VOLUME 5 | ISSUE 26 | AUGUST 8, 2012

I NSI DE: PRIZEWEEK PUZZLE: PG. 4 • OPENING NIGHT AT LEVOY • FARMERS MARKET WEEK • SINATRA TRIBUTE
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n July of 2010, Cumberland County reached an agreement with ReCommunity
Recycling, the independent company contracted to manage the county’s reusable
waste, to expand the amount of products that could be recycled by nearly 60 percent.
With a larger demand for plastics and paper in the marketplace, there was now greater
financial motivation to increase the county’s intake of recyclables, and ReCommunity
Recycling was capable of distributing on a larger scale.
With the change, however, there came some ambiguity. Even today, nearly two years
since the recycling expansion occurred, there is still quite a bit of uncertainty among
Cumberland County residents about what exactly they should and shouldn’t be recycling.
In hopes of shedding some light on a fuzzy situation, this reporter sat down with some
of the area’s recycling authorities. What follows is a comprehensive guide on everything
you need to know about recycling in Cumberland County.
WHAT SHOULD YOU BE RECYCLING?
Before the summer of 2010, Cumberland County only accepted number one and two
plastics for curbside recycling. But since the county revised its recycling standards, the
types of plastics that are now recyclable have been widely expanded. Along with the ones
and twos, the county now accepts plastics number four, five and seven.
What does this mean exactly?
Well, it means before you couldn’t recycle things like yogurt containers, margarine tubs
or plastic takeout containers. Now you can.
Member FDIC
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Our Focus Is You.
No purchase necessary. Sweepstakes drawing November 1, 2012. Three winners will be chosen from entries at each Capital Bank branch for the three prizes. All winners will have the option to be featured in future Capital Bank advertising programs. You need not be present at the time of the drawing to win. All federal, state and local tax liabilities
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CONNECTI NG YOU TO SOUTH JERSEY. WEEKLY.
Cumberland County operates under a dual stream recycling system (plastics, metals, and
glass in one bucket, paper in another), and now accepts plastics four, five, and seven, as
well as aseptic containers.
E C R W S S
L o c a l
R e s i d e n t i a l C u s t o m e r
School District Honored for United Way Contributions
Vineland Public Schools received a "Distinguished Campaign"
award from the United Way of Cumberland County at the organi-
zation's annual banquet, held July 25 at Merighi's Savoy Inn. The
district was recognized for raising $13,930 for the local charity,
an increase of 160 percent from the previous year, according to
Alice Woods, Executive Director for the United Way.
County Recycling Goals Expanded
From left, Sylvia Morano, Barse School; Debra Bechtel, Winslow
School; Dan Greco, Durand School; Dr. Mary Gruccio, Superintendent;
Karen Malatesta, Petway School; Tammy Monahan, Rossi School;
Madeline Galan, Vineland High School South; Ed Benish, Sabater School, and Karen Gillespie, Winslow School.
Goals for expanded recycling have been set. Here’s an update
on how we might reach them. { STORY AND PHOTOS BY RYAN DINGER }
Continued on page 29
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STAFF
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{
CONTENTS
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MIKE EPIFANIO Editor & Publisher
DEBORAH A. EIN Managing Editor
GAIL EPIFANIO Controller
MARIE HALPIN-GALLO Advertising Executive
MICHELE LOW Advertising Executive
TRACY BUSCHAM Graphic Designer
RYAN DINGER Editorial/Sales Assistant
The Grapevine
907 N. Main Rd., Ste. 205, Vineland, NJ 08360
PHONE: 856-457-7815 • FAX: 856-457-7816
EMAIL: letters@grapevinenewspaper.com
WEB: www.grapevinenewspaper.com
The Grapevine is published on Wednesdays by
Grapevine News Corp. Copyright © 2012. All
rights reserved.
To qualified buyers: See dealer for complete details on select
models. Price includes all rebates & dealer incentives. Price
includes all costs except tax, tags and licensing fees. Not
responsible for typographic errors. All prices plus taxes, tags, and
title, plus doc. Fee. Factory rebates in lieu of special financing.
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title, plus doc. F Factory rebates in lieu of sp
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1 Recycling Goals
Expanded
Goals for wider recycling efforts
have been set. RYAN DINGER
3,6,8
10,12 Faces in the News
4 Prizeweek Puzzle
11 Hope in a Storm
The columnist likens our economic
recovery to recent storm chal-
lenges. TODD NOON
14 Letter to the Editor
19,28 News in Brief
16 Community Calendar/
Sports
18 Labor Force
Bridgeton’s P.J. Ritter Company
hired German POWs in the sum-
mer of 1944. VINCE FARINACCIO
20 Entertainment
22-23 HOME AND GARDEN
24 DINING: Locally Grown
on the Table
Two efforts to support the field-to-
fork initiative.
27 Recipe Corner
The Jersey tomato stars in this
week’s recipes. LISA DINUNZIO
30 REAL ESTATE
31 CLASSIFIEDS
I
Gleanings { BY DEBORAH A. EIN, MANAGING EDITOR }
Driving in
Full Circles
A
round our house, I’m considered
“old school” by the younger set.
That’s perfectly fine with me—
who can keep up with all the
new technology, jargon, gadgets, and video
games, anyway? My husband can, that’s
who—and I totally rely on him to monitor
Facebook accounts, cell phone usage and
the like. (This is an important task, as our
twin boys just turned 13, and we now offi-
cially have three teenagers under our roof.)
So when some of my throwback ways
are so antiquated that they’re considered
cool—make that dear old Mom is cool—I
have to sit back and smile, and just wallow
in all my coolness. This happened a little
while back when I was driving one of the
two family cars, the one my husband usually
drives. As I was zipping along, shifting
gears, my son commented, “Hey, you know
how to drive a stick!”
All my kids have heard (more than once)
that I learned to drive behind the wheels of
the tractors and trucks on the family farm
when I was just 11 years old. If my son had
really thought about this, he would have
realized that tractors are seldom automatic.
But no, he hadn’t thought about it, and nei-
ther had his big sister when she took her
behind-the-wheel training last summer.
She hadn’t thought about how learning
only automatic would eliminate one of the
family cars she’d be able to drive. She
hadn’t thought about how she might some-
day want—or need—to drive a sportscar
(she’s already spotted a couple that she’s
dreamed of buying).
All this has gotten me wondering if
shifting through the gears of a car is
becoming a lost art. Probably not in some
areas of the country, where a farmer’s
permit can get anxious teens on the road a
full year ahead of their peers. For that very
reason, this area of the Garden State would
likely qualify for having more shifters than
other areas of the state and country.
Several articles have been written about
the demise of the stick shift. I suspect that
the driving schools do not go out of their
way to offer the skill. Also, that more boys
than girls take up the challenge. Those who
have been shifting bikes and motorized
vehicles as pre-teens are probably more
likely to take up shifting on the road.
And that certainly is a challenge, added
to lots of other ones drivers now face. Since
I have a teen driver and have thought about
when I first took to the road myself, I
grudgingly realize that traffic and driving
conditions are a lot more challenging—in
some cases, intimidating—today.
The DMV, on its website, has this to say
about driving a vehicle with a manual
transmission: “[It] can be intimidating for
many drivers young and old. Many
motorists go through life without owning
or ever even driving a stick shift, but it is a
good skill to have, as these types of vehicles
are popular. Once you learn how to do it,
and after a little practice, driving a stick
shift is fairly easy. It becomes habit and also
becomes, for many, a more exciting and
exhilarating way to drive a car or truck.
Stick shift vehicles come in all shapes and
sizes, from the smallest economy cars to
huge work trucks.”
This hits on my husband’s reasons for
preferring to drive a stick. Anyone who has
a passion for cars will tell you, first and
foremost, it’s more fun to drive this way.
Parents who drive stick are more likely to
teach their teens to drive one, and it can
even be a great bonding activity. Who
doesn’t remember Dad mentoring them in
some aspect of the driving lesson, whether
it was parallel parking or when and how to
shift gears?
Many parents today are in favor of the
manual transmission precisely because it
is more challenging and therefore keeps
drivers more focused on the task at hand—
and less able or likely to text while driving.
Not a bad idea.
That second sentence of DMV’s state-
ment about going through life without ever
driving a stick didn’t always hold true. I
think of my own parents, who had no choice
but to learn to drive a stick shift, since that
was all that was available when they were
new drivers. This, from the General Motors
website: “GM introduced the industry’s
first fully automatic transmission, called
Hydra-Matic, on the 1940 Oldsmobile. Like
many prior GM innovations, it was soon
adopted by the entire industry.”
Well, I don’t think I’ll share this bit of
trivia with the kids. If they thought about
their grandparents driving nothing but
stick shift, it would only take away from
my own coolness factor. I
When Mom’s old-school ways become “cool.”
Grapevine 1-2 080812-de:Layout 1 8/6/12 8:04 PM Page 2
Gruccio-Coia Engagement
Mary Gruccio announces the engagement
of her daughter, Lauren Marie Gruccio of
Vineland, to Paul Christopher Coia of
Vineland, son of Elaina and Paul Coia.
The bride-to-be is also daughter of the
late Michael Gruccio. She is a 2007 graduate
of Nova Southeastern University and is
employed as an elementary school teacher
by the Vineland Board of Education. Her
fiance, a 2004 graduate of Atlantic Cape
Community College is employed in farming.
The couple became engaged February 7,
2012. A fall wedding is planned.
Birth Announcement
Connor Sebastian St. Clair was born
July 25, 2012, at SJH Regional Medical
Center in Vineland. He weighed 8
pounds, 14 ounces, and was 21 inches
long. His blessed parents are John Jr.
and Shannon St. Clair of Vineland. The
proud grandparents are John Sr. and
Roseann St. Clair of Vineland and
Harry Jr. and Nancy Curley of Vineland.
The joyful great-grandparents are Harry
Sr. and Joyce Curley of Vineland and
Frank and Lorraine Koshak (formerly of
Vineland) of Ocean City.
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Faces in the News
I
VFD Swears In
New Captain
On July 27, 2012, Mark Cifaloglio
of the Vineland Fire Department was
promoted to Captain. The ceremony
took place in Mayor Romano's office
at City Hall. Pictured here is
Cifaloglio (left) being congratulated
on his new promotion.
WWW.TEAMBARSE.COM
Ordered and Paid for by Vineland Campaign 2012, John Barretta Treasurer
PLEASE VISIT OUR WEBSITE FOR WEEKLY UPDATES FROM
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REVIEW WHAT HAS BEEN TAKING PLACE IN CITY
GOVERNMENT DURING THE PAST FOUR YEARS.
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A B M A E T . W W W
U O F AST PPAST E H T ING R DU T N
A LLA P KING A TTA N BEE AS H T AAT
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M O C . E S R A
. EARS Y R U
Y T I C IN ACE
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2 Note contest rules at the top of this page.
Readers can deposit their puzzles 24/7
in the drop-slot located in the vestibule of
South Jersey Federal Credit Union,
106 West Landis Ave., Vineland, NJ 08360.
Entries must be deposited by 8:30 am on Monday.
Or, completed puzzles can mailed to:
South Jersey Federal Credit Union
Prizeweek Puzzle
PO Box 5429
Deptford, NJ 08096-0429
Mailed entries must be received by 10 am on Monday.
HOW TO ENTER:
$ PRIZEWEEK PUZZLE $
ACROSS:
1. Novice bookstore owner
_ space on newly installed
shelves for entire stock of
books, the exact number of
which he’s uncertain.
3. Art expert stuns friend
by claiming pal’s recently
purchased painting is most-
ly _ and therefore almost
worthless.
5. Girl is intrigued,
watching camp instructor
start a _ fire by rubbing
sticks together.
7. “So engaging, so full of
life” is the way adventurer,
in his stories, explains _.
8. Being _ short when
there are few workers cre-
ates stress for manager.
9. Businesswoman relies
on special _ as impetus to
complete an important task.
11. Visiting elderly aunt
complains that often _ get
in her way in the kitchen.
12. Experienced personnel
working for picture distribu-
tion firm have many a _
for consideration when
serving customers.
14. “Put your _ aside.
You’re worrying too much
about them,” says wife while
vacationing with husband.
15. Searched through
something.
17. “There are too many
complicated new _ to learn,”
complains new student at
professional acting academy.
18. A vehicle used for
transit.
DOWN:
2. Neighbor asks to bor-
row a pair of _ gloves to
use for an afternoon of
gardening.
3. Outstanding _ may
have a marked effect on
our emotions.
4. The law might take a
second look at a lot of _ in
a motor vehicle.
6. The opposite of under.
7. Reading father’s jour-
nal after his death is
unpleasant, especially when
it’s apparent _ is cause of
heartrending family event.
10. Raised in the country,
grandfather claims he was
usually served _ vegetables
with every dinner.
11. Adventurer recom-
mends relatively inexpen-
sive way to see faraway
places, which is with a _.
13. Business executive
warns colleague it is best
not to buy mining stocks
unless she can successfully
_ promoter’s claims.
16. Every.
THIS LIST INCLUDES, AMONG OTHERS,
THE CORRECT WORDS FOR THIS PUZZLE.
ALLOTS
ALLOWS
CAB
CARDS
CARES
DRINKS
DRUNKS
EACH
FADED
FAKED
FEARS
FEATS
GOOD
MEAL
MEN
MILD
ODD
OLD
OVER
POINT
PRINT
PROBE
PROVE
RAKED
ROLES
RULES
SEAL
SEAS
SIN
SON
TEN
TOTS
TOYS
TRAILER
TRAWLER
WILD
WOOD
ZEAL
PRIZEWEEK 080412
Jackpot increases by $25 each week if
no winning entry is received!
$300
1. Solve the puzzle just as you would in
any crossword puzzle. Choose from each
printed clue the word that best fits the
definition. Write the answers in the blank
space provided in each puzzle until all
spaces have been filled in.
2. There is no limit to the number of times
you may enter, however no facsimiles or
reproductions will be accepted. Only original
newspaper entry forms will be accepted.
3. Anyone is eligible to enter except
employees/directors of South Jersey
Federal Credit Union (SJFCU) and the
Grapevine and their immediate families.
4. A basic prize of $50.00 will be awarded
to the winner(s) of each weekly Prizeweek
Puzzle. In the case of multiple winners, the
prize money will be shared. If no correct
puzzle entries are received, $25.00 will
be added the following week. Winners
agree to permit use of their names and
photos by SJFCU and/or the Grapevine.
5. Entries can be mailed to South Jersey
Federal Credit Union, Attn: Prizeweek
Puzzle, PO Box 5429, Deptford, NJ
08096, or dropped off 24 hours a day,
7 days a week in the vestibule of SJFCU,
106 W. Landis Avenue, Vineland. Mailed
entries must be received by SJFCU no later
than 10 am on the Monday following the
Wednesday publication of the Prizeweek
Puzzle. Entries dropped off at the SJFCU
Vineland branch must be received no
later than 8:30 am on the Monday fol-
lowing the Wednesday publication of the
Prizeweek Puzzle. SJFCU assumes no
responsibility for late or lost entries.
6. South Jersey Federal Credit Union
reserves the right to issue additional
instructions in connection with the
Prizeweek Puzzle. All such instructions
are to become part of the official rules.
Visit www.SouthJerseyFCU.com for list
of additional rules.
SOLUTION TO LAST WEEK’S
PRIZEWEEK PUZZLE
The answers to last week’s puzzle
are below. For a detailed explanation
of the answers to last week’s puzzle
and additional rules, visit
www.SouthJerseyFCU.com
This week’s jackpot
Grapevine 3-11 080812-de:Layout 1 8/6/12 8:08 PM Page 4
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Faces in the News
I
Cruise Coordinators Praised By Vineland Mayor
Vineland Mayor Robert
Romano recently presented
certificates of appreciation to
Cruise Down Memory Lane
event coordinators, Marvin
Askins (center) and Ben
Notaro (left). The Cruise Down
Memory is the largest automo-
bile event held in the City of
Vineland. Askins is President
of South Jersey Mustang Club
and Notaro is Spokesperson
for South Jersey Cruisers
Association.
Young Jewish Leaders Take Trip To Israel
Arielle Hermanson of Millville and John Burkhart of Vineland recently
returned from a month-long trip to Israel as participants from Cumberland
County in the Kefiada program for young Jewish leadership, sponsored by New
Jersey and Delaware’s Partnership 2Gether Program.
Hermanson and Burkhart were two of a group of young Jewish leaders from
Jewish Federations in New Jersey and Delaware who brought together the
Partnership 2Gether Program and selected by the program to spend a month
in Israel. The participants are brought together to be living bridge representa-
tives to Jewish Federation’s sister city Arad, just outside the Dead Sea in
southern Israel.
The Kefiada program participants, while in Israel, traveled to Jerusalem and
other cultural and historical sites and met with Israeli community leaders.
They were also paired with Israeli counselors and worked to teach English to
Israeli school children at a summer camp in Arad. The Kefiada program is
funded through donations to Jewish Federation’s annual campaign.
John Burkhart of Vineland (extreme left) and Arielle Hermanson of Millville (second
from right) joined with other young Jewish leaders from Jewish Federations in New
Jersey and Delaware—Yale Gordon, Hayley Geller, Cara Klein, and Dillon Glaser—in a
month-long trip to Israel through the auspices of the Kefiada program for young
Jewish leadership.
Grapevine 3-11 080812-de:Layout 1 8/6/12 8:08 PM Page 6
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PRIMARY CARE PLUS
Comprehensive family care and wellness planning
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Just last year, Ginni Bell needed a cane to walk. She was
in pain, inactive, overweight, diabetic and hopeless.
Then one small decision changed her story – she called
AtlantiCare. Ginni was warmly embraced by the whole team
at her AtlantiCare Primary Care Plus practice. They gave
her the tools and information she needed to get her health
under control. They taught her to live again. Now she’s
walking without a cane, she’s lost weight, her diabetes
is managed and she’s more active than she’s ever been.
Ginni is especially thankful for her care manager, Deb
Glick, RN, who she credits for providing the support she
needed to live a longer, healthier, and happier life story.
Start a healthy new chapter in your life.
Call to schedule an appointment with your new
AtlantiCare Primary Care Plus provider.
AtlantiCare.org 1.888.569.1000
Taking You Well Into The Future
Care manager Deb Glick, RN and Ginni Bell Oceanview, NJ
SEND US YOUR
FACES. IT’S FREE!
Get your photos published in The
Grapevine... birthdays, engagements,
weddings, anniversaries, births,
graduations, awards. Send them to the
address listed on p. 2.
With Cherished
Memories
For Luis M. Rivera, Sr., who was
taken back to heaven two years
ago. You will be reunited with fami-
ly, friends and countless genera-
tions. We miss you more and more
each day you are not with us. With
our eternal love, forever and
always.
Love,
Your wife, Faith, your sons, Jr.,
Rick, Nate and A.J., and your
grandchildren, family and friends.
Radio Show Harkens
Back To Earlier Days
Cruisin’ with Philly Carol and New York
Kathy airs every Monday from 9 to 10 p.m.
on 92.1 WVLT FM. The show is a good old-
fashioned radio show, in the vein of radio
the way it used to be. It’s a live show with a
different guest every week. The hosts play
music, discuss area events, tell jokes, give
away a lunch, and always share a food
recipe at the end. Call in and share at 856-
596-0082.
Grapevine 3-11 080812-de:Layout 1 8/6/12 8:08 PM Page 7
Grand Opening of
The Dream Center
A ribbon cutting ceremony on July
27 marked the grand opening of The
Dream Center, at 541 E. Landis Avenue,
Vineland. The Dream Center is a thrift
store operated by Chestnut Assembly
of God, of Vineland.
From left: Diane Sacco, Main Street
Vineland Board of Directors Chairperson;
Rev. Anthony Cotto, Assistant Pastor of
Chestnut Assembly of God and Director of
The Dream Center; Isauna Cotto, Rev.
Cotto’s wife and volunteer at The Dream
Center; Hon. Robert Romano, Mayor of the
City of Vineland; Rev. Ralph Snook, Pastor
of Chestnut Assembly of God; and Todd
Noon, Main Street Vineland Executive
Director.
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Faces in the News
I
Man With Heart Condition Helped by Y Cares
The YMCA of Vineland has an 85-
year tradition of making a difference
in the lives of local people. One ster-
ling example of this is the story of
Victor Raposo, of Vineland. Raposo
was working as a nurse in New York
State in 2008 when he was diag-
nosed with myocarditis, a loosening
of cardiac muscle. Now, at age 40,
even with medications and a defib-
rillator/pacemaker, his heart only
functions at 30 percent. This means
that he cannot work and that he
must get regular exercise and main-
tain an optimum weight.
Raposo and his wife moved with
their four children to Vineland several years ago.
“My wife has relatives [in Vineland]. We moved here for family support, which
we needed due to my illness,” Raposo explained when asked why his family
came to Vineland. “I came from making a good salary to a social security check.
Even though my wife works, it’s extremely hard.”
The good news in Raposo’s story has been the YMCA of Vineland. Through it,
the entire family gets physical activity, which is so important—especially to
Raposo himself.
“The whole family loves it,” he said. “We swim and get other exercise. I highly
recommend that other families look into memberships.”
In the Raposo family’s case, membership was made accessible through the “Y
Cares” assistance program.
The Y offers memberships and programs at reduced rates to individuals and
families who meet strict criteria. “Y Cares” is funded by the Vineland Y’s Annual
Giving campaign.
“Victor and his family are perfect examples of members who are in special
circumstances and can be helped by our Annual Campaign,” said George
Steinbronn, Jr, the YMCA’s executive director. “We appreciate the community
support that makes ‘Y Cares’ possible.”
Donations to this year’s campaign are still being accepted online and at the YMCA.
“’Y Cares’ is a great program,” noted Raposo. “The Y has helped me emotion-
ally, physically, and mentally. I especially hope that people in seclusion or denial
will come to the Y. It has an excellent facility and staff. They are very professional
and caring.”
Raposo learns from his 6 year-old daughter, Raquel, about pool safety beside the pool at
the Vineland Y. Eleven-year-old Nathanial looks on. The family swims and exercises reg-
ularly at the Y.
Grapevine 3-11 080812-de:Layout 1 8/6/12 8:08 PM Page 8
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Vineland Y Adds New Board Members
Bob DeSanto, Alex Curio, and Diego Cuartas have been named to the YMCA
of Vineland’s Board of Directors. They join an active, 25-member board of com-
munity leaders. All are Vineland residents.
DeSanto is a partner in the Vineland law firm of Gruccio, Pepper, DeSanto,
and Ruth. He has been active in many state and county legal organizations, as
exemplified by his presidency of the Cumberland County Bar Association.
His many accolades include selec-
tion by the New Jersey Commission
on Professionalism for its Professional
Lawyer of the Year Award for 2002
and as a “Super Lawyer” by New
Jersey Monthly. DeSanto is also exten-
sively involved in the community. His
board memberships include the
Greater Vineland Chamber of
Commerce, the Vineland Downtown
Improvement District, the Italian
Benevolent Association, the Rotary
Club of Vineland, and others. He was
honored by the Italian Cultural
Foundation in 2011 and as a
“Hometown Hero” by The Grapevine
the previous year. This new Board
member has been a member of the
Vineland Y for two years. He has a
son, Christopher, and a daughter,
Stephanie. He is 66 and enjoys sports.
Following his graduation from
Johns Hopkins University, Curio
worked for his family’s retail business
in Vineland, as a writer and editor of
The Daily Journal, and as a planner
and grant writer for Tri-County
Community Action Agency. Since
1998, he has been employed by the
City of Vineland, originally with SNAP
(Strategic Neighborhood Assistance
Program); since 2005, he has been
the Community Development director.
Curio has not only been a member of
the Vineland Y but has worked with it
through his role with the City.
Curio and his wife, Joan, have two
children, Nicole and Matthew. His hob-
bies include golf, fishing, and garden-
ing. He is 57.
Unlike Jersey natives DeSanto and
Curio, Cuartas was born in Colombia,
South America. He pursued theologi-
cal studies in Ecuador before earning
Bachelor and Master’s degrees from
Nyack College, in New York State.
Cuartas has worked in Cumberland
County since 1988, both with the
Millville and Vineland Public Schools.
From 2000 to 2007, he was the execu-
tive director of the Hope Community
Foundation, in Vineland. From there,
Cuartas worked as a Community
Relationship aide for the Vineland
Health department.
Since 2001, he has also served as
the associate pastor of the Living Faith
Alliance Church, a Christian
Missionary church in Vineland.
Cuartas has been a member of the
Vineland Y for eight years and
describes the organization as “transformational.” Cuartas and Cindy, his wife,
have a daughter, Tabitha. He enjoys the beach and biking for relaxation.
From top to bottom: Bob DeSanto, Alex Curio and Diego Cuartas.
Grapevine 3-11 080812-de:Layout 1 8/6/12 8:08 PM Page 9
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Dr. Tyson uses the Optiwave Refractive Analysis (ORA) system:
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Attend a FREE seminar to have all of your questions answered
and speak with Dr. Tyson personally. Hear from an actual
patient and have a chance to watch a LIVE Cataract Procedure.
Reservations are required and limited for the Wednesday, August 22 Seminar. There will
be 4:30 and 6:30 pm sittings. Call Donna today to make your reservation at 856-691-
8188 ext 277. Seminars will be held at the SurgiCenter of Vineland. Refreshments will
be served. Attendees will be entered to win a gift certificate!
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Faces in the News
County College Program Graduates Clinical
Medical Assistants
Students of the Clinical Medical Assistant program at Cumberland County
College marked the completion of their training this month with a graduation
ceremony in the Luciano Center.
The students are: Jaime Berry of Port Norris, Racine Campbell of Millville,
Evelyn Eachus
of Bridgeton,
Jackie Hudson
of Deptford,
Dominique
Martin of
Bridgeton,
Naomi Narvaez
of Millville,
Brittany Pachelli
of Cape May
Court House,
Meghan
Pantalione of
Vineland, Lisa
Randazzo of
Bridgeton, Kathleen Rivera of Millville, Ashley Roberts of Vineland, and Lindsey
Smith of Cape May Court House.
CCC’s Clinical Medical Assistant program, administered by the Office of
Professional and Community Education, is designed for those interested in work-
ing in a physician’s office or clinical setting. Upon completion of the program,
students are prepared to help the doctor carry out procedures, care for patients,
perform basic lab tests and administer medications.
Graduates of CCC’s Clinical Medical Assistant program celebrate their accomplishments.
From left, they are: Lindsey Smith, Brittany Pachelli, Evelyn Eachus, Lisa Randazzo,
Racine Campbell, Jamie Berry, Meghan Pantalione, Naomi Narvaez, Kathleen Rivera,
Ashley Roberts and instructor Mary Ann Lincks.
Project Thanksgiving Founders Honored
Steve Plevins (top photo) and Alex Kaganzev
were recently honored by Governor Chris
Christie for their volunteerism and for starting
Project Thanksgiving. Both of these citizens
worked with the Vineland and Bridgeton
Salvation Army to make this a success.
To date, they have raised $45,000 for the
Salvation Army. This progress has been so
successful that is has spread to Gloucester
County. The goal is to eventually expand
statewide.
In a letter to the pair, Governor Christie
wrote, “On behalf of the State of New Jersey, I
am pleased to recognize your outstanding
efforts in collecting and donating turkeys
through Project Thanksgiving.
“Learning of the compassionate and chari-
table deeds of our state’s residents makes me
proud to be a New Jersayan. I understand that
because of your efforts, Project Thanksgiving
has grown into a valuable source of support
for individuals and families throughout New
Jersey. Our state is fortunate to benefit from
the leadership of individuals like you who go
above and beyond what could ever be expect-
ed. I commend you for setting a model of
community service that can serve as inspira-
tion for others to follow.”
Grapevine 3-11 080812-de:Layout 1 8/6/12 8:09 PM Page 10
L
ast night I was awoken by the
sounds of thunder claps rattling
the windows and the walls of
our home. This sound of sum-
mer has never really bothered me in the
past, but since the land hurricane (appar-
ently called a “derecho”) that hit our area
several weeks ago, I’ve grown a little
uneasy with extreme weather.
Like many people, the derecho affected
my family and me. Our house suffered an
explosion in the fuse box, resulting in us
living with my in-laws up north for more
than a week; the tops of several large oak
trees in our yard were sheered off; and a
fence in the backyard was destroyed by a
falling tree. Although our damage was
fairly significant, I am thankful that we all
made it through.
Today, after a night where sleep
seemed to come in short periods between
the rumbling of thunder, I looked out at
our backyard to see that while no further
damage was done, I still have much to do
from last month’s storm. I have been slowly
chipping away at the mountain of wood
that needs to sawed down into manage-
able pieces, so the end for me is in sight,
but my work is not done.
And so it is with many of life’s
challenges.
The economic challenges that our
nation has faced over the past few years
have taken a toll on everyone, and down-
town Vineland has certainly not been
immune. We’ve seen good businesses
struggle to survive, and we’ve even seen
good businesses simply close their doors,
unable to hold on until the recovery
comes.
And the recovery will come, I believe.
Even during these difficult times, I see
reasons for optimism. It seems that as I
walk Landis Avenue, each week brings a
new downtown business. In the 600 block
of Landis Avenue alone, work has been
going on without break for the past sever-
al weeks to transform a long-empty build-
ing into a new restaurant. A sign on a
storefront tells passersby that a clothing
store will soon occupy that space.
And right across the street from that a
well-known restaurant will soon open in
what was formerly the CrepeMaker Café.
I see businesses trying different things
to bring new customers into their shops,
and have heard about the positive impact
these efforts have had for the owners. I
watch improvements—both big and small—
take place, such as the installation of a new
gas main along the Avenue and something
as simple as merchants sweeping the side-
walk in front of their businesses.
And I see store owners getting involved
in projects like the Seafood Festival, the
Sidewalk Sale and the Wedding
Weekend—all of which are organized or
cosponsored by Main Street Vineland and
which are designed to help drive foot traf-
fic to the downtown.
I know things have been so hard for so
many, but I am hopeful that recovery for
our downtown, our city, our state and our
nation is in the offing. I
For more on Main Street Vineland, call (856)
794-8653, visit www.mainstreetvineland.org,
or check them out on Facebook.
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{ TODD NOON, EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR, VDID / MAINSTREET VINELAND }
I
Hope in a Storm
Economic recovery is on the horizon, but there are challenges along the way,
just as there is still work to do in storm cleanup.
8/31/12
Grapevine 3-11 080812-de:Layout 1 8/6/12 8:09 PM Page 11
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3
Faces in the News I
Six Honored at BAAU 13th Annual
Awards Banquet
Six people who have made significant contributions to enrich or
better the lives of African Americans and their communities were
honored by The Bridgeton African American Union (BAAU) of
South Jersey on Saturday, July 28, 2012, at their 13th annual
rewards dinner. This year’s recipients were Dr. Alfred Comer,
Dennis Bundy, Dr. Thomasina Jones, Karen Hollaway, Rev. Charles
Wilkens, and Richard Kates. Doug Long was the guest speaker.
Angela Jackson, Jordan Pierce, Karma Segers, and Sean Carter Jr.
received a stipend to assist them in furthering their education. The
event was held at Gia’s Catering Hall in Bridgeton.
Clockwise, from top left: Alfred Comer, Charles Wilkens, Dennis Bundy,
Karen Hollaway, Richard Kates, and Thomasina Jones.
Preschoolers Graduate
Christ The Good Shepherd Preschool held their Pre-K/Preschool graduation on Friday,
June 15. There was also a celebration in the church afterwards.
A Few Seats Still Remain!
There is still time for your child to receive a premier Catholic Education. St.
Mary School in Vineland, announces that there are still a few seats open in the
PreK3, PreK4, 4th, 6th, 7th and 8th grade classrooms.
Serving Cumberland and Atlantic counties since 1960, St. Mary School is a
welcoming community grounded in the traditions of the Daughters of Mercy.
They strive to inspire minds through 21st century learning, while the Catholic
faith aligns hearts with God and fosters lives of service.
For more details about St. Mary School or to schedule your personal tour, con-
tact Carol Kirchman, Advancement Director at 856-692-8537, ext. 320.
Grapevine 12-17 080812-de:Layout 1 8/6/12 7:53 PM Page 12
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Post-Storm Days
I live in Baltimore and after we got
slammed here, I texted my mom to please
take cover, it was heading [her] way and it
was bad. The next day, after securing
things at home, I drove to Vineland. I was
stunned by the devastation. I couldn’t
believe my drive up Route 55 as the dam-
age got worse and worse the closer I got
to [my hometown]. Every single yard had
at least one tree down. It was worse than
any storm I could remember.
My parents had lost a half dozen
ancient trees. My sister had one come
down, missing her living room but smash-
ing my nephew’s window.
Not having TV, living in the big garage
where the generator kept fans and the
refrigerators running, we sat around and
talked like we haven’t in years. I spent real
time with my parents, my sister and my
niece, without everyone running in differ-
ent directions or distracted by television. I
stayed for three days and it will be a time I
will always remember.
Despite the heat, the lack of power, the
damage, and so many other challenges
dealt with by everyone in those days, we
got to talk, to listen, and to be listened to.
It was an uninterrupted opportunity to
really get to catch up with family that I
love but don’t often get to appreciate like I
did in those post-storm days.
—Darlene Sanders Harris,
Baltimore, MD
In The Wake of Aurora
As the debate continues for the
implementation of a federal gun control
law, firearms sales have surged in the
aftermath of the Colorado theater mas-
sacre. This is a natural reaction by the
populace that also took place after the
truck bomb detonated in Oklahoma City
on April 19, 1995, the Columbine High
School massacre on April 20, 1999, the
Virginia Tech shooting on April 16, 2007
and the Fort Hood, Texas incident on
November 5, 2009.
The end result of a strict gun control
law fell on deaf ears and will continue to
do so. Over time, the debate over this
topic will subside and everything will
return to the way it was in the past.
Does anybody think that the federal
government will actually take action on
this matter?
If it hasn't happened by now, it won't
happen in the future.
—David M. Levin,
Vineland
Letters to
the Editor
I
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Bye bye ugly veins...
hellooooo summer.
The Vein Center at AMI AtlantiCare
can help get your legs looking and feeling great.
Complimentary Screenings
Are Available.
To discuss treatment options or to schedule
an appointment, please contact us at: 609-652-6094
219 North White Horse Pike, Hammonton, NJ
www.amiatlanticare.com
The Vein Center at Atlantic Medical Imaging treats
the entire spectrum of venous disease from spider
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source, resulting in a quicker, less painful treatment
option for you.
Guest Column { BY BRITTANY RAUP }
I
Ask Your Doc
That’s all it may take to get enrolled in a
Physician Referred Exercise Program.
H
ave you been thinking about
starting an exercise program but
aren’t sure where to start, what
you should be doing, or if it’s
even safe for you to exercise? Maybe you
have a disease or disability and never
thought you could exercise. Many people
share this sentiment and experience five
common fears that accompany the thought
of joining a fitness center. The five fears are
the fear of feeling stupid, the fear of feeling
isolated, the fear of looking and feeling like a
klutz, the fear of “physique anxiety,” and the
fear of being “forced to join.” Can you relate
to any of these fears?
If so, realize that you are not alone and
that there is an option for you to become
physically active in a safe and supportive set-
ting. With the consent of your physician, you
can participate in the Physician Referred
Exercise Program (PREP) at the South
Jersey Healthcare Fitness Connection. PREP
is a supervised program that combines the
expertise of a fitness professional with the
recommendations of your physician to
design a safe and effective program based on
your personal needs and goals. The PREP
program is affordable—60 days of supervised
exercise for $60. PREP is the first step into a
healthy lifestyle. All PREP participants meet
twice a week with a Medical Fitness
Specialist in a small group setting, and have
unlimited access to the Fitness Connection
on all other days. The program also includes
a monthly nutrition evaluation with the goal
of helping you achieve optimal health.
The South Jersey Healthcare Fitness
Connection’s PREP program has now
touched the lives of over 1,000 members of
our community. PREP began in 2010 with
the goal of working with the medical com-
munity to provide a safe, affordable, and
effective exercise program for people who
need to increase their physical activity. Since
its beginnings, PREP has received referrals
from over 190 physicians.
The PREP program follows the Surgeon
General’s “Exercise is Medicine” initiative to
use exercise as a tool to prevent disease or
act as a co-treatment for controlled disease.
Many individuals who are referred are bat-
tling chronic diseases such as diabetes,
hypertension, heart disease, cancer, or
arthritis. Others start PREP to prevent dis-
ease by increasing their activity and losing
weight.
Becoming more physically active is one of
the best things that you can do for your
health. “1 hour of exercise equals 1.95 added
hour of life” (New England Journal of
Medicine). Half of U.S. adults do not meet
the recommendations for physical activity,
and obesity is an epidemic that is sweeping
our country at staggering and ever-increas-
ing rates. Obesity is the number one most
preventable cause of death (American
Medical Association), and can be avoided by
living a healthy lifestyle that includes a bal-
anced diet and regular physical activity.
Do you have a medical diagnosis like dia-
betes, hypertension, or cancer? In most
cases, exercise is still an appropriate part of
your treatment and long-term wellness. The
PREP program can be used as a tool to stay
active before or after bariatric surgery, dur-
ing or after cancer treatment, or after com-
pleting rehab for a joint replacement. At the
Fitness Connection, we will work with you
and your doctor to ensure that your exercise
program is safe and appropriate for your
unique conditions.
Exercise can fit into your busy lifestyle.
Even five-minute bouts of exercise, if accu-
mulated throughout the day, can reduce your
risk of heart disease, obesity, diabetes, and
many other metabolic diseases, as well as
improving your mood, your sleep patterns,
and your metabolism.
We have many success stories to share
from the 1,000 participants who have fin-
ished PREP. One member was able to lose 25
pounds and shed several inches from her
waist and hips. Another member came in
after recovering from a stroke and he shared,
“The only days I don’t have pain are the days
that I exercise.” Other members have experi-
enced reduced fatigue after cancer treat-
ment, reduced pain in arthritic joints,
reduced blood pressure and blood sugar, and
increased mobility and quality of life. Will
you be our next success story? Have your
physician sign a referral and call the PREP
program to get started. I
Brittany Raup is PREP Coordinator at the
South Jersey Healthcare Fitness Connection.
She is certified by the American College of
Sports Medicine as a Health Fitness Specialist,
and is also certified by the American College
of Sports Medicine and the American Cancer
Society as a Cancer Exercise Trainer.
SJH Fitness Connection — PREP Program
1430 W. Sherman Ave. Vineland, 856-696-
3924, ext. 113.
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HAPPENINGS
EVERY THURSDAY
DivorceCare Series. Vineland First
Church of the Nazarene, N. Delsea Dr.
and Forest Grove Rd., Vineland. 6:30-7:45
p.m. Open to all men and women experi-
encing divorce or separation. No church
affiliation necessary. Seminar Sessions
Include: "Facing Your Anger"; "Facing Your
Loneliness"; "Depression"; "Forgiveness"
and more. DivorceCare uses a video
series featuring some of the nation's fore-
most experts on divorce and recovery
topics. This is an on-going series. Free,
child care provided. 697-4945.
FIRST AND THIRD THURSDAYS
Grupo de Autismo. Convent, 23 W.
Chestnut Ave., Vineland. 10 a.m.–12 noon.
Group of families with children diagnosed
with autism. Share information, ideas,
experiences, and suppport. Addressed to
the Hispanic community and people with
special needs. 882-8929,
www.facebook.com/gdautismo.com
WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 8
Historical Society Open House.
Vineland Historical and Antiquarian
Society, 108 S. Seventh St., Vineland. 1–4
p.m. Tour the museum and enjoy some
light refreshments after the time capsule
is buried on the grounds of the museum.
In addition, the Society will welcome visi-
tors on Saturday, August 11, between 1
and 4 p.m. with a brief tour of the
grounds where the time capsule is
buried before they tour the museum. The
Society, founded in 1864, is the oldest
local historical society in New Jersey. For
further information, call 856-691-1111 or
e-mail vinelandhistory@gmail.com.
Free Patient Education Seminar.
Lecture Hall at CDI, 1550 E. Chestnut
Ave., Vineland. 5:15–6:15 p.m. The topic
is Screening for Stroke, Vascular Disease
and Osteoporosis. Free, space is limited.
RSVP at 794-1700 or www.centerfordiag-
nosticimaging.com.
FRIDAY, AUGUST 10
Second Friday By The Bay. Bivalve.
5:30–8:30 p.m. Enjoy food, music,
gallery exhibits, lectures, vendors, and
craft activities in a beautiful waterfront
setting. August theme is Migration. The
Café offers service inside and on the
wharves for those who would like to dine
alfresco. Guests can sit and enjoy a
dozen oysters, sip New Jersey beer or
wine, have a delicious bowl of the Cafe's
signature Oyster Chowder or a home-
made dessert while listening to the
music or just watching the river flow.
Make A Wish Foundation Fundraiser.
Merighi’s Savoy Inn, E. Landis Ave. and
Union Rd., Vineland. 6–10 p.m. $40. BBQ
buffet, Chinese auction, DJ Nicky G, danc-
ing, all for a great cause, to help send a
local child to Hawaii for her special wish.
SATURDAY, AUGUST 11
Bivalve Family Fun Day: Purple
Martin Spectacular, 1–6 p.m. -
Investigate the world of purple martins
and other migrating animals at a special
event in Bivalve. learning about the
endemic species that use Bivalve as rest-
ing ground along their migration route.
Seafood, beverages and entertainment on
the wharves, migration games and crafts
for the kids. www.mauricerivertwp.org.
Monster Truck Mania. NJ Motorsports
Park, Millville. The off-track events are
something the whole family will enjoy—
from taking a ride in a REAL monster
truck to enjoying the moon bounce in the
Kids' Zone. Be here by 5:30 p.m. for Pit
Party starting at 6 p.m. You'll be able to
meet the drivers and get up close to the
Monster Trucks. The Finish Line Pub will
be open with $5 burger, six styles to
choose from, a Kids' Menu and $12.99
Steak Dinner Special.
Downtown Millville Car Show. High
St. from Main to Broad sts., Millville. 9
a.m.–3 p.m. in the Glasstown Arts
District. The Greater Millville Chamber of
Commerce and the Garden State 50’s
Auto Club will host the antique and clas-
sic cars. Popular girl group the
Angeltones, comedian and actor Johnny
Petillo, and Corky’s Time Machine. Cars
made before 1986 are eligible to partici-
pate, as well as special interest and
modern collectibles of any age. Dash
plaques and T-shirts will be given to the
first 250 cars registered. Judges will
award over 50 trophies, including two
Best of Show. Rain date 8/18. car regis-
tration: 856-825-3047. For event informa-
tion, call 856-825-2600.
The Troubadour KP's 5th Annual
Tomato Taste Off. Bogart’s Bookstore.
210 N. High St., Millville. 4 p.m. Free
admission. Bring your best tomato dish
and your best tooking Tomato. Live music,
prizes and tastes of the Jersey tomato.
SUNDAY, AUGUST 12
Family Fun Days: Summer Still Life
Drawing. WheatonArts, 1000 Glasstown
Rd., Millville. First Session: 1 to 2 p.m.,
Second Session: 2 to 3 p.m. Hands-on
art project. 17 and under admitted free.
Balancing Hormones Naturally.
Cooper Wellness Center, 6 LaSalle St.
(acrossfrom YMCA), Vineland. 7 -8 p.m.
Dr. Cooper, DC, from the non-profit
Foundation for Wellness Professionals,
will address hormonal issues that women
face, such as PMS and menopause.
Limited to 20 registered. 691-1313.
SUNDAY, AUGUST 12
Semper Marine Detachment 2nd
Sunday Breakfast. Semper Marine
Detachment #205, 2041 W. Landis Ave.,
Vineland. 8 a.m. - 12 p.m. All you can eat
breakfast. $7, $4 for children under 12, 5
and under free. 692-4300.
MONDAY, AUGUST 13
Malaga Camp Meeting Auxiliary
Luncheon and Concert, 4500 N.
Delsea Drive,Newfield. 12:30 p.m.
Limited seating concert by Robert &
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COMMUNITY CALENDAR

ITALIAN CULTURAL
FOUNDATION GALA
The Italian Cultural Foundation
(ICF) of South Jersey is set to host
its annual Gala Ball on Saturday,
October 20 at Merighi’s Savoy Inn
on East Landis Avenue in Vineland.
The Ball will honor Mary L. Gruccio
Ed.D, Gino Ciancaglini and Lenny
Gagliardi. Sponsorship and adver-
tising opportunities are available.
The deadline for all advertisements
is Friday, September 28. Tickets are
$150 per person.
Proceeds benefit the Italian
Cultural Foundation, a 501(c)(3)
non-profit organization whose mis-
sion is to educate the community
on the history and culture of Italy
and the important role Italian
Americans have played in the
development of the United States.
For more information, call (856)
691-5353, or write to The Italian
Cultural Foundation at P.O. Box 841,
Vineland, NJ 08362.
For more information or to pur-
chase tickets, call 856-691-5353.
Bus Trips
• Ramoth Church (Vineland Nazarene)
is sponsoring a bus trip to New York City
on Saturday, October 6. Bus leaves
church parking lot at 8 a.m. and returns
at 9 p.m. NYC Drop off locations: Radio
City Music Hall, Central Park or Canal
Street with eight hours to do as you wish.
$45 per person includes transportation,
driver gratuity, coffee/water/ doughnuts.
Call 358-9124.
• The Millville Senior Center is spon-
soring a trip to theAmerican Music
Theatre Christmas Show in Lancaster, PA,
on December 4. Dinner at Huckleberry
Restaurant at the Fulton Steamboat Inn.
Tickets are $100. For information and to
make a reservation call 856-207-4802.
• Shop the Lancaster Outlets and dine
at Shady Maple Smorgasbord on
Saturday, November 10. Depart SJH
Fitness Connection (rear parking lot) at 8
a.m. Return to SJH Fitness Connection
9 p.m. Tickets: $51 (for bus fare and din-
ner) per person. Itinerary includes Tanger
and Rockvale Outlets. For reservations
and information, contact Jill Higgins (856-
358-8822). Proceeds benefit Girl Scout
Troop #97420.
• Ramoth Church (Vineland Nazarene)
is sponsoring a bus trip to Rockvale and
Tanger Outlets in Lancaster, PA, on
Saturday, November 17. Bus leaves
church parking lot at 8 a.m. and returns
at 7 p.m. $40 per person includes trans-
portation, driver gratuity, coffee/water/
doughnuts. Call 358-9124.
LOVE THY NEIGHBOR
• Word of Life Pantry, 425 N. 6th
St., Vineland. Word of Life "Love
Thy Neighbor" Food Pantry sup-
plies families with food and house-
hold items throughout the year. Our
pantry is open on the third and
fourth Sunday of each month from
1:30 - 2 p.m. Families are allotted
one food pick up per month. For
more details, call 507-0005. Word
of Life is located at 425 N. 6th
Street Vineland (across from
Landis Park).
• “A Helping Hand" is a ministry of
Faith Bible Church whose goal is to
provide food assistance to those in
need throughout the Vineland area.
This ministry operates out of the
Faith Bible Church facility on the
third Saturday of every month from
9 to 11 a.m. Faith Bible Church is
located at 3139 East Chestnut
Avenue, across from Vineland High
School. Phone: 856-691-3460 or
email www.faithbible.org.
Grapevine 12-17 080812-de:Layout 1 8/6/12 7:53 PM Page 16
Joyce Hayes from America’s Keswick. For
details: 696-8065.
TUESDAY, AUGUST 14
Family Fun Night. Purple Penguin Ice
Cream, 1008 Harding Hwy (Rt. 40
between Main Rd and Bluebell Rds).,
Newfield. Forest Grove Vol. Fire Co is
sponsoring this event. 7–10 p.m. One-
hour pony rides, clown, music, cartoon
characters,food and friends. Bring a
chair/blanket, special showing at dusk.
Park in rear of property. 697-4731.
City Council Meeting. Council
Chambers, City Hall, Vineland. 7:30 p.m.
Formal official action may be taken at
such meetings on any and all business
involving The City of Vineland. Pre-meet-
ing conferences at 7 p.m., at the Council
Caucus Room, City Hall. No formal offi-
cial action shall be taken at any such
pre-meeting conference.
Movie for Children and Teens. Millville
Public Library, 210 Buck St., Millville. 1:30
p.m. The animated fantasy film The
Legend of the Guardians: The Owls of
Ga’Hoole (PG), will be shown. Based on
the popular series of books by Kathryn
Lasky, this movie follows Soren, a young
owl enthralled by his father’s epic stories.
Popcorn will be served. Bottled water/
snacks are allowed. RSVP at Millville
Public Library or call 856-825-7087, ext. 12.
Programs are free and open to the public.
WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 15
Historical Society Seminar. Vineland
Historical and Antiquarian Society, 108 S.
Seventh St., Vineland. 7 p.m. Mark
Demitroff presents "Come Earnest
Homeseekers: Ethnic Settlements of the
Pines." Demitroff, who is currently com-
pleting his doctoral degree in cultural
geography at the University of Delaware, is
a dynamic speaker who will share some of
his findings about regional settlement pat-
terns. For further info, call 856-691-1111 or
e-mail vinelandhistory@gmail.com.
AUGUST 16 THROUGH 18
The Greater Bridgeton Amish Farm
Market. 720 Shiloh Pike (Route 49),
Bridgeton. Thursday 9 a.m.–6 p.m., Friday
9 a.m.–7 p.m., Saturday 9 a.m.–4 p.m.
Breakfast at 8 a.m. all three days. Horse
and buggy rides, pig roast, specials and
sales. 856-451-3008.
AUGUST 18 AND 19
Seafood Festival. Bellview Winery 150
Atlantic St., Landisville. Local vendors will
be on hand with freshly prepared seafood
of all kinds; BBQ and other fare will also
be available. Live music by Philadelphia's
popular “To the Max” dance band.
Saturday’s festivities feature an American
Car Show from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. (rain date
is Sunday). Bellview's wines may be sam-
pled under the wine tent. Three varieties of
sangria will be offered by the carafe. Bring
lawn chairs or blankets. Admission to
Seafood Festival and Car Show is $10 per
person (includes wine tasting, car show,
music, souvenir Bellview wine glass). For
directions and details on how to register
your car in the American Car Show, call
856-697-7172 or go to
www.BellviewWinery.com.
SUNDAY, AUGUST 19
Chicken Barbecue. North Italy Club,
South East Ave. and Virano Ln., Vineland.
Noon–6 p.m. Platter includes half chick-
en, macaroni salad, tomatoes, corn, hot
or sweet peppers, and roll. $10. Also
available: raw and steamed clams, hot
dogs, sausage and pepper sandwiches,
cake and coffee. Music by Double Helix
Band. 856-692-9862.
WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 22
Cataract Seminar. Eye Associates,
SurgiCenter of Vineland, 251 S. Lincoln
Ave. Vineland. 4:30 and 6:30 sittings.
Watch Dr. Tyson perform cataract surgery
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THE SOUP KITCHEN OF
VINELAND AUXILIARY
The Soup Kitchen of Vineland Auxiliary is a non-prot 501 (c) (3): contributions: tax deductible 170 (b) (1) (A) (vi).
The Final Program will be the evening of
August 17, when we will present to the Arise
Summer Camp administrator our $1000 grant.
You and your friends are all invited to attend.
The camp is FREE.
Breakfast, lunch and snacks will be served.
Also... Arts & Crafts • Woodworking
Recreation • Games • Swimming
Kitchen Activities • Bar-B-Q on Fridays
Special Visitors • Music • Field Trips
Martial Arts • Academic Refreshers
Social Skills Character Development
It is held at the First United Methodist church,
corner of 7th and Landis, Vineland, NJ. For children
who have completed grades 1st through 5th.
To register for this FREE camp
(space is extremely limited),
call 856-691-0940.
We are pleased to announce
THE ARISE SUMMER CAMP
will be August 6 –17, from 9 am to 4 pm each day
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High School Reunions
• Millville High School Class of 1962
is planning its 50th class reunion for
September 29, at The Ramada Inn.
Invitations have been mailed to
classmates, and reservations are
now being accepted. For more infor-
mation, contact Barbara @ 856-327-
8095 or judiben@comcast.net.
• Millville Senior High School Class
of 1992 Reunion Committee is
searching for classmates. Please
email Angie and Kimfor reunion tick-
et information at
mshs1992class@gmail.com or find
us on FACEBOOK at face-
book.com.MSHS.Class.of.1992.
Reunion is Saturday, October 6,
2012 at Millville Motorsports Park
from 7 to 11 p.m."
• SHHS Class of 1957 is having its
55th class reunion on September 30,
at Greenview Inn, Italia Ave.,
Vineland, noon to 4 p.m. Casual
attire, more information to follow.
• Vineland High School Class of
1982 is holding its 30th class
reunion on Saturday, November 24,
from 7 p.m. until midnight, at the
newly remodeled Greenview Inn at
the Eastlyn Golf Course. The
Greenview Inn is located at 4049
Italia Avenue. Tickets are $75 per
person and include a full course
meal, beverages and entertainment
by a disk jockey.
For more information, including a
reservation form: http://www.
vineland.org/pr/public/vhs82_reunio
n.pdf The class officers are also
attempting to reach all classmates.
Please contact them through their
Facebook page - VHS Class of 82, or
contact Lisa (Rosi) Arena at
larena@vineland.org.
Continued on page 28
Grapevine 12-17 080812-de:Layout 1 8/6/12 7:53 PM Page 17
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Vintage Vineland { VINCE FARINACCIO }
Labor Force
Bridgeton’s P.J. Ritter Company employed German
POWs in the summer of 1944.
I
n early 1944, Bridgeton’s P.J. Ritter
Company looked as if it could
become a casualty of World War II.
With its production significantly
increased during the war and its work
force compromised by the growing num-
ber of U.S. military enlistments, the busi-
ness had struggled the previous two sum-
mers to attain the 600 summer employees
necessary to tend to the seasonal crop.
When the army was no longer able to
provide labor, Ritter Company offered
employment to an unlikely source—the
German POWs housed in Fort Dix.
The decision was daring and there
were a series of requirements and
demands that needed to be met before the
Germans could become Bridgeton laborers.
In “War on the Home Front,” an elaborate
and revealing account of P.J. Ritter
Company’s employment of POWs pub-
lished more than 20 years ago in South
Jersey Magazine, former Ritter Personnel
Director Earl L. McCormick explains that
the A.F.L. Labor Union was the first hurdle
in the proposed plan.
The union, he writes, “would agree to
the use of POW labor only if every
American job applicant was first
employed, regardless of physical condition.
So, we would carefully review our options,
other than the employment of German
prisoners. There were no other options.”
The suggestion to use POW labor,
according to McCormick, came from the
State and U.S. Employment Services, which
arranged a conference with the Fort Dix
Commanding Officer. At the meeting,
McCormick was informed that any employ-
ment of the prisoners was contingent upon
securing an area close to the Ritter plant
that was large enough to construct a com-
pound to house the POWs and guards.
The search for a suitable location
turned up Robinson’s Farm, a secluded
area of Fairfield Township that hosted
religious retreats for urban dwellers and
was run by Bishop Ida Robinson. Four
miles from Ritter’s operations, the wooded
area was an ideal spot, but its proposed
use as a facility for German prisoners did
not meet with the bishop’s immediate
approval. The Nazi portrayal of African-
Americans as “subhuman” was the deter-
mining factor in Robinson’s decision, but
McCormick’s efforts convinced her to
relent and abandon the retreat program in
favor of the POW camp.
Acquiring the site left only the
Germans’ approval of the jobs they were
being offered. Various sources report that,
by Geneva Convention standards, prison-
ers of war were allowed to work as long as
they were paid. In addition, POWs could
not be required to involve themselves in
any services considered “war production”
benefitting their captors, and that included
food industries.
The only way to determine how open
the Germans were to the job proposal was
to set up a meeting. In the spring of 1944,
a heavily guarded truck carrying approxi-
mately 20 prisoners journeyed from Fort
Dix to Fairton’s Robinson’s Farm to meet
with McCormick. Anticipating that at
least one of the Germans would speak
English, the Ritter Personnel Director was
surprised to discover that half of the
POWs already spoke our native tongue,
with several displaying an impressive
command of the language.
It wasn’t long before the Germans
addressed the Geneva Conference ruling
about food and “war production.”
McCormick informed them that “we did
not consider food the same as guns” and
explained that food industries fed civilians
as well as soldiers. “I acknowledged their
right to refuse work in a food factory and
asked that they not accept the company
offer unless they really wanted to do so...,”
he reports.
Addressing questions from the prison-
ers, McCormick explained that “they
would be used throughout the plant in
most production operations, the same as
civilians.” He was frank about how some of
the current employees, especially those
with family and friends in the military,
might harbor “adverse feelings” but was
confident that most would “appreciate the
situation” and avoid confrontation.
After several recesses during which the
Germans discussed the proposal privately,
the prisoners accepted the jobs, still
believing that “food was as essential to the
war effort as guns,” but conceding there
was a difference here because it was being
used to feed civilians as well. They also
admitted that they were tired of just sitting
around. Within minutes of their accept-
ance, they were on the road back to Fort
Dix while the army began converting
Robinson’s Farm into a compound. I
Grapevine 18-23 080812-de:Layout 1 8/6/12 8:07 PM Page 18
Knit for Kids in Need
The Cumberland County Library will be
accepting donations of knitted hats and
scarves in new condition for the organiza-
tion, World Vision’s Knit for Kids, in asso-
ciation with Vogue Knitting LIVE and its
Chairperson, Debbie Macomber.
Knit for Kids is a nationwide family of
28,000 volunteer knitters who fight pover-
ty with their knitting needles. The dona-
tions will provide warmth and comfort to
children in need across the nation and
around the world. Last year, World Vision
distributed more than 66,000 knitted items
to children in poverty. The Cumberland
County Library will accept donations
through September 22, 2012.
Come visit the Cumberland County
Library at 800 E. Commerce St., Bridgeton,
to view the knitted items, and knitting pat-
tern books, located in the library display
case. For specific questions regarding the
Knit for Kids project, phone Gina Allewelt
at the library at 856-453-2210, ext. 108.
OLMA Announces 2012
Salerno Society Inductees
Our Lady of Mercy Academy, the all-
girls Catholic college preparatory school in
Newfield, has announced plans for the
inaugural Tribute Golf Classic on Tuesday,
October 23, at Galloway National Golf Club.
The event will also mark the induction of
four individuals into the school’s Salerno
Society, the recently formed hall of fame
created to pay tribute to students, coaches
and contributors who have had a profound
effect on the growth and success of sports
at the school.
The newly formed Salerno Society is
named in honor of Sister Mary Dolores
Salerno, D.M., who served as the school’s
first principal from 1962 to 1980. It was
through her efforts that OLMA introduced
sports as an integral part of the curriculum
at the school.
This year’s inaugural class of inductees
includes the following individuals:
Philip Caporale
(posthumously):
Mr. Caporale
served as varsity
soccer coach at
OLMA for nine
years. During that
tenure he eclipsed
101 career wins and
led the Villagers to numerous Cape-
Atlantic League division and conference
titles. He died in
May 20, 2012 as the
result of a traffic
accident at the age
of 31.
John Bohanna
(posthumously):
Mr. Bohanna was a
beloved swimming
coach at OLMA from 1998 to 2002. In
addition to coaching OLMA’s swim team,
he helped establish the girls Volleyball and
Track & Field programs and St. Augustine
Prep’s swim program. A Marine Corps vet-
eran, Coach Bo succumbed to pancreatic
cancer at the age of 36 in 2002.
Dolores
Lopergolo (posthu-
mously): Ms.
Lopergolo was well
known in the area
for her years serv-
ing as Clerk for the
City of Vineland.
But it was her ded-
ication to OLMA that helped build the ath-
letic program at the school. Ms. Lopergolo
was the first coach of the OLMA basketball
team and directed the squad for numerous
years. She died in 2009 at the age of 77.
Carmine C.
Catalana III
(posthumously):
Mr. Catalana was
well known across
the region for his
tireless support of
athletics. A former
coach in various
youth leagues, he was the owner of
Cumberland Dairy and a major contributor
over the years to not only OLMA athletics
but to other schools and youth leagues in
the Cumberland County. Mr. Catalana died
early this year at the age of 81.
Proceeds from October’s golf tourna-
ment and tribute dinner will help support
the growing athletic program at Our Lady
of Mercy Academy. For more information
about golf or sponsorships, call 856-690-
1999 or e-mail jcovella@comcast.net. A
special website can also be accessed at
http://www.wix.com/olmaathletics/golf.
National Immunization
Awareness Month
Are your child's vaccinations up to date?
Howabout yourself? Since August is
National Immunization Awareness month,
it would be a great time for everyone to
make sure they're up to date with their
immunizations or vaccinations. Being vacci-
nated protects you fromserious illnesses
and helps control many diseases and infec-
tions in our country fromspreading.
Children, under the age of 5, are especially
at risk for diseases because their immune
systems have not built the necessary defens-
es to fight infection. All children must have
their vaccinations before entering school or
a licensed daycare because they can easily
contract an illness fromanother child.
It’s also important for adults to keep up
with the appropriate vaccinations, especial-
ly when a booster is needed. “One of the
most effective ways to protect you and your
child’s health and well-being, is to be sure to
receive the vaccines they need before enter-
ing a daycare, school or college,” says
George Sartorio, the Health Officer for the
Cumberland County Health Department.
“It’s vital for adults to talk with their health-
care provider to see what vaccinations are
appropriate for themand their children.”
Nurses from the Health Department
will be administering free immunizations
for children ages 2 to 18 for diseases such
as measles, mumps, rubella, diphtheria,
tetanus, hepatitis B and pertussis through
their Shots for Tots program. A parent or
legal guardian must accompany all children
and are required to bring up to date shot
records. No appointments are necessary for
Shots for Tots clinics. Shots for Tots clinic
locations, dates and times:
* St. Andrews Episcopal Church, 186 E.
Commerce St., Bridgeton
Every second Thursday of the month
from 10 a.m. to 12 noon
* First United Methodist Church, 201 N.
2nd St., Millville
Every fourth Thursday of the month
from 10 a.m. to 12 noon
* Vineland Public Health Nursing, 610
Montrose St. Suite 1, Vineland
Every third Wednesday of the month
from 9 a.m. to 12 noon
Adults without insurance or that have
insurance that doesn't cover vaccination can
receive free immunizations for the flu,
meningitis, pneumonia, human papillo-
mavirus, hepatitis Aand B, and others
through the STDprogram. No appointments
are needed for the STDclinic. The STD
clinic is located at the FamCare building at
30 Magnolia Avenue in Bridgeton every
Wednesday from4 p.m. to 5 p.m. Contact
the Nursing Division of the Cumberland
County Health Department at 856-327-7602
to make an appointment for the chickenpox
and shingles vaccines for adults and children.
For more information, visit the
Cumberland County Health Department
website at www.ccdoh.org.
CDI Joins Aetna Health
Insurance Network
The Center for Diagnostic Imaging
(CDI) has signed an agreement with Aetna
to enable patients covered by the health
insurance company to use CDI’s advanced
radiology services. This agreement provides
patients in Cumberland, Salemand Atlantic
counties with a newcost saving option for
health care that includes a comprehensive
array of modalities including MRI, CT,
PET/CT and more. Aetna patients can
schedule tests at CDI immediately, with the
changes having gone into effect on August 1.
Since opening in Vineland in 2002 and
in Bridgeton in 2005, CDI has been com-
mitted to providing state-of-the-art imag-
ing services. CDI is equipped with the
finest technologies and staffed by board-
certified radiologists. Over 300 patients a
day utilize the CDI facilities and CDI pro-
vides employment for 80 individuals.
CDI is a partnership between five pres-
tigious, board-certified physicians:
Shailendra Desai M.D.; Ernesto Go, M.D.;
Ajay Munjal, M.D.; Steven Rothfarb, M.D.;
and Satish Shah, M.D.
W
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856-981-0418
1425
Magnolia Rd.
Vineland NJ 08361
magnoliahillstudios@verizon.net
3 CAMP WORKSHOPS IN AUGUST
Castles and Cottages, Aug. 6-10
- art, classical music, and theatrical movement
- the greatest stories ever told with princess, knight,
dragon, and firebird
Animation Arts & Cartoon Drawing, Aug 13 - 17
- learn stop motion animation technique
- make an animated video
- bring your drawings to life
Little Peanuts Dance and Art Camp, Aug 18
- for our youngest friends
- dance and art based on the Peanuts characters
News in Brief
I
Continued on page 28
Grapevine 18-23 080812-de:Layout 1 8/6/12 8:07 PM Page 19
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AUGUST 7 THROUGH 11
Nightlife at Bennigan’s. 2196 W. Landis
Ave., Vineland, 205-0010. Karaoke
Thursdays with Bob Morgan, 9 p.m.-close,
$3 Heinekens, DJ/Dance Party Fridays 9
p.m.-Close, $3 Coronas. All Sports
Packages: MLB Extra Innings, NBA League
Pass, NHL Center Ice, and NFL Sunday
Ticket. $3 23-oz. Coors Light & $5 23-oz.
Call for RSVP and details.
EVERY TUESDAY
Karaoke. The Cosmopolitan. 3513 S.
Delsea Dr,, Vineland. Sing your heart out.
765-5977.
EVERY WEDNESDAY
Salsa Night. The Cosmopolitan. 3513 S.
Delsea Dr., Vineland. Latin-inspired dance
party. 765-5977.
Country Dancing. The Centerton Country
Club & Event Center, 1022 Almond Rd.,
Pittsgrove. 7–11 p.m.
WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 8
John Clark Little Big Band. Michael
Debbi Park, 327 Cedar Ave, Richland. 7–9
p.m. Free, bring a lawn chair.
EVERY THURSDAY
Jazz Duos. Annata Wine Bar, Bellevue
Ave., Hammonton, 609-704-9797. Live Jazz
featuring area's best jazz duos. 6:30 - 9:30
p.m. No cover. RSVP recommended.
Magician Kevin Bethea. Centerton
Country Club & Event Center, Ten22 Bar &
Grill, 1022 Almond Rd., Pittsgrove, 358-
3325. 6–8 p.m. Magician and sleight of
hand illusionist performs world-class
magic.
AUGUST 9 THROUGH 12
Nightlife at Ten22. Centerton Country
Club & Event Center, The Patio Bar at
Ten22, 1022 Almond Rd., Pittsgrove, 358-
3325. Wed.: Country Night with DJ Bob
Morgan, 7-11 p.m. Lessons and non-stop
dancing (song requests all night) on one of
the largest dance floors in region
Admission is $5. Thurs: DJ Tommy B 8
p.m., Fri: TBA 9 p.m., Sat: DJ Tommy B 9
p.m.
Nightlife at Mori’s. Lou Ferretti's Mori's
on Landis, 830 E. Landis Ave., Vineland,
690-0300. Thurs.: Juicy 8 p.m.. Fri.:
Marquee 8 p.m. Sat.: High Noon Express. 8
p.m.
AUGUST 9 THROUGH 13
Nightlife at Ramada. Harry's Pub at
Ramada, W. Landis Ave. and Rt. 55,
Vineland, 696-3800. Wed.: Ladies Night,
1/2 price appetizers all night. Happy Hour
Mon.-Sat, 4-6 p.m. $1 off alcoholic drinks.
Wed.–Sat., live entertainment.
AUGUST 9, 10 AND 11
Nightlife at Neptune Restaurant. 1554
S. Delsea Dr., Vineland. Nightly entertain-
ment. Call for details. 692-2800.
Nightlife at The Rail. The Rail, 1252
Harding Hwy, Richland. 697-7245. Fri.: 4-
Wheel Drive Band with line dance instruc-
tion. Sat.: Me & the Boys..
Nightlife at Bojo’s. 222 N. High St.,
Millville, 327-8011. Tues.: Bike Nite with live
entertainment. Thurs.: Karaoke. Fri.: Mike
Bryan Band. Sat.: DJ/band. Daily drink and
food specials.
ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

VRDC Summer Dance
Program Features Renowned
Dance Instructors
Dance students are invited to an
intensive dance workshop to learn
with some of the best teachers in the
world of dance. This three-week pro-
gram provides unique classical, mod-
ern, contemporary, pointe, jazz, lyric,
hip hop, tap and variations training.
The program runs weekdays
August 13-31. There are two ses-
sions. The intermediate session is 9
a.m. to 4 p.m. The advance session
runs 10:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. There is
free wrap around care beginning at
8:30 a.m.
The faculty this year spans from
New Jersey to California. Teaching
ballet this year is James Ihde, princi-
ple dancer with Pennsylvania Ballet.
Angelo Lemmo, resident choreogra-
pher and faculty member of Canton
Ohio Ballet will also be teaching bal-
let. The Artistic Director of
Philadelphia Dance Theater, Joy
Delaney will round out the ballet fac-
ulty. Daniel Marshall, artistic director
of La Diego Dance Theater, will be
teaching Modern and Jazz. New
Jersey residents Kelly Millar and
Jenna Dannenberger will be teaching
on faculty. Millar is the Ballet
Mistress for the VRDC and she will
be teaching the specialty classes,
which include tap, musical theater,
lyric, and pointe. Dannenberger, a
graduate from Hartt University will be
teaching Modern and variations.
Rounding out the faculty will be
Marlayna Locklear, principle dancer
with Dayton Contemporary Dance
Company, teaching Modern dance.
Kimberly Chapman, graduate of
Juilliard, will instruct Dance History.
Cost for the program is a weekly
rate of $300 or the full course is at a
savings of only $800. To enroll,
phone Maxine’s Studio, home of the
Vineland Regional Dance Company,
at 856-691-6059. You can also get
more detailed information on the
company website at www.VRDC.org.
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Maxine’s Dance Studio
C
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L
EBRATING 41 YEA
R
S
Fall Registration
Now through August 31
For Ages 3 and up
Classes in: Ballet t Pointe t Tap t Jazz t Modern t Hip Hop
For more information and to register
Maxine’s Dance Studio is the official home of the VRDC (Vineland Regional Dance Company)
and a full performing honor member of Regional Dance America/NE for 34 years.
OPEN HOUSE
AUGUST 13
TH
- 17
TH
º 9 - 10:S0 AM
Maxine & Kimberly Chapman; Co-Directors
2388 N. East Avenue, Vineland, NJ 08360
Visit our web site at: www.VRDC.org
* LIMITED BOYS SCHOLARSHIPS AVAILABLE
All Current Students
Must Re-Reglster
Phone: 856-691-6059
Make a lifelong
friend from abroad.
Enrich your family with
another culture. Now you
can host a high school
exchange student (girl or
boy) from France, Germany,
Scandinavia, Spain,
Australia, Japan, Brazil, Italy
or other countries. Single
parents, as well as couples
with or without children,
may host. Contact us ASAP
for more information or to
select your student.
Host an Exchange
Student Today!
(for 3, 5 or 10 months)
Camilla from Italy, 16 yrs.
Enjoys dancing, playing the piano
and swimming. Camilla looks
forward to cooking with her
American host family.
Daniel from Denmark, 17 yrs.
Loves skiing, playing soccer and
watching American movies. Daniel
hopes to learn to play football and
live as a real American.
Sue at 732-251-1517 or
Amy at 1-800-677-2773 7ROO )UHH
www.assehosts.com or email info¡asse.com.
Founded in 1976
ASSE International Student Exchange Program is a Public Benefit, Non-Profit Organization.
For privacy reasons, photos above are not photos of actual students
I N T E R N A T I O N A L S T U D E N T E X C H A N G E P R O G R A M S
AUGUST 10, 11, 12, 16, 17, 18, 19, 23, 24 AND 25
My Way: A Musical Tribute to Frank Sinatra. Eagle Theatre, 208 Vine St.,
Hammonton, 609-704-5012. 8 p.m. except August 12 and 19 at 3 p.m A tribute to
the life and times of the musical and cultural legend. For more information, including
inquiries regarding group sales, call the Eagle Theatre at (609) 704-5012.
Tickets $22. Reserve at www.TheEagleTheatre.com.
OL’ BLUE EYES
Nightlife at Old Oar House. Old Oar
House Irish Pub. 123 N. High St., Millville,
293-1200. Wed.: Karaoke 9 p.m., Fri.:Main
Street Band 9 p.m., Sat.: Rob Huntley 9
p.m. Sun.: Rob Huntley, 5–9 p.m.
EVERY FRIDAY AND SATURDAY
Top 40 Dance Party w/ DJ Tony
Morris. The Cosmopolitan. 3513 S. Delsea
Dr,, Vineland. All of the most popular main-
stream dance music. 765-5977.
FRIDAY, AUGUST 10
Rich Fuller and Friends . Bogart’s
Bookstore. 210 N. High St., Millville. Free
admission. Indie Soul Rock 7–9 p.m.
Adelante. Viet Bistro, The Cumberland
Mall, 3849 S. Delsea Dr., Vineland, 825-
5001. 6 and 7:45 p.m.
SATURDAY, AUGUST 11.
Adelante. The Sweet Life Bakery, 601 E.
Landis Ave., Vineland, 692-5353. Live
music. J. Jody Janetta-drums, Paul
Woznicki-piano/flute and Stephen Testa-
bass. Sets: 11 a.m. and 12:15 p.m.
AUGUST 10, 11, AND 12
The Music Man. Levoy Theatre, 126-130 N.
High St., Millville. Showtimes: Friday 8 p.m.,
Saturday 2 & 8 p.m., Sunday 2 & 7 p.m.
Catch the resident theater troupe, the Off
Broad Street Players, in their inaugural pro-
duction. Guests who attend Opening Night
are invited to tour the stage and participate
in a meet-and-greet with the director and
artists. Ticket prices vary. www.levoy.net
MONDAY, AUGUST 13
Tony Mascara. Giampetro Park, E. Landis
Ave., Vineland. 7 p.m. Enrico Serra Band
Shell. In case of rain: Memorial School
Auditorium, Main Rd. and Chestnut Ave.
Come out and enjoy the free Monday con-
certs and dancing on the adjacent dance
floor. Upcoming concerts: 8/20 Bud Cavallo
Duo, 8/27 Frank Marone and The Italians.
TUESDAY, AUGUST 14
John Melton Big Band. Bruno Melini
Park, 616 Central Ave., Minotola. 7–9 p.m.
Rain or shine. Come out and enjoy the free
Tuesday concerts staged by The American
Federation of Musicians, Local 595.
Upcoming concert: 8/21 – Joe Luisi.
WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 15
Lonnie Youngblood. Michael Debbi Park,
327 Cedar Ave, Richland. 7–9 p.m. Free,
bring a lawn chair. Upcoming concerts: 8/22
Bob Ferris Orchestra, 8/29 DJ Nicky G.
THROUGH AUGUST 31
Maureen Fain: Watercolor Moments.
Gallery 50, Inc., 50 E. Commerce St.,
Bridgeton. Wed.–Sat. 11 a.m–4 p.m. Opening
Reception Friday, August 3, 6–9 p.m. The
artist will present “Flowers: A Workshop in
Watercolors” on Saturday, August 4, 9:30
a.m-3:30 p.m. 856-575-0090.
AUGUST 17 THROUGH 19
Into the Woods Junior. Landis Theater,
830 E. Landis Ave., Vineland. Local thespians
present this cockeyed fairy tale where all of
your favorite characters—Cinderella, Little
Red Riding Hood, Jack (and his beanstalk)
and The Witch—meet and interact on their
journeys. Tickets $15. For information or to
purchase tickets, visit Landistheater.com,
stop by our Box Office at 830 E. Landis
Avenue, or call 856-691-1121.
THURSDAY, AUGUST 23
King Kong. Landis Theater, 830 E. Landis
Ave., Vineland. The original 1933 RKO
classic. 7:30 p.m. $14. 856-691-1121.
OL’ BLUE EYES
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Farmers Market Week
New Jersey Secretary of Agriculture
Douglas H. Fisher and Patricia Dombroski,
USDA Food and Nutrition Service Mid-
Atlantic Regional Administrator called on
Garden State residents and visitors to
enjoy Jersey Fresh produce from one of
the state’s 153 community farmers markets
during Farmers Market Week August 5-11
and throughout the state’s growing season.
Fisher and Dombroski visited the Long
Valley Green Market on Thursday, August 2
to kick off 2012 Farmers Market Week, pro-
claimed August 5 to 11 in New Jersey by
Governor Chris Christie and nationally by
U.S. Secretary of Agriculture Thomas Vilsack.
“You can’t get more local than visiting a
New Jersey farmers market, where you
can find a vast variety of just-picked fruits,
vegetables and herbs and many other agri-
cultural products from our state’s farm-
ers,” said Secretary Fisher. “Shoppers
could really spend hours at the Long
Valley Green Market, where they can pick
up Jersey Fresh produce, plants, meat,
cheese, wine, bread, and local items.”
The Long Valley Green Market, which
runs on Thursdays, 3 to 7 p.m. at 20
Schooley’s Mountain Road in downtown
Long Valley, was founded by Kate
Munning and Leona Harrington and is
housed in a building owned by Harrington.
“Leona hoped a farmers market would
bring some life to the sleepy downtown
area,” said Munning. “I have always had a
passion for food and have been known to
drive to farms in three counties in one day
to get my food shopping done, developing
friendships with farmers and local arti-
sans in the process.”
The pair started the market with the
goal that it would become a habit for many
Long Valley residents and a source of reli-
able income for the vendors. They host
special events and entertainment, as well.
The market also provides access to
local produce for those in need through
the Women, Infants and Children (WIC)
and Senior Farmers Market Nutrition
Program. The United States Department
of Agriculture (USDA) programs adminis-
tered by the State Department of Health
and Senior Services allot $20 in checks to
qualifying individuals, which are valid
through November 30.
“The USDA will provide over $2 mil-
lion in funding this year for New Jersey—
funding that improves the diets of seniors
and low-income families by bringing the
bounty from New Jersey farms into more
kitchens and onto more tables,” said
Dombroski. “This is truly a win-win for
everyone—shoppers benefit from more
locally grown produce in their diets, and
farmers benefit from having additional
customers close to home.”
Some New Jersey farmers markets also
allow those in the Supplemental Nutrition
Assistance Program to purchase produce
at the markets, through their electronic
benefit transfer cards.
New this year, the Department of
Agriculture teamed with the state
Department of Transportation to create a
list of public transportation options for
visiting New Jersey Farmers Markets.
That list can be found at
www.state.nj.us/jerseyfresh/transportatio
noptionsNJFarmersMarkets.pdf.
Eating Jersey Fresh fruits, vegetables
and other agricultural products can go a
long way to improving overall health.
Eating locally also is a good choice for pro-
tecting our environment by reducing the
miles a meal travels between farm and fork,
lessening fuel consumption. In addition,
choosing locally grown products helps keep
New Jersey farmers on their land, preserv-
ing the Garden State’s quality of life.
Jersey Fresh produce is at the peak of
the season with a wide variety of fruits
and vegetables available, including sweet
corn, tomatoes, peaches, nectarines, pep-
pers, eggplant, squash, basil, melons,
beets, cabbage, collards, Swiss chard,
arugula, kale, leeks, cilantro, parsley, dill,
mint, turnips and white potatoes.
To locate a nearby community farmers
market, visit www.jerseyfresh.nj.gov.
To learn more about farmers market
nutrition programs, visit www.nj.gov/
agriculture/divisions/md/prog/
communityfarmers.html#1.
Projects to Improve
Delaware River, Bay
A collaboration of public and private
supporters has identified five projects as
this year’s best ways to improve the tidal
Delaware River and Bay.
The nonprofit Partnership for the
Delaware Estuary formed the Alliance for
Comprehensive Ecosystem Solutions, or
PDE Alliance, in 2010. Together they have
considered projects from among more than
160 submissions by 45 institutions con-
cerned about the restoration and enhance-
ment of the tidal Delaware River and Bay.
The projects they picked as this year’s top
priorities include two in Pennsylvania, one
each in Delaware and New Jersey, and one
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Growers of Quality Plants
For All Your
Home Gardening Needs
470 N. Union Rd. East Vineland
(between Oak Rd. & Landis Ave.)
856-691-7881
www.cmgrowers.com
Mon. - Sat. 8am-6pm Sun. 9am-5pm
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PATIO
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Grapevine 18-23 080812-de:Layout 1 8/6/12 8:07 PM Page 22
benefiting both sides of the bay.
“The Alliance was formed to address the
dilemma of too many restoration needs and
not enough funding to meet them all,” said
Jennifer Adkins, executive director of the
Partnership for the Delaware Estuary. “We
don’t have the resources to fully fund these
projects ourselves, but by identifying them
as priorities we can help to attract other
resources to them.”
Each year, the PDE Alliance strives to
include at least one project from each state
on its list of priorities. This year, that list
includes two projects in Philadelphia: the
creation of three acres of wetlands where
Penn Treaty Park meets the Delaware River
in Fishtown, and a four-acre stream and
wetland restoration on Cresheim Creek
near West Mt. Airy.
“In addition to providing fish habitat and
benefitting local neighborhoods, restoring
streams and wetlands in and around
Philadelphia helps to keep our drinking
water clean,” said Howard Neukrug, com-
missioner of the Philadelphia Water
Department and member of the PDE
Alliance.
With its Green City, Clean Waters pro-
gram, Philadelphia has become a national
leader in using green infrastructure like
plants and trees to protect water quality.
For the third year in a row, the PDE
Alliance has identified Delaware Bay oyster
restoration as a priority project. Past efforts
to replenish reefs in Delaware Bay (mostly
off southern New Jersey) have shown a $25
return for every $1 invested, helping to bol-
ster the region’s sustainable shellfish indus-
try. With each adult oyster filtering up to
50 gallons of water per day, oyster restora-
tion efforts also provide clean water for
Delaware Bay. Together, these make oyster
restoration one of the best values for the
money and a top funding need.
The PDE Alliance also occasionally con-
siders research projects aimed at improving
conservation efforts, like the Juvenile Red
Knot Monitoring Project selected as a pri-
ority this year. The red knot is a shorebird
that stops in Delaware Bay to feast on
horseshoe crab eggs during its spring
migration. It is currently being considered
for inclusion in the federal Endangered
Species Program, and it was added to the
State of New Jersey’s endangered species
list last February.
“We know a great deal about red knots,
but we still have a major gap in our knowl-
edge about where the juveniles winter dur-
ing their first year,” said Gregory Breese of
the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. “This
project will provide this important piece of
the puzzle by using innovative technology
to track them during their first year of
migration.”
The Red Knot Monitoring Project is a
collaborative effort of the Conserve
Wildlife Foundation of New Jersey,
Monomoy National Wildlife Refuge, and
the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s
Delaware Bay Estuary Project.
Anyone can submit a restoration project
for future consideration by the PDE
Alliance or others. To do so, visit
DelawareEstuary.org and click on the left-
hand logo for the Project Registry. The
PDE Alliance typically convenes in the
spring to consider projects entered into the
registry during the previous year, after they
have been vetted by expert reviewers.
For more information call the PDE at
(800) 445-4935, extension 107.
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Call for Details: 856-692-8650 Mon.-Fri. 7-5 ‡ Sat. 7-12
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Organic Certification
Reimbursements
The New Jersey Department of
Agriculture announced a partnership
with the federal government to reduce
organic certification costs as part of
ongoing efforts to promote New
Jersey-grown and marketed organic
food products.
The New Jersey Department of
Agriculture is participating in the
United States Department of
Agriculture (USDA) Organic
Certification Cost Share Program.
Each qualified producer and handler
of organic products is eligible for a
reimbursement of up to 75 percent of
its costs of certification not to exceed
$750. Certification costs include fees
and charges levied by the certifying
agent for certification activities.
To qualify for reimbursement under
this program, an organic handler or
producer must have been inspected
and certified or inspected and receiv-
ing continuation of certification during
the period of October 1, 2011 and
September 30, 2012. Certification
must be through a USDA-accredited
certifying agent.
In the event that demand exceeds
the amount of funds allocated to New
Jersey, applications will be processed
on a first come, first served basis. In the
case of multiple certifications, excluding
renewal of certification, only one pay-
ment shall be made to the operation.
Applications must be received by the
New Jersey Department of Agriculture
no later than November 19, 2012.
Applications and more information
about the program are available online
at www.nj.gov/agriculture/grants/
organiccostshare.html.
Contact Melissa Spakosky with
questions at 609-984-2225 or find
them on Facebook to learn more
about the New Jersey Department of
Agriculture www.facebook.com/
NJDeptofAgriculture.
Grapevine 18-23 080812-de:Layout 1 8/6/12 8:07 PM Page 23
A
s part of efforts to provide
improved nutritional opportuni-
ties for school children, New
Jersey Secretary of Agriculture
Douglas H. Fisher recently announced
that New Jersey has received federal
funding to expand the Fresh Fruit and
Vegetable Program for the 2012-2013
school year.
The number of schools participating in
the program will increase from 143 in 16
counties last school year to 155 schools in
18 counties starting in September. Almost
76,000 students in total will benefit.
“The Fresh Fruit and Vegetable
Program has been extremely successful in
New Jersey,” said Secretary Fisher. “The
program has changed the school environ-
ment for the better, with children at one
school we visited referring to the fresh
produce as ‘treats.’ It is a hands-on way of
teaching students about good nutrition
and creating good food habits that will last
them a lifetime.”
The United States Department of
Agriculture has allocated $3,887,073 for
New Jersey’s Fresh Fruit and Vegetable
Program. The program provides fresh pro-
duce to students during the school day,
along with nutrition education. By expos-
ing children to healthy foods, their fruit
and vegetable consumption increases, ulti-
mately leading to improved lifelong
dietary habits.
Some of the criteria used in selecting
the schools to participate included:
• Elementary schools with 50 percent
or more of their students eligible for free
or reduced price meals;
• Schools that planned to purchase
locally grown fruits and vegetables as
much as possible;
• The program would be well-publi-
cized and all students would have access
to the produce offered; and
• Plans to partner with outside organi-
zations to enhance nutrition education.
The schools that will participate in the
Fresh Fruit and Vegetable Program in
Cumberland County for the 2012-2013
school year are:
—Cherry Street School, Bridgeton
—Indian Avenue School, Bridgeton
—Haleyville-Mauricetown School,
Commercial Twp.
—Fairfield Twp. School, Fairfield Twp.
—Silver Run School, Millville
—Wood Elementary School, Millville
—Silver Run Elementary School,
Millville
—Marie Durand Elementary School,
Vineland
—Dr. William Mennies School,
Vineland
“Give Back” Field Tour Set for
August 15
Earthtec Solutions LLC, a Vineland-
based firm specializing in the science of
interpretive analysis and implementation of
sustainable agriculture for the betterment
of the world, in cooperation with local fruit
and vegetable growers, will be hosting the
Nature’s Eye™ “Give Back' Field Tour on
August 15, 2012.
This bus tour will take invited guests—
from the fresh produce supply chain
including growers, supermarket agents,
food service operators, food, retail and agri-
cultural media, and more—to four thought
provoking presentations at the farms of
select growers who recently invested in the
Earthtec Solutions/Nature’s Eye™ process,
before closing with a luncheon event on a
Marino Brothers farm in Swedesboro, NJ.
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Locally Grown
on the Table
Cumberland County students will receive fresh fruits
and vegetables.
Food News
Grapevine 24-32 080812:Layout 1 8/6/12 8:05 PM Page 24
With the nation in the midst of the
worst drought in 50 years, the urgency for
growers to optimize their resource use and
to become more resilient in the face of
severe environmental conditions has never
been greater. The mission of the “Give
Back” Field Tour is to dramatically illus-
trate the positive contributions the grow-
ers have made for both the environment
and community by using Earthtec
Solutions’ eco-efficient agricultural
methodologies. The tour will also call
attention to how these methodologies
translate into the best available solutions
for drought resilient agriculture. The
growers’ efficiencies, from field to the fork,
will be highlighted in an approach that has
never been done before, showing how con-
sumers who care about saving energy and
practicing sustainability can
make a real difference through
the purchases they make.
“Nature’s Eye™ and the ‘Give
Back’ Field Tour are about get-
ting the message out,” says Lee
Fiocchi, president of Earthtec
Solutions. “We’re enormously
proud of the results we’ve seen
from our partnership with these
growers. We want to tell their
stories and the measurable dif-
ference they’ve made conserv-
ing natural resources. We want
to show how what they do in the field
truly translates into giving back to their
communities.”
Since its inception in 2006, Earthtec
Solutions has been developing cutting-edge
data analytics to help growers and the busi-
nesses they serve increase efficiencies and
reduce their environmental footprint.
Fiocchi explains, “The key to sustainable
agriculture is in understanding how to
gather the right data directly from the
crops and environment and how to inter-
pret that data. Once you can zero in on the
true measurable needs of the plant, you
have the power to eliminate waste and
increase productivity. The result is better
agriculture for everybody-the farmer, the
communities they serve, the planet.”
Earthtec Solutions launched Nature’s
Eye™ as a means to provide consumers
with verifiable standards of sustainability
and to better illustrate the impact growers
efforts have on the world. “Open and hon-
est communication is essential part of
overcoming the challenges the planet
faces,” Fiocchi adds, “The beauty of agri-
cultural analytics is that we can actually
say how many gallons of water can be
saved through more efficient growing
practices. Every one of the growers repre-
sented on the Give Back Field Tour has a
story like this to share.”
Growers participating in the tour
include:
—Joe Marino and Russ Marino
Marino Brothers Farm, Swedesboro, NJ
Highlighted Crop: Cucumbers and
Pickles
—Tom Sorbello and Rich Wheeler
Sorbello & Wheeler Farms,
Swedesboro, NJ
Highlighted Crop: Peppers
—George Cassaday
Cassaday Farms, Monroeville, NJ
Highlighted Crops: Sweet Corn, Melons
and Squash
—Carmen Merlino
Oakcrest Farms, Hammonton, NJ
Highlighted Crop: Blueberries I
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Downtown Vineland · 631 E Landis Ave · 856-213-6002
LandisMarketPlace.com
for Coupons & Specials
Scan for more info
At Vineland, NJ
Amish Market
There’s no better time to be in South
Jersey than the summer. If you’re
looking for a fun fresh foods shopping
experience, Landis MarketPlace is the
place to be!
The Upper Market (Open Wed thru Sat)
showcases the specialty kitchens of
Las Lomas Fresh Mexican Grill and
Luciano’s New Orleans Seafood Market.
Also shop our many specialty vendors,
including Amish Furniture and the
Country Store.
The Lower Market (Open Thurs thru
Sat) is an authentic Amish Market, fea-
turing fresh meats, seasonal produce,
award-winning barbecue, tempting
baked goods and much more.
Stock up before heading to the
shore or planning your perfect
summer barbecue!
s New Or ’’ uciano L
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At Vineland, NJ
Amish Market
cue! e rb a
528B N. Harding Highway • Vineland, NJ 08360
Phone: (856) 213-6391 • Fax: (856) 213-6594
www.guiseppesmarket.com
Fresh Produce, Hot & Cold Take Out Food,
Deli Meats & Imported Cheeses, Vegetable
Platters, Fruit Platters & Custom Gift Baskets
Professional Catering
Mon. - Closed • Tues. - Sat.: 9am - 7pm • Sun.: 10am - 4pm
CLIP AND SAVE COUPON
$
3 Off
Any $25
Purchase or More
Cannot be combined with any
other oer • GVN • Exp 8/22/12
We Sell Boars Head &
Dietz & Watson Products
Tuesdays: Senior Day
All Seniors Get 10% O Their Purchases
cannot be combined with any other oer
Wednesdays: Happy Hour
4pm- 6pm. 10% O Purchases
cannot be combined with any other oer
EBT WE ACCEPT
Fridays & Saturdays
Italian Garlic Blue Clawed (cooked) Crabs First
come rst serve. (limited - when available)
Grapevine 24-32 080812:Layout 1 8/6/12 8:05 PM Page 25
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FRIDAY, AUGUST 24TH
1:00 pm - 5:00 pm
SATURDAY, AUGUST 25TH
10:00 am - 1:00 pm
or by appointment
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7 Greenwood Ave
Neweld, NJ 08344
856.697.7575
www.pizzazzdancecenter.com
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856.691.44440
Andrea Trattoria, 16 N. High St., Millville, 825-
8588. Formerly located in Newfield, chef/
owner Andrea Covino will serve up Italian
specialties in Millville starting in mid-August.
Annata Wine Bar, 216 Bellevue Ave,
Hammonton, 609-704-9797. Food served
tapas style, catering, private parties.
Extensive wine list. Live music Thurs. night.
Babe's Village Inn, Martinelli Avenue,
Minotola, NJ 856-697-1727. Famous crabs,
seafood, Italian cuisine. Eat in or Take out.
Bagel University, 1406 S. Main Rd.,
Vineland, 691-0909. Breakfast and lunch
spot offering sandwiches named for col-
leges near and far.
Barbera’s Chocolates on Occasion, 782 S.
Brewster Rd., Vineland, 690-9998.
Homemade chocolates and candies, custom
gift baskets.
Bennigan’s Restaurant, 2196 W. Landis
Ave., Vineland, 205-0010. Entrees,
desserts, drink specials. Take-out. Happy
Hour Mon-Fri 3pm-7pm, Sun-Thu 10pm-cl.
All Sports packages available. NBA League
Pass, NHL Center Ice, & MLB Extra Innings.
Big Apple, 528 N. Harding Hwy., Vineland,
697-5500. Steaks, veal, chicken dishes.
Meet friends at bar. Daily lunch and dinner.
Big John’s Pizza Queen, 1383 S. Main Rd.,
Vineland, 205-0012. Featuring “Gutbuster”
a 21-oz. burger, pizza, wings, subs, dinners.
Black Olive Restaurant. 782 S. Brewster
Rd, Vineland. 457-7624. 7 a.m. - 10 p.m
daily. Entrees, desserts. Take out available.
Bojo’s Ale House, 222 N. High St., Millville,
327-8011. All food is homemade, including
the potato chips.
Bombay Bites, 112 W. Chestnut Ave.,
Vineland, 696-0036. Indian cuisine. $8.95
lunch buffet ($5.99 on Mondays).
Bruni's Pizzeria. 2184 N. 2nd St., Millville
(856) 825-2200. Award-winning pizza since
1956. Open Mon-Sat. 11 a.m.-10 p.m. Sun.
11 a.m.-9 p.m.
Bruno's Family Restaurant, Cape May Ave.
and Tuckahoe Rd., Dorothy, 609-476-4739.
Breakfast, lunch, dinner, pizza. Open Mon-
Sat. 7 a.m.-8:30 p.m.
Chow’s Garden 1101 N. 2nd St., Millville,
327-3259. Sushi Bar, All-you-can-eat buffet.
Cosmopolitan Restaurant Lounge, Bakery,
3513 S. Delsea Dr., Vineland, 765-5977.
Happy hour everyday 11 a.m. - 6 p.m. half-
priced appetizers, and reduced drink spe-
cials.
Crust N Krumbs Bakery, Main/Magnolia
rds., 690-1200. Cakes, pies, cookies,
breads, doughnuts, custom wedding cakes.
Dakota Steakhouse & Sushi Bar at
Ramada, W. Landis Ave. and Rt. 55,
Vineland, 692-8600. Stylish atmosphere
perfect for an upscale lunch or dinner.
Delicious steaks, seafood and sushi. Closed
Monday for dinner.
Deeks Deli & Kustard Kitchen, 1370 S.
Main Rd., Vineland, 691-5438. Call for
lunch and dinner specials. Soft ice cream
and cakes year-round. Mon.-Sat 9 a.m.–
8 p.m.
Denny’s, 1001 W. Landis Ave., Vineland,
696-1900. Breakfast, lunch, dinner. Take-
out, too. Happy Hour Mon.-Fri. 3-7 p.m.
Open 24 hours. Kids eat free Tues. & Sat.
Dominick’s Pizza, 1768 S. Lincoln Ave.,
Vineland, 691-5511. Family time-honored
recipes, fresh ingredients.
Double Eagle Saloon, 1477 Panther Rd.,
Vineland, 213-6176. Open for lunch and
dinner. Traditional tavern fair.
Elmer Diner, 41 Chestnut St., Elmer. 358-
3600. Diverse menu of large portions at
reasonable prices.
Esposito's Maplewood III, 200 N. Delsea
Dr., Vineland, 692-2011. Steaks, seafood
and pasta dishes at this Italian restaurant.
Eric’s, 98 S. West Ave., Vineland, 205-
9800. Greek and American cuisine, pizza.
Fat Jack's BBQ. Cumberland Mall, next to
Starbucks, 825-0014. Open 7 days a week,
11 a.m.-9:30 p.m. Eat in or take out.
Serving ribs, wings, sandwiches, salads
and sides.
Five Points Inn, E. Landis Ave. and
Tuckahoe Rd., Vineland, 691-6080. Italian
cuisine and dinner buffets to savor. Family-
owned.
Gardella’s Ravioli Co. & Italian Deli,
527 S. Brewster Rd., 697-3509. Name says
it all. Daily specials, catering. Closed Sun.
Gina’s Ristorante, Landis and Lincoln Aves.
in ShopRite Plaza, Vineland. Serving dinner
Tues.-Thurs., 4-9 p.m.; Friday & Sat., 4-10
p.m.; Reservations recommended. 205-
0049.
Gina’s Outdoor Grill, Open 11 a.m. - 9 p.m.,
Tuesday through Saturday. Cheesesteaks.
Golden Palace Diner Restaurant 2623 S
Delsea Dr, Vineland, 692-5424. Serving
breakfast, lunch and dinner daily.
The Greenview Inn at Eastlyn Golf Course,
4049 Italia Avenue, Vineland, 691-5558.
The golfers’ lounge and bar serves lunch
and snacks daily from 11 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.
The Greenview Inn is a fine dining restau-
rant open for dinner Wed.-Sun. at 5 p.m.
Guiseppe's Italian Market, 528B N.
Harding Hwy, Buena. 856-213-6391. Hot &
Cold Take outs. Crabs Friday & Saturdays.
Harry’s Pub at Ramada, W. Landis Ave.
and Rt. 55, Vineland, 696-8600. Lunch &
dinner 7 days a week. Happy hour daily 4-
6pm with half price appetizers. Live
Entertainment Wednesday thru Saturday.
High Street Chinese Buffet, High St.,
Millville, 825-2288. All-you-can-eat buffet.
Jersey Jerry's. 1362 S. Delsea Dr.,
Vineland, 362-5978. Serving subs, sand-
wiches, and take-out platters.
Joe's Poultry. 440 S. Delsea Dr., Vineland,
692-8860. Barbecue and Kosher chickens,
homemade sides, catering.
Kawa Thai & Sushi, 2196 N. Second St.
(Rt.47), Millville, 825-9939. Thai and
Japanese cuisine. BYOB.
Lake House Restaurant. 611 Taylor Rd.,
Franklinville, 694-5700. American grill
cuisine, daily happy hour specials, great
selection of wine and cigars. Open-air deck
bar and patio.
Larry's II Restaurant, 907 N. Main Rd.,
Vineland, 692-9001. Three meals daily.
Sunday breakfast buffet, early-bird dinners.
La Locanda Pizzeria & Ristorante, 1406 S.
Main Rd., Vineland, 794-3332. Pasta, veal,
chicken. Lunch and dinner. Closed Sun.
Luciano’s New Orleans Seafood Kitchen,
Landis Marketplace, 631 E. Landis Ave.,
Vineland, 609-970-7653. Authentic Cajun
and Creole. Catering 7 days a week by
appointment.
Marciano’s Restaurant, 947 N. Delsea Dr.,
Vineland, 563-0030. Italian-American cui-
sine, seafood and veal. Open daily for
lunch and dinner, Sunday breakfast buffet.
Manny & Vic’s, 1687 N. Delsea Dr., Vineland,
696-3100. Daily pizza specials, delivery.
Manny’s Pizza, 426 N. High St., Millville,
327-5081. Daily pizza specials, delivery.
Martino’s Trattoria & Pizzeria, 2614 E.
Chestnut Ave., Vineland, 692-4448. Brick
oven pizza, risotto, polenta. Three meals
daily.
Merighi's Savoy Inn, E. Landis Ave. and
Union Rd., Vineland, 691-8051.
Banquet/wedding facility and intimate
restaurant. Dungeness Crabs Night on
Tuesdays in the Bistro. Gourmet Pizza Nite
on Wed. Outdoor dining in the adjacent
Luna’s Outdoor Bar & Grille.
Millville Queen Diner, 109 E. Broad Street,
Millville. 327-0900. Open 7 Days a Week 24
Hours.
Milmay Tavern, Tuckahoe and Bear’s Head
rds., Milmay, 476-3611. Gourmet lunches
and dinners, casual setting.
Moe’s Southwest Grill, 2188 N. 2nd St.,
Millville, 825-3525. Tex-Mex, burritos, catering.
Mori’s, E. Landis Ave., Vineland. 690-0300.
Adjacent to the Landis Theater Performing
Arts Center. Includes a “casual, upscale”
restaurant with a banquet facility and
lounge on site. Lunch and dinner.
MVP Bar, 408 Wheat Road, Vineland, 697-
9825. Full bar menu, drink specials.
Neptune Restaurant and Cocktail Lounge,
1554 S. Delsea Dr., Vineland, 692-2800.
Live lobsters, seafood, prime rib, steak,
cocktails.
Old Oar House Irish Pub, 123 N. High
Street Millville, 293-1200. Year round Fresh
seafood daily, slow roasted prime rib
DINING OUT
From fine dining to lunch spots to
bakeries, the area has choices to
satisfy any appetite. Call for hours.
Grapevine 24-32 080812:Layout 1 8/6/12 8:05 PM Page 26
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Bellview
Winery
Seafood
Festival
Sat & Sun, Aug 18th & 19th
11am ‘til 5pm
Seafood • Wine • Crafters • Tours
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150 Atlantic Street
Landisville, NJ
(856) 697-7172
BellviewWinery.com
American Car Show
Sat. 8.18
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Fabrizio Chiropractic
Is Now Oering
Technology!
“Nothing is more Precious than your Health.”
Dr. Theresa A. Fabrizio
1790 N. Main Rd. Vineland
(856)692-0077
Fax: (856)692-4008
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Latex free, water-resistant and breath-
able tape made of pure cotton with
100% acrylic hypoallergenic adhesive.
• Decrease Strain On Muscles
• Helps To Reduce Muscle
Cramping
• Helps to Restore Normal
Muscle Activation
• Heal From Injury Faster &
Prevents Further Injury
• Increase Range of Motion
• Helps to Alleviate Pain &
Pressure Points
G
reetings! This month I’m sharing two
recipes using a heart-healthy fruit—
the tomato. I know that may sound
confusing, since many people think of the
tomato as a vegetable. In all actuality, it is a
fruit. But no matter what it is, tomatoes are
chock full of health benefits for you and your
family (unless you are allergic, of course).
Tomatoes are known for their outstanding
antioxidant content, including their rich con-
centration of lycopene. They also provide an
excellent amount of vitamin C, vitamin E,
beta-carotene and a good amount of the min-
eral manganese. Some research studies show
that eating tomatoes or tomato-based foods
regularly, along with a healthy diet, may
reduce the risk of heart disease, which is
another good reason to add tomatoes to your
family meals as often as possible!
Homemade Tomato Sauce
2 tbs. extra-virgin olive oil
1/2 medium onion, finely chopped
3 cloves garlic, minced
1 tsp. tomato paste
10 -12 fresh Italian plum tomatoes,
diced
1/4 cup water
1 tbs. raw sugar, honey, agave or
natural sugar substitute
Pinch of crushed red pepper flakes
Sea salt, to taste
Black pepper, to taste
A few leaves of fresh basil, chopped
Heat olive oil in a medium saucepan over
medium heat. Add onion and cook until
translucent, stir in garlic and tomato paste,
cook for 1 minute, then add tomatoes and
water. Add sweetener of choice, crushed pep-
per flakes, and season well with salt and pep-
per. Once the sauce comes to a boil, lower the
heat and cook for 25 minutes. Add the
chopped basil and simmer sauce for 5-10
minutes longer. If desired, puree tomato
sauce in a food processor before serving over
hot cooked, and drained multi-grain pasta.
Bruschetta
1 loaf crusty multi-grain bread, sliced
3 tbs. extra-virgin olive oil, divided
3 cloves garlic, minced
5 fresh Italian plum tomatoes, diced
small
2 tsp. balsamic or apple cider vinegar
4 - 5 fresh basil leaves, cut into thin
shredded strips
Sea salt, to taste
Black pepper, to taste
Preheat oven to 450°. Brush each piece of
bread with olive oil, place on an ungreased
baking sheet and bake for 3 to 5 minutes or
until lightly browned. In a bowl, combine
garlic, chopped tomatoes, 1 tbs. olive oil, bal-
samic or apple cider vinegar, basil, salt and
pepper, give a good stir, then spoon mixture
on top of bread slices and serve. I
Lisa Ann is author of Seasoned With Love,
Treasured Recipes and Lisa Ann’s Seasoned
With Love II. Send recipes for publication to
lapd1991@aol.com or The Grapevine, 907 N.
Main Rd., Vineland, NJ 08360.
Tasty Tomatoes
The world’s most-mistaken-for-a-vegetable
fruit stars in this week’s column.
I
Recipe Corner { LISA ANN DiNUNZIO }
specials, delicious summer Salads, every-
day lunch & dinner specials, homemade
corn beef, kitchen open until 1 a.m., out-
door beer garden.
Olympia Restaurant, 739 S. Delsea Dr.,
Vineland, 691-6095. Authentic Greek cui-
sine—lamb dishes and salads.
Pegasus, Rts. 40 and 47, Vineland, 694-
0500. Breakfast, lunch, dinner specials;
convenient drive-thru, mini-meal specials.
Peking Gourmet, 907 N. Main Rd., (Larry’s
II Plaza), Vineland, 691-0088. Chinese.
Takeout only. All major credit cards
accepted.
The Rail, 1252 Harding Hwy., Richland,
697-1440. Bar and restaurant with daily
drink specials and lunch specials.
Saigon, 2180 N. Second St., Millville, 327-
8878. Authentic Vietnamese—noodle
soups, curry, hotpot, Buddhist vegetarian.
South Vineland Tavern, 2350 S. Main Rd.,
Vineland, 692-7888. Breakfast, lunch, din-
ner daily. Seafood and prime rib.
Speedway Cafe at Ramada, W. Landis Ave.
and Rt. 55, Vineland, 696-8600. Open
Daily, 6 a.m.-11 p.m. Breakfast served all
day. Daily specials Monday thru Friday.
Over 30 dinner selections at 2 for $19.99
and also 7 for $7.00 available 7 days a
week starting at 3 pm.
Sweet Life Bakery, 601 E. Landis Ave.,
Vineland, 692-5353. Neighborhood bakery.
Homemade pastries, cakes, coffee.
A Taste of the Islands, 731 Landis Ave.,
Vineland, 691-9555. First prize winning
BBQ Ribs, Jamaican Jerk chicken, Curry
chicken, seafood, rice and beans and much
more. Closed Sunday only.
Ten22 Bar & Grill at Centerton Country
Club, 1022 Almond Rd., Pittsgrove, 358-
3325. Lunch and dinner. New tavern menu
features soups, salads, burgers, sandwich-
es, wraps and entree selections. Sunday
Brunch extravaganza.
Tre Belleze, 363 E. Wheat Rd., Buena, 697-
8500. Serving lunch and dinner daily with
complimentary buffet Thurs., Fri. and Sat.
from 3-5 p.m. Serving gluten-free pizza,
pasta and beer.
Uncle Ricky’s Outdoor Bar, 470 E. Wheat
Rd., Vineland, 691-4454. Ribs, chicken,
fish, steaks. Always clams, eat in or take
out. Live music Saturday & Sunday night.
Dungeness Crab All You Can Eat.
Villa Fazzolari, 821 Harding Hwy., Buena
Vista, 697-7107. Dinner combos, grilled
meats, fish. Lunch and dinner daily.
Wheat Road Cold Cuts, 302 Wheat Rd.,
Vineland, 697-0320. Deli and catering.
Wild Wings, 1843 E. Wheat Rd., Vineland,
691-8899. Dinners, grilled sandwiches, wings.
Winfield’s. 106 N. High St., Millville, 327-
0909. Continental cuisine and spirits
served in a casually upscale setting.
Ye Olde Centerton Inn, 1136 Almond Rd.,
Pittsgrove, 358-3201. American classics
served in a picturesque setting.
Grapevine 24-32 080812:Layout 1 8/6/12 8:05 PM Page 27
For more information about radiology
services at CDI, or to schedule an examina-
tion, call (856) 794-1700 or visit
www.CenterForDiagnosticImaging.com.
Cumberland County College
Trustee Openings
Officials report that the Cumberland
County College Search Committee is seek-
ing two new board members for the
Cumberland County College Board of
Trustees. Interested candidates should
send their resume to the Cumberland
County College Search Committee, Attn:
Beth Kostok, Cumberland County
Administration Building, 790 E. Commerce
St., Bridgton, NJ 08302.
Interested applicants must be residents
of Cumberland County four years prior to
the appointment, shall not be elected offi-
cials, shall not be an employee of
Cumberland County, shall not be an
employee of the college, and shall not have
been a member of the trustee search com-
mittee within the six months prior to the
appointment to the board of trustees. Public
Notice with a filing deadline is forthcoming.
Applicants should possess a desire to
advocate for the college and its students;
should be knowledgeable about board gov-
ernance responsibilities and appreciate the
difference between board governance and
administrative responsibilities; should be
able to commit sufficient time to board
governance responsibilities; should be
aware of ethical issues of board governance
and be unencumbered by private agendas;
should be sensitive to issues of diversity;
should understand the governance authori-
ty is vested in the board, not the individual
trustee; should be committed to continuing
trustee development and completion of a
training program during the first year of
service as a trustee; should possess charac-
teristics and qualities that will endure the
standing of the college within the commu-
nity; and should not be an immediate fami-
ly member of nor be involved in a common
business venture with a county employee.
JCP Cares, Free Cuts in August
As parents and students prepare to head
back to school, they can support Boys &
Girls Clubs of America when shopping at
jcpenney this month. By simply rounding-
up their purchases to the nearest whole
dollar, jcpenney customers’ spare change
can make a huge difference in supporting
afterschool programs that inspire and
empower kids across America. A hundred
percent of donations raised will go towards
the Boys & Girls Club in your community.
Additionally, to kick off jcp salon’s free
kids cuts offer this month, jcpenney will
donate $1—up to $50,000—to Boys & Girls
Clubs for every haircut that takes place on
August 1. jcpenney will also support Boys &
Girls Clubs this month through the
Facebook social game, WeTopia. WeTopia
allows players to connect with friends,
build their virtual town, and spend a
unique form of currency called “Joy” that
spreads real-world aid to various non-prof-
its around the world. jcpenney will match
the “Joy” that players give in the month of
August to help fund a Boys & Girls Club
project. Players will also be rewarded with
a special jcpenney-branded piece for their
virtual town.
4-Day Cancer Fundraising
Events and Bottino MudRun
A 4 day event Cancer Fundraising Day
—with the Bottino Family donate 5 percent
of the total sales of the day toward the
cause—began on Monday August 6 at our
Deerfield/Bridgeton ShopRite. It continues
today, Wednesday August 8 at the Millville
ShopRite 2130 N. Second St. (Union Lake
Crossing) from 11 a.m. until 4 p.m.;
Thursday, August 9 at the 215 N. Delsea
Drive Vineland ShopRite from 11 a.m. until
4 p.m.; and Wednesday, August 22, at the
Washington Twp ShopRite located on 382
Egg Harbor Road from 11 a.m. until 4 p.m.
The culmination and fun Bill Bottino
MudRun for Cancer will be Saturday,
September 15, at the New Jersey
Motorsports Park. Doors open at 2 p.m.
and opening ceremonies will begin at 4
p.m. There's a kid’s mudrun, an obstacle
course of mud and muck for anyone who
wishes to run the four miles and an easier
one for those who don’t. There will be a
free BBQ, cash bar, music, silent/Chinese
Auction, and a candlelight walk to honor
the memory of a loved one or to celebrate
the survivors. It’s an all-day event of fun,
competition between costumes, teams
with the most creative outfits to run in the
mud. If you are not part of a team, just
come and enjoy the fun. Register at
www.njmudrun.com.
Call 811 Before Digging
With August 11 almost here, South
Jersey Gas hopes that date on the calendar,
8/11, will serve as a natural reminder for
residents to call 811 prior to any digging
project to have underground utility lines
marked. When calling 811, homeowners and
contractors connect to NewJersey One
Call, the local one-call center, which noti-
fies the appropriate utility companies of the
caller’s intent to dig. Professional locators
then have three business days to mark the
approximate locations of underground utili-
ty lines with flags, spray paint or both.
Striking a single line can cause injury,
repair costs, fines and inconvenient out-
ages. Every digging project, no matter how
large or small, warrants a call to 811.
Installing a mailbox, building a deck,
planting a tree and laying a patio are all
examples of digging projects that need a
call to 811 before starting.
Visit www.call811.com or www.south-
jerseygas.com for more about 811 and safe
digging practices. I
Vineland U10 All Stars Go Undefeated
The Vineland girls 10U All Stars went undefeated to capture the District 3
Championship. The girls beat Mays Landing, Folsom and Millville to take the title.
Pictured here, from left: (front row) Nicolette Merlino, Mackenzie Joslin, Emme Barbera,
Nicole Ortega, Carli Melchiorre and Amber Carney; (middle row) Veronica Fennimore,
Carly Endres, Devin Coia, Kailie Todd, Hazel Negron and Isabel Burgos; (back row)
coaches, Steve Endres, Bob Coia and Joe Barbera.
COMMUNITY CALENDAR

News in Brief
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in progress. Many patients who are hesi-
tant or have lingering questions will find
this seminar very helpful in continuing
their journey toward better vision.
Refreshments will be served and attendees
will be entered to win a gift certificate.
Reservations are required and limited. Call
Donna at 856-691-8188, ext 277.
SATURDAY, AUGUST 25
6th Annual Peach Festival. Malaga
Camp, 4500 N. Delsea Drive, Newfield.
For details, call 856-466-0288.
SPORTS HAPPENINGS
FRIDAY, AUGUST 10
7th Annual Everett Marshall Charities
Golf Tournament & Dinner. White Oaks
Country Club, 2951 Dutch Mill Rd.,
Newfield. $100 for golf and dinner; $35 for
dinner. Registration begins at 11:00 a.m.,
shotgun start at 12:30 p.m. Proceeds from
this event will benefit The Burn
Foundation. Deadline for registration fee
payment is August 3. For more information
or to make reservations, call 856-697-
6900. Sponsorships are available.
WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 15
Italian-American Benevolent
Association’s 13th Annual Scholarship
Fund Golf Tournament. Buena Vista
Country Club, 301 Country Club Ln.,
Buena. $100 for golf and dinner; $150 per
golfer. Registration and lunch begins at
11:30 a.m., shotgun start at 12:30 p.m.
Proceeds from this event will benefit local
Italian-Americans in need of financial assis-
tance to pursue higher education. Deadline
for registration fee payment is August 1.
Space is limited to 152 golfers. For more
information or to make reservations, con-
tact the Italian-American Benevolent
Association. Sponsorships are available.
SATURDAY, AUGUST 18
5th Annual Joshua M. Moren
Memorial Slo-Pitch Softball
Tournament. Rob Shannon Sports
Complex, Cedarville Road Recreation
Complex, Cedar St (Cedarville Rd.),
Millville. $200 per team, $10 per home
run derby contestant. Make-up/rain date:
August 19. All proceeds go directly to the
Joshua Moren Memorial Scholarship Fund.
Each team will receive up to 15 tourna-
ment T-shirts. For more info., visit
www.games4josh.com
FRIDAY, AUGUST 24
Dick Baum Memorial Golf
Tournament. Buena Vista Country Club,
301 Country Club Lane, Buena. $110 per
peson, $425 per foursome. Noontime reg-
istration and lunch, shotgun start at 1:00
p.m. Sponsored by Habitat for Humanity,
proceeds from this event will go to help
the altruistic company. Golfers should reg-
ister by August 17. For more info., contact
Robert Scarpa at 856-563-0292.
TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 18
11th Annual WheatonArts Golf
Classic. Running Deer Golf Club, 1111
Parvin Mill Rd., Pittsgrove Township. All
proceeds benefit the arts program for chil-
dren at WheatonArts. For more info., call
Katherine at 856-825-6800 x114.
Continued from page 17
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The other big thing the county accepts
now is aseptic containers.
“Basically, what we mean when we say
an aseptic container, are things like table
top containers and juice boxes,” said
Dennis DeMatte, Cumberland County’s
Recycling Coordinator. “People are also
buying things like soy milk, rice milk, and
broth in a wax-style box. These are now
recyclable, too.”
These types of containers, along with
the wide array of other non-paper recycla-
ble items, can be thrown in with your
plastics. When in doubt, you can look on
the bottom of your plastic product. In the
center or near the universal recycling
symbol—the three inter-locking arrows
that form a triangle—there will be a num-
ber. That number will tell you the type of
plastic it is. If it’s a one, two, four, five or
seven, you can recycle it.
Aside from plastics, Cumberland
County still accepts metals, glass and
papers in their recyclables as well.
Because the county practices dual-stream
recycling, paper does have to be separated.
Metals, glass and plastics can go in your
round, plastic bin, while papers can now
be put in the separate, smaller, rectangular
paper bin. Things like magazines, newspa-
pers and even junk mail all should go in
with your papers.
There is also a wide array of items
that can be recycled, but that aren’t able
to be picked up curbside. Things like
electronics, large sheets of metal, fluores-
cent lights and bigger pieces of plastic,
while recyclable, all need to be brought
to either the Public Works Complex in
Vineland, or the Cumberland County
Solid Waste Complex in Rosenhayn.
There is a nominal fee for dropping off
recyclables at the waste complex, but it is
pro-rated and can be written off on your
taxes.
WHAT SHOULDN’T YOU BE
RECYLING?
Two big things in Cumberland County
that are still non-recyclable are Styrofoam
and vinyl. Aside from those, there are some
other restrictions on what can be recycled
that didn’t exist a few years ago.
“One big thing is that batteries are no
longer recyclable,” said Sharon Flaim,
Vineland’s Assistant Director of Solid
Waste and Recycling Coordinator. “Before
batteries were always recyclable, but now
that manufacturers make them with less
mercury, they can go in the trash.
Rechargeable batteries, like the ones in
people’s cell phones, should still be recy-
cled, though.
“Another big thing we’ve seen is that
people throw their bottle caps from water
bottles in the recycling. Those bottle caps
are made from a different type of plastic,
and should not be recycled.,” said Flaim.
WHAT HAPPENS TO THE ITEMS
ONCE THEY’RE RECYCLED?
It’s a nearly ubiquitous belief that recy-
cling is beneficial to the environment, but
there is a lack of clarity about what exactly
happens to recyclables once they’re picked
up from the curb. We know it’s good to
recycle, but we’re not sure in what way.
When your items are picked up, they
are taken to the Solid Waste Complex.
Once there, they are separated into papers,
plastics and metals, and placed into a large
collection and distribution bins known as a
Transtors. The materials are then dumped
into tractor-trailers and taken to an offsite
location owned by ReCommunity
Recycling, where they’re distributed to pri-
vate companies, which reuse them.
But that still doesn’t quite tell us exactly
what happens to them. DeMatte expounds.
“A lot of cans are used by manufacturers
to make products like steel,” he said.
“Plastic number one is used to make fleece
and polyester clothing. Plastic number two
is used to make decking materials. The
clear glass products, believe it or not, are
melted down and made into new glass bot-
tles. So your jelly jars, your olive bottles, a
lot of the food products are coming in glass
jars made from recycled glass.
“If it’s being recycled, it’s being reused,”
said DeMatte.
WHAT ARE THE BENEFITS OF
RECYCLING?
Recycling’s biggest benefit is in the raw
materials it saves.
“Almost all of the materials that are
recycled—plastic, paper, some metals—
they’re all made from nonrenewable
resources,” said DeMatte. “Once you take
these out of the earth, you can’t put them
back. It’s important to maximize their
use.”
But there is also some financial motiva-
tion for residents to recycle what they can.
“A lot of the municipalities in
Cumberland County receive tonnage
grants every year,” said Flaim. “And the
money they receive is based on the amount
in tons that is recycled. This money is rein-
serted back into the community, which
provides some tax relief for residents.”
There’s another benefit that also plays
into reducing the financial burden on resi-
dents: Reducing waste disposal costs.
“Though the recycling is handled inde-
pendently, waste management is still done
here in the county. So we’re paying to
process the waste we receive,” said
DeMatte. “The more we put in there, the
more we have to pay to process it.”
DeMatte says he’s already seen some of
the benefits in action since expanding the
recycling program two years ago.
“Since we’ve started this new program,
our landfill capacity has expanded out sig-
nificantly because of recycling,” said
DeMatte. “That means we don’t have to go
and build another one. That’s something
that’s very impacting. That alone should
make people happy.” I
While a county recycling truck dumps the day’s collection into the nearest Transtor, a
second, already-full Transtor dumps its contents into a tractor trailer waiting below.
Aseptic containers like the ones pictured
above are now eligible to be recycled in
Cumberland County. Residents can throw
these types of containers in the same
receptacle as their metals and plastics.
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Retiring Is Easy.
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• Homeowners must be 62 years or older
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*Consult your tax adviser Gateway Funding Diversified Mortgage Services, L.P. #1071; Branch NMLS #241866; NJ Residential Mortgage Lender License
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“Opening Doors to Home Ownership” • www.gatewayfunding.com
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REAL ESTATE TRANSACTIONS
The following transactions of $20,000 or more were filed with Cumberland County in
the month of June 2012 (transactions may have occurred in an earlier month).
Names listed may, in some cases, be those of buyers’ or sellers’ representatives.
BRIDGETON
288 Holly St., South Jersey Health
System Inc. to Miller David LLC on
6/13/12 for $25,000
290 Holly St., South Jersey Health
System Inc. to Miller David LLC on
6/13/12 for $30,000
26 Institute Pl., Bryan T Jones to Grazyna
Bykuc on 6/13/12 for $135,000
COMMERCIAL TWP
7709 Raymond Dr., Patrick Jamison (P.
Rep.) to Elber Munyon on 6/7/12 for
$20,500
DOWNE TWP
62 & 64 Virginia Ave., Gaunt Howard E
Revocable Living Trust (by Trust) to
Walter W Kieba on 6/6/12 for $25,000
FAIRFIELD TWP
16 Richmond Ln., Daniel M Richmond, Jr.
to Prudential Relocation Inc. on 6/11/12
for $235,000
16 Richmond Ln., Prudential Relocation
Inc. to Nathaniel Young on 6/11/12 for
$235,000
490 Fairton & C., Nationstar Mortgage
LLC to Ellis Pierce on 6/14/12 for
$100,000
HOPEWELL TWP
249 W Park Dr., William R Barbera to
Michael Jones on 6/4/12 for $171,500
123 Stave Mill Rd., Raymond C Yansick to
Antoine Nelson on 6/6/12 for $130,810
172 Shoemaker Rd., Frank P Baitinger, III
to Jeffery T Belum on 6/7/12 for $205,000
MILLVILLE
10 Oakdale Dr., David S Shields to
Frederick A Jacob on 6/1/12 for $230,000
204 Howard St., David A Hadley, Jr. to
John R Harris on 6/4/12 for $67,000
922 Shar Lane Blvd., Davco Construction
Inc. to Keith Harris on 6/4/12 for
$152,000
1311 Mallard Ln., Joseph A Marinelli to
Strategic Operational Initiatives LLC on
6/7/12 for $225,000
637 Skewchenko Ave., James Rhubart to
Duane A Lewis on 6/7/12 for $240,000
2069 Fairton Rd., Daniel J Kortvelesy, Jr.
to Scioto Properties Sp-15 LLC on 6/7/12
for $254,000
16 W Foundry St., Bernice M McQuaid
(Adm.) to Affordable Investments &
Rentals LLC on 6/8/12 for $35,000
43 Lisa Marie Terr., David McWilliams to
Mercedes Harden on 6/8/12 for $220,000
420 Cedar St., Halbert Green to Diane
Keedy on 6/11/12 for $86,000
609 Richard Dr., Nicolas Joseph Marin to
Joseph S Ware, II on 6/11/12 for
$138,000
1816 Newcombtown Rd., Raymond H
Burris to John Fazzolari on 6/11/12 for
$140,000
20 Oakdale Dr., Frederick A Jacob to
Douglas R Smith on 6/12/12 for $217,000
1-27 Reese Rd., Century Savings Bank to
Manantico Realty LLC on 6/12/12 for
$475,000
901 Woodland Ave., George Mendolera to
Nicole C Macavoy on 6/14/12 for $129,000
UPPER DEERFIELD
7 Holly Ln., Vicky L Kernan to Michael D
Bernstein on 6/6/12 for $95,000
197 Silver Lake Rd., Timothy J Barton to
Kenneth P Stevens, III on 6/6/12 for
$175,000
210-216 & 218 Landis Ave., Frank
Catalana to JAC Landis LLC on 6/11/12
for $150,000
VINELAND
2101 Venezia Ave., Robert Newman to
Landmark Development No. 4 LLC on
6/1/12 for $87,500
2948 Wynnewood Dr., Ignacio L Gonzalez
to Thomas Levari on 6/1/12 for $127,500
2193 Civil War Rd., William T Henry to
Dale J Sciore on 6/1/12 for $225,000
1941 Apache Ct., Thomas C Ruhl to
James Snyder on 6/1/12 for $251,000
1185 Kay Pl., Robert F Scamoffo to James
L Boswell on 6/4/12 for $156,000
4136 E Landis Ave., Arthur James Ferrari
to Michelle Coxe on 6/5/12 for $143,000
1289 N Mill Rd., I&H Homes to Fidel A
Lopez on 6/5/12 for $148,000
1951 Arrowhead Trail, Therese Farrow
Ozoria to Olga I Rivera on 6/5/12 for
$168,000
1015 S Orchard Rd., Kevin M Harkins to
Todd Felix on 6/6/12 for $145,000
3711 Wexley Way, Mauricio O Lopez (by
Atty.) to Center For Family Services Inc.
on 6/6/12 for $230,000
631 S Spring Rd., David Marino (Ind.
Exec.) to Deborah A Pepper on 6/7/12 for
$95,000
1268 N Valley Ave., Carolee Moreno to
Anthony Harris on 6/11/12 for $173,000
2562 Bartholomew Dr., Benjamin Ocone
to Erik Caignon on 6/11/12 for $182,500
1096 Utopia Ln., Erik Caignon to Radu
Leustean on 6/11/12 for $227,500
1015 McClain Dr., Ari Goldberger (Ind. &
Atty.) to Brad Giordano on 6/11/12 for
$450,000
2102 E Oak Rd B6., NVR Inc. (DBA) to
Mandi Vanes on 6/12/12 for $60,251
2881 S Delsea Dr., James Hodge, Jr. (by
Grdn.) to Kunal Kinjal LLC on 6/12/12 for
$357,000
1711 W Oak Rd., Craig J Coffey (Ind.
Exec.) to Hipolito Rivera on 6/13/12 for
$133,900
For a no-obligation
advertising consultation,
call 856-457-7815 or e-mail:
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Call 9 a.m - 5 p.m daily, Deadline for paid ads: Friday, 3 p.m.
To order your classified call, 856-457-7815 or visit
www.grapevinenewspaper.com/classifieds
Call 9 a.m - 5 p.m daily, Deadline for paid ads: Friday, 3 p.m. To order your classified, call 856-457-7815 or
visit www.grapevinenewspaper.com/classifieds. See box below for additional ordering information.
Only $10 per ad, per week, up to 20 words; over 20 words,
$0.50 per word. $0.30 for bold—per word/per issue, $3 for a
Border/per issue. Add a photo for $15. Mail Ad & payment or go
online to www.grapevinenewspaper.com/classifieds.
Not responsible for typographical errors. • Once an ad is placed, it cannot be cancelled or changed. The Grapevine does not in any way
imply approval or endorsement. Those interested in goods or services always use good judgment and take appropriate precautions.
Acct. No. ___________________________________Exp. Date________ 3 Digit # on back
of card__________
Signature:__________________________________________
Printed Name:______________________________________
Name ___________________________________
Address__________________________________
City__________________________Zip_________
Phone #: ________________________________
email____________________________________
The Grapevine
907 N. Main Rd., Suite 205
Vineland, NJ 08360
www.grapevinenewspaper.com
Mail Ad
Form with
Payment TO:
Classifieds
Call for more information
856-457-7815
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Check if needed.
Refer to prices above.
JBold
J Border
CLASSIFIEDS
Credit Cards
Accepted:
Having a Yard Sale or Garage Sale?
It’s time to make room in that attic, garage or
basement, and there’s no better way to get the
word out than to advertise your yard sale in
The Grapevine’s Classifieds.
Use the form below, or visit
www.grapevinenewspaper.com/classifieds
Deadline is Friday for the following Wednesday’s paper.
Micro Electric LLC.
Residential repair, addi-
tions, and services.
Bonded and insured.
“no job is too small.”
NJ LIC #14256.
Call 609-501-7777
Start your own business
for only $10. Call: 856-
332-6446 Jasmine Avon
ISR Para Español llamen
Gresenia 856-391-5958.
Block Long Yard Sale.
Forest Grove Road,
Vineland (between Blue
Bell Road & Delsea Drive).
Saturday, August 11th.
Yard Sale. Household
items, tools, screen
doors, home insulation,
clothing, etc. Saturday,
August 11, 8 a.m.
410 Reviam Ct., Vineland.
Call Sonia at 856-405-
6153 for more info.
2005 Chrysler Sebring
Convert Touring Edition.
Loaded. New tires, battery.
Excellent condition.
31,000 miles. $11,900.
Call 856-691-2254
Two boxer male dogs for
sale, $300.00 for both.
one is white the other is
brown. They are a year old
and are brothers, crates
included. 856- 982-0596.
Sectional Sofa w 2
Recliners. Light brown
microsuede. Excellent
condition! $450
Call 856-205-0654
1999 Corvette. 67,000
miles. Pewter. Automatic.
Garage-kept. $16,950.
Call 856-696-1950.
Leave message.
Upstairs apartment for
rent: One bedroom, living
room, eat-in kitchen, bath-
room. $750/mo. Tenant
pays utilities. Call 856-
405-6500
Have a bike taking up
space in your home?
Please consider donating
it. The Vineland Rotary
Club has partnered with
Pedals for Progress to
export bikes to third-world
countries where they are
needed for transportation.
Also collecting treadle and
portable sewing machines.
Contact Henry Hansen at
856-696-0643 for drop-off
or pick-up.
Jack’s Light to Medium
Hauling Service. Serving
all of Vineland, Millville
and Bridgeton. Will pick
up all junk. Call 856-979-
3018
Attention Public
Speakers, Trainers,
Motivators! Multi-Billion
Dollar International
Utility Co. looking for
people to recruit, train,
motivate, a sales force. 6
figure income potential.
For more info email us:
greenzone2000@gmail.com
856.982.4398
www.unlimitedprofits.me
REAL Painting:
Reasonable Prices–High
Quality Residential &
Commercial Painting
Interior/Exterior/Custon
Staining–South Jersey
Areas. (302) 444-2396
BUSH AND TREE TRIM-
MING, SNOW, LEAF, TREE
AND STUMP REMOVAL,
GUTTERS/BASEMENT
CLEAN-OUTS, MOWING,
FIREWOOD SALES.
VINELAND/MILLVILLE
AREA. 856-305-0194
Steelman's Drywall.
Drywall installation and
repairing nailpops, cracks,
water damage, unfinished
drywall. Big or small! Call
Joe for a free estimate at
609-381-3814.
Turk's Pressure Clean.
Property maintenance.
Vinyl and aluminum sid-
ing, concrete, brick, roof
cleaning, gutter clean-
out. Over 25 years in
business, fully insured.
(856) 692-7470.
John's Lawn Mowing:
Clean Ups, edging, bush
and tree trimming &
stump removal, mulch,
river-rock, gutter cleaning,
Vineland/Millville area
856-305-0194
AJB III Construction.
Licensed and fully
insured. Windows, doors,
remodeling, and more.
Call us today at 856 332
7865.
Wanted Dead or alive.
Junk or running cars.
Quick removal. Cash
paid. 856-649-2732.
Electrical
Contractor
Pete Construction
Specializing in decks,
roofs and home
remodeling. State
licensed and insured.
Call for a free esti-
mate. 856-507-1456.
East Park Avenue
Apartments. 2 bed-
room, $875/mo.
Includes heat. No
pets. Credit and
background checks.
Vineland.
856-696-9045.
Huge Yard Sale!
Wheaton bottles,
baby wear, clothing,
books, jewelry,
household supplies,
belts, pocketbooks,
etc. Lots of items!
New stuff coming in
every week. Every
Friday, Saturday, and
Sunday in July &
August, first and sec-
ond weekends of
September. 8 a.m. - 3
p.m. every day. 215
Smith St., Millville,
NJ 08332.
New matresses, low-
est prices! Twins
start at $149.99; Fulls
at $189; Queens at
$229; and Kings at
$379. Call Jack at
856-935-2930 or
609-420-8739
Pizzazz Dance Center
is seeking an enthusi-
astic part-time dance
instructor for the
upcoming season.
Looking for someone
who is a well-rounded
instructor and very
knowledgeable. Pay
based on experience.
Please send resumes
to pizzazzdc@aol.com.
Chrysler 2007 handi-
capped accessible
van. Very good condi-
tion. Call 856-692-
5345 for details.
Krystal Clear, LLC,
Home and Office
Cleaning Service..
Experienced,
Professional staff.
Ask about our senior
discounts. Free esti-
mates! 856-982-3310,
or 856-507-8939
Help Wanted
Home
Improvement
Landscaping
For Sale
Employment
Services
Bikes Wanted
For Rent
Yard Sale
Do you have a car or boat that is
taking up space in your drive-
way? Are you hoping to sell your
vehicle for some extra cash?
Publicize the sale of your vehicle
by advertising in The Grapevine’s
Classifieds section. Make your
junk someone else’s treasures.
We Buy
Used Vehicles!
See Lenny Campbell See Lenny Campbell
808 N. Pearl St., Bridgeton NJ
(856) 451-0095
Items Wanted
LANDSCAPING & PAVERS
Professional Installations...Over 10 Years
SPECIALIZING IN:
Lawn Maintenance
Landscape Design • Walks,
Driveways • Retaining Walls
Fire Pits • Restoration of Pavers
Call 856-982-7701
or 856-498-7571
lewbowhunter@gmail.com
See our work on

See our w
whu lewbo
or 856-498-7571
Call 8
e Pits • Restor Fir
ays • Retaining Drivew
Landscape Design •
Lawn Maintenance
SPECIALIZING IN:
ork on ur w
unter@gmail.com
56-498-7571
856-982-7701
vers ation of Pa Restor
alls W s • Retaining
alks, W pe Design •
Maintenance
ALIZING IN:
Need work? Have a business and need more
customers? Why not get the word out through
The Grapevine’s Classifieds?
Advertize your skills and
business in the Classifieds by
calling 856-457-7815.
Grapevine 24-32 080812:Layout 1 8/6/12 8:05 PM Page 31
WWW.QUALITY-DENTALCARE.COM
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691-0290
Bridgeton
451-8041
Next to Acme
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Across from
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Grapevine 24-32 080812:Layout 1 8/6/12 8:05 PM Page 32