gun 13.
Storage container 14.
Roofing material 15.
Callas' forte 16.
German city 18.
Summer squash 20.
Receive enthusiastically 22.
Headings 25.
Spend too much money from an account? 26.
Biological classifications 28.
Delump flour 29.
Crumb 33.
Busy activity 34.
Draw 36.
Cable network 37.
Down
Kelp 1.
Come close to 2.
Bigfoot's cousin 3.
Pat lightly 4.
First series of supercomputers 5.
Cure-all 6.
Indian police stick 7.
Get situated 8.
Court contest 9.
Sky color 17.
Chews on tobacco 19.
Flow of air rising 21.
Leave the computer 22.
Opposed 23.
Five years 24.
Gas that can be a health hazard 27.
Account entry 30.
Hawaii ___-O 31.
Young one 32.
Go (for) 35.
SUDOKU by Myles Mellor and Susan Flanagan
Each Sudoku puzzle consists of a 9X9 grid that has been subdivided into nine smaller
grids of 3X3 squares. To solve the puzzle each row, column and box must contain each
of the numbers 1 to 9. Puzzles come in three grades: easy, medium and difficult.
Level: Medium
1 7 9
4 1 9 8 7
4 3
3 5 7
8 9 5 1
6 4 8
3 8
7 5 4 3 6
2 7 4
H A C K E N S A C K | P A R A M U S | M E A D O W L A N D S
• Recent high school grads.
• Top achievers like NJ STARS students.
• Adults seeking new certifications.
• International students from
around the world.
• Veterans returning home.
• Former college students looking
for a fresh start.
Register now for classes
beginning September 5.
Bergen offers more than 140 academic degree and certificate programs taught by nationally
recognized faculty at locations in Paramus, Hackensack, Meadowlands, Fort Lee and Mahwah.
To register, or for more information, visit room A-129 at the College’s
main campus, 400 Paramus Road, Paramus or
www.bergen.edu/fall2012.
Join our community
this fall.
Hackensack High School
Vice Principal Patricia
Lozano fled a civil law-
suit against school board
Trustee Carol Martinez on
July 18 at Superior Court
of Bergen County, alleging
that she tried to fre her for
political reasons.
Lozano, of North Bergen,
joined the Hackensack pub-
lic school system in 2004
as a teacher, and, in 2010
was promoted to her current
post.
Lozano, who is being rep-
resented by Louis Zayas, of
North Bergen, said Marti-
nez began gunning for her
termination in April.
“Despite Lozano’s un-
disputed qualifcation to
perform the duties of vice
principal, Defendant Mar-
tinez began to undermine
Lozano’s credentials in an
effort to remove her because
of her perceived political af-
fliation with the Zisa politi-
cal organization,” states the
lawsuit. “Martinez attempt-
ed to block the renewal of
plaintiff’s contract based
on her belief that Lozano
is politically affliated with
the Zisa family, which has
established political roots
and ties to the Hackensack
political circles.”
The suit alleges that Mar-
tinez aligned herself with a
group of politicians whose
aim is to replace perceived
Zisa supporters in govern-
ment jobs with their own
supporters. In the weeks
leading up to the vote on
renewing Lozano’s con-
tract, Martinez was a vocal
and staunch opponent of the
plan.
The suit states that on
May 18, Martinez asked
Interim Superintendent Jo-
seph Abate for Martinez’s
personnel fle and spent ap-
proximately 10 hours over
the course of several days
reviewing it, the suit alleges.
“After Martinez obtained
confdential information
contained in Lozano’s per-
sonnel fle by purportedly
acting in her offcial capac-
ity, Martinez fled a petition
before the Board of State
Examiners in her individual
capacity, challenging Loza-
no’s credentials and qualif-
cations in an illicit scheme
to replace Lozano with
someone affliated with
Martinez’s political aspira-
tions and anti-Zisa agenda,”
states the suit.
According to the suit,
Martinez is accused of vio-
lating the board’s code of
ethics and bylaws by wrong-
fully obtaining and review-
ing the fle. She is accused
of violating Lozano’s First
Amendment rights because
of her perceived political af-
fliations, violating her civil
rights and right to privacy.
Lozano is seeking com-
pensatory damages, puni-
tive damages, attorney’s
fees and monetary relief
and has requested a trial by
jury.
Hackensack High School
Vice Principal Sues Trustee
MARIA DiPARDo, née Meo, of Hackensack
passed away peacefully on June 30 at the age of
86. Born in Italy, she came to the United States
in 1953. She had worked as a seamstress for Jace
Sportswear in Garfeld for many years. Beloved
wife of the late Michele DiPardo (2000). Loving
mother of Rosina Gianfrancesco and her husband
Antonio of Hackensack. Cherished grandmother of
Lucia Moran and her husband Terrence of Oradell,
Anthony Gianfrancesco of Hackensack and the
late Marie Gianfrancesco. Great-grandmother of
Nicholas, Andrew and Michael. Dearest sister
of Angelina Vita and her husband Salvatore of
Hackensack and the late Domenico Meo, Antoinetta
Pizzanelli and Felice Meo.
CATHERINE kAPTUR, née Burke, of Clinton,
Md., formerly of Waldorf, Md. and Hackensack,
passed away peacefully on June 30 at the age of
93. She had worked as a bookkeeper for Randa
Neckwear in Hackensack. Beloved wife of the
late John Joseph Kaptur (2001). Loving Mother
of Ronald Kaptur Sr. of Clinton, Md. Cherished
grandmother of Michelle Morrison of Chesapeake,
Va., and her husband Scott, who is serving aboard
the USS Eisenhower, and Ronald Kaptur Jr. and
his wife Jean Anne Kaptur of Ames, Iowa. Great-
grandmother of Ryan Meyer, Katylin Morrison,
Cole Kaptur and Reese Kaptur. Dearest sister
of Joseph Burke of Ramsey, Anna Johnston of
Hackensack, Patricia Carucci of Hackensack,
Edward Burke of Delaware and the late Helen
LaSpina and Elizabeth Rose.
ERNA VASIoS, née Daus, age 92, passed away
on July 3 at Golden Living Center, Heathwood,
Chestnut Hill, Mass. Born 1920 in Riesenburg,
Germany to Anna and Hermann Daus, Erna
immigrated with her parents and younger sister Elsa
to the United States in 1923, settling in Teaneck.
Erna was predeceased by her husband W. George,
two sisters, Elsa and Anna, and one brother,
Herman. Surviving are her daughter, Kristine
Vasios of Brookline, Mass., son George Vasios,
his wife Claire, and granddaughter Alexa, also of
Brookline, Mass.
EDITH IoZZIA, née Saitta, passed away
peacefully surrounded by her loving family on July
3 at the age of 85. Born in Hackensack to the late
Joseph and Ella, she lived in Fair Lawn for more
than 30 years and in Hummelstown, Pa. for the past
fve years. Beloved wife of the late Bartolo “Benny”
Iozzia. Devoted mother of Patricia Turlick and her
husband Mark and Bob Iozzia and his wife Iris
both of Hummelstown, Pa. Cherished grandmother
of Stephanie Iozzia of Hummelstown, Pa. Loving
sister of Joseph Saitta and his wife Deanie of San
Beach, Calif. Dearest stepdaughter of the late
William Van Eechkoven.
CHARLES bEAM, of Hackensack, passed
away on July 4 at the age of 80. Prior to retiring,
he worked as a rigger for Anthony’s Trucking and
Rigging in Hackensack. He was an Army veteran of
the Korean War. Dearest brother of Alice D’Andrea
of Cliffside Park, and the late Mabel Rogers, Robert
Beam, Bertha Beam, Mollie Anger, Ernie Beam Jr.
and Frank Beam. Charles also leaves behind several
nieces, nephews and his good friend, Mickey
McGuigan, and family, of Hawthorne.
PETER TUCCI Sr., of Hackensack died on July 5
at the age of 80. Tucci owned and operated Tucci
Properties in Hackensack for more than 50 years.
Peter was extremely passionate and very dedicated
in all his ventures. He was a past president of the
Builders Association of New Jersey, past president
and board member of the North Jersey Friendship
House in Hackensack, trustee of the Bergen County
200 Club and a veteran of the U.S. Air Force.
Devoted father of Peter Tucci Jr. of Haworth and
James Tucci and his wife Erika of Napa Valley,
Calif. Cherished grandfather of Peter Maxwell,
Julia Elizabeth, Matteo Bien and Serafna Song.
Dearest brother of Dominick Tucci and his wife
Anne of Moonachie, Catherine DallaFior and her
husband Al of Florida and the late Bernard Tucci.
Peter also leaves behind Judith Tucci of Haworth.
MICHELE bEIDES, née Cascone, age 63,
of Haworth, formerly of Hackensack, passed
away July 6. Prior to retiring, Michele worked
as a group manager in the Salon Department for
Bloomingdale’s in Hackensack. Beloved wife of 20
years to Jeffrey Beides. Loving mother of Anthony
John DeRosa and his wife Jennifer of Tinton Falls,
David Elliot DeRosa and his wife Leah of Parker,
Colo., and Justin Michael Beides of Haworth.
Cherished grandmother of David, Anthony, Elijah,
Skyla, Mia, Joshua and Lucas. Devoted daughter
of the late John Cascone Sr. and Angelina Cascone
(nee Ballestrieri). Dearest sister of Patricia Hunter
and her husband Tom of Florida, John Cascone Jr.
of Wyckoff and the late Bruce Cascone.
ANToNIo SAVoIA, of Fairfeld, formerly of
Hackensack, passed away peacefully surrounded
by family on July 7 at the age of 80. He was born
in Italy and worked as a sheet metal operator for
Anchor Precision in South Hackensack. Beloved
husband of 47 years of Rosaria Savoia (née
DeMaio). Devoted father of Nina Orsini and her
husband Lou, Vincent Savoia and his wife Elaine,
Domenica Biasucci and her husband Paul, and Joe
Savoia and his wife Nicole. Loving grandfather
of Lea, Anthony, Sofa, Marcello and Giulia.
Devoted son of the late Vincenzo and Antonia
Savoia. Dearest brother of Giuseppina Stalteri
and her husband Salvatore, Carmela Cundari
and her husband Francesco, Rosaria Savoia and
her husband Carmelo, Caterina Canfora and her
husband Angelo, Rosario Savoia and his wife
Filomena, Paola Barila and her husband Nicola,
and the late Domenica Valente and her husband, the
late Giuseppe.
VIoLA “yoLA” TRobIANo RIZZI, 89 of
Elmwood Park, passed away at her home on July
13 surrounded by her family. She leaves to cherish
her memories three children, Peter and wife
Bonnie of Toms River, James and fancée Dawn
of Lodi, John and wife Carol of Millington; six
grandchildren, Fara Daniels, Jaclyn Rizzi, Lauren
Rizzi, Janine Rizzi, Jenna Rizzi and J.C. Rizzi; and
great-granddaughter Brianna Daniels. She will also
be loved and missed by her twin sister Peggy’s two
girls, Nancy Rodgers and Dee Fontanella, who were
like daughters. Yola is also survived by her husband,
Pete, and her brother, Thomas Trobiano of Paramus.
She was one of 11 siblings, Mike Trobiano, Frank
Trobiano, Jeanette Capsouras, Mildred McAulifffe,
John Trobiano, Fred Trobiano, Henry Trobiano,
Helen Gulino, James Trobiano and Peggy
Fontanella, who are deceased.
JoHN SPIEkER, of Hackensack, passed away
on July 16 at the age of 66. Prior to retiring, he
worked as a certifed emergency medical technician
for the Ridgefeld ambulance corps where he
attained the rank of captain. Beloved husband
of Diana (née Gallo). Loving father of Sharon
Spieker of Hackensack and devoted friend of Bill
for more than 41 years. Devoted son of the late
Rudolf Spieker and Alice Spieker (née Broom).
ANTHoNy IURATo, of Hackensack, passed
away on July 21 at the age of 91. Prior to retiring,
he owned and operated Iurato Building Materials
in Hackensack for many years. Anthony proudly
served in the U.S. Air Force during World War II
where he was a top turret gunner and chief engineer
on a B-24 Liberator in the China, Burma and India
war campaigns. He was also a member of the San
Giuseppe Santa Croce Camerina Society. Beloved
husband of 54 years to Adriana (nee Tummino).
Loving father of John Iurato, Josephine Tozzi
and her husband Tom and Andrew Iurato. Loving
grandfather of Alyssa and Matthew Tozzi. Dearest
brother of the late Salvatore Iurato. Devoted son
of the late John Iurato and Josephine Iurato (née
Campanella).
JUSTINE MARIE TAyLoR, of Jersey City,
“our precious angel,” passed away on July 22 at
the age of 15 months. Beloved daughter of Tameka
Dyer and Justin Taylor. Cherished granddaughter
of Verna Mejias and Diane Dyer and the late Luis
Melendez. Dearest sister of Kamora Lee Dyer.
Justine is also survived by her loving aunts and
uncles, Lasheena Lopez, Jessie Osario, Diego Dyer,
Lora Arrington and Brian Diaz.
MILLIE PENQUE, née Agosta, 82, of Paramus,
formerly of Hackensack, passed away on July
31. Beloved wife of 61 years to Angelo “Sonny”
Penque. Loving mother of David Penque and his
wife Patricia of Upper Saddle River and Scott
Penque of Allendale. Cherished grandmother of
David, Michael, Scott and Diana. Dearest sister of
Lucy Agosta of Paramus and Christina Barone of
Paramus.
ELIZAbETH “bETTy” IoZZIA, née Dinallo,
of Greenbriar Woodlands, Toms River, formerly of
Hackensack, passed away peacefully at her home
on July 31 at the age of 82. Beloved wife of 62
years to the late Anthony Iozzia (2011). Devoted
mother of Barbara Iozzia and her husband Ron
Watt of West Windsor, Richard Iozzia and his wife
Marylou of Fair Lawn, and Anthony Iozzia and his
wife Eileen of Bayville. Cherished grandmother
of Ryan, Daniel, Gina, Leslie, Alexander, Nicole,
Michelle and Rachel. Dearest sister of Maggie
Szawiola of Hackensack and the late Angelo,
Carmen, Nicholas and Victor Dinallo and
Mary Maffetone and Antoinette Blundo.
Repast Luncheons
To advertise in this section call 201-488-5795
Lutheran Volunteers
Visit bosnia
Maywood Shutterbug
Applauded
bill Wetzel of Maywood
recently placed second
in the non-professional
photography category
at the 10
th
annual ber-
gen County Juried Se-
nior Art Show for his
picture, “Lladro Flower
Girl.” He also won sec-
ond place last year with
“Garden Angel.”
Photo Courtesy: Wayne olsen
Pastor Gary LeCroy and members of St. Paul Lutheran
Church of Teaneck recently decorated tote bags and sent
them to bosnia as part of the New Jersey Lutheran Synod’s
servant trip to bosnia-Herzegovina. The trip allowed volun-
teers to organize friendship camps for bosnian children in
eight towns and give schools with supplies and sports equip-
ment. For more information visit www.servanttrips.org.
Photo Courtesy: bill Wetzel
Photo Courtesy: karen Peterson
on June 7, the Paramus High School LEAP Program
and Fair Lawn High School bridge program gath-
ered at the Paramus Country Club’s mini-golf course.
Joined by Paramus High School Principal kurt kar-
cich, students assembled into mixed groups and tried
their luck at 18 holes of golf. They later enjoyed lunch
at the 9 Iron Grill on the club’s premises. The outing
was arranged by Rotarian Marty Diamond.
Paramus Golfers Tee off
Photo Courtesy: Jim brennan
Paramus Senior No. 1 Club members recently enjoyed
their annual picnic at the Joseph Cipolla Senior Center
on Farview Avenue.
Photo Courtesy: Jim brennan
Paramus Senior No. 1 Club recently hosted a non-strenuous
Senior olympics for its members who participated in events
such as the 50-foot shuffe. Pictured, in the starting blocks:
Lidia Puskas, barbara McCann, Lou Pujol (winner), Ron
Mikolajczyk, Joan Campanale and Mary Zaleski.
Senior Athletes Face off
Seniors Picnicking
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As it has done for the
past 103 years, Maywood
once again celebrated In-
dependence Day in grand
style with a colorful parade
on July 4.
The sun was shining
brightly as members of
the Maywood Borough
Council ceremoniously
inspected the personnel
and equipment of the po-
lice and fre departments,
fre police and emergency
services squad at borough
hall before offcially join-
ing the line of march. The
parade stepped off in the
southern part of town and
traveled along Maywood
and Pleasant avenues, each
lined with hundreds of fag
wavers, en route to Memo-
rial Park.
The theme of this year’s
parade was “Let Free-
dom Ring,” and longtime
resident Thomas Gaffney
served as the grand mar-
shal. Gaffney waved to
the crowd from the front
seat of a convertible that
followed behind the May-
wood American Legion
Color Guard.
Parade participants in-
cluded school bands,
church groups, car clubs,
sports groups, Scouts, fre
and police departments.
Horns and sirens blared
as the emergency vehicles
went by with the occu-
pants tossing candy to the
children anxiously waiting
curbside.
At the reviewing stand
on West Fairmount, there
was a short ceremony and
ice cream for all the chil-
dren. Maywoodian Aman-
da Taylor was announced
as the winner of a poetry
contest sponsored by the
Maywood Historical Com-
mittee for her submission,
“Let Freedom Ring” and
was presented an award by
historian Betty Fetzer.
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copier, fax machine, Internet
access. Separate entrance
in beautifully renovated
mixed-use building. Ideal
for attorney or small busi-
ness. Call 201-488-6010.
Help Wanted
Advertising sales, must
have own transportation.
Fax resumes to 201-343-
8720 or e-mail info@cnty-
seat.com.
YMCA member service
representatives needed. Up-
per Welcome Center: must
possess excellent customer
service skills. Computer
literate, knowledge of Y
programs, heavy phones.
Lower Welcome Center: re-
quires excellent interperson-
al relationship skills. Greet
and check in members and
guests. Light clerical duties.
Night security: responsible
for ensuring the security of
the YMCA building during
the hours that the facility is
closed. Please apply in per-
son at YMCA of Greater
Bergen County, 360 Main
St., Hackensack or e-mail
info@ymcagbc.org.
YMCA swim instructors
and lifeguards needed: Must
have required certifcations.
Must be energetic, friendly
and responsible and enjoy
working with people of
all ages. Day, evening and
weekend shifts are available.
Apply in person at YMCA
of Greater Bergen County,
360 Main St., Hackensack,
or call the Aquatic Depart-
ment at 201-487-6600, ext.
213.
YMCA youth develop-
ment coordinator, respon-
sible for, but not limited to
performing the following:
assisting in staffng of all
teen and sports programs,
assisting in the creating and
reviewing of teen and sport
program curriculums, super-
vising teen and sports pro-
gram instructors, managing
and monitoring all teen and
sports program equipment,
ordering new equipment
when needed, assist in bud-
get for teen and sports pro-
gram, monitoring weekly
enrollment of all teen and
sport programs, inform
camp and teen director of
any issues within programs.
Must be able to fll in for any
class such as soccer, tennis,
T-ball or karate. Please ap-
ply in person at YMCA of
Greater Bergen County, 360
Main St. Hackensack, or e-
mail info@ymcagbc.org.
Lessons
Piano lessons in my Hack-
ensack home. Beginner and
intermediate. All ages. Call
Mary 201-489-5695.
CALL 201-488-5795
TO
PLACE YOUR AD
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PuzzleAnswers
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The article headlined “Hackensack Council Approves Historic Downtown Plan” on
page 3 of the August 2012 edition should have said that the plan was approved during a
public hearing on June 27.
Correction
“We Fix Windows
Since 1972”
REPAIRS OR
REPLACEMENTS
Storm Window
(Interior/Exterior)
Vinyl Replacement
Window Installed-$89
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yMCA Child Care Registration
The YMCA Child Care Center at the YMCA of Greater Bergen County in Hacken-
sack is now accepting registrations for September for children aged 2 1/2 to 5. The
YMCA’s Child Care Center has been operating for 30 years as a year-round, full-time
child care center. It features a low ratio of teachers to children, and the unique facility
allows children to enjoy swim lessons and gym play as well as an outdoor playground.
The YMCA Child Care Center’s hours are 7 a.m. to 6 p.m., and parents are encouraged
to join the YMCA as members and get into shape by using the wellness center or pool.
For more information about the YMCA Child Care Center contact Kathy Cappucci,
child care director, 201-487-6600, ext. 211.
Maywood Lets Freedom Ring
Photo Courtesy: Patti McNamara
Marchers in period costumes wave to parade-goers.
by PATTI MCNAMARA
Games on Page 22
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For more information,
visit UnitedWater.com/uwnj
Protecting our
environment.
Serving our
community.
Today and tomorrow. We know the
two go hand in hand. That’s why
everything we do is focused on what
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tomorrow. Clean water. A healthy Earth.
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Every day we’re your vital resource,
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Photo Courtesy: Robert Marion
Students from Midland, Parkway and Stony Lane
schools in Paramus recently took part in the Jeopar-
dy bowl reading competition. Students from all three
schools were encouraged to read from of list of 20 ti-
tles to prepare for the event. This year, the trophy was
taken home by the competition’s host, Midland School.
Midland Wins
Jeopardy bowl
Welcome to Maywood
Avenue School
Photo Courtesy: Michael Jordan
Exiting third graders at Maywood Memorial School
recently attended an orientation program at Maywood
Avenue School, which houses the fourth, ffth, sixth,
seventh and eighth grades. The tour was hosted by the
school’s ambassadors.
Photo Courtesy: Michael Jordan
A total of 86 fourth and ffth graders at Maywood Av-
enue School participated in the battle of the books
competition June 1. The ffth grade winning team was
the Dazzling Readers.
battle of the Maywood
Readers
On June 21, William
DeFabiis, chief school
administrator, selected
eighth grader Winni Yang
as South Hackensack Me-
morial School’s Student of
the Fourth Marking Period.
Winni served as treasurer
of her graduating class,
participated on the soccer
and basketball teams, was
crowned the school’s spell-
ing champion, was mem-
ber of the math league and
served as salutatorian of
the Class of 2012. Winni
will attend Bergen County
Academies in Hackensack
in September.
yang Named Top Student
Ready, Set, Read
Photo Courtesy: Paramus Public Library
The Paramus Public Library recently kicked off its sum-
mer reading program with a celebration complete with
raffes, popcorn, ice cream, cotton candy and more.
Photo Courtesy: Anne Turtoro
A person by the name of
James Dent once said, “A
perfect summer is when the
sun is shining, the breeze is
blowing, the birds are sing-
ing and the lawn mower is
broken.”
Walter Winchell had an-
other take on that, “It’s a sure
sign of summer if the chair
gets up when you do.”
I think we all like to ac-
knowledge summer as sim-
plicity at its best. For me,
and I’m sure to many, sum-
mertime presents memories
waiting to happen, a time to
remember a summers past
and maybe call upon a sum-
mer love.
I think about my baby
boomer years growing up
here in Hackensack and re-
membering summers taking
short excursions in New Jer-
sey. There were trips to visit
the Gingerbread Castle in
Hamburg, the Jersey Shore
at Point Pleasant and riding
the children’s train on the
sandy beach, going to Arcola
Pool, horseback riding at Van
Saun Park and vacationing at
Beach Haven, Long Beach
Island, right after the 1962
storm.
With June having more
than six days above 90 de-
grees and that high mercury
mark in July giving us more
than two dozen, what can
make us feel better and cool-
er than some summer songs?
Just sit back and listen
to some favorites from the
1950s, 60s and 70s such
as Nat King Cole singing
“Those Lazy Hazy Crazy
Days of Summer” or “Sum-
mer Breeze” by Seals and
Crofts, “Under the Board-
walk” by the Drifters, “Sum-
mertime Blues” by Eddie Co-
chran, “In the Summertime”
by Mungo Jerry, any song
by the Beach Boys such as
“Surfn’ Safari” and “Wipe-
out,” “Heatwave” by Martha
and the Vandellas and who
can forget, “Itsy Bitsy Teenie
Weenie Yellow Polka Dot Bi-
kini” by Bryan Hyland.
To think about the parts of
summer that we like to expe-
rience commands an endless
list. It’s what we wear such
as fip fops, shorts, sunglass-
es and a smile. We hear the
sounds of the katydid. We
grill, eat ice cream, seafood,
burgers, hot dogs, corn on
the cob, drink a cold beer,
get together with friends and
laugh. We could be down the
shore or on a lake foating on
an old inner tube. We enjoy
seeing the end of a day flled
with lightning bugs, maybe a
full moon or a shooting star
and no mosquitoes.
Summer is the time to go
to amusement parks, enjoy a
hot air balloon or boat ride,
see freworks, read a good
book, take that long walk you
never seem to have time to
do, pack a cooler and go on
a picnic, ride a bike or just do
nothing for a change.
A drive-in movie used to
be a way to spend a summer’s
evening. Just park your car,
enjoy a movie or two with an
intermission to allow you to
get popcorn, candy, fries or
something hot off the grill . A
green coiled mosquito repel-
lent on one’s car dashboard
was always an essential.
Those bugs sure knew where
we were and were good for a
bite or two.
Several sounds, tasks and
tastes of summer remain
today. A cool iced tea, the
sounds of the ice cream truck
coming down your block,
cleaning the grill, planting
the vegetable or fower gar-
den, cleaning the pool, wash-
ing the car, trimming the
hedges and more.
I think about sun exposure.
My friends and I used to
combine baby oil and iodine
as a suntan lotion and wrap
our record album covers with
aluminum foil to refect the
sun against ourselves and
literally fry under the sun in
hopes of getting that perfect
tan. Granted, there was a
Coppertone product, but that
was not a sun block back
then. For many of us, we
burned frst, tanned later.
So, however you pass
these lazy crazy days of sum-
mer, remember to stop and
enjoy them. Soak up the
rays, spend time outdoors,
smell the roses, make some
memories and then wait for
next year to do it all over
again.
Barbara J. Gooding is a
creative and historical writer
who resides in Hackensack.
She is co-author of Hacken-
sack, A Pictorial Historical
History and Images of Amer-
ica-Hackensack. She may be
contacted via The County
Seat newspaper or bjgood-
ing@gmail.com. If you were
raised in the local area, we’d
like to hear about your mem-
orable experiences. Write to
The County Seat, 77 Hudson
St., Hackensack, NJ 07601 or
e-mail info@cntyseat.com
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Ah! Summertime Simplicity
by bARbARA J.
GooDING
Photo Courtesy: barbara Gooding
Drive-in movies were popular in the 1950s and 60s.
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