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I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Auckland Plan Committee will be held on:

Date: Time: Meeting Room: Venue:

Tuesday, 7 August 2012 10.00am Reception Lounge Level 2 Auckland Town Hall 301-305 Queen Street Auckland

Auckland Plan Committee OPEN AGENDA


MEMBERSHIP Chairperson Deputy Chairperson Councillors Deputy Mayor Penny Hulse Cr George Wood, CNZM Cr Anae Arthur Anae Cr Cameron Brewer Mayor Len Brown, JP Cr Dr Cathy Casey Cr Sandra Coney, QSO Cr Alf Filipaina Cr Hon Chris Fletcher, QSO Cr Michael Goudie Cr Ann Hartley, JP Cr Mike Lee Member Anahera Morehu

Cr Des Morrison Cr Richard Northey, ONZM Cr Calum Penrose Cr Dick Quax Cr Noelene Raffills, JP Cr Sharon Stewart, QSM Member David Taipari Member Glen Tupuhi Cr Sir John Walker, KNZM, CBE Cr Wayne Walker Cr Penny Webster

Independent Maori Statutory Board Alternate (Quorum 12 members)

Chairperson, Independent Maori Statutory Board, Mr David Taipari

Crispian Franklin Committee Secretary 31 July 2012 Contact Telephone: (09) 373 6205 Email: crispian.franklin@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Note:

The reports contained within this agenda are for consideration and should not be construed as Council policy unless and until adopted. Should Members require further information relating to any reports, please contact the relevant manager, Chairperson or Deputy Chairperson.

Auckland Plan Committee 07 August 2012 ITEM TABLE OF CONTENTS 1 2 3 4 5 Apologies Declaration of Interest Confirmation of Minutes Petitions Public Input 5.1 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 Key strategic and financial benefits on Auckland from preserving GE-free / GM-free regional production - John Carapiet and Lisa Er PAGE 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 6 6 7 15 87 95

Local Board Input Extraordinary Business Notices of Motion Defining the Rural Urban Boundary Auckland Plan Annual Implementation Update (AIU) Auckland Unitary Plan update on progress Endorsement of the Draft Mngere-thuhu Area Plan for community engagement Consideration of Extraordinary Items

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Auckland Plan Committee 07 August 2012 1 Apologies Apologies for non-attendance from Councillors Dick Quax, George Wood, Sharon Stewart, Christine Fletcher, Arthur Anae and Sir John Walker have been received. 2 Declaration of Interest Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have. 3 Confirmation of Minutes That the minutes of the Auckland Plan Committee held on Tuesday, 3 July 2012 and the minutes of the Confidential Meeting of the Auckland Plan Committee held on Tuesday, 3 July 2012, be confirmed as a true and correct record. 4 Petitions At the close of the agenda no requests for petitions had been received. 5 Public Input Standing Order 3.21 provides for Public Input. Applications to speak must be made to the Committee Secretary, in writing, no later than two (2) working days prior to the meeting and must include the subject matter. The meeting Chairperson has the discretion to decline any application that does not meet the requirements of Standing Orders. A maximum of thirty (30) minutes is allocated to the period for public input with five (5) minutes speaking time for each speaker. 5.1 Key strategic and financial benefits on Auckland from preserving GE-free / GM-free regional production - John Carapiet and Lisa Er John Carapiet, Senior Market Researcher and Consumer Advocate and Lisa Er wishes to address the Committee on key strategy and financial benefits on Auckland from preserving genetically-engineered and genetically-modified free regional production.

Local Board Input Standing Order 3.22 provides for Local Board Input. The Chairperson (or nominee of that Chairperson) is entitled to speak for up to five (5) minutes during this time. The Chairperson of the Local Board (or nominee of that Chairperson) shall wherever practical, give two (2) days notice of their wish to speak. The meeting Chairperson has the discretion to decline any application that does not meet the requirements of Standing Orders. This right is in addition to the right under Standing Order 3.9.14 to speak to matters on the agenda. At the close of the agenda no requests for local board input had been received.

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Auckland Plan Committee 07 August 2012 7 Extraordinary Business Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states: An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if(a) (b) The local authority by resolution so decides; and The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,(i) (ii) The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states: Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,(a) That item may be discussed at that meeting if(i) (ii) That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

(b)

no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.

Notices of Motion At the close of the agenda no requests for notices of motion had been received.

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Auckland Plan Committee 07 August 2012

File No.: CP2012/12071

Executive Summary
The Auckland Plan requires the definition of a 2040 Rural Urban Boundary (RUB). A project methodology has been developed to identify the RUB for inclusion in the Unitary Plan in 2013. This project seeks to identify the RUB through an integrated, cross-council process which will analyse a wide range of technical data and consider the views of affected people, stakeholders and communities. Along with areas already identified for future urban development the RUB will ensure 30 years supply of greenfield land for Aucklands residential and business needs consistent with the requirements of the Development Strategy (Section D of the Auckland Plan). The purpose of this report is to inform the committee of the proposed RUB project, and obtain endorsement for the proposed methodology.

Recommendation/s
a) b) c) d) That the report be received. That the Auckland Plan Committee endorses the Rural Urban Boundary (RUB) project methodology That the report be referred to all local boards noting that some boards are affected more directly than others by the outcomes of this work That the report be referred to the Independent Maori Statutory Board and Rural Advisory Board for information.

Background
The Auckland Plan Development Strategy identifies the importance of a rational pattern of longterm development that supports the commitment to a quality compact Auckland. It provides for a Rural Urban Boundary (RUB) that will define the maximum extent of urban development to 2040 in the form of a permanent rural-urban interface. It will be defined around all significant urban areas the existing urban core, satellite towns, and rural and coastal towns. The Development Strategy also signals that up to 40% of new dwellings will be outside the baseline 2010 Metropolitan Urban Limit (MUL) and hence nearly all of this will be bounded by the RUB. Following the establishment of the RUB, greenfield land will be zoned, serviced and developed in strategic steps to provide at all times 20 years forward supply of land and between 5-10 years of readily available development capacity. All relevant asset management plans including infrastructure plans will come into alignment to support the coordinated staging of land release and development inside the RUB, giving greater certainty to asset providers, developers and communities. Outside the RUB, rural areas will remain rural. This report outlines a project to determine the RUB, including a proposed methodology and engagement with affected communities. Staging of RUB The identification of the RUB is a complex process that requires a number of different steps to ensure the final RUB is located in such a way that it can be robustly defended through the statutory RMA processes. The following steps have been identified:

Defining the Rural Urban Boundary

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Defining the Rural Urban Boundary

Auckland Plan Committee 07 August 2012 Step 1: Resolve legacy plan changes and structure plans that in the past have affected the MUL, but now need to be resolved to determine the RUB, examples include Hingaia, Takanini and Massey North, Hobsonville etc (as part of Norsga). Step 2: Investigate the greenfield areas of investigation to determine the optimum location for the RUB. These are the areas where the majority of new greenfield land will be needed and are shown on the maps D1 and D2 in the Development Strategy. Step 3: Finalise RUB location in rural and coastal towns and in a few other locations, examples include Kingseat, Puhinui and Glenbrook. Steps 1 + 3 are to be undertaken by the Unitary Plan team as part of the new growth areas workstream. The content of this report focuses on the methodology to achieve Step 2. A Cluster Approach The Auckland Plan identifies ten separate greenfield areas of investigation. In order to investigate all of these areas in time to contribute to the Unitary Plan, it is suggested that officers pursue a cluster approach for the largest of these areas. This brings together the main greenfield areas of investigation that are within reasonably close proximity and deals with them as 3 distinct study areas. The smaller, less significant investigation areas will mainly be dealt with in Stage 3 of the methodology. To further maximise efficiencies, it is proposed to focus study on one cluster area at a time in the following order: 1. Southern Cluster (includes Pukekohe, Karaka, Drury and Paerata) 2. Western Cluster (Whenuapai, Kumeu, Huapai) 3. Northern Cluster (Warkworth, Silverdale West) Determining the order for each cluster area was based on an assessment of strategic alignment, scale and infrastructure readiness. The clusters are shown in Appendix 1. A Methodology to Define the RUB The following is a summarised step-by-step methodology to define the RUB and include the results in the Unitary Plan: Confirm project scope and project plan, establish working group, governance etc and sign off. Compile existing technical information. Initiate consultation with affected communities, stakeholders, including: Local boards Iwi Affected communities and land owners Relevant government departments Infrastructure providers (council and non-council) Affected or interested non-government and private sector organisations Undertake technical analysis. Identify any additional work required to fill gaps and comission external work where needed. Collaborative workshop to identify RUB options (in-house + CCOs) Analyse RUB alternatives including a broad land use pattern inside the RUB Further consultation, further review and approvals. Complete input including maps for the Unitary Plan and get formal sign off. Complete final report and documentation. Note that within this methodology provision will be made for appropriate information to be included in the draft unitary plan to be released in March 2013 and this will contribute to the preparation of the final Section 32 (RMA) report.

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Defining the Rural Urban Boundary

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Auckland Plan Committee 07 August 2012

Consultation and Engagement Schedule one of the Resource Management Act 1991 outlines the statutory consultation requirements for the development of the Unitary Plan. As a key component of the Unitary Plan, RUB issues will be consulted on through this statutory process. However it is also good practice to undertake early consultation with communities and stakeholders. Accordingly, a consultation plan is being developed for the overall RUB project. In addition, it is anticipated that each cluster area will have its own consultation plan that will identify local issues and concerns and ensure consultation processes are appropriate for each area. An important component of the consultation will be the engagement of the relevant Local Boards to ensure local knowledge is utilised. It is intended to align RUB consultation with the consultation already underway for the Unitary Plan where possible to reduce the potential for consultation overload with Auckland communities and to avoid confusion about the purpose of the consultation. Governance It is intended that as this project advances, regular reporting will be undertaken, firstly through existing internal planning processes under the direction of the Chief Planning Officer to provide oversight and direction. The technical work has been split into three main groups. A RUB Project Team will operate the RUB project on a day to day basis, supported with technical input from a wide range of council departments. A Critical Issues Team is intended to meet monthly to determine key issues that might fundamentally affect the location of the RUB. Direction and advice will be sought on officer recommendations via regular reporting to the following political groups: the Unitary Plan Political Working Party, the Auckland Plan Committee, plus the Local Boards, the Independent Maori Statutory Board, Pacific Advisory Panel and the Rural Advisory Board. The Auckland Plan Committee has the delegation to make final decisions on the Unitary Plan provisions, including the RUB. Deliverables At the completion of the RUB project it is intended to draw all of the work together into a single RUB Investigation Report. This report will include a summary of the analysis undertaken, including alternatives considered, maps showing the location of the RUB, and summaries of consultation undertaken. In addition, there will be a separate officers report that can feed directly into the relevant sections of the Unitary Plan with supporting Section 32 RMA analysis. Overall project timing The complexity of this project means it will take considerable time to arrive at a final RUB. Therefore, it is not intended to include a final RUB in the draft Unitary Plan in March 2013, but rather to provide a final RUB in the notified Unitary Plan in September 2013. The overall project timetable is outlined below and is subject to further refinement to ensure alignment with the Unitary Plan project: RUB Project Timing:

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The key to the success of this methodology is good collaboration between council departments in providing high quality technical advice as well as strong consultation and engagement with affected communities, landowners and stakeholders.

Auckland Plan Committee 07 August 2012


Key Task

Item 9

Jun 2012

Jul

Aug

Sep

Oct

Nov

Dec

Jan 2013

Feb

Mar

Apr

May

Jun

Project Scoping, Commencement, compiling existing info Consultation Strategy and Risk Management Plan Southern cluster process:

Western cluster process:

Northern cluster process:

Checking across sub-regions and integration Draft variation and section 32 report (final mapping)

Prepare Greenfield RUB Investigation report

Decision Making
The Auckland Plan Committee has been delegated decision-making power in relation to the implementation of the Auckland Plan and development of the Unitary Plan.

Significance of Decision
The RUB will determine where future urban greenfield growth occurs in the Auckland region over the next 30 years. Accordingly, the location of the final RUB will directly affect existing rural communities, tangata whenua and landowners where the new RUB is proposed. It will also influence future investment decisions for a variety of infrastructure providers and land developers. As such it is a major part of the Auckland Plan development strategy and critical to the effectiveness of the Unitary Plan.

Maori Impact Statement


Consultation requirements with mana whenua are to be met through an iwi engagement strategy already underway as part of the development of the Auckland Unitary Plan.

Local Board Views


Consultation and engagement with Local Boards are a core component of the consultation strategy for the RUB project. It is intended to focus primarily on those Local Boards most directly affected by the RUB, but also to provide regular progress reports on this project to all Local Boards. The proposed methodology has been presented to the Franklin Local Board. This is the most directly affected local board and the location of the first cluster area.

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Auckland Plan Committee 07 August 2012

Consultation
Consultation will be targeted at specific communities, stakeholders and landowners most affected by the RUB. A consultation strategy is being prepared as well as separate consultation plans for each cluster area.

Financial and Resourcing Implications


The RUB project is being resourced through the approved LTP budgets.

Legal and Legislative Implications


The draft methodology for the RUB project has been shared with councils legal services department.

Implementation Issues
Implementation of this RUB project will involve a cross-section of officers from various council departments working on this project until mid-2013. Subsequent implementation of the RUB itself will be through councils resource consent department, in their implementation of the provisions in the Unitary Plan, and through the further detailed planning and servicing of these areas with infrastructure.

Attachments
No. A Title Investigation Clusters Page 13

Signatories
Authors Authorisers Michael Tucker Team Leader Spatial Strategy David Clelland Manager Spatial & Infrastructure Strategy Ree Anderson - Acting Chief Planning Officer

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Defining the Rural Urban Boundary

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Attachment A

INVESTIGATIONCLUSTERS 1.CommenceInvestigation June/July2012: Pukekohe/DrurySouth Karaka/Paerata _____________________ 2.CommenceInvestigation October2012: Whenuapai/Kumeu/Huapai _____________________ 3.CommenceInvestigation January2013: Warkworth/ SilverdaleWest

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File No.: CP2012/12088

Executive Summary
The Auckland Plan was adopted on 29 March 2012. The Auckland Plan has a strong implementation focus, requiring the preparation of an Annual Implementation Update (AIU). The purpose of the AIU is to report progress on the major initiatives and the many actions contained in the Plan. This first AIU indicates that in spite of the relatively short time that has passed since adoption (4 months), there is already a considerable amount of work underway by Council and other stakeholders to implement the Plan. Nevertheless, there are challenges. The Auckland Plan has a 30 year outlook and not everything that is aspired to will be achieved overnight. The first ten years is a period in which to build the runway. As well as seeing a number of major projects and initiatives getting underway, this will be a time in which stakeholders prepare themselves for delivering the vision and look at new and different ways of achieving aspirations in the Auckland Plan. This AIU shows that Auckland is on track with implementation. It shows that: a) a number of identified critical place shaping projects identified in the Plan are included in the Long Term Plan or in the capital programmes of the Council Controlled Organisations (CCOs); b) a number of key strategies and policies required to give effect to the Auckland Plan have either been adopted, are underway or a being scoped; c) work is advancing on determining the unconstrained development capacity of Auckland and managing the development pipeline through the Greenfield Areas for Investigation work which will also determine the extent of the rural urban boundary (RUB) for inclusion in the Unitary Plan; d) there is good progress on development of the Unitary Plan; e) there is overall a high level of alignment between central government and the Council reflected in the formal response to the Auckland Plan delivered by the Minister of Local Government; f) for the two big place-based initiatives: a. the City Centre Master Plan and Waterfront Plan have been adopted and the LongTerm Plan contains funding for related major capital projects; b. The Southern Initiative: a governance arrangement has been approved; a new position, General Manager Southern Initiative advertised; two community forums have been held; and a number of partners in The Southern Initiative have their own projects underway; g) there are important partnerships (such as those with infrastructure providers) being developed to ensure successful implementation of the Auckland Plan. This AIU reports on a number of challenges facing implementation and on key areas that require the focus and efforts of stakeholders in the coming year. These include amongst other matters: a) the need for further discussions with central government on alignment of Auckland Plan targets, land use and transportation issues, and advancement of work around transportation funding tools in particular; b) the finding that the unconstrained development capacity for greenfield land does not meet the targets in the Auckland Plan and the need to advance work in this area as well as work on the brownfield land development supply and business land supply c) further advancement of the Unitary Plan and a number of key strategies and action plans; d) advancement and coordination of major infrastructure projects across Auckland.
Auckland Plan Annual Implementation Update (AIU) Page 15

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Recommendations
a) b) c) That the report be received That the report be forwarded to the Minister of Local Government and Central Government Departments, together with key stakeholders to the Auckland Plan That the report be circulated to the Local Boards, Independent Maori Statutory Board, Pacific Peoples Advisory Panel, Ethnic Peoples Advisory Panel, the Disability Strategic Advisory Group, Rural Advisory Panel, the Business Advisory Board, Youth Advisory Panel and the Auckland Sport & Recreation Reference Group for their information That the committee note the considerable progress already underway with the implementation of the Auckland Plan That, in addition to work already underway and while in no way limiting the progress required to be made on the many projects, programmes and actions in the Auckland Plan, the committee note the following particular areas of focus for the 2012-2013 year: i) Further spatial analysis of the Long-term Plan ii) Determination of unconstrained development capacity for both residential and business land delivery iii) Identification and understanding of implications of existing operative and proposed planning provisions for Auckland Plan iv) Further discussions with central government on Auckland Plan targets v) Further discussions with central government on transport and land use issues vi) Advancement of Alternative Funding for Transport investigations vii) Advancement of work on partnerships and forums including: The Youth Advisory Panel Establishment of the Auckland Infrastructure Forum Establishment of an Urban Development Forum. That officers report back in six months with a detailed scope and process for the second Annual Implementation Update.

d) e)

f)

Background
The Auckland Plan is a 30-year plan for Auckland. It is a comprehensive long-term strategy for Aucklands growth and development required by the Local Government (Auckland Council) Act 2009. There is now a vision for Auckland to be the worlds most liveable city, and, for the first time, there is a single comprehensive plan with a development strategy setting the direction for all of Auckland over the next 30 years. The Auckland Plan, adopted on 29 March 2012, and publically launched by the Mayor on 29 May 2012 places a strong emphasis on implementation. This first Annual Implementation Update (AIU) of the Auckland Plan, attached as Attachment A, is intended to ensure that progress on implementing the many projects and actions in the Auckland Plan is closely monitored and delivery of the Plan is assessed and achieved. This AIU has been prepared just four months following adoption, and as a result it is too early to report fully on progress on all aspects of the Plan. This AIU focuses on measures being put in place by Council itself and other stakeholders to ensure the Plan is able to be successfully implemented. This update indicates good alignment and progress on a number of important projects, strategies and policies that are intended to give effect to the Auckland Plan. It provides a baseline for future updates and provides guidance on key areas to focus on in the year ahead.

Auckland Plan Annual Implementation Update (AIU)

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Decision Making
The requirement for an Annual Implementation Update (AIU) The Implementation Addendum to the Auckland Plan requires progress on implementation of the Auckland Plan to be reported annually to the Council. The Annual Implementation Update includes: a) b) content the extent of progress on the implementation of the many projects, strategies and actions listed in the Auckland Plan; and process the extent to which stakeholders are engaged and processes are in place to achieve the desired outcomes.

The AIU contains recommendations to deal with cases where the content or process audits highlight particular issues and concerns. Since adoption, the Auckland Plan work-streams have been organised under a number of workstreams and the AIU in Attachment A is structured accordingly as follows: Three Auckland Council group work-streams: Long-term Plan (including Council Controlled Organisations and Local Boards) Strategy and Policy Unitary Plan and Operative Plans Four partnership work-streams: Central government Infrastructure providers Developer and development agencies Community groups and non-governmental organisations (NGOs). Two big place-based work-streams: The City Centre The Southern Initiative. Scope of this Update In the relatively short time since adoption of the Auckland Plan it has not been possible and nor are systems in place to carry out the full content and process audits envisaged for an AIU. In some cases stakeholders still need to be engaged through appropriate forums and working groups in order for progress on the Auckland Plan to go ahead. Within the council organisation itself the Long-term Plan was already well advanced when the Auckland Plan was adopted. All of the elements of the Auckland Plan from the strategic directions to the many projects and actions are being or will be incorporated into councils business planning, asset management planning and performance measurement processes to allow comprehensive reporting and monitoring to take place and identify any potential stumbling blocks to implementation. The same principle applies to other stakeholders who still need to work through their own detailed implementation analysis.

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A comprehensive review of progress across all the actions will occur through the second Annual AIU, scheduled for August 2013. the second AIU will highlight if there are gaps in implementation and allow consideration of any actions to remedy such gaps.

Auckland Plan Committee 07 August 2012

Item 10

This first AIU provides an overview of known progress on implementation. It highlights the next steps for implementation and areas upon which the Council and other stakeholders will have to focus in the coming year. It does not make specific recommendations to resolve issues. A comprehensive review of progress across all aspects of the Auckland Plan will occur through the second Annual Implementation Update, scheduled for August 2013. An implementation plan The AIU is a reporting process. While it may give direction for the year ahead, it is not an implementation plan as such. A clear plan of action is being developed to engage stakeholders within and outside of council and ensure that they have the organisational capabilities to deliver the Auckland Plan. Steps are being taken to ensure that Auckland Plan implementation becomes the new business as usual throughout the council organisation, its CCOs and amongst all other stakeholders. Overview of findings Attachment A sets out findings of the first Auckland Plan AIU. It shows that there is already a considerable amount of work underway by the Council itself and other stakeholders to implement the Auckland Plan. There are clear indications from the report that Auckland is on track to implement the Auckland Plan. Key findings are that: a) In the first three years the Long-term Plan already provides for: Significant contributions to transformational initiatives or initiatives key to the delivery of the Auckland Plan and/or in the two big place based initiatives under the Long-term Plan themes of Planning, Economic Development, Transport and Lifestyle and Culture. Some contribution to initiatives in the priority locations under the Long-term Plan themes Economic Development, Built and Natural Environment, Stormwater and Flood Protection, Water Supply and Sewerage, Transport, Community and Lifestyle and Culture. Overall, there is a high level of alignment between central government and the Council reflected in the formal response to the Auckland Plan delivered by the Minister of Local Government. Areas of alignment include but are not limited to: Government support for key aspects of the Auckland Plan Development Strategy The Economy chapter of the Plan which is largely consistent with the governments Business Growth Agenda Government support for management of the transport system as a single network and the priority given to freight movement. Housing There are a number of key strategies and place-based plans that are already adopted, such as: The Economic Development Strategy The City Centre Master Plan The Waterfront Plan The Waste Management and Minimisation Plan The Alcohol Harm Reduction Strategy The Indigenous Biodiversity Strategy. The Southern Initiative-: Governance arrangements approved Joint Manukau Institute of Technology (MIT)/Auckland International Airport Company (AIAL) Internship Cadetship Scheme launched.
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b)

c)

d)

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Auckland Plan Committee 07 August 2012

f)

There are a number of major infrastructure projects underway, such as: The City Rail Link (CRL) The Central Interceptor, a major Watercare Services Limited wastewater project The Ultra-fast Broadband Initiative The Mens Correction Facility at Wiri. There are a number of important partnerships being developed to ensure successful implementation of the Auckland Plan, such as: The establishment of the joint central government Council owned Tamaki Redevelopment Company Scoping work for the establishment of an Infrastructure Providers Forum The establishment of an Auckland Sports and Recreation Reference Group Auckland Council partnering with the Auckland Chamber of Commerce and Work and Income to launch a Work Experience Program. Memorandum of Understanding with Massey University signed 28 May. The purpose of the memorandum is to identify research objectives and to collaborate and co-operate on mutually beneficial programmes. The broad areas of research that have been identified belong to Economic Development, Social and Community Development and Environmental Management. Council is progressing its Development Strategy for Auckland, evident through: The Greenfield Areas for Investigation work which is currently underway The Rural-urban Boundary (RUB) determination work which is currently underway Work underway to establish tools to achieve quality intensification.

g)

h)

Key areas of focus for the 2012-2013 year The AIU highlights a number of areas of focus for the 2012-2013 year: a) Further detailed place-based analysis of the Long-term Plan. While a number of themes in the Long-term Plan already show significant contributions to the Auckland Plan there may be a degree of inertia from legacy projects and programmes particularly in terms of the place based location of capital expenditure. A number of themes show only some contribution to Auckland Plan imperatives. It is expected that the 2015-25 Long-term Plan will show a more substantial shift in focus across all themes to reflect the two major place based initiatives and spending in other priority locations. Advancement of the work for determining unconstrained development capacity for both residential and business land delivery to meet the required targets. Advancement of work on the Greenfield Areas for Investigation. Advancement of the Unitary Plan to notification. Identification and understanding the extent of operative and proposed planning provisions that are not consistent with or pre-empt outcomes in the Development Strategy or may limit land supply targets and qualitative outcomes envisaged. This may lead to decisions to bring plan changes to completion or withdraw plan changes if necessary if still feasible to do so. Advancement of major place shaping and growth enabling capital projects.
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b) c) d) e)

f)

Auckland Plan Annual Implementation Update (AIU)

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e)

The Unitary Plan and a number of important initiatives and strategies are well advanced or underway, such as: The Housing Strategic Action Plan (Stage 1) The Integrated Transport Strategy The Maori Wellbeing Plan The Energy and Climate Change Mitigation Strategy The Sports and Recreation Strategy The City Centre Retail Prospectus The Parking Strategy (Auckland Transport).

Auckland Plan Committee 07 August 2012 g)

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h)

Completion of the Mangere-Otahuhu Local Area Plan and Hibiscus and Bays Local Area Plan. In addition to those already adopted or reported above as being underway, advancement of a number of core strategies and plans including:

The Children and Young People Strategic Action Plan The Community Development Strategy The Maori Responsiveness Portfolio The Arts and Culture Strategy The Historic Heritage Plan The Sport and Recreation Strategy The Environment Strategy The Marine and Coastal spatial plans The Water Strategy The Open Space Strategic Framework. Note: The full strategy and policy work programme will be the subject of a separate report. i) j) k) l) Further discussions with central government over Auckland Plan targets. While analysis shows broad alignment between central government Better Public Services targets and those in the Auckland Plan, there is a common desire to work towards better alignment. Further discussions with central government on the links between transport and the development strategy, the proposed modal split and shortfalls in funding the transport programme. Further advancement of the work already underway within the council on the Alternative Funding for Transport investigations. Advancement of work on partnerships and forums including: The Southern Initiative The Upper North Island Freight Story and Upper North Island Strategic Alliance Port Study Establishment of the Youth Advisory Panel Establishment of the Auckland Infrastructure Forum Establishment of an Urban Development Forum.

The above list in no way limits or precludes the progress required to be made on many other projects, programmes and actions set out in the Auckland Plan.

Significance of Decision
Neither this report, nor the recommendations in it trigger the Councils Significance Policy. As the Auckland Plan becomes entrenched into the daily business of the council, activity managers will be required to demonstrate more clearly and measurably how their activities contribute to the delivery of the Auckland Plan as part of both the strategic alignment and funding decision making processes. There is already a considerable amount of work taking place within the council to align planning, management and monitoring processes with Auckland Plan outcomes.

Maori Impact Statement


The Auckland Plan includes a specific chapter on Aucklands Maori but the interests of Maori are widespread across all aspects of the Auckland Plan. For this reason, the AIU reports on the involvement and interests of mana whenua, including those though the Independent Maori Statutory Board, under a number of work-streams such as the Strategy and Policy, Unitary Plan and Developer / Development Agency work-streams. The Developer / Development Agency workstream for example includes commentary on papakainga housing provided by Maori Strategy and
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The recommendations in this report have no greater impact on Maori than provisions already contained in the Auckland Plan.

Local Board Views


Local Boards have not been directly consulted on this report. They have however been individually briefed through a series of cluster meetings and workshops on the next phase of the delivering the Auckland Plan. The Local Boards made separate submissions on the Draft Auckland Plan which included a chapter on the Implementation Framework necessary to implement the Auckland Plan. This has been refined further with the production of an Addendum to the Plan, providing the basis for this AIU. Local Boards have also been consulted on the Long-term Plan content which is discussed in the Update. A copy of the draft report was also sent to the Policy and Planning Manager Local Boards for comment. Engagement with local boards will be essential and ongoing throughout the Auckland Plan implementation process. It is crucial to ensure that this continues by involving boards in relevant forums and structures. Good examples are the involvement of six local boards in the Steering Group for the Southern Initiative and the role each Local Board will play in developing the draft Unitary Plan, with Local Board consultation planned in the third quarter of 2012.

Consultation
Internal consultation on the councils first AIU was undertaken with officers across the Council, including CCO Monitoring officers, Long-term Plan officers, Unitary and Operative Plans officers, Auckland Plan Chapter Leads/Project leaders. The Update report used input from officers and was modified as a result of feedback received. In the time available, the Update report has been subject to limited consultation with external stakeholders. It is expected that the second AIU to be prepared in July 2013 will involve all key stakeholders in its preparation and presentation.

Financial and Resourcing Implications


The AIU is undertaken within budgets approved through the LTP. The AIU will help to inform future financial and resourcing requests.

Legal and Legislative Implications


There are no legal or legislative issues associated with implementing the recommendations in this report.

Implementation Issues
Not applicable.

Attachments
No. A Title Auckland Plan Annual Implementation Update 2012 Page 23

Signatories
Authors Authorisers Robert Bates, Acting Team Leader Infrastructure Strategy David Clelland, Manager Spatial and Infrastructure Strategy Ree Anderson, Acting Chief Planning Officer
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Relations. The draft Update report was also circulated to the relevant Auckland Plan Chapter Lead for Aucklands Maori for comment.

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AUCKLAND PLAN IMPLEMENTATION UPDATE Attachment A


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Auckland Plan Committee 07 August 2012 Introduction ............................................................................................. 3 Headline Progress - 2012 ........................................................................... 4 Areas of Focus: 2012/2013 ........................................................................ 8 Annual Implementation Update..................................................................12 The Implementation Plan ..........................................................................13 Structure of this report .............................................................................15 Auckland Council Groups Work-Streams......................................................18 Long-term Plan .....................................................................................18 Council-Controlled Organisations (CCOs) ..................................................26 Local Boards ........................................................................................29 Strategy and Policy ...............................................................................31 Unitary Plan and Operative Plans.............................................................32 Partnership Work-Streams ........................................................................37 Central Government ..............................................................................37 Infrastructure Providers .........................................................................45 Developer and development agencies ......................................................50 Community Groups and Non-Governmental Organisations ..........................62 Place-based Work-Streams .......................................................................64

Attachment A

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Auckland Plan Committee 07 August 2012

The Auckland Plan is a 30-year plan for Auckland. It is a comprehensive long-term strategy for Aucklands growth and development required by the Local Government (Auckland Council) Act 2009 legislation that established the Auckland Council. There is now a vision for Auckland to be the worlds most liveable city, and, for the first time, there is a single comprehensive plan to deliver this vision. The Auckland Plan was adopted on 29 March 2012, and publically launched on 29 May 2012. The Auckland Plan places a strong emphasis on implementation. This is the first Annual Implementation Update of the Auckland Plan. It is designed to ensure that progress on implementing the projects and actions in the Auckland Plan is closely monitored and delivery of the Plan is assessed and achieved. This Update has been prepared just three months following adoption, and as a result it is too early to report fully on the progress of all aspects of the Plan. This Update will show however that a number of projects and actions are already underway. That is very positive but there is still much to be done. The Auckland Plan refers to the first 10 years as a period for building the runway. This Update will also show that there are a considerable number of initiatives underway and that council and other key stakeholders are gearing up to implement the Auckland Plan. The Update provides a baseline for future updates and provides guidance on key areas to focus on in the year ahead.

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Attachment A

Item 10

Introduction

Auckland Plan Committee 07 August 2012

Item 10 Attachment A

Headline Progress - 2012


The following section highlights some of the key areas of progress and achievements which have followed Auckland Councils adoption of the Auckland Plan. This list is not exhaustive and significant work continues to progress actions in the Auckland Plan. Notably, global affairs magazine Monocle (Issue 55) ranks Auckland 9th in its list of the Worlds 25 most liveable cities, up from 20th in 2010 and 13th in 2011. Major strategic documents Long-term Plan The Long-term Plan 2012-2022 (LTP) was adopted on 28 June 2012. Indications are that it already provides: Significant contributions to transformational initiatives or initiatives key to the delivery of the Auckland Plan and/or in the two major place based initiatives under a number of themes Some contribution to initiatives in the priority locations under a number of themes. Unitary Plan Progress is being made towards release of a draft Unitary Plan for stakeholder engagement in early 2013. Other strategic documents that will implement the Auckland Plan The following documents were adopted in 2012: Economic Development Strategy adopted on 26 July 2012 City Centre Masterplan Waterfront Plan Waste Management and Minimisation Plan Alcohol Harm Reduction Strategy and creation of the Mayoral Taskforce on Central City Alcohol and Community Safety Indigenous Biodiversity Strategy. Visitor Strategy, Major Events Strategy (ATEED) Substantial progress has also been made on the following:

Housing Strategic Action Plan (Stage 1) - The scope was approved on 24


July 2012 Auckland Integrated Transport Plan (Auckland Transport) expected to be adopted by the Auckland Transport Board in August 2012. Energy and Climate Change Mitigation Strategy a discussion document was released for feedback in June 2012.

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Auckland Plan Committee 07 August 2012 Sports and Recreation Strategy - expected to be adopted in February 2013.

City Centre Retail Prospectus completed in July 2012. Parking Strategy (Auckland Transport).

Major Capital Expenditure Projects (Completed/Underway or Funding Allocated) Transport Auckland Transport, NZTA and KiwiRail City Rail Link route protection funding allocated Development of regional cycling network underway Additional Waitemata Harbour crossing planning underway Auckland Integrated Fare System roll-out underway Waterview Connection- EPA approval, funding allocated Electrification of Auckland Urban Rail Network underway Auckland Manukau Eastern Transport Initiative (AMETI) underway and East-West Link under investigation Puhoi to Wellsford Road of National Significance (RONS) planning progressing. Water and wastewater Central Interceptor Project (Watercare Services Limited) planning underway Construction of the Hunua No.4 Watermain (Watercare Services Limited) underway. Social infrastructure (Note: Central government is the main funder and provider of social services) Auckland Council Restoration and re-opening of Tepid Baths (completed) Otautaua Stonefields Visitor Centre (Mangere Gateway Project) planning underway Glen Innes Music and Arts Centre (feasibility study & concept plans). Central government Hobsonville Point Schools public-private partnership - primary school build well underway Mens Correction Facility at Wiri.

Area Planning Mangere-Otahuhu Local Area Plan and Hibiscus and Bays Local Area Plan
Auckland Plan Annual Implementation Update (AIU) Page 27

Attachment A

Item 10

Auckland Plan Committee 07 August 2012 are both underway Papatoetoe town centre redevelopment planning underway Ormiston town centre redevelopment in Flatbush planning underway New Lynn transformation programme continuing at Merchant Quarter (Auckland Council, Auckland Transport and Infratil Infrastructure Property Ltd), includes the Integrated Family Health Centre under construction Westgate/Massey North programme continuing: library and community centre being developed.

Item 10 Attachment A

Other sector leaders/infrastructure providers Telecommunications Ultra-fast broadband initiative - roll-out for Auckland continuing (Auckland Council working with Chorus to prioritise locations) Rural Broadband Initiative rollout underway (Central government, Vodafone NZ and Chorus). Electricity New Hobson Street Substation underway (Transpower and Vector) North Auckland and Northland (NAaN) Grid Upgrade (Transpower) underway North Island Grid Upgrade underway (Transpower).

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Auckland Plan Committee 07 August 2012 Process, Partnerships and Forums The Auckland Central Government Local Government Forum was held on 20 July 2012 Auckland Sports and Recreation Reference Group established (regionwide and cross-sector forum). Natural hazard risk forum hosted. Upper North Island Strategic Alliance (UNISA) - Auckland Council actively involved in this strategic partnership. In 2012, Auckland Council partnered with the Auckland Chamber of Commerce and Work and Income to launch a Work Experience Program that provides opportunities for young people starting their careers. Tamaki Transformation Programme - Central government and Auckland Council signed a Heads of Agreement in 24 July to jointly form New Zealands first Urban Redevelopment Company to transform Tamaki (including Glen Innes, Pt England and Panmure) over the next 15-20 years. Mayoral Taskforce for Jobs partnership between Auckland Council and private sector to facilitate training and work opportunities between young people and local businesses. Memorandum of Understanding with Massey University signed 28 May. Its purpose is to identify research objectives and to collaborate and cooperate on mutually beneficial programmes. The broad areas of research that have been identified belong to Economic Development, Social and Community Development and Environmental Management. Central government Better Public Services Initiative launched. Development Strategy Greenfield areas for investigation work currently underway Rural-urban boundary determination work currently underway Review of tools to achieve quality intensification underway Tamaki Redevelopment Company to commence operations in September 2012.

Southern Initiative

Governance arrangements approved

Joint Manukau Institute of Technology (MIT)/Auckland International


Airport Company (AIAL) Internship Cadetship Scheme launched.

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Attachment A

Item 10

Auckland Plan Committee 07 August 2012

Item 10 Attachment A

Areas of Focus: 2012/2013


The following provides a number of areas of focus for Auckland Council and its partner stakeholders in the short-term, following on from Auckland Councils adoption of the Auckland Plan. Major strategic documents Long-term Plan Further detailed place-based analysis of the LTP is required in order to examine alignment Unitary Plan and Operative Plans Unitary Plan - Local Board, mana whenua and key stakeholders involvement in draft Unitary Plan provisions between August and December 2012. Ongoing discussions with central government on pre-requisites for the unitary plan to become operative sooner than possible under current legislation. Operative Plans - The need to identify and fully understand the extent of operative and proposed planning provisions that are not consistent with or pre-empt outcomes in the Development Strategy or may limit land supply targets and qualitative outcomes envisaged. This may lead to decisions to bring plan changes to completion or withdraw plan changes if necessary and feasible to do so. Auckland Council is currently developing a number of strategic documents to deliver the Auckland Plan. In addition to those strategies and policies already underway as identified in the Headline Progress table, key areas of focus for 2012/13 include: Children and Young People Strategic Action Plan it is proposed that the final document be ready for adoption in June 2013. This links with central governments work on the Green and White Paper on Vulnerable Children Community Development Strategy expected to be completed by June 2014. Maori Responsiveness Portfolio expected to be adopted by September 2013.

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Auckland Plan Committee 07 August 2012 Arts and Culture Strategy expected to be completed by June 2013. Historic Heritage Plan final plan is expected in June 2013. Sport and Recreation Strategy - expected to be adopted by Feb 2013.

Environment Strategy scoping underway.


Marine and Coastal spatial plans first expected for adoption in June 2014. Water Strategy - scoping is underway for this strategy. Open Space Strategic Framework - expected to be adopted in December 2012. Alignment criteria and consistency between monitoring approaches across Council frameworks (e.g. EDS/ATEED) and the Auckland Plan.

Housing Strategic Action Plan (Stage 2) by March 2013


Area Planning Completion of Mangere-Otahuhu Local Area Plan and Hibiscus and Bays Local Area Plan by December 2012.

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Attachment A

Economic Development Strategy implementation.

Item 10

Auckland Plan Committee 07 August 2012 Major Capital Expenditure Projects

Item 10 Attachment A

Auckland Council Controlled Organisations Transport Auckland Transport Electrification of the urban rail network and AMETI Complete integrated ticketing roll-out Light rail tram extension between Wynyard Quarter and Britomart. Utilities Watercare Services Limited Developing key infrastructure, including the central interceptor project, Hunua No. 4 Water main Waterfront Development Agency Cruise ship terminal at Queens Wharf Social infrastructure (Note: Central government is the main funder and provider of social services) Auckland Council Opening of Waitawa Regional Park, near Kawakawa Bay by 2013

Process, Partnerships and Forums Complete formation of the Youth Advisory Panel Auckland Infrastructure Forum- hold first forum by the end of 2012 Further discussions with central government over Auckland Plan targets, land use and transportation issues, and related funding of major projects Progress the Upper North Island Freight Story and UNISA Port Study Alternative funding for transport investigation. Future guidance and advice is expected from the Independent Maori Statutory Board regarding direction of engagement with iwi and will be reported in more detail in the second Update.

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Auckland Plan Committee 07 August 2012 Development Strategy Five-year research programme underway reviewing town centres and commercial activity Monitoring of land supply targets and programme for ensuring targets are met and monitoring the housing supply response to land delivery Greenfield areas for investigation- work currently underway Rural-urban boundary determination- work currently underway Tools for achieving quality intensification.
Southern Initiative

The Southern Initiative- multi-sector action plan complete by December 2012 and continued implementation of on actions and initiatives.

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Attachment A

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Auckland Plan Committee 07 August 2012

Item 10 Attachment A

Annual Implementation Update


How does the Annual Implementation Update fit in with other Auckland Plan processes? The Auckland Plan Addendum provides the instructions for carrying out the annual update a snapshot of progress by all key stakeholders during the preceding year. It also makes recommendations for stakeholders to change and adjust what they are doing and how they are doing it, to ensure they remain on track to achieve Auckland Plan outcomes. Figure 1: Auckland Plan Implementation Processes

Running alongside the annual reporting process is an overall Implementation Plan. This is a plan that looks at everything the Auckland Plan requires to be done over the
Auckland Plan Annual Implementation Update (AIU) Page 34

Auckland Plan Committee 07 August 2012 years and ensures that the right stakeholders, structures and organisational abilities are in place to achieve it. If they are not then this should be picked up by the Annual Implementation Update and corrected as soon as possible. The Auckland Plan also requires that every three years, progress is measured against the many targets set out in the Plan (Chapter 15) which will be the subject of a separate monitoring report accompanying the third Annual Implementation Update. If targets are not being achieved, recommendations will be made to adjust and change what stakeholders are doing.

The Implementation Plan


The Annual Implementation Update is a reporting process. It is in addition to councils own statutory reporting requirements such as financial reporting through the Annual Report. It also reports on the actions of a wide range of other stakeholders. While it may give direction for the year ahead, it is not an implementation plan. It is to identify progress already made and work underway to achieve the outcomes sought in the Auckland Plan. The challenge for successful implementation will be to ensure that each key stakeholder, within and outside of the Auckland Council has: a clear understanding of what the Auckland Plan means for them and the role they will be expected to play in its success; and, the human and financial resources, planning, implementation and reporting system capability to deliver Auckland Plan outcomes. A clear plan of action is needed to engage stakeholders and ensure they can play their part. While the Auckland Plan requires regular reporting and monitoring and points the way to a range of tools and techniques that could be used for successful implementation, it is not prescriptive about how each stakeholder must participate. There may be an expectation that as stakeholders go about their normal daily business, as they have in the past, the right outcomes will be achieved. It is more likely that stakeholders will need to do things differently and modify and refine their capabilities to achieve success. A key principle of the Implementation Plan is on optimising and adjusting existing structures and systems rather than creating new ones. Steps are being taken to ensure that Auckland Plan implementation becomes the new business as usual throughout the council organisation, its CCOs and amongst all other stakeholders. This is a critical part of the councils transformation programme, as the council moves from the transition stage into realising the full benefits of Transformation. Initiatives

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Attachment A

Item 10

Auckland Plan Committee 07 August 2012 are also underway to involve and engage other stakeholders outside of council who are central to implementation success. The Implementation Plan aims to: Engage stakeholders within and outside Auckland Council Establish a structured process for implementation of the Auckland Plan Co-ordinate implementation and report annually on progress Structure resources to ensure implementation and reporting occurs.

Item 10 Attachment A

As will be shown in this report, a number of initiatives are underway already with key stakeholders to set up implementation forums and structures and to ensure organisational capabilities resources, capacity and funding are in place to ensure that Auckland Plan outcomes will be achievable. Within the council and the CCOs, work is already underway on three main crosscutting tasks affecting all parts of the organisation: Internal communication of the Auckland Plan amongst divisions and departments; Human resources training initiatives and support for organisational transformation; and, Systems adjusting information systems, information collection, planning, portfolio, project management and reporting systems in ways that better achieve Auckland Plan outcomes.

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Auckland Plan Committee 07 August 2012

This Annual Implementation Update addresses alignment across nine work-streams (Figure 2). The work-streams cover: major areas of council group business essential to Auckland Plan implementation the major external partnership areas the major place based initiatives. The work-streams are windows through which to view the implementation of the Auckland Plan. The council group work-streams look at how major areas of work, such as the Unitary Plan are contributing to implementation. The partnership workstreams look at the role of major external individual or group stakeholders such as central government in implementation. The place based work-streams are intended to provide some focus on the implementation of the two major initiatives in the Auckland Plan. Importantly, Figure 2 shows that the role of the Governing Body, the Local Boards, the Council Controlled Organisations and the interests and involvement of mana whenua and the role of the Independent Maori Statutory Board, cutting across a number of work-streams. For example mana whenua interests and initiatives are reported under various work-streams in the Update, such as the Unitary Plan, Developer / Development Agency and Strategy and Policy sub-sections. In future updates all work-streams will need to demonstrate tangible evidence of progress to address the Maori aspirations in the Auckland Plan.

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Attachment A

Item 10

Structure of this report

Auckland Plan Committee 07 August 2012 Figure 2: Work-streams

Item 10

Manawhenuaand IndependentMaori StatutoryBoard UnitaryPlanand OperativePlan Alignment TheSouthern Initiative

LongTermPlan andcouncilgroup Alignment

LocalBoards

Central Government Alignment

Developerand development agencies

Attachment A

Councilgroup Strategyand PolicyAlignment

Infrastructure providers Alignment TheCityCentre

Community groupsandNGOs Alignment

CouncilControlled Organisations

GoverningBody

There are three Auckland Council group work-streams: Long-Term Plan (including Local Board and Council Controlled Organisation) alignment Strategy and Policy Unitary Plan and Operative Plans. There are four partnership work-streams: Central government Infrastructure providers Developer and development agencies Community groups and non-governmental organisations. There are two big place-based work-streams: The City Centre The Southern Initiative. This first Update focuses on putting in place the structures and systems necessary to ensure the Plan is able to be successfully implemented. A comprehensive review of

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Auckland Plan Committee 07 August 2012 progress across all the actions will occur through the second Annual Implementation Update, scheduled for August 2013. Importantly, this first Update provides a baseline position for council and other stakeholders across Auckland to work together to create the worlds most liveable city.

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Attachment A

Item 10

Auckland Plan Committee 07 August 2012

Item 10 Attachment A

Auckland Council Groups Work-Streams


This section of the report looks at the three Auckland Council Groups work-streams: Long-term Plan, including Local Board and Council Controlled Organisation alignment. Strategy and Policy Unitary Plan and Operative Plans. Because of the scale of work being undertaken by the Council Controlled Organisations and collectively by the Local Boards, these are reported under separate headings below.

Long-term Plan
This section of the report considers the extent to which the Long-term Plan 20122022 (LTP), adopted on 28 June 2012, is expected to contribute to the delivery of the Auckland Plan. It is a requirement of council that the LTP, a principal policy and funding instrument of the council, should deliver on the Auckland Plan. This LTP is the first produced by Auckland Council, whereas previous documents (Auckland Councils LTP 1 November 2010 - 30 June 2019, and Annual Plan 2011/12) were an amalgamation of the existing plans from the eight legacy councils. In future, any LTP will be prepared in the context of and aligned with the adopted Auckland Plan. Due to the prevailing circumstances, much of the preparation of the current LTP has taken place in advance of the Auckland Plans adoption on 29 March 2012. In spite of this, the LTP already contains significant policy and funding provisions to begin implementing the Auckland Plan. Global affairs magazine Monocle (Issue 55) ranks Auckland 9th in its list of the Worlds 25 most liveable cities, an improvement on 13th place in 2011 and 20th place in 2010, rounding out a top-10 placing across all three international quality of life surveys [Monocle (9th), Mercer (3rd) and the Economist Intelligence Unit (10th)]. The magazine notes that the council has just adopted the Auckland Plan and highlights major transport infrastructure projects such as the Upper Harbour Ferry Terminal and AMETI. It talks of the need to complete the City Rail Link (CRL) and to find funding sources, other than rates to complete major projects.

Status

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Auckland Plan Committee 07 August 2012 The LTP provides information about what the council plans to do, why it plans to do it, how and when it will be done and what funding is required to do it over the next ten years. Why council does things in the LTP is determined by a variety of drivers, but, must ultimately be aligned to their contribution to the set of seven identified LTP community outcomes. These outcomes are the outcomes stated in the Auckland Plan and provide the strategic overview to which councils activities must contribute. Significantly, for this LTP, the outcomes are underpinned at a strategic level through the 13 strategic directions of the Auckland Plan. The LTP has grouped councils activities into twelve themes which have been aligned with the Auckland Plan strategic directions of council. Each theme has an associated activity plan which is supported by the respective asset management plans where appropriate. These have been aligned to the strategic directions of the draft Auckland Plan. All groups of activities contribute directly or indirectly towards progressing the Auckland Plan. Further analysis is required to better determine the extent of contribution of individual projects and activities to advancing the Auckland Plan, but for the purpose of this report, the following criteria have been used as a starting point to determine current contribution by theme to the Auckland Plan on a spatial basis (Table 1). Three categories were used for ranking the contribution by each theme: Business as usual (BAU) The normal execution of standard functional operations. Further analysis is required but it is expected that many standard functional operations already contribute to Auckland Plan outcomes. Some contribution - Projects that occur within the seven priority areas (Hobsonville / Westgate, Massey North, New Lynn, Onehunga, Tamaki, Takapuna, Warkworth, Pukekohe) Significant contribution - Projects clearly identified in the Auckland Plan as transformational or key to the delivery of the Auckland Plan and/or in the Southern Initiative or City Centre Master Plan area. Some of the key highlights by theme and the cost allocation for the first three years of the adopted LTP are provided below: Table 1: Long-Term Plan 2012-2022 alignment with the Auckland Plan
THEME KEY HIGHLIGHTS AND CONTRIBUTION BY YEAR Page 41

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Auckland Plan Committee 07 August 2012


Governance Key Highlights: Develop treaty framework as a basis for ensuring the council observes its statutory obligations with respect to the Treaty and engages and communicates effectively with Maori LTP (Yr 1-3) Significant Contribution ($000) 0 8,758 Some Contribution ($000) 0 0 BAU ($000)

Item 10

CAPEX OPEX Planning

2,980 60,529

Key Highlights: Implementation of the Auckland Plan through the development of core strategies and Unitary Plan LTP (Yr 1-3) Significant Contribution ($000) 10,257 131,384 Some Contribution ($000) 0 0 BAU ($000)

CAPEX

0 0

Attachment A

OPEX

Commercial and Key Highlights: Redevelopment of the Papatoetoe Town Centre ($3.4M) and investment investment into Port of Auckland ($61.4M) LTP (Yr 1-3) Significant Contribution ($000) 88,890 0 Some Contribution ($000) 0 0 BAU ($000)

CAPEX OPEX Economic Development

26,204 468,733

Key Highlights: Establishment of New Zealand Innovation Centre adjacent to Tamakis research-led campus ($27.8M) and waterfront development initiatives ($286M) LTP (Yr 1-3) Significant Contribution ($000) 243,361 252,964 Some Contribution ($000) 6,410 134,192 BAU ($000)

CAPEX OPEX

35,072 102,437

Built and Key Highlights: Develop Historic Heritage Plan and provide Built Heritage Acquisition natural Fund ($33M) and prepare Hauraki Gulf Marine Spatial Plan environment LTP (Yr 1-3) Significant Some BAU ($000) Contribution Contribution ($000) ($000) CAPEX OPEX Solid waste 24,012 0 0 151,826 17,325 558,438

Key Highlights: Radio frequency enabled wheelie bin collection (RFID) ($4.2M) LTP (Yr 1-3) Significant Contribution ($000) Some Contribution ($000) BAU ($000)

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Auckland Plan Committee 07 August 2012


CAPEX OPEX 0 0 0 0 6,270 311,967

Stormwater Key Highlights: Extension of stormwater network to cater for growth ($167M) and flood LTP (Yr 1-3) Significant Some BAU ($000) protection Contribution Contribution ($000) ($000) CAPEX OPEX 41,771 0 106,653 56,917 90,057 292,553

Water supply Key Highlights: Hunua No.4 Water main ($339.1M) and Central Interceptor and sewerage ($797.1M) LTP (Yr 1-3) Significant Contribution ($000) 0 0 Some Contribution ($000) 988,480 1,511,684 BAU ($000)

CAPEX OPEX Transport

0 0

Key Highlights: City Rail Link- investigation, designation and land purchase ($200m), increase in public transport services funding, AMETI Land acquisition and roading improvements ($2.49M) LTP (Yr 1-3) Significant Contribution ($000) 1,049,287 1,515,526 Some Contribution ($000) 725,390 1,488,204 BAU ($000)

CAPEX OPEX Community

627,689 0

Key Highlights: Takanini Library ($5.9M) Waiheke Library ($3.6M) LTP (Yr 1-3) Significant Contribution ($000) 6,306 0 Some Contribution ($000) 26,719 375,416 BAU ($000)

CAPEX OPEX Lifestyle culture

158,315 166,833

and Key Highlights: Massey North Community Centre ($7M) and redevelopment of Otahuhu Library ($6.3M) LTP (Yr 1-3) Significant Contribution ($000) 111,408 180,208 Some Contribution ($000) 113,776 1,155,046 BAU ($000)

CAPEX OPEX Corporate support

366,455 122,367

Key Highlights: Strategic property acquisition ($105.1M) and implementation of business processes and systems in the drive for efficiency and cost savings LTP (Yr 1-3) Significant Contribution ($000) Some Contribution ($000) BAU ($000)

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Attachment A

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Auckland Plan Committee 07 August 2012


CAPEX 0 0 0 0 365,345 321,882

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OPEX

Alignment- Table 1 shows that, in the first three years the LTP already provides for: Significant contributions to transformational initiatives or initiatives key to the delivery of the Auckland Plan and/or in the two major place based initiatives under the Planning, Economic Development, Transport and Lifestyle and Culture themes Some contribution to initiatives in the priority locations under the Economic Development, Built and Natural Environment, Stormwater and Flood Protection, Water Supply and Sewerage, Transport, Community and Lifestyle and Culture themes. An effort has been made to show more closely the spatial distribution of the LTP capital programme1 across Auckland using local board boundaries. Results are indicative only and systems are being developed to provide a more detailed placebased analysis of spending for the second Annual Implementation Update in July 2013. Figure 3 shows that almost $3.5 billion of capital spending items is attributed to Auckland-wide programmes with no specific location identified. Further analysis will be needed to break this spend down into localities. Figure 3 shows some emphasis on the City Centre (using the Waitemata Local Board boundary) and on Local Board areas with major greenfield developments in them2. There is as yet no apparent emphasis of capital spending in the Southern Initiative area3. Importantly, this analysis does not include spending by the two largest CCOs and by central government, which may already show a stronger emphasis on the Southern Initiative. It has to be recognised that the first ten years of the Auckland Plan is a period for building the runway. The current LTP is still expected to reflect a significant degree of direction from legacy projects and programmes. It is likely that the 2015-25 LTP will be the first to show a real shift in spending to reflect the two major place based initiatives and spending in other priority locations. The review of the LTP every three years, along with the annual plan and local board plans planning process, provides the council with the opportunity and flexibility to modify and incorporate changes to programmes, initiatives and budgets both for capital and operating expenditure. As the Auckland Plan becomes more embedded into the daily business of the council, activity managers will be required to demonstrate more clearly and measurably how their activities contribute to the

Attachment A

1 2 3

Excludes Auckland Transport and Watercare Services Limited capital spending Uses Hibiscus and Bays, Henderson-Massey, Howick and Upper Harbour Local Board boundaries Uses Mangere-Otahuhu, Manurewa, Otara-Papatoetoe and Papakura Local Board Areas Page 44

Auckland Plan Annual Implementation Update (AIU)

Auckland Plan Committee 07 August 2012 delivery of the Auckland Plan as part of both the strategic alignment and funding/decision making processes.

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Attachment A

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Auckland Plan Committee 07 August 2012 Figure 3:

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Location of Inflated LTP 2012-2022 capital spending by major areas


$4,000,000,000 $3,500,000,000 $3,000,000,000 $2,500,000,000 $2,000,000,000 $1,500,000,000 $1,000,000,000 $649,800,152 $500,000,000 $0 $413,880,803 $198,763,627 $44,036,544 Local Board All other Local areas with major Board areas greenfield locations Other (Unallocated) $606,808,096 $3,482,306,047

Attachment A

Auckland-wide

City Centre (Waitemata)

Southern Initiative Local Board areas

There is already a considerable amount of work taking place within the council to align planning, management and monitoring processes with Auckland Plan outcomes. Initiatives include: The development of the strategy and policy work programme, which is now well advanced, enabling a focus on a number of key policies/strategies/plans of council that will make best use of resources and help provide the necessary guidance required for activity and asset managers to align their activities to the Auckland Plan Business planning process - work is already underway within the organisation to embody Auckland Plan transformational shifts, strategic directions, priorities and actions into departmental business planning processes Performance measures - work is underway to ensure that business performance measurement across the council is consistent with agreed levels of service and with targets to be monitored in the Auckland Plan Information systems planning which includes funding for priority Auckland Plan projects Advancement of internal council communication and training processes to raise awareness of Auckland Plan and the role everyone in the organisation will play in its implementation The internal Auckland Council Transformation programme- which focuses on 10 critical success measures along with 24 best opportunities to address these measures framed around three workstreams: customer experience and cost to

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Auckland Plan Committee 07 August 2012 serve, operational excellence and productivity and high performance teams, as well as opportunities such as adopt a place-making mind set and practices . As an example of organisational change and initiatives to support Auckland Plan outcomes, Auckland Council partnered with the Auckland Chamber of Commerce and Work and Income in early 2012 to launch a Work Experience Program that provides opportunities for young people starting their careers. The Auckland Chamber of Commerce has strong links to a large group of career starters through two youth employment programmes; Cadet Max and Limited Service Volunteers. Within these highly structured employment placement programmes, work experience is recognised as a valuable component to transitioning and placing youth into employment. Council's first Work Experience intake was in February 2012. By July, more than 100 young people had gained work experience at Council across a wide range of its departments. In many cases, the work experience cadets have remained in Council beyond the standard two week period to undertake project work. Feedback from the cadets and managers has been consistently very positive about the program and its outcomes. These initiatives support priority actions in Chapter 1: Aucklands people on the provision of clear pathways and support for further education, training or employment for all young people leaving school.

Challenges
Existing projects The council has inherited a number of legacy projects that, when assessed against the Auckland Plan, may no longer be consistent with or considered as priorities in terms of the Auckland Plan. The council is in some instances contractually obliged to continue particular projects. Some projects cannot be easily modified or stopped due to their stage of advancement. Timeframes - The concurrent development of the Auckland Plan and the LTP has required assumptions to be made by activity and asset managers in regard to the degree of alignment with the Auckland Plan of the assets and services they deliver. Agreed growth rates, spatial priority areas and other long term strategic considerations needed to be consistent across the organisation in order to bring confidence and rigour to the planning process. Although it was unlikely that the council would change its services significantly in the first three years of the LTP, it was still important to maintain sufficient flexibility to allow council to optimise the immediate opportunities presented through the Auckland Plan now and in the future. Budget and resources Although the Auckland Plan is a 30-year planning document, there needs to be some assurance that sufficient funding will be available in the
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Attachment A

Item 10

Auckland Plan Committee 07 August 2012 current LTP period to implement all of the initiatives outlined for Year 1 to Year 10 of the Auckland Plan. The Auckland Plan points to the use of alternative funding mechanisms to ensure outcomes are achievable. Work has already been undertaken by the Mayors office to look at alternative sources of funding for transport projects.

Item 10 Attachment A

Areas of focus
Achieve improved alignment between activities and the Auckland Plan through the development and implementation of strategies and policies Code budget lines against contribution to Auckland Plan to enable better tracking in the future. Activity and asset management plans should be better aligned to the Auckland Plan as identified through the improvement planning process which will require measurable outcomes to be achieved Investment Proposals Develop clear and consistent criteria for assessing Investment Proposals against the Auckland Plan Budget mapping Capital and operational budgets should be recorded against their contribution towards Auckland Plan to ensure funding is allocated correctly Levels of service (LoS) need to be evaluated against their contribution to the Auckland Plan which may result in the development of new services and reduction of others Staff training and up-skilling on how the Auckland Plan needs to drive work throughout the organisation Ongoing work on business plans and performance measurement

Council-Controlled Organisations (CCOs)


Auckland Council Controlled Organisations (CCOs)4 and Watercare Services Limited (as an Auckland Council Controlled Organisation from 1 July 2012) are major delivery mechanisms for the Auckland Plan and are key to its successful implementation. They play a critical role in progressing Auckland Plan actions and in the delivery of major projects across Auckland. This section of the report provides a status update on key areas of alignment in relation to CCOs.
4

Includes Auckland Council Investments Limited; Auckland Council Property Limited; Auckland Tourism Events and Economic Development Limited (ATEED); Auckland Transport; Auckland Waterfront Development Agency; Regional Facilities Auckland)

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Auckland Plan Committee 07 August 2012

Actions Various actions reliant on CCOs for implementation are underway and progressing. They include: o Auckland Transport - discussions with NZTA for the first phase of the Multi Modal East West Study - a study around the development of an east-west strategic transport corridor linking the Western Ring Route (SH20) at Onehunga and the Southern Motorway Watercare Services Limited - discussions with Auckland Council on the Greenfield Areas of Investigation, helping to determine timings, capacities, and servicing costs Waterfront Development Agency Waterfront Plan adopted June 2012 Auckland Tourism Events and Economic Development Limited the implementation of Auckland Councils recently adopted Visitor Strategy and Major Events Strategy Major Infrastructure projects - Some CCOs are also responsible for progressing major infrastructure projects and are working with other parties (e.g. NZTA and Kiwirail) (Addendum Table 3 in the Auckland Plan Implementation Addendum). A number of these projects are already underway and progressing, such as: o Auckland Transport - AMETI (Panmure section); City Rail Link route protection; Additional Harbour Crossing planning; Public transport Integrated Fare System roll-out, all underway; electrification of the Auckland Urban Rail Network o Watercare Services Limited - Hunua No.4 Water Supply Scheme and Puketutu Rehabilitation and the Central Interceptor Project o Waterfront Auckland- Auckland Council Strategy and Finance Committee approved funding for the $14.6 million upgrade (total project cost) of Queens Wharf Shed 10 to complete conversion into a multi- use cruise and event facility, a significant cost savings from the original $25 million dollar budget. Further details can be found in the Infrastructure Providers section of this report (p46).

o o

Statements of Intent - Each CCO, within its Statement of Intent (SOI), has recognised the importance of the Auckland Plan and has identified explicit linkages between their service delivery and relevant aspects of the Auckland Plan (demonstrating a causal link in how each CCO acts consistently with and will give effect to it). This is an important step forward given the critical role and responsibility CCOs have in working towards achieving Auckland Plan outcomes.

Challenges
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Auckland Plan Committee 07 August 2012 An overall challenge for council is to translate Auckland Plan outcomes into the everyday processes and procedures of the CCOs. Programmed improvements to the performance monitoring framework for CCOs will be a key element to this, ensuring that deliverables have stretch targets in accordance with the Auckland Plan, and that these targets are measured and reported on regularly.

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Areas of focus
As shown above, the CCOs are already well involved in Auckland Plan implementation and their 2012-2015 Statements of Intent are clearly aligned with Auckland Plan outcomes. A structured process for ongoing engagement with the CCOs needs to be established, bringing the CCOs formally into infrastructure forums and involving them closely in the delivery of the Development Strategy and the numerous actions in the Plan. This is essential to ensure they are aware of and supported in the role they play in implementing the Auckland Plan, both in terms of actions and capital projects. Improvements to the performance monitoring framework and ensuring that CCOs are actively identifying their contributions to council outcomes in the Auckland Plan will also assist.

Local Boards
As part of Auckland Councils shared co-governance model, Local Boards provide local leadership for the Auckland Plan and are instrumental to its successful implementation at a local area level. They have a significant and wide-ranging role making decisions on local matters, providing local leadership and building strong local communities.

Status
Local Boards have been regularly engaged and consulted with throughout the development of the Auckland Plan. This has taken place through regular meetings held with local boards to provide updates on Auckland Plan development and to receive feedback from the boards. Two series of meetings with local boards have been held since the adoption of the Auckland Plan. Despite being prepared without the Auckland Plan being in place, Local Board Plans already place strong emphasis on a number of key Auckland Plan outcomes including: local economic improvement village and town centre improvements environmental and heritage protection local community services, facilities and recreation provision

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Auckland Plan Committee 07 August 2012 local transportation improvements The local board plans also identify the advocacy role that the boards expect to play on Auckland-wide imperatives, in particular in terms of major recreational facilities and transportation projects. Council will continue to work with local boards throughout the implementation of the Auckland Plan. This is important given the significant role local boards play in the development of their local areas and to ensure alignment with Auckland Plan outcomes.

Challenges
There is still considerable work to be done in establishing the degree of fit of local initiatives with the Auckland Plan and also the extent to which Auckland-wide initiatives align with local board aspirations. The challenge is to continue to work closely with the local boards to ensure that the outcomes desired by the Auckland Plan are achieved. Issues of non-alignment, when they are identified, will also need to be worked through.

Areas of focus
Engagement with local boards will be ongoing throughout the Auckland Plan implementation process. It is crucial to ensure that this continues by involving boards in relevant forums and structures where they are stakeholders. A good example is the involvement of six local boards in the Steering Group for the Southern Initiative, or the role each Local Board will play in developing the draft Unitary Plan. A detailed analysis of the alignment between the 21 local board plans and Auckland Plan needs to be undertaken and reported in the second Annual Implementation Update.

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Auckland Plan Committee 07 August 2012

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Strategy and Policy


Auckland Council inherited a wide range of strategies and policies from the legacy councils in 2010, and work has been underway since 2011 to establish an agreed strategy and policy work programme that aligns with the Councils strategic directions set out in the Auckland Plan. This update indicates strong alignment and good progress on a number of important strategies and policies that are intended to give effect to the Auckland Plan. It also requires consideration of the impacts of any policy development on those CCOs which may then be required to give effect to them.

Status
Council has undertaken a comprehensive review of the strategy and policy work programme it inherited from legacy councils. Approximately 140 items were identified in the review. This list has been considerably refined using the following criteria: the degree of alignment to the Auckland Plan, i.e. the strategic case for continuing with the work mandatory requirements statutory or contractual obligations degree of completion criticality significance to Maori corporate capability customer service, risk mitigation and cost effectiveness affordability and achievability. The strategy and policy work programme is fundamental to successful implementation of the Auckland Plan. While already providing the high level strategy for key areas such as housing and transport, the Auckland Plan points to a number of other areas in which strategies are required, such as the Community Development Strategy, Arts and Culture Strategy, Water Strategy, and Energy and Climate Change Mitigation Strategy. The Auckland Plan also lists as actions, a number of policies and action plans required to embed the strategic directions already provided by the Plan. These include the: Housing Strategic Action Plan Children and Young People Strategic Action Plan Historic Heritage Plan.

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Challenges
A key challenge for this programme of work is ensuring that it considers operational impacts for CCOs, and that it is delivered in an integrated manner insofar as decision makers understand the relationship between each item and other key processes, e.g. the Unitary Plan. The strategy and policy work programme needs to be carried out within the financial provisions of the LTP.

Areas of focus
Once agreed, an update on the status of items on the work programme will be provided to the Council on a quarterly basis. Any recommended additions or other changes to the programme will be included in that update. A full communication programme will also be rolled out across the organisation and CCOs. This is both to ensure that there is a high level of awareness of agreed strategy and policy work, and to reduce the potential for ad-hoc strategy and policy development. There will also be a focus on providing advice and guidance to support best-practice strategy and policy development.

Unitary Plan and Operative Plans


Auckland Councils Unitary Plan and Operative Plans are key tools for the implementation of the Auckland Plan. As regulatory documents with statutory weight, the Auckland Plan relies heavily on them in order to achieve many of its desired outcomes.

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Unitary Plan There are 32 actions in the Auckland Plan, spread across a number of chapters that directly rely on the Unitary Plan for implementation. The Unitary Plan is fundamental to the delivery of Auckland Plan outcomes in a timely manner and the Development Strategy (Section D of the Auckland Plan) is highly dependent for its success on the Unitary Plan process. Although the Unitary Plan project is well underway, the achievement of Auckland Plan outcomes will be strongly influenced over the next 1 to 3 years by the existing Operative Plans and a number of plan changes in train. A key issue remains the question of changes to legislation that would enable the Unitary Plan to become operative sooner than would normally be possible under current legislation. It is clear that any legislative changes that reduce access to appeals, if agreed, would need to be accompanied by a highly collaborative upfront process to the development of the Unitary Plan. This message has been reinforced by central government officials. . In July, the Auckland Plan Committee considered progress on the Unitary Plan and proposals for an enhanced engagement process. The committee supported the proposed release of a draft Auckland Unitary Plan in the first quarter of 2013 for community discussion prior to formal notification. Prior to this, engagement is proposed between August and December with the local boards, key stakeholders and mana whenua in developing the draft proposals. A key part of the Unitary Plan engagement process to date has been a series of sector-based workshops held with infrastructure providers and other stakeholders. This created the opportunity to establish constructive multi-party discussions on key issues. Operative Plans Auckland Council inherited a wide range of district plans from the legacy councils in 2010. It is reasonable to expect that the operative plans may not support Auckland Plan outcomes in a number of respects. Added to this, a number of plan changes are underway across Auckland. Preliminary analysis indicates that the majority of these plan changes align with Auckland Plan, but there are cases where alignment is poor or tends to undermine the Auckland Plan. Examples include: o Plan Change 28: Kingseat Structure Plan - although identified as a rural and coastal village in the Auckland Plan and lying within an identified greenfield area of investigation, the level of development envisaged by the plan change requires significant servicing upgrades. The plan change pre-empts investigation, servicing and funding processes

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Auckland Plan Committee 07 August 2012 o Plan Change 32: Clevedon Village - this provides for significantly more development than is envisaged in the Auckland Plan and the plan change raises major wastewater funding issues o Private Plan Change 34: Pine Harbour the plan change is well advanced with a consent order being finalised. It provides for significant amounts of mixed-use development. Although falling within a greenfield area of investigation, the plan change will pre-empt investigations. The change raises water supply and wastewater treatment issues with the Beachlands-Maraetai wastewater treatment plant only having capacity to service stage 1 of the proposed development. Area Plans - The Council has commenced work on a series of place-based local area plans commencing with the Mangere-Otahuhu Local Area Plan and Hibiscus and Bays Local Area Plans which are expected to be completed by December 2012. Area Plans will: o Depict how Auckland Plan directions and outcomes could be implemented at a o o o o more local scale Present a 20-30 year future spatial vision for a local area in support of the Local Board Plan Provide an integrated picture of economic, environmental, social and cultural outcomes at a more local level Help to resolve tension between regional and local aspirations Include outcomes, aspirations and initiatives broader than those within council control.

Challenges
A major challenge facing Auckland Council is to ensure that the Unitary Plan, a key instrument for the implementation of the Auckland Plan, is made operative as soon as possible. While the Auckland Plan has a 30 year outlook, implementation in the early years will be influenced by the statutory planning framework that the Auckland Council inherited. Addressing areas of misalignment between the Auckland Plan and the operative plan and numerous plan changes, will be a challenge moving forward. The implications arising from a number of plan changes need to be more fully understood.

Areas of focus
There is a need to identify and fully understand operative and proposed planning provisions that: a) b) are not consistent with or pre-empt outcomes in the Development Strategy; or may limit the 5 to 10 year land supply targets and qualitative outcomes envisaged.

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Auckland Plan Committee 07 August 2012 It may be necessary to seek ways of addressing these issues in advance of the Unitary Plan being notified in 2013. This may involve bringing plan changes to completion or withdrawing plan changes as necessary if it is still feasible to do so.
Figure 4: Timeline for preparing Area Plans for Auckland.

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Ongoing work with the Unitary Plan team on the particular requirements that the Auckland Plan places on it, is another immediate focus for the year ahead. This includes working to implement the Auckland Plan land delivery requirements, the location of the Rural Urban Boundary (RUB) and provisions to ensure quality outcomes. Local Board, mana whenua and key stakeholders and involvement is proposed on the draft Unitary Plan provisions between August and December 2012 prior to formal notification in 2013.
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Auckland Plan Committee 07 August 2012 Ongoing discussions are required with central government on pre-requisites to legislative changes enabling the unitary plan to become operative sooner than possible under current legislation. Key dates: Discussions with local boards, mana whenua and key stakeholders on draft Unitary Plan proposals between August and December 2012. Release of the Unitary Plan engagement March 2013. discussion draft for widespread community

Unitary Plan ready for notification September 2013.

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Partnership Work-Streams
This section of the report looks at the four Partnership work-streams: Central government Infrastructure providers Developer and development agencies Community groups and NGOs

Central Government
New Zealand Government is a major stakeholder in the Auckland Plan and key to its successful implementation. Government is listed as a stakeholder against many actions in the Auckland Plan and is a significant contributor to the funding of numerous major projects (particularly infrastructure) and initiatives across Auckland. Government is also the primary funder of social services in Auckland. Governments role in Auckland is critical and yet it has national priorities to consider. Auckland Plan implementation has to occur within this wider context. There was considerable dialogue with central government throughout the Auckland Plan development. There is a high degree of alignment between Auckland Plan outcomes and government priorities in a number of areas.

Status
To date, there is strong common ground with Central government around: Social imperatives including the Southern Initiative Economic imperatives including the Economic Development Strategy Spatial imperatives in the Development Strategy Upper North Island Freight Story and Port Access Study Additional Waitemata Harbour Crossing- preparation of Notice of Requirement to protect route (NZTA) Kiwirail- investigation underway into third rail freight line. Climate change mitigation strategy and targets Initiatives related to Aucklands Mori The development of Arts and Culture, and Historic Heritage strategies The proposal to nominate the Auckland Volcanic Field for World heritage listing The Fresh start for Fresh Water initiative

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Auckland Plan Committee 07 August 2012 Further work is required around: Transport imperatives Alignment of central government and Auckland Plan targets. The Minister of Local Government has made a formal response to the adoption of the Auckland Plan. This lays the foundation for on-going dialogue on Auckland Plan implementation, and indicates there is a high level of Government support for and alignment with the Auckland Plan. The Government has raised a number of matters of concern but looks forward to ongoing dialogue to advance work in these areas. The Auckland Plan lists 81 Actions across all chapters identifying Government as a stakeholder, 10 of which specifically list Government as the lead stakeholder for implementation and delivery. Government is already actively involved in Auckland in health, education, housing, welfare, transport and other sectors, and is reviewing its position in light of adoption of the Auckland Plan and in the context of its Better Public Services (BPS) programme. Government is also a major provider of capital projects in Auckland and the status of these projects is covered in detail in the infrastructure providers update in this report. Building on Auckland Plan development, a number of structures have been developed or are emerging to further develop strong working relationships and partnerships between central government and Auckland Council. Government and public agencies are already involved in: The Economic Development Strategy The Southern Initiative - discussions are underway about the forums and structures that will need to be put in place to ensure this major initiative proceeds The Energy and Climate Change Mitigation Strategy (ECCMS) (in preparation) The Arts and Culture Strategy - Government is a major funder of the arts and will be a key stakeholder in developing this strategy Housing Strategic Action Plan (in preparation) - Government supports council's focus on housing supply and affordability issues, both through the development strategy and the Strategic Housing Action Plan and partnerships such as Tamaki. There is also underlying or intrinsic support for government BPS targets through the pursuit of more stable and affordable housing, providing households with stability and better health, education and employment outcomes. The government has outlined four priorities for the current term as follows: 1. Responsibly managing the governments finances 2. Building a more competitive and productive economy 3. Delivering better public service within tight financial constraints
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Auckland Plan Committee 07 August 2012 4. Rebuilding Christchurch

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As part of the Better Public Service (BPS) initiative, ten priority result areas have been identified. These are: Reducing long term welfare dependency 1. Reduce the number of people who have been on working age benefit for more than 12 months Supporting vulnerable children 2. Increase participation in early childhood education 3. Increase infant immunisation rates and reduce the incidence of rheumatic fever 4. Reduce the number of serious assaults on children Boosting skills and employment 5. Increase the proportion of 18 year olds with NCEA level 2 or equivalent qualification 6. Increase the proportion of 25-34 year olds with advanced trade qualifications, diplomas and degrees (at level 4 or above) Reducing crime 7. Reduce the rates of total crime, violent crime and youth crime 8. Reduce reoffending Making it easy to interact with Government 9. New Zealand businesses have a one-stop on-line shop for all Government advice and support they need to run and grow their business 10. New Zealanders can complete their transactions with Government easily in a digital environment.

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Auckland Plan Committee 07 August 2012 Alignment with Targets in Better Public Service The following are targets under the Governments Better Public Services initiative announced on 25 June 2012. Shown beneath them are corresponding targets in the Auckland Plan. It is recognised that the Better Public Services targets relate to the whole country and the Auckland Plan targets to Auckland only. The Auckland Plan acknowledges that the Government is the primary funder and provider of social services. Auckland Council and Government officials are working together on opportunities to improve alignment. 1. Reduce the number of people continuously receiving working-age benefits, which will become the new Job Seeker Support, for more than 12 months by 30%, from 78,000 in April 2012 to 55,000 by 2017 - BPS. 2. Increase participation in early childhood education to 98% of children starting school in 2016 - BPS. All 3 to 4-year-olds will participate in, and have access to, quality, culturally appropriate early childhood learning services, by 2020 - AP. 3. Increase infant immunisation rates to achieve and maintain 95% coverage of 8month-olds fully immunised with the scheduled vaccinations by 2017; and reduce the incidence of rheumatic fever by two-thirds to 1.4 cases per 100,000 people by June 2017 BPS. Ensure that by 2017, all pre-school children receive all well checks, including the b4school check, and are up-to-date with childhood immunisation - AP. 4. Halt the 10-year rise in children experiencing physical abuse and reduce current numbers by 5% by 2017 - BPS. By 2020, the number of breaches of Domestic Violence Act (1995) will have stabilised and by 2040 will have fallen by 40% - AP. 5. Increase the proportion of 18-year-olds with NCEA Level 2 or equivalent qualification to 85% in 2017 BPS. Increase the proportion of school leavers who achieve at least NCEA Level 2 from 74% in 2010 to 100% by 2020, with all school leavers having a career plan by 2020 AP. 6. Increase the proportion of 25-34 year olds with advanced trade qualifications, diplomas and degrees (at level 4 or above) to 55% in 2017 - BPS. All young adults will complete a post-secondary qualification by 2030 - AP. 7. Reduce the rates of total crime by 15%, violent crime by 20% and youth crime by 5% by 2017 - BPS. Reduce the rate of total criminal offences per 10,000 population from 939 in 2010 to 800 in 2040 - AP. 8. Reduce reoffending, the re-imprisonment rate, and the re-conviction rate of community sentenced offenders by 25% by 2017 BPS. 9. New Zealand businesses have a one-stop online shop for government
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Auckland Plan Committee 07 August 2012 advice and support with business costs from dealing with government reduced by 25% by 2017 through year on year reduction in effort required to work with agencies. Government services to business will have similar key performance ratings as leading private sector firms by July 2017, and businesses will be able to contribute to this through an online feedback system from July 2013 - BPS. 10. An average of 70 per cent of New Zealanders' most common transactions with government will be completed in a digital environment by 2017 - BPS.

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At the joint Auckland Central-Local Government Forum held on 20 July 2012, the Minister of Local Government the Honourable David Carter presented the Ministerial response to the adoption of the Auckland Plan. The Minister sees Auckland Plan as a key vehicle for developing an integrated approach to managing Aucklands growth, meeting central government objectives and avoiding duplication of effort. The Ministers response can be summarized as follows: The Economy chapter of the Plan is largely consistent with the Governments Business Growth Agenda At a high level, there appears to be broad alignment between the BPS result areas and Auckland Plan targets, although differences do exist Government supports key aspects of the Auckland Plan development Strategy including: o the range for growth estimates within and outside the 2010 MUL, with a target of 60:40 inside to outside, retaining an aspiration of 70:30 and ensuring a supply of 5-10 years of unconstrained development capacity the provision of more greenfield business land for the 30 years of the Plan

than was proposed in the draft Auckland Plan Government supports the Councils proposed reviews of policy and regulatory tools around land use, consents and infrastructure and amenity pricing and allocation Government supports management of the transport system as a single network and the priority given to freight movement There is broad alignment with Auckland Plan and central governments social priorities Government welcomes the role Council can play in adding value to shared education priorities Government is broadly supportive of the initiatives identified in the Aucklands Maori chapter Government welcomes the opportunities to work with Council in arts, culture and historic heritage areas and sees broad alignment with Sports New Zealands key performance indicators and actions
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Auckland Plan Committee 07 August 2012 Government will support future work signalled in the Environment chapter requiring Government input Government supports the Councils integrated approach to building resilience to natural hazards and adapting to the impacts of climate change and supports the need for having robust, secure and resilient infrastructure Government welcomes aims in the Rural chapter which align broadly with Governments priorities, particularly the Business Growth Agenda Government is supportive of measures proposed to implement Auckland Plan including the Annual Implementation Update.

Challenges
The main concerns raised in the Ministers response centre on: The Transport chapter, in particular the affordability, value for money and effectiveness in addressing congestion of the programme of projects proposed in the Transport chapter The lack of alignment at a detailed level of some targets and the lack of clarity on roles, responsibilities and resourcing around Aucklands People and the Southern Initiative. The Prime Minister and Minister of Local Government announced an eight point reform programme for local government on 19 March 2012 which it believes will provide better clarity about councils roles, stronger governance, improved efficiency and more responsible fiscal management. The Local Government 2002 Amendment Bill was introduced to Parliament on 30 May 2012 and covers the first four points of the reform programme. The Bill is likely to be enacted by the end of the year. At its 3 July 2012 meeting, the Auckland Plan Committee resolved to oppose the proposed new purpose statement in the Bill which removes the requirement on councils to promote the social, economic, environmental, and cultural well-being of communities.5 The Committee also resolved to oppose any narrowing of local governments purpose that will have implications on its ability to implement the Auckland Plan, and to emphasise that its role in many Auckland Plan targets and actions is facilitative in nature. The second four points of the Better Local Government reform programme are being developed through a range of mechanisms including the establishment of an efficiency taskforce; an inquiry by the Productivity Commission into the allocation of regulatory functions between central and local government; an advisory group to
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Auckland Plan Committee 07 August 2012 consider policy settings in relation to quality infrastructure; and a review by the Auditor-General on the use of development contributions by councils. Recommendations arising from these inquiries and investigations will be included in a further local government bill to be introduced in 2013.

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Areas of focus
There is already a high level of dialogue with Central government on Auckland Plan implementation and support by Government across numerous aspects of the Plan. The focus for the work with Central government in the coming year is expected to centre on the following areas: Implementation and advancement of the Economic Development Strategy Ongoing work on alignment of targets and supporting actions. It has not been possible, in the short time since adoption of the Auckland Plan and the recent release of the Governments own targets and actions, for each of its result areas (publicly released on 26 June 2012) to amend the Auckland Plan targets and actions as required in paragraph 845 of the Auckland Plan. However, there is a commitment for officers to continue to work with Government officials to seek further alignment between targets and actions. Continued work with Government on transport analysis of major projects, priorities and funding issues Advancement of the Housing Strategic Action Plan Continuation of engagement with Government and social sector service agencies regarding alignment and progressing Government priorities, including engagement on the Southern Initiative. Effective engagement with iwi/Maori on initiatives in the Auckland Plan Chapter 2: Aucklands Maori. There are also other parts of the Plan where engagement with iwi/Maori will be important (such as the Economic Development Strategy which has a cross-cutting theme around Maori economic development). Development of an Arts and Culture Strategy and Historic Heritage Strategy. Responding constructively to governments reform programme for local government and other legislative changes affecting Auckland Plan implementation.

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This section provides a brief update on progress relating to the planning and delivery of infrastructure projects outlined in the Auckland Plan and the work of Council to align infrastructure delivery with the strategic directions in the Auckland Plan.

Status
Major Projects Infrastructure providers have provided feedback on the progress made on projects within the Major Projects Table in the Auckland Plan Implementation Addendum. This feedback was generally positive, with progress well underway on a number of projects including: The City Rail Link (the CRL) The CRL will unlock the full potential of Aucklands rail network, allowing for faster, more reliable and direct services to a wider range of destinations. This project will also allow Britomart to become a through station, as it was originally envisaged. The CRL will also give impetus to the redevelopment and improvement of many areas of the central city, with new stations at the Aotea Centre, Karangahape Road, and Newton, and to centres on the rail network. The Council has now identified the preferred route, while the Long Term Plan sets aside $110 million in the next year to assist with route protection and land acquisition. Waterview Connection The project received Environmental Protection Agency Approval in July 2011 and a contract for the projects construction was awarded the following month to the Well Connected Alliance. Early works have begun on the project, including reconstructing the Maioro Street interchange, relocating recreation facilities in Allan Wood Reserve and other more minor works around the southern end of the project. Tunneling is expected to commence in early 2014, with the project completed and opened by 2017. Electrification of Auckland Urban Rail Network Infrastructure works for electrification have significantly advanced over the past 12 months. Electrification clearance works at bridges is close to completion, except for Ellerslie-Panmure Highway which will be reconstructed in stages as part of the AMETI project. The electrification signaling system is complete apart from some minor tidying-up works. The traction system is complete on the Onehunga Line and the western line from New Lynn to Swanson and underway across the rest of the future electrified network. The new electrification depot is under construction in Wiri. All infrastructure works (apart from Ellerslie-Panmure Highway bridge replacement) are due for completion by mid-2013.
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Infrastructure Providers

Auckland Plan Committee 07 August 2012 Auckland Manukau Eastern Transport Initiative (AMETI)

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AMETI will allow for the improvement of public transport, walking, and cycling opportunities across the eastern suburbs of Auckland. This project will also help reduce traffic congestion and will involve a multi-stage construction scheme. The Long Term Plan allocates $747.8 million over the next ten years to progress AMETI. East-West Link Investigation is underway into alignment options. Will provide a strategic transport link between the eastern suburbs of the isthmus and improved accessibility between SH1 and SH20 corridors, the airport and East Tamaki. Alternative Transport Funding Investigation is underway into the use of alternative funding mechanisms for Aucklands transport requirements over the next three decades. The North Auckland and Northland (NAaN) Grid Upgrade The NAaN project is currently being undertaken by Transpower and will improve energy security for Auckland and Northland by the provision of a new 220 kV line from Pakuranga to Albany. The overall budget of the project is $417 million (approx). Construction of new ducts and cabling is well underway with the commissioning of the new line anticipated in mid-2013. The North Island Grid Upgrade This project involves the provision of a new 400 kV line from Whakamaru to Pakuranga (and in the future Otahuhu). This new line will traverse a distance of 186 km at a cost of $824 million. The project will improve energy security for Auckland and ensure that electricity supplies can match future projected demand. Currently 78% of pylons have been erected, with 15% of the new line strung. It is expected that the new line will be commissioned later this year. The new Hobson Street Substation The construction of the new Hobson Street substation is currently underway as a joint project by Transpower and Vector. The substation forms part of the wider NAaN project to improve security of electricity supply to the Auckland CBD. It is expected to be completed by March 2014 at a cost of $82 million. The Ultrafast Broadband Initiative (the UFB) The rollout of the UFB across Auckland is currently underway, with Auckland Council working with Chorus to prioritise the first locations to receive this service. While priority has been given to schools, hospitals, and businesses, over 25,000 properties across Auckland are now able to be connected to the network. The Rural Broadband Initiative (the RBI)

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Auckland Plan Committee 07 August 2012 The RBI is based around the provision of broadband services using wireless technology, with fixed fibre used for schools, hospitals, and some community facilities. Rollout of the RBI began in April 2011 and construction is on-track to finish the project in 2015. The Central Interceptor The Long Term Plan allocates over $790 million for this project. It will involve a new wastewater connection which crosses the western portion of the Auckland Isthmus and the Manukau Harbour to the Mangere Wastewater Treatment Plant. The project will provide for intensification of the isthmus, improved resilience of Aucklands wastewater network, and reduce wastewater overflows into our harbours. Advanced planning is underway for this project. The Hunua #4 Water Main

Hobsonville Point Schools At a combined cost of $70m, construction of Hobsonville Point Primary School is well underway with foundations laid. The design of the secondary school is being finalised and construction is expected to start in August 2012. Mens Correction Facility at Wiri A consortium of companies led by Secure Future was appointed to design, finance, build, operate and maintain the new 960-bed facility, which is needed to meet growing demand for prisoner accommodation in Auckland ($300-350m).

Infrastructure Spend The scale of infrastructure spend (where capital values have been identified) in the Auckland Plan by portfolio has been undertaken. It is noted that the capital costs for transport projects is significantly more than the spend proposed for all other infrastructure. While urban broadband, international telecommunication cabling, airport and liquid fuels projects are listed in the Table 3 of the Implementation Addendum, no costs are available for current levels of investment. It should also be noted that the table does not list the value of any purchase or improvement works for public open space. The value comparison of the differing portfolios highlights the significant investment that will be made by central government in social infrastructure, principally new medical and educational facilities. With regards to council spend; the most significant
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The project involves the construction of a 28km long potable water main from the Redoubt Road reservoir to Epsom. Construction is underway and is planned to be completed in 2016 at a cost of $339 million.

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Auckland Plan Committee 07 August 2012 project by value (excluding transport) is the central interceptor wastewater project, which has a capital value of $797 million for its first stage. However, not all infrastructure spend has funding. The majority of funding shortfalls exist in the transport and social infrastructure portfolios. This is due in part to their significant overall size in capital spend. Further work is underway by Council to determine the appropriate funding mechanisms that should be adopted to reduce these shortfalls. Auckland Plan actions The Auckland Plan identifies a number of infrastructure related actions that council and other parties are required to undertake. A number of processes are underway to implement these actions including: Auckland Infrastructure Forum - work is currently underway to develop an Auckland Infrastructure Forum. This development work includes determining possible governance structures, terms of reference, and resourcing. It is anticipated that a final set of options for this forum will be presented to the Auckland Plan Committee in September 2012. The Energy and Climate Change Mitigation Strategy - this will inform energy infrastructure policy for the Unitary Plan and other policy documents and is currently under development. A discussion document Powering Aucklands low carbon transformation was released in June 2012. A number of work-streams covering a variety of energy and climate change mitigation fields are also in progress, with the work-streams formed by key external stakeholders and council representatives. Greenfield Areas of Investigation - council officers are currently engaging with major infrastructure providers as part of the Greenfield Areas of Investigation work by council. While this work is covered elsewhere in this update, the infrastructure directives of the Auckland Plan are being implemented through councils collaborative work with infrastructure providers to determine the most appropriate greenfield areas for future development. Water Strategy - the council is currently scoping the structure and work programme for the development of a water strategy. The Auckland Plan recognised the importance of water to health of our natural environment, our economy, and the ability for Auckland to grow. It is anticipated that the water strategy will consolidate water related strategic documents, provide guidance on the future investment of water related infrastructure, and better link water related financial and planning decisions to environmental considerations and the Auckland Plan Development Strategy. This work will continue throughout 2012 in collaboration with Watercare Services Ltd and other key stakeholders.

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Auckland Plan Committee 07 August 2012 Broadband prioritisation - Council is continuing to work with Chorus and Vodafone in the delivery of the ultra-fast and rural broadband initiatives. Unitary Plan development - a number of infrastructure related actions in the Auckland Plan relate to policy inclusion within the Unitary Plan. As discussed in detail elsewhere in the Update, these actions are being progressed as part of the Unitary Plan currently under development. A key part of the Unitary Plan engagement process to date has been a series of sector-based workshops held with infrastructure providers and other stakeholders, which has created the opportunity to establish a constructive multi-party discussion on key issues.

Challenges
The key issue facing the infrastructure-related directives and actions in the Auckland Plan is: alignment with other Council documents, including the Long Term Plan. This is due in part to the need for ongoing discussions regarding the funding of new infrastructure.

Areas of focus
For the upcoming year, the following are the main infrastructure priorities for the implementation of the Auckland Plan: Finalising the Greenfield Areas of Investigation and incorporating the Rural Urban Boundary into the upcoming Unitary Plan Establishing an Auckland Infrastructure Forum Finalising the Energy and Climate Change Mitigation Strategy Finalising infrastructure related content for the Unitary Plan.

Developer and development agencies


The actions on land supply and development are discussed in Section D: Aucklands High-Level Development Strategy of the Auckland Plan although this is a theme repeated throughout the Plan given the critical importance of housing Aucklands future population.

Status
Measurement of planned land capacity and unconstrained capacity targets Development capacity targets in the Auckland Plan are intended to enable a significant increase in the numbers of dwellings built in Auckland and ensure a strong
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Auckland Plan Committee 07 August 2012 supply of business land. As will be shown in this Update, Aucklands greenfield residential land supply is slightly below that required by the Auckland Plan and while targets are theoretically met for brownfield residential land and business land, there is some uncertainty around this supply. It was to be expected that the 2012 land supply would not meet Auckland Plan targets which require major shifts in the way the Council and other stakeholders work to deliver land on a large scale, while ensuring quality outcomes. The Auckland Plan refers to a process of generational change over three decades. The first ten years building the runway is a period when: existing greenfield areas and brownfield zonings provide some early land supply; and planning and infrastructure investment is geared up to meet the types and scales of delivery envisaged in the Auckland Plan. DIRECTIVE 10.2 of the Auckland Plan, in Chapter 10: Urban Auckland is to: Plan for a seven-year average of unconstrained development capacity (zoned and serviced with bulk infrastructure) at any point in time with a minimum of five years and a maximum of 10 years capacity. Unconstrained development capacity is described in the Auckland Plan as land where: operative zoning and bulk services infrastructure6 are in place Greenfield residential land To meet the land delivery targets reflected in Figure D7 of the Development Strategy, Auckland must provide for over 46,000 new greenfield7 dwellings in the 10 years to 2021. Table 2 shows that there is unconstrained (greenfield) development capacity in 2012 for 18,500 dwellings8 or 4 years of supply. This capacity is in the areas denoted G1 in Figures 6 and 7.

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For the purposes of this Annual Implementation Update, the availability of bulk services is interpreted as the availability of trunk water supply and wastewater infrastructure. Future Annual Implementation Updates may widen the scope of availability to include electricity supply 7 For purposes of this Annual Implementation Update, greenfield areas are those capable of providing large-scale land delivery such as the greenfield areas shown in Figures 6 and 7. Greenfield land as defined on Page 375 of the Auckland Plan, in smaller parcels within the existing urban areas, is excluded from the current greenfield analysis. This is currently included as part of the brownfield land supply analysis. Larger parcels may be brought into the greenfield analysis in the next Update 8 Supply does not include greenfield capacity in the rural towns, villages and satellites Auckland Plan Annual Implementation Update (AIU) Page 70

Auckland Plan Committee 07 August 2012 This level of supply is less than the 5-year minimum and 3 years less than the targeted 7 year average. Additionally, some of this supply may still be subject to more detailed planning processes. Analysis shows that there is capacity for a further 12,500 dwellings, or 2.7 years of supply on land that should become unconstrained in the next few years. This is referred to as zoned serviceable land (as opposed to zoned serviced land) in the Auckland Plan Addendum and is shown in areas G1(a) in Figures 6 and 7. The term zoned serviceable is used to identify land supply that is constrained but should come on stream in the short term and needs to be considered in the supply discussion. Even with this zoned serviceable component, the total unconstrained and zoned serviceable supply is only 6.7 years as shown in Table 3. Auckland Council and its partner stakeholders will need to work to ensure supply meets the targets set out in the Auckland Plan. The analysis reinforces the need to continue to press on with a number of plan changes and associated infrastructure investments as well as the Greenfield Areas for Investigation and Unitary Plan processes.
Table 2: Amount of unconstrained development capacity (greenfield) in the Auckland area Targets (dwellings) 5 years (minimum) 23,250 7 years (target) 32,250 10 years (maximum) 46,500 Estimated availability in 2012 Dwellings Years of supply

Approximately 18,500 dwellings

Table 3: Amount of unconstrained development capacity and zoned serviceable greenfield land in the Auckland area Target (dwellings) Estimated availability in 2012

10 years (maximum) 46,500 dwellings

Dwellings unconstrained development capacity Approximately dwellings 18,500

Dwellings zoned serviceable Approximately dwellings 12,500

Years of supply 6.7

While additional unconstrained development capacity is needed to meet the Plan target, the main reason for the current low level of housing development is the overall economic situation facing the development sector. Brownfield residential land

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Auckland Plan Committee 07 August 2012 In most of the existing urban (brownfield) area, zonings allow for considerable numbers of additional dwellings. Water and wastewater bulk infrastructure is generally available. Preliminary analysis indicates that there is well over ten years of unconstrained development capacity for residential brownfield supply. In practice however, this capacity may still be constrained by other factors such as: inadequate capacity in existing or ageing bulk infrastructure and in some cases, moratoria applying to further development fragmented titles making land aggregation for redevelopment difficult levels and types of existing development which restrict redevelopment.

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The focus for the next year will be on refining data on infill and redevelopment potential in the existing urban area to take account of these limiting or influencing factors and achieve expectations of brownfield land supply that can realistically be taken up in the 10-year period.

Business land
Chapter 6: Aucklands Economy9 establishes the following target for: Ongoing provision of planned and serviced capacity for Group 1 business land, including large lots, to meet 5-yearly demand as assessed by annual surveys. Group 1 business land refers to more land-extensive businesses (manufacturing, wholesale trade, construction, transport and storage). A recent survey by CBRE10 concluded there is currently around 1,148 hectares of vacant zoned industrial land in Auckland. Between 1996 and 2011 a total of 1,440 hectares of zoned industrial land was built on, representing an annual uptake of 96 hectares per year. At this rate of uptake there is approximately 12 years of vacant land capacity. Most of this land can theoretically be regarded as unconstrained development capacity as it exists in existing serviced subdivisions that are already partly built out, or on sites that are built on but largely vacant. Although the unconstrained development capacity situation for Group 1 business land in Auckland may appear positive, some of this capacity may be impractical to develop further for business uses, being subject to similar constraints facing residential development in brownfield areas.

10

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Auckland Plan Committee 07 August 2012 CBRE note that much of the land identified is in small parcels or is being utilised for things such as vehicle parking, indicating that the total vacant land supply is an overestimate. The CBRE analysis also indicates that there is a relatively small number of larger business land lots in Auckland, with over three quarters of available sites being smaller than one hectare. It is therefore likely that there is less than 5 years supply of unconstrained development capacity of large-lot business land in the Auckland market. Work is underway to better understand Aucklands business land supply situation and underlying sectors of the market that may need more capacity made available. This information will be important for the Unitary Plan process and findings will be reported in the 2013 Annual Implementation Update. Monitoring to date (including the 2011 Capacity for Growth Study) has indicated that there is a good supply of space for office development in Auckland and capacity constraints are unlikely in the near future. This may be so but as part of building the runway for the 30 years of the Auckland Plan it will be necessary to gain a greater understanding of the office land supply-take up situation and ensure that delivery mechanisms are put in place. Development pipeline The Auckland Plan commits to maintaining 20 years of land capacity in the development pipeline11 The development pipeline is defined in the glossary as: land that is in the process of planning and servicing with infrastructure for the purpose of urban development, but is not yet available for the building of houses or businesses and intended final uses. The Auckland Plan Development Strategy sets out how residential and business growth is expected to be accommodated over the next 30 years. The Unitary Plan is now being developed to provide the required capacity and discussions are already being held with infrastructure providers, including discussions on the Greenfield Areas for Investigation process discussed below. Progressing the Unitary Plan The Unitary Plan is one of the most important means that the Council will use to implement the Auckland Plan. The Unitary Plan will:
11

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provide for the development capacity that enables the type, amount and location of development envisaged by the Auckland Plan provide the regulatory mechanisms to influence quality development outcomes. A draft Auckland Unitary Plan is expected to be released for informal feedback in March 2013 with the Plan ready for public notification in September 2013. Prenotification engagement activities are planned beginning in August 2012 to capture early views and ideas. Potential tools to support quality compact city Internal discussions on tools that could be used to support a quality compact Auckland have commenced. While some tools may be implemented through the Unitary Plan, other innovative, proactive tools are being considered to complement the more traditional regulatory functions of the Council. Future Annual Implementation Updates will provide more detail on the emerging suite of tools as they are investigated, evaluated and implemented. Greenfield Areas for Investigation The Auckland Plan identifies a number of Greenfield Areas for Investigation Figures 6 and 7. In addition, the intended 30 year developed extent of the rural towns and villages needs to be worked through. A key milestone in the process of investigating the suitability of these areas for urban development is to confirm a Rural Urban Boundary (RUB). A total of 18 separate greenfield areas and rural /coastal /satellite towns have been identified for further investigation. It is important that this work is progressed to ensure that a sufficient greenfield land development pipeline is being taken through planning processes, and targets for unconstrained (greenfield) development capacity can be met in the future. The proposed process and timeline for these investigations is the subject of a separate report and ensures alignment with the Unitary Plan process. Options considered to establish an Urban Development Forum An Urban Development Forum has been considered as a useful tool for the Council to: seek regular feedback on land supply and demand engage private and public development agencies as key stakeholders to gain their commitment to work together to achieve a quality compact urban form engage critical infrastructure providers to align infrastructure provision with zoning processes and the market.

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Auckland Plan Committee 07 August 2012 The proposed Urban Development Forum will be a platform for the Council to engage with the private development sector on Auckland Plan implementation. Public land development and delivery agencies will be involved in the forum, including central government agencies, such as Housing New Zealand, and the Social Housing Unit within the Ministry of Business Innovation and Employment as well as Council Controlled Organisations, such as Auckland Council Property Limited (ACPL), and Auckland Waterfront Development Agency (AWDA). Council officers have started to meet landowners with substantial land holdings, including iwi in relation to Treaty Settlement land. However the most effective and efficient way to conduct the Urban Development Forum is yet to be decided. Options for operating the forum have been considered including regular e-newsletter, meetings with individual land holders or development agencies when required, or an annual formal development forum involving all stakeholders and relevant players. The first formal Urban Development Forum is intended to be held by the end of June 2013. Housing New Zealand plays a vital role in Auckland in providing social housing as well as carrying out comprehensive developments in Auckland. To illustrate its importance in housing delivery, Housing New Zealand is currently involved in the Northern Glen Innes redevelopment project. It involves the creation of at least 260 new homes, including 78 that Housing New Zealand will own, at least 39 owned by other social or community housing providers, and the remainder for private sale. It also proposes modernising another 40 state houses in the project area. Central government and Auckland Council signed a Heads of Agreement on 24 July 2012 to jointly form New Zealands first Urban Redevelopment Company (the Crown and Council owned Tamaki Redevelopment Company) to transform Tamaki (including Glen Innes, Pt England and Panmure) over the next 15-20 years.

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Enabling and support for papakinga development

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In the Auckland Plan, the term papakinga applies to the development of Mori ancestral land or where appropriate, to land held in general title by mana whenua. In response to this direction, the Council methods and rules in the draft Unitary papakainga, marae and other development and mapping Maori land administered under Mori Land Overlay. is drafting issues, objectives, policies, Plan relating to the development of on Maori land. This includes identifying the Te Ture Whenua Maori Act 1993 in a

Attachment A

The papakinga concept also applies to Mataawaka interests through providing for affordable housing, i.e. waahi kainga12 in the Auckland Plan and again, issues, objectives, policies, methods and rules are being drafted into the draft Unitary Plan relating to the development of waahi kinga, marae and associated development on general land. Both Mataawaka and mana whenua could develop on general land using these provisions. A feasibility study to waive/reduce the development contribution for papakainga development has been undertaken by the Councils Maori Strategy and Policy unit. The Council is working through stage one of the Mana Whenua Engagement Approach with the 19 mana whenua groups in Auckland. Activities include: a governance hui held in December 2011; individual hui with the mandated technical representatives from each mana whenua group; and a series of topic-based workshops with mana whenua in March 2012. Work is currently underway to scope Stage Two of the Mana Whenua Engagement Approach for the Unitary Plan which is likely to include more targeted consultation on key topic areas. Central government through the Ministry of Business Innovation and Employment is currently undertaking work on Maori housing initiatives as part of the social housing reform programme. Housing Strategic Action Plan

It has been suggested by Mori Strategy and Relations that the appropriate term for developments based on a papakinga concept but initiated by mataawaka can be referred to as waahi kainga.

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Auckland Plan Committee 07 August 2012 The Council is developing a Housing Strategic Action Plan (HSAP). A scoping paper for Stage 1 of the HSAP was reported to RDOC in July 2012. The first stage will focus specifically on the Council and how it can contribute to housing supply through its assets, policy and regulatory powers. The draft HSAP will be delivered in December 2012. The core project team will include Council officers while input will be sought from an external housing reference group. The group will comprise community housing sector members, central government as well as private developers. A series of workshops have been planned to date for Councillors to meet with a range of developers, housing providers and financial providers and to explore potential roles for the Council and opportunities to work together. Auckland Council Property Limited is a Council Controlled Organisation that manages the Councils property portfolio. ACPL recognises the strategic potential that Council property can have in supporting the wider objectives of Auckland Plan. One example includes options for the redevelopment of Wilsher Village (Housing for Older People) close to Henderson town centre are under the consideration by the Council at the time of reporting. Relevant departments in Auckland Council and ACPL have been working toward criteria that will assist with considering the strategic, non-financial implications of acquisitions and disposals of property. ACPL has recently amended its Statement of Intent so that its scope of activities can assist the Council in the planning and delivery of affordable housing.

Challenges
The Auckland Plan sets challenging development capacity supply targets. These are unlikely to be achieved without new approaches to the use of regulatory and nonregulatory tools and without the involvement of all key stakeholders. As part of monitoring the policy effectiveness of the Development Strategy and in its work in housing strategy, council will need to monitor the housing supply response to land delivery. The Unitary Plan is being progressed and its delivery will be a major focus for the Council in the short to medium-term. The organisational focus on the Unitary Plan will likely mean that, until it is significantly advanced, it may be challenging for the Council to advance other tools and methods for implementing the Auckland Plan. There are a number of significant housing initiatives underway addressing issues such as affordability that will need to be pursued.

Areas of focus

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Auckland Plan Committee 07 August 2012 Key priorities for the coming year include:

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advancement of work on meeting the land and development capacity targets for greenfield and brownfield residential land and for business land and advancement of work on understanding the nature of unconstrained development capacity for each land supply category monitoring the housing supply response to land delivery advancement of the Unitary Plan to notification progressing the Greenfield Areas for Investigation project, ensuring that there is sufficient residential and business land in the development pipeline and incorporating the rural urban boundary (RUB) into the Unitary Plan establishment of an Urban Development Forum development of the Housing Strategic Action Plan due for completion by December 2012 continued commitment to partnerships in regeneration and affordable housing development projects, such as the Tamaki Transformation project Continued work on Maori development interests.

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The voluntary, social and community sector (such as tertiary, education and health institutes) have a critical role in facilitating and realising Auckland Plan priorities. Notably, half of the implementation actions ranging across all chapters in the Plan identify non-governmental organisations (NGOs) as key stakeholders/partner organisations with fifteen actions led or co-led by community groups and NGOs for implementation and delivery.

Status
To date, Council has been working with the wider community and NGOs through: The Auckland Plan engagement process On-going engagement with statutory advisory boards and panels Ongoing engagement with non-statutory reference group and advisory groups. Community groups and NGOs actively participated in meetings and/or made written submissions and oral presentations on their submissions to ensure their aspirations were fully considered during drafting of the Auckland Plan. The sector generally endorsed the strategic directions and vision set out in the Auckland Plan. Further opportunities for community groups and NGOs involvement and participation have been planned in the councils work programme in developing councils strategies, policies, plans and projects. The council is preparing a comprehensive communication and engagement plan to create momentum and support/buy-in for the Plan. Activities include document production and distribution to ensure the Auckland Plan is accessible to all interested. A dedicated website has also been created for the Auckland Plan. Engagement meetings, letters and briefings have also been planned at different locations across the region. The communication and engagement activities will commence in July 2012. Councils statutory boards and advisory panels are important platforms to engage communities and NGOs. They include the: Independent Maori Statutory Board Pacific Peoples Advisory Panel Ethnic Peoples Advisory Panel Social Policy Forum Councils Business Advisory Panel.

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Community Groups and Non-Governmental Organisations

Auckland Plan Committee 07 August 2012 The council has also established advisory groups to provide on-going guidance on specific issues, for example: Disability Strategic Advisory Group (established) Sports and Recreation Reference Group (established) Rural Advisory Panel (established) Housing reference group (to be established).

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Challenges
Coordination and prioritisation of investments given the likelihood of competing priorities.

Areas of focus
Auckland Council will: Continue to engage communities and NGOs to align and implement priorities set out in the Auckland Plan, e.g. the Southern Initiative and the Housing Strategic Action Plan (HSAP). Work with and seek to empower communities and NGOs to enable them to lead the actions they are identified in the Auckland Plan Addendum as being responsible for.

Place-based Work-Streams
This section of the report looks at the two place-based workstreams:
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Auckland Plan Committee 07 August 2012 The City Centre Initiative The Southern Initiative

The City Centre Initiative


The City Centre Initiative is one of two big initiatives in the Auckland Plan and plays a key role in achieving the outcomes sought by the Auckland Plan. The City Centre Initiative is supported by the City Centre Masterplan, which was developed in parallel to the Auckland Plan and provides a 20-year transformational direction for the future of the City Centre.

Status

o o

Planning underway for city centre transport improvements City Centre Rail Link; pedestrian accessibility and amenity of Quay Street Adoption of Alcohol Harm Reduction Strategy and creation of the Mayoral Taskforce on Central City Alcohol and Community Safety.

The Waterfront Plan, a companion document to the City Centre Masterplan, has also been recognised by the Auckland Plan as being important to achieving the vision of the City Centre. This has also been recognised in Chapter 9: Urban Auckland.

Challenges
Consistency between investment and funding City Rail Link is critical to unlocking potential of other parts of the centre

Areas of focus
It will be necessary to ensure continual engagement occurs with the various stakeholders involved in the City Centre Initiative to ensure there is a collaborative effort to achieving Auckland Plan outcomes.

The Southern Initiative

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The City Centre Initiative is currently progressing. This can be seen through: The adoption of the City Centre Masterplan in June Recognition of the importance of the City Centre Masterplan to achieving the outcomes of the City Centre Initiative in the Auckland Plan The progression of a number of projects for the city centre, such as o The completion of the Tepid Baths restoration

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Auckland Plan Committee 07 August 2012 The Southern Initiative (TSI) is one of two initiatives in the Auckland Plan and plays a key role in achieving Auckland Plan outcomes. The overall purpose of the Southern Initiative is to plan and deliver a long-term programme of co-ordinated investment and actions to deliver transformational change, especially socio-economic change. The Southern Initiative builds on the commitment of multiple sectors, including central government, iwi, business, local boards, community and Pasifika to help deliver this change in an area of high social need and significant economic opportunity. There are four progress areas for the Southern Initiative: The proposed interim governance and delivery model The proposed TSI governance and workstream structure TSI initiatives The Social Policy Forum and Central government response to date.

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Status
Governance, workstream structure and delivery model endorsed following ongoing discussions with local boards, central government, and others, with the intention of delivering a multi-sector action plan by December 2012 Update on Initiatives a stock take is being carried out on the number of projects and proposals that have been initiated or gained momentum during the development of TSI. A report to the Auckland Plan Committee on 5 June 2012 gave an update on numerous initiatives within TSI. These include the Joint Manukau Institute of Technology (MIT)/Auckland International Airport Company (AIAL) Internship Cadetship Scheme, various ECE projects and the second stage of the Manukau Station project including a $95m MIT campus and integrated transport hub due for completion in 2013. Social Policy Forum and Central government response to date - a presentation on TSI was given to the Social Policy Forum meeting on 17 May. The Minister and forum members expressed support for TSI and will receive update reports on TSI. Significant work on matters of common interest such as ECE and NCEA Level 2 are well underway through the Ministry of Educations business as usual.

Budget provision for new bus services between airport, Mangere and Onehunga and educational campaign about new bus services. Council officers are continuing to build on the substantial progress made with central government departments during the development of the Auckland Plan, in aligning policies and programmes with TSI and identifying opportunities for joint work. The
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Auckland Plan Committee 07 August 2012 Council will engage with the Auckland Social Sector Leaders Group chaired by the Regional Commissioner for the Ministry of Social Development over priority setting. The initial response from government officials to the proposed multi-sector working teams has been favourable.

Challenges
The main challenge is the lack of alignment at a detailed level of some targets and the lack of clarity on roles, responsibilities and resourcing around Aucklands People and the Southern Initiative. This will need to be worked through as the Southern Initiative is progressed.

Areas of focus

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There is already a high level of dialogue with Central government on implementation of the Southern Initiative. It is expected that this will continue.

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Auckland Plan Committee 07 August 2012

File No.: CP2012/12099

Executive Summary
The purpose of this report is to update the Committee on progress with the development of the Auckland Unitary Plan over the past month. Members of the Committee will recall the Committees decision in July to release the Auckland Unitary Plan as a draft in March 2013. Since July, five local board chairs have been nominated to become representatives on the Auckland Unitary Plan Political Working Party (PWP). Key direction setting papers have been considered and a number of officers are currently in the process of completing a detailed consultation and engagement programme as a result of the Committees decision to release a draft of the Auckland Unitary Plan prior to formal notification. The detailed programme will be presented to the Committee in September.

Recommendation/s
a) b) That the report be received. That the Auckland Plan Committee endorse the work programme to date for the development of the Auckland Unitary Plan and the directions proposed by the Auckland Unitary Plan Political Working Party contained in Attachment 1 to this report, in particular; i) ii) iii) iv) v) vi) c) an enhanced Auckland Unitary Plan engagement process a Greenfield (rural urban engagement with local boards boundary) investigation with enhanced

notification to owners of potential historic heritage sites four residential zones to enhance housing choice and affordability historic character overlay, with advice to be received from Heritage Advisory Panel and local boards assessment criteria for integrating structure plans with the Auckland Unitary Plan.

That this report and resolutions be forwarded to all local boards for their information.

Background
In July, the Auckland Plan Committee considered the last update report and an associated report on an enhanced engagement programme for the Unitary Plan. This report provides a further update on the development of the Auckland Unitary Plan. Governance The PWP has met on four occasions since the last update report. Local board workshops throughout July (clustered into the central, south, north and west local boards) considered key issues that will be addressed by the Auckland Unitary Plan. The Chair of the PWP has held a meeting with representatives from the Local Board Chairs group to discuss local board involvement in the enhanced engagement process. At that meeting, it was agreed that each local board would develop its own engagement plan by the end of July. The local board chairs were

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also invited to nominate five representatives to join the PWP meetings. Five representatives have been drawn from the four geographical areas plus one rural representative. Matters considered by the Political Working Party Auckland Unitary Plan enhanced engagement process Greenfield Rural Urban Boundary investigations project Access to historic heritage sites Achieving housing choice, more affordable housing and a quality compact city Historic character overlays Approach to greenfield land development Integrating structure planned areas into the Auckland Unitary Plan Auckland Unitary Plan enhanced engagement process On 19 June 2012 the PWP considered a presentation on how an enhanced engagement programme could be undertaken. The PWP considered the purpose of an enhanced engagement process being the: production of a better quality plan that has benefited from wide stakeholder and community input; and ensuring a process that incorporates the principle of natural justice. The following indicative timeline was discussed: August 2012 begin enhanced engagement; September 2012 workshops with local boards on maps; September November 2012 local board led engagement with key stakeholders and continuing targeted engagement between staff and other stakeholders with regional interests; March to June 2013 draft Auckland Unitary Plan released for informal feedback; June to July 2013 review feedback and respond to feedback; August 2013 report the draft back to committee and September 2013 plan finalised for possible notification. The following topics have been identified by the PWP as the hot topics for engagement: Achieving a compact city - intensification and protection of historic character and heritage. Creating a rural urban boundary - rural greenfields development and the rural urban boundary (RUB). Economic development and business growth - business land supply and addressing the effects of out of centre retail and office development. The rural economy - significant ecological areas and landscape protection impacts on the use and development of rural land. It is intended that a more detailed plan for engagement will be reported to the PWP by late July / early August.
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Greenfield RUB Investigations Project (See also a separate agenda item on the RUB project) On 27 June 2012 the PWP considered a presentation on the programme proposed for identifying the location of the Rural Urban Boundary (RUB). A three-stage process was agreed to complete this task. Stage 1 Intermediate RUB based to a large extent on the current Metropolitan Urban Limit in the Auckland Regional Policy Statement. Stage 2 Investigation of priority greenfield areas with the intent of including these areas in the Unitary Plan prior to notification. Stage 3 Investigation of other areas. Access to historic heritage sites Following an earlier presentation to the PWP in May on gaining access to 29 sites of historic heritage, this matter was considered further on 6 July 2012. Local boards have agreed for officers to approach the landowners to gain access, provided they continue to be informed and letters seeking access are clear and easily understood. The PWP agreed to the proposed process and asked for the letter to include information on the process and the involvement of heritage experts. Achieving housing choice, more affordable housing and a quality compact city Four proposed residential zones (single house, mixed housing, terraced housing and apartment buildings and large lot residential) were outlined to the PWP on 6 July 2012. The outcomes sought from the residential zones are to provide housing choice and affordable housing options in residential areas and integrate this with historic character. The zones provide for regional consistency but allow for local variation which is provided by overlays (e.g. lot size, density, historic character, landscape protection). The PWP supports the four residential zones, and agreed to an approach of applying the mixed housing and terraced housing and apartment buildings zones near centres and in the case of mixed housing, along routes well-served by public transport. Historic character overlays The PWP considered the development of a region-wide approach for historic character overlays whilst still recognising the different approaches in the operative district plans. Officers also recommended that the historic character overlays be based in extent on the existing historic character areas currently within the operative district plans. The PWP has requested officers present the proposed approach to the Heritage Advisory Panel and local boards to develop a complete package of provisions for further reporting back to the PWP. The PWP also requested officers to report back on the resource implications of identifying new historic character areas. Approach to greenfield land development On 10 July 2012 the PWP considered how the RUB could be incorporated into the Auckland Unitary Plan. The Auckland Unitary Plan may include an intermediate position, with other areas added over time through variations to the Auckland Unitary Plan. An approach to setting an intermediate RUB based on current urban boundaries for satellite and rural coastal towns and the Metropolitan Urban Limit (MUL) for the Auckland urban area was discussed. Subsequent investigations could see the final RUB identified through variations to the Auckland Unitary Plan. The supply of greenfield land will be managed within the RUB through the use of future urban zones that will apply until it is considered appropriate that the land be zoned for development.

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Principles of land release were outlined to ensure 20 years of development capacity with an average seven years unconstrained land supply. The PWP supported this approach. Integrating structure planned areas into the Unitary Plan At the 10 July 2012 meeting, the PWP also heard how there are 52 structure plans to be assessed for inclusion in the Auckland Unitary Plan. All are at different stages in the planning process and their status is constantly changing. Due to the level of complexity of approaches, the PWP also heard how it is not possible to simply roll these over in their current form for inclusion in the Auckland Unitary Plan. The use of assessment criteria to determine which structure plans are able to be converted into the Auckland Unitary Plan and which will need modification first before being converted was presented and agreed. Current state of drafting An officers draft of provisions is scheduled for completion by 31 August 2012. These will include all objectives, policies, rules, definitions, zoning and overlay maps. These provisions will be available in topic packages (e.g. residential, business) for discussion with local boards, Iwi and key stakeholders.

Decision Making
The Auckland Plan Committee holds the jurisdiction and overall decision making power in relation to the development of the Auckland Unitary Plan.

Significance of Decision
The decisions made by the Council on the final shape and form of the Auckland Unitary Plan will have a direct impact upon Aucklands population, its built form, environmental outcomes and economic prosperity. The Auckland Unitary Plan will have a direct relationship to all development in Auckland from the time of its public notification until a point 10 15 years hence. The decisions sought by this report will set direction for the development of the Auckland Unitary Plan. Decisions sought by Committee assist in guiding the development of the Auckland Unitary Plan which in turn will have a significant impact upon residents, public interest, councils delivery on social, economic, environmental or cultural well being and statutory responsibilities. Consultation is being undertaken as identified in this report.

Maori Impact Statement


Consultation requirements with Mana Whenua are being met through following an Iwi Engagement Strategy that in turn meets the requirements of Schedule One of the Resource Management Act 1991. The PWP also continues to have representation from the Independent Maori Statutory Board.

Local Board Views


Local board views are currently being understood through the local board planning forum, local board symposium and workshops with local boards. It is also intended that this report be circulated to all local boards to update them on the Auckland Unitary Plan development process to date. As noted earlier in this report, additional local board representation has been sought by the PWP with five local board chairs invited to become part of the PWP. Local boards have also been asked
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Auckland Plan Committee 07 August 2012

Consultation
Statutory consultation requirements for the development of the Auckland Unitary Plan are specified within Schedule One within the Resource Management Act 1991. All Schedule One requirements will be met through the development and notification phase of the Auckland Unitary Plan. Consultation has continued to occur in a targeted way with local boards, Iwi, sector groups and other key stakeholders with oversight from the PWP. Major opportunities for enhanced community consultation exist based on the release of a draft Auckland Unitary Plan in March 2013.

Financial and Resourcing Implications


The development of the Auckland Unitary Plan is currently progressing within the operational budget of the policy and planning division. The enhanced engagement process agreed by this Committee may put pressure on this budget.

Legal and Legislative Implications


Councils Legal Services department has been providing advice to the Auckland Unitary Plan team and it is anticipated that ongoing advice will be provided. The extent to which the Auckland Unitary Plan can meet the needs of Auckland will be partly determined by the degree of Central Government and legislative support. It is anticipated that there will be an ongoing need to advocate to central government for legislative change. The key legislative change sought is the removal of Environment Court appeals on the Auckland Unitary Plan (until it becomes operative). The Minister for the Environment has yet to confirm whether or not the Government will support this request.

Implementation Issues
There is a need to discuss the possible impact of the Auckland Unitary Plan on resource consent staff. It is not possible to quantify the impact at this stage, but a close working relationship has been established to address the impacts as they are foreseen.

Attachments
No. A Title Attachment 1 - Auckland Unitary Plan Political Working Party Directions June-July 2012 Page 93

Signatories
Authors Authorisers Phill Reid - Manager Unitary Plan Penny Pirrit - Regional & Local Planning Manager Roger Blakeley - Chief Planning Officer

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to prepare short engagement plans for the main engagement phases: September November 2012 and March June 2013.

Auckland Plan Committee 07 August 2012

Auckland Unitary Plan Enhanced Engagement Process Indicative timeline for enhanced engagement agreed as presented. Topics for engagement identified as: Achieving a compact city intensification and protection of historic character and heritage. Creating a rural urban boundary rural greenfields development and the rural urban boundary (RUB). Economic development and business growth business land supply. The rural economy significant ecological areas and landscape protection impacts on the use and development of rural land. Greenfield Rural Urban Boundary Investigation Project The PWP agreed with the three-stage approach as presented to determine the Rural Urban Boundary and requested that a new step two be included to provide an initial listening session with local boards to identify community stakeholders and confirm the approach. Access to historic heritage sites The PWP agreed with the proposed approach of sending letters seeking access to 29 owners of historic heritage sites. Local boards are to be kept advised on the process and the letters are to include information on process and the involvement of heritage experts. Achieving housing choice, more affordable housing at a quality compact city The PWP supported the four residential zones presented by officers (single house, mixed housing, terraced housing and apartment and large lot residential), and agreed to an approach of applying the mixed housing and terraced housing and apartment buildings zones near centres and in the case of mixed housing, along routes well-served by public transport. Historic character overlays The PWP endorsed the use of a region-wide approach (whilst retaining the legacy North Shore District Plan and Isthmus District Plan approaches) to historic character overlays and requested that officers report back on the resource implications of identifying new historic character areas. A completed package of provisions is to be reported back to the Heritage Advisory Panel before being reported back to PWP and local boards. Greenfield land and the RUB The PWP supported and confirmed the approach to be applied in the Auckland Unitary Plan for the release of greenfield land for development being:
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Attachment A

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Attachment 1 Auckland Unitary Plan Political Working Party Directions June July 2012

Auckland Plan Committee 07 August 2012 staged approach of intermediate and final RUB (in some locations only) in the notified Auckland Unitary Plan; remaining areas to be set after additional investigations and subsequent variations to the Auckland Unitary Plan; and use of future urban zone and structure plans to guide development of particular greenfield areas. Integrating structure plans into the Auckland Unitary Plan The PWP agreed with the use of an assessment criteria approach to determine which structure plans can be converted directly into the Auckland Unitary Plan and which structure plans need modification prior to being converted.

Attachment A
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Auckland Plan Committee 07 August 2012

File No.: CP2012/12550

Executive Summary
In February this year the Auckland Future Vision Committee endorsed the sequence and cogovernance approach for Area Plans and endorsed the establishment of political working groups of relevant ward councillors and local board members nominated by their local board to oversee the development of the area plans. The first two area plans to be developed are the Mngerethuhu and Hibiscus and Bays area plans. This report is specific to the Mngere-thuhu area plan. From March to May, the Mngere-thuhu political working group consisting of Lydia Sosene (chair of the working group), Carrol Elliott, Sylvia Taylor and Councillors Anae and Filipaina has met on a regular basis with the area plan team to discuss the aspirations, key moves and ways the area plan can help to deliver on the outcomes and directions of the Auckland Plan. From these workshops a draft area plan for the Mngere-thuhu local board area has been developed. The draft area plan is included in Attachment A. The Mngere-thuhu political working group and area plan teams have now prepared a draft area plan for community engagement. The plan has been reported to the Mngere-thuhu Local Board who have recommended that the Auckland Plan Committee endorse the draft area plan for community engagement. A copy of the local board resolutions is included in Attachment B. This report seeks the endorsement of the draft area plan for community engagement.

Recommendation/s
a) b) c) That the report be received. That the Auckland Plan Committee endorses the Draft Mngere-thuhu Area Plan in Attachment A for community engagement. That officers undertake a review of projects in the Prioritisation Plan and Schedule contained in Section 4 of the Draft Mngere-thuhu Area Plan prior to the commencement of community engagement, to ensure alignment with the finalised Long-term Plan. That officers review the land uses proposed in the area plan to align with the draft Unitary Plan Zones which are proposed to be shared with all Local Boards in September prior to community engagement for the Mngere-thuhu Area plan. That the Chair of the Auckland Plan Committee be appointed to approve minor amendments to the draft area plan prior to the commencement of community engagement.

d)

e)

Background
In February 2012 the Auckland Future Vision Committee endorsed the sequencing of the area plans and also endorsed a co-governance approach to the area plans. The Committee resolved: e) That the Auckland Plan Committee supports a mechanism for local boards and the governing body to engage directly throughout the preparation of particular area plans, through establishment of a working group of relevant ward councillors and local board members nominated by their local board to oversee the development of the area plan.

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Endorsement of the Draft Mngere-thuhu Area Plan for community engagement

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In March the Mngere-thuhu Local Board nominated board members Lydia Sosene (chair of the working group), Carrol Elliott and Sylvia Taylor to the political working group. Together with Councillors Anae and Filipaina the working group has met regularly to discuss the emerging content, issues and aspirations of the draft area plan. A programme for the meetings was developed and over three months the working group has worked through the programme which included: Confirming the mandate of the working group Setting the context for the area plans Analysis of the findings from research and previous consultation Understanding information on Auckland Plan implications, including growth projections and The Southern Initiative Discussions and identification of issues on growth expectations Mapping environments (land uses) that will eventually translate into zones for the Unitary Plan Mapping economic, community, transport, network infrastructure, built and natural environment themes The approach to communications and engagement including targeted stakeholder engagement Confirming the key moves for the area plan Reviewing content. Key components of the draft area plan Alignment with the Auckland Plan Area plans are driven by the Auckland Plan and are one mechanism used to implement Development Strategy of the Auckland Plan. The area plan framework map in section 3.3 of draft area plan shows spatially the locations of different environments that implement development strategy and which will inform the development of the Unitary Plan. What Auckland Plan means for the local board area is set out in section 2.1.3 of the draft area plan.

the the the the

It is important to note that the environments shown in the 30-year framework map are what are envisaged by 2042. It will take time to reach this final outcome as infrastructure (hard and soft) needs to be provided before the plan can be fully realised. In this respect there may be little change in some areas until the final 10 years of the plan. A prioritisation plan for the first 10 years of realising the area plan is included in section 4 of each draft area plan. This is discussed further below. The Southern Initiative (TSI) is one of two big initiatives in the Auckland Plan. The purpose of the TSI is: to plan and deliver a long-term programme of co-ordinated investment and actions to bring about transformational social, economic, and physical change. The Southern Initiative is an opportunity to improve the quality of life and wellbeing of local residents dramatically, reduce growing disparities, and increase business investment and employment opportunities, for the benefit of all of Auckland and New Zealand. There is also a focus to strengthen children and families and to support stable homes in an area of high social need. TSI includes the four local board areas of Mngere-thuhu, tara-Papatoetoe, Manurewa and Papakura. Key to the transformation of this area is educational achievement and developing the skills which lead to well-paid employment. Working collaboratively with other agencies and delivery partners will also be required to achieve the better community outcomes envisaged. The purpose of TSI has been integral to the development of the area plan for Mngere-thuhu. An outline of the key priorities for TSI is included in section 2.1.4 of the draft area plan in Attachment A.
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Auckland Plan Committee 07 August 2012 Local Board Plans The Mngere-thuhu Local Board Plan has played a key role in informing the development of the area plan priorities, projects and community aspirations. Local board plans are reviewed every three years which will enable appropriate parts of the area plans to be incorporated into subsequent local board plans. Key Moves The draft area plan promotes five key moves. Key moves are outcomes that have a physical or spatial aspect and when realised will make a transformational contribution to making the local board area a great place to live, work and visit. These contribute to achieving the vision for Auckland to be the worlds most liveable city. The key moves are detailed in section 3.2 of the draft area plan and are summarised below: Revitalise and celebrate the unique, multi-cultural character and history of Mngere-thuhu urban centres Provide for rail to the airport Improve the quality of and access to and around the Manukau Harbour Promote the Airport and Mngere Gateway as a local and regional employment, tourism and recreation destination Progressively enhance Mngeres residential areas through comprehensive planning and redevelopment.

The delivery of the key moves is supported by the land uses identified in the area plan framework map and actions and outcomes are identified under each of the theme maps. Maps, plans and text The draft area plan has a spatial (maps) focus but also contain text to represent a 30-year spatial outcome for each local board area. The maps include: Key Moves - this map conceptualises the key spatial interventions to deliver on the Councils vision for the local board area. Area Plan Framework - This map identifies the anticipated environments that are envisaged to occur in the local board area in the next 30 years, broadly categorised as living, business, mixed use, rural, public open space and special purpose environments. These will alter slightly as they are designed to be the same environments as the Unitary Plan. Theme maps - These maps overlay the area plan framework map and build on the key moves at a more local level by identifying particular local values and aspirations under three themes. These themes include transport and network infrastructure; economic and community development; natural, heritage and character environment. The particular grouping of themes can change to respond to each local board area Prioritisation plan - for the area plan to be successful there are a range of activities which will need to be undertaken by various stakeholders, utilising a range of tools. This plan identifies the priorities for the next 10 years. The text in the document covers a range of matters including: an introduction to area plans relationships between area plans and other plans (Local Board Plans and Unitary Plan) strategic context (including the Auckland Plan) key outcomes and steps to achieve them implementation and prioritisation The text accompanying the theme maps outline the key outcomes and what steps will support achieving these outcomes. The steps include a range of approaches and mechanisms such as advocacy, policy development, recognition of places and values, provision of services and facilities and supporting future development. These steps would be taken not only by Auckland

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Council but also Council Controlled Organisations, delivery partners, infrastructure providers, land owners, developers and community groups/organisations. Prioritisation Plan A key component of the draft area plan is the Prioritisation Plan which is contained in section 4 of the draft area plan. This plan shows where work will be focused in the first 10 years and will support ongoing alignment between the Auckland Plan, Long-term Plan (LTP), Unitary Plan and projects of other infrastructure investors. Further funding for work to implement the area plan will need to be advocated for and promoted through subsequent LTPs and annual planning processes as not all priorities have been allocated funding. Advocacy will also be critical with delivery partners and infrastructure providers in their long term budget allocations and prioritisation planning to achieve the outcomes of the area plans. A review of the prioritisation plan will be required prior to the draft Mngere-thuhu area plan being released for community engagement to ensure it is aligned with the finalised LTP. Community Engagement Community engagement is proposed to occur from 28 August to 21 September. The Local Board will host some of these events, while there will be displays staffed by the wider area plan team at a range of locations within the area such as libraries, community centres, shopping centres and schools to engage with those members of the community who do not usually attend public meetings or formal events. Once the engagement period is over, the feedback will be reviewed, grouped into themes and amendments to the draft area plan will be discussed with the political working group before a final area plan is reported to the Mngere-thuhu Local Board in December 2012 and the Auckland Plan Committee for adoption in February 2013. Start of next two area plans The next two area plans to be commenced in the 2012/13 year are the Otara-Papatoetoe and Devonport-Takapuna plans. Lessons learned from the development of the first two area plans will be used to inform the development of these future area plans.

Decision Making
The co-governance approach to the area plans requires reporting to both the Local Board and the Auckland Plan Committee. In arriving at the draft area plan, the area planning team has met with the political working group (made up of members of the Local Board and ward councillors) and discussed the issues, aspirations and opportunities for the area in the context of the Auckland Plan. Once community engagement on the draft plan has been completed, feedback will be considered by the political working group, the area plans will be updated accordingly and reported through to the Mngere-thuhu Local Board and Auckland Plan Committee for adoption.

Significance of Decision
Area plans are a key mechanism to implement the Auckland Plan and enable greater levels of detail in terms of outcomes and aspirations expected across the region. The area plan will inform the development of the Unitary Plan and future long-term plans where facilities and items for capital investment may be required. The implementation and prioritisation of actions in the area plan will inform and help to shape the forward work programmes for the Council, Council Controlled Organisations and other key delivery partners.

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Maori Impact Statement


The Independent Maori Statutory Board was represented on the working party of the Planning and Urban Design Forum, during the scoping phase on the area plan programme from June 2011. The Board was also provided with an overview presentation and report on the confirmed programme and proposed engagement strategy. The process of engagement on area plans with mana whenua and mataawaka in the region has been developed in collaboration with the Maori Strategy and Relations Department. The engagement approach will be used as a general approach across all area plans, but also more specifically with iwi and mataawaka related to each area plan. Between March and June 2012 the area plan teams have been engaging with iwi and mataawaka in the region to understand their aspirations for the Mngere-thuhu area. This has involved a series of hui throughout the area. The draft area plan incorporates key relevant and agreed features of importance to iwi and mataawaka.

Local Board Views


Members of the Mngere-thuhu local board were nominated to be part of the political working group with the ward councillors in developing the draft area plan. The working group consists of Lydia Sosene (chair of the working group), Carrol Elliott, Sylvia Taylor and Councillors Anae and Filipaina. It met on a regular basis with the area plan team to discuss the aspirations, key moves and ways the area plan can help to deliver on the outcomes and directions of the Auckland Plan. The meetings and workshops held with the working group has provided a forum for discussion and debate as the content of the draft plan emerged. The draft area plan has been reported to the Mngere-thuhu Local Board and it has recommended that the Auckland Plan Committee endorse the draft area plan contained in Attachment A for community engagement. Briefing sessions with local boards that share a common border with the Mngere-thuhu local board area have been held to explain the area plan process and the content of the draft area plan prior to community engagement.

Consultation
The draft area plan takes into consideration the consultation and feedback received on previous policies and plans, including Auckland Unleashed, the Draft Auckland Plan and Local Board Plans and other legacy plans/documents. Targeted engagement with key local stakeholders identified by the Mngere-thuhu Local Board has been undertaken through a series of meetings and workshops to explain the area plan purpose and to assist with informing the political working group discussions. In addition, meetings and briefings with regional stakeholders have been held on the wider area plans programme, including with the Auckland Policy Office, New Zealand Transport Agency, Watercare Services Limited, Housing New Zealand, Auckland International Airport Limited, utility providers, developers and key land holders. Ongoing communication with these stakeholders will be maintained through the future development of each area plan. Engagement with local communities and stakeholders is a key component in the area plan process. The political working group is involved in the approach to engagement on the draft area plan to ensure that the events held are best suited to the Mngere-thuhu community.

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Financial and Resourcing Implications

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The work of area spatial planning, both at a local/place based or precinct level, and also at the area-wide level, is the responsibility of teams in the Regional and Local Planning Department in collaboration with other parts of the council and Council Controlled Organisations. This will require ongoing resource and staff commitment to integrate planning approaches and project management to coordinate activities. This work is budgeted for in the Regional and Local Planning Department budget. Out of each area plan will fall a range of actions contained in the prioritisation plan that will need to be considered for funding as part of future Long-term Plan processes.

Legal and Legislative Implications


Section 79 of the Local Government (Auckland Council) Act 2009 requires Council to prepare and adopt a spatial plan for Auckland. Council adopted the Auckland Plan on 29 March 2012. Area plans are driven by the Auckland Plan and are one mechanism used to implement the Development Strategy of the Auckland Plan.

Implementation Issues
The preparation of high quality and responsive area plans will require Council-mandated application of resources and staff from across the organisation and beyond, to achieve an appropriate comprehensive place-based picture of the future for areas at the scale selected. The planning and delivery of new local town centre or precinct plans that stem from area plans will require agreements with delivery partners to manage the realisation of the outputs on the ground or in other ways such as the Unitary Plan.

Attachments
No. A B Title Mangere-Otahuhu Draft Area Plan (Under Separate Cover) Local Board resolutions on the Mangere-Otahuhu draft area plan 101 Page

Signatories
Authors Authorisers Marc Dendale - Team Leader Planning South Penny Pirrit - Regional & Local Planning Manager Roger Blakeley - Chief Planning Officer

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Auckland Plan Committee 07 August 2012

FOR ACTION/INFORMATION Your attention is drawn to the following resolutions of Mangere-Otahuhu Local Board Meeting 27 June 2012:
26 Draft Mangere-Otahuhu Area Plan Resolution number MO/2012/154 MOVED by Member PE Skelton, seconded Member CF O'Brien: a) That the report be received. b) That the Mngere-thuhu Local Board recommends to the Auckland Plan Committee that the Draft Mngere-thuhu Area Plan as set out in Attachment A be endorsed for community engagement. That officers undertake a review of projects in the Prioritisation Plan and Schedule contained in Section 4 of the Draft Mngere-thuhu Area Plan prior to the commencement of community engagement, to ensure alignment with the finalised Long Term Plan. CARRIED

c)

PLEASE NOTE ANY ACTION RESULTING FROM THIS DECISION IS THE RESPONSIBILITY OF THE REPORTING OFFICER
Janette McKain Committee Secretary Local Boards Otara-Papatoetoe Mangere-Otahuhu Auckland Council (09) 262 5283 (021) 457 423 janette.mckain@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

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Attachment B

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Attachment B