10S: Thursday, August 9, 2012

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EDITED Back to School BY: • Aiken Standard

Packing your own lunch
By Chris Walsh cwalsh@aikenstandard.com If you are reading this you may remember the good ole days of bringing your lunch to school in your fantastic tin lunch box. You were rocking the Dukes of Hazard, Star Trek, Superman or whatever children’s show you woke up on Saturday mornings to watch. And while times may have changed, some things haven’t. It’s cool to bring your lunch to school and according to local dietitian Cyndi Catts, it’s healthier too. “I always encourage my parents to get their kids used to taking lunch to school at an early age,” Catts said. “It’s not the fault of the individual schools, it’s the budget.” While it may not have always been cool to show up with a hand-packed sandwich and apple, Catts said, “the more kids see other kids taking their lunch, the easier it is on them.” And yes, rocking an awesome lunch box matters, no matter the age. “An investment in a cool lunch box makes all the difference,” Catts said. “From a food safety standpoint, it’s a good idea to get an isolated lunch box and it opens up to a greater variety of what they can bring.” It is what’s inside the box that matters much more than what’s on the outside though. The decision on what actually goes in there however, shouldn’t just be on the parents. “Allowing from a very young age for kids to help pack their lunch helps and by the seventh grade they could pack their own,” Catts said. “The biggest problem I’ve seen is mom sends her kid to school with something the kid doesn’t like and they trade it away for cookies or something. The next biggest issue is sending them with the quick and easy processed stuff.” So what should they be bringing? It’s simpler than you

might think. First off Catts said, “there’s nothing wrong with a sandwich.” Catts said there is nothing wrong with grain, kids need it, but parents should look for a flour-less bread, or a wrap. As for what goes in it, the meat should be from a deli, or even left over dinner meat. Not the processed stuff that is in nice shapes at the store. The sandwich should also include some veggies, like tomatoes, lettuce, onions, pickles or whatever the kid likes. As for the sides, there are plenty of fruits and veggies — like an apple or carrots — as well as dairy items like cottage cheese. The drinks should be healthy too, like bottled water, milk or 100-percent juice. Catts said to avoid the fruit drinks due to the color and sugars they add to it. It’s easy as those few steps to get your kids eating better and feeling better about it this year.

Healthy Lunch Options
• Sandwich on whole grain bread or wrap (3 gm fiber or more per slice), preferably made of cracked or sprouted grain rather than flour • Fresh deli meat, mustard, chutney, hummus, lettuce, tomato, onion • Tuna, shrimp, crab or egg salad with healthy mayo • Soy burger with soy cheese • Fresh fruit • Raw veggies or salad with healthy dressing (made with healthy oils) • Yogurt (organic, plain, fatfree if possible) • Flourless whole grain crackers with no hydrogenated oils • Leftovers from a healthy supper the night before • Broth type soup with whole grain flour-less crackers • Huge salad with fish or lean meat on top and healthy dressing • Salad with beans, peas, nuts or seeds on top • Hummus, bean dip, tapinade, avocado, tabbouleh

Parents connecting with social media
There is a power outage, and your child’s school is dismissing students early, requiring you to arrive quickly for pickup. Your kid will not be left waiting for you because you got this information immediately after a quick log-in to the social media site you use to connect with other parents. Some other parents may be delayed in receiving this important information because they rely on phone alerts. Social media has changed the way people communicate. Whether through tweets or status updates, information shared through social media avenues is often instantaneous and can reach a large number of people, which is why many parents have turned to social media to learn about events at school. According to a study by Nielsen McKinsey Company, parents are more likely than adults without children to play games, engage in creative pursuits, and look for entertainment on Facebook, blogs and other social sites. The data collected from 2,000 adults (both parents and nonparents) who frequently use social media found 88 percent of users rely on social networking sites for communicating with family and friends. The next most popular activity is connecting with new friends, followed by accessing product reviews and online entertainment. Reports show that adults devote a quarter of their time spent online to social media sites. Parents, in particular, are finding new ways to put these sites to use. Social media is helping parents in a variety of ways, even enabling them to keep an eye on their children when they go online. According to a survey from Laptop magazine, 55 percent of parents are using social media to watch their kids’ online activities. Of that 55 percent, one-fifth indicated they only use social media to monitor their child’s online activity. However, social media has other handy purposes. Many parents use it as they would a bulletin board -- posting all types of information. Some parents use social media to stay abreast of school happenings, asking questions about when fundraiser money is due or if anyone got the spelling words for the week. Others find it is a good way to meet parents or speak with the parents of their child’s classmates. Some moms and dads use it to set up parents’ nights out, advertise things for sale or ask for recommendations on contractors. Parents also use social media to invite people to special events, including birthday parties. Others can see who was invited and decide if they’re going to come, too. More parents are turning to social media sites for advice and information, to stay in touch or simply to share a good laugh.

Parents are increasingly relying on social media sites to communicate with others and learn about school happenings.

Packing Healthy Lunches
• Choose skim or soy milk products • Leave off the full-fat cheese • Choose a dairy-free alternative made from soy or a low-fat or fat-free variety. Avoid “cheese food” or processed cheeses. • Use fresh lean deli meat or meatless products Purchase lunch meats sliced from the deli or opt for the growing number of good tasting soy based foods. • Add fruit • Include a serving of fruit every day for lunch. Old standbys include apples and bananas but experiment also with pears, melons, kiwis and others. Berries are also a great treat. The best way to include them is to pack with their stems still on (for strawberries) perhaps in a zip lock bag. • Don’t forget the veggies! • Try cukes, lettuce, tomato, onion and green peppers on sandwiches. Pack them in zip lock bags with a healthy dressing or hummus for dip. Baby carrots are great. Veggie salads, when kept cool with ice packs, can include all types of veggies including romaine or leaf lettuce, spinach, broccoli, peas, carrots, etc. • Swap the white bread for those that are heavy and dense. • Make sure that a whole grain is listed as the first ingredient. 3 gm of fiber is a minimum per slice. Consider wraps or pita bread as well. • Limit sweet baked goods • Often hard to resist, cookies, doughnuts and brownies, including “lowfat” types, are not nearly as nutritious as fruit. • Watch the Whites • Avoid potato, corn and tortilla chips made with hydrogenated oil: look for snacks made with liquid canola and olive oil. • Pack 100% Juice • Check labels for “100% Juice”; some juices contain only 10% juice and are more like sodas than juice. • Use healthy “lunchables” • Some Oscar Meyer Lunchables get as much as 2/3 of their calories from fat and sugar. Create your own using whole grain crackers and lean meat, a piece of fruit and juice or water. • Remember dried fruit • Packets of dried fruit, such as dried plums, and nuts, such as walnuts, are safe and full of nutrients. • In cold weather, soups are enjoyable. • Veggie soup can be made and then kept hot in a thermos. One suggestion is to fill the container with boiling water, let stand for a few minutes, empty and then pour in the piping got food. Keep the thermos closed until lunchtime to keep it hot at about 140 degrees or above.
—Information provided by Cyndi Catts, RD, LD. For more information on good nutrition for the whole family, Cyndi may be reached at 803-642-9360 or cattfood@bellsouth.net.

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Tutors help fill educational gaps
Many parents choose to hire a tutor for a child who is struggling with a portion of his or her school work. Finding the right tutor involves some research. That’s because, in addition to the tutor being well versed in his or her area of expertise, he or she should have a connection with the tutored child. Otherwise the child may struggle. The role of standardized testing has increased in recent years, and a child’s test scores are now subject to heightened scrutiny during his or her academic career. No longer just for admittance to college, standardized tests now play a bigger role earlier on in a child’s academic career. Tests taken during elementary school may be used to determine where a child attends middle school. Some schools are prepping Many parents realize their children can benefit from a tutor students strictly for what will offering personalized lessons. be on tests. The resulting gaps in the curriculum can leave students clueless about routine lessons, such as spelling or grammar. The combination of these factors has led many parents to hire tutors to ensure their children receive a more wellrounded education. According to Eduventures, an educational market research firm, tutoring is now a $4 billion industry, with revenues increasing by 15 percent each year since 2001. With so many people getting into the tutoring business, the average parent may not know where to look to hire someone for his or her child’s needs. There are a few steps you can take to hire a tutor. • Contact your child’s teacher or teachers, some of whom may tutor outside of the classroom. If your child responds well to a teacher’s methods, consult that teacher about the possibility of your child receiving private tutoring. • Visit the guidance department and find out if they recommend tutors who have successfully worked with students at the school in the past. This can help narrow down the number of prospects. • Talk to other parents about their experiences with tutors. Those who have been in the same situation may recommend a tutor or can point you in the right direction. • Explore the franchised tutoring businesses available in the neighborhood. Most, if not all, tutoring companies have a website where you can research options. A quick browsing of the Internet may also yield reviews of particular companies, so you will get a better idea of their track records. • Check the newspaper for advertisements. Independent or freelance tutors may advertise their services in the classifieds or even in a church bulletin. The newspaper also may provide information on former teachers or educators acting as volunteer tutors. • Visit the library and see if they have a relationship with any local tutors, or see if any tutors are using the library as a meeting place for tutoring sessions. This way, you can make a connection and find out more information. Once you find the right tutor, be sure to have all policies spelled out in a contract. Make sure the tutoring rate and duration of services is listed as well as any guarantees of student improvement. It is a good idea to do a background check on the tutor to ensure your child’s safety. When the student meets with the tutor, make sure it is in a quiet, private location that will facilitate learning without any distractions.

How parents can get involved at school
Research indicates that children whose parents get involved with their education are more likely to earn better grades and less likely to have behavioral problems in the classroom. The concept of parents working in conjunction with schools is nothing new. A 1987 study by Paul G. Fehrmann and colleagues documented the importance of parental involvement on their child’s grades. Published in the Journal of Education Research, the study found that when parents stayed directly involved in their child’s studies throughout high school, the child’s grades improved. There are many different reasons for parents to get involved with their child’s school and the community. Helping their children succeed is just one of them. The choice is just how to go about connecting with the school. Here are a few ideas: get a firsthand account of what your child is doing in class. You may be asked to prepare and package homework assignments or put together materials for craft projects. Some teachers welcome parents who come in to read books to the class or even give spelling tests. Think about chaperoning a field trip or helping with the set-up and clean-up of class parties. If you keep an open dialogue with the teacher through phone calls or e-mail, you may be presented with plenty of opportunities to get involved. the daily activities of the classroom. However, you can show your support by attending special events hosted by the school – such as fundraisers or field-day activities. Volunteer your time with the setup of teacher-appreciation lunches and bake sales, serve as a tour guide for the school when new parents are invited, build sets or make costumes for a school play, or take pictures of events and create a collage to be put on display in the school.

Teachers are increasingly facing obstacles with regard to time and funding. Many must preside over large classes and are responsible for outfitting their classrooms with certain supplies. This presents ideal opportunities for parents to step up and pitch in. Attend special events Volunteering in your child’s classroom is a good way for you Not every parent can serve on the PTA or be present in to help his or her teacher and

Work with the teacher

Parent-teacher associations or organizations are often instrumental in helping a school to run smoothly. They are the people behind fundraisers and special activities outside of the classroom. The PTA is also privy to information on upcoming events before the rest of the school community. Attending monthly meetings can keep you up to speed on the goings-on at your child’s school. It will also ensure your voice is heard with regard to school policy. Showing your face at meetings will also give you the opportunity to meet other parents.

Attend meetings

Some schools can benefit from the specialized skills of parents. Ask if you can come in and talk about your job or hobby and demonstrate it to the class. Individuals who have technology skills can volunteer to install computer software or to run networking throughout the school. If you have a background in print layout, find out if you can help design and publish the school newsletter Parents can volunteer their skills in the classroom to help improve their child’s learning experience. or yearbooks. Anytime a parent volunteers his or her time, that means less funding has to go to hiring an outside vendor for the job, saving the school money it sorely needs. Being involved in your child’s school sets a positive example for your kids and provides their school with some muchneeded assistance.

Volunteer your skills

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2012-13 bus route information is online at:

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2S: Thursday, August 9, 2012

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EDITED Back to School BY: • Aiken Standard

Aiken schools’ Beth Everitt provides 2012-13 overview
By RoB Novit rnovit@aikenstandard.com Bluff became the district’s first high school to introduce a freshman academy. The As the 2012-13 school concept called for ninth year approaches, the Aiken graders to have their own County School District will assigned teachers and to focus on student achievement have their own designated in literacy and math, the classroom area within the upcoming adoption of new schools. Proponents said the academic standards and much program has seen success more. in focusing greater attention The district has moved on younger students as they to a stronger emphasis on make the transition to high literacy in recent years school. since Superintendent Dr. More recently, Midland Beth Everitt joined the Valley High and Wageneradministration in 2008. Salley High have added the Federal stimulus funds were academies. used to provide reading The district administration intervention specialists, and and School Board members those positions were retained decided during the budget after the stimulus dollars process last February they expired in 2011. could fund an additional The school system has been academy in the new school using federal Title I dollars to term. Through an application keep the ratio of students and process, North Augusta High teachers to 16:1 in the first was selected. Principal Todd grade in 16 schools — using Bornscheuer, previously at those funds to provide an Silver Bluff, was an assistant additonal first-grade teacher principal there before in each school. When the U.S. becoming the principal. At Department of Education that time he worked with his decided that those funds principal, the late Warren could no longer be used Whitson, to develop the for that purpose, the Aiken academy model at Silver County Board of Education Bluff. picked up funding for nine of “Our interest in a freshman those positions in the schools academy started last year with the highest poverty rate. at North Augusta when the “We want our kids to learn teachers began investigating to read as early as possible,” the research,” said Everitt said. “But we’re also Bornscheuer, “determining pushing forward on math this whether they had the buy-in year.” to move forward. It’s exciting For the past few years, to see how it can work, not the school district, USC only for the students as ninth Aiken and Aiken Technical graders, but as a continuous College have collaborated program toward a successful on an algebra institute each high school career.” summer for public school The State Department will teachers. For many years, pilot a proposed evaluation success in English I for ninth tool this year for teachers and graders has been considered principals. The Aiken School a gateway to provide them District will not participate in a much better chance of the pilot, Everitt said, because graduating. More recently, principals and administrators now regard Algebra I with the same importance. This summer, the emphasis was shifted in part to elementary grades. Longtime educators Gwen Johnson and Gloria Allen hosted 60 teachers at USCA — three each from 20 elementary schools. The teachers explored new strategies in math instruction with algebraic concepts — all in conjunction with new Common Core standards. The intent is to help teachers become comfortable about their own knowledge of how fractions build for young kids and how they can help the children understand them, Allen said last month. “It’s important that the concept of fractions build and build and feed into high school,” she said. “A lot of people could memorize things, but that’s not really understanding them.” Common Core is a statedriven effort, now including 45 states, to develop and implement consistent and rigorous national standards in math, language arts and social studies. The S.C. General Assembly voted to opt out of the Common Core science standards initiative. Aiken’s district administrators agreed, pointing out the state’s existing standards are rated among the nation’s highest. For the other subjects, “Common Core will provide the standards that students need to learn,” Everitt said. The implementation process remains under way for the next two years. The State Department of Education is not providing support at the state level, with districts picking up training opportunities on their own. The Aiken School Board approved three new instructional coach positions, and those educators will work in schools to train teachers on the new standards. “It would not be efficient or a good use of teachers’ time for schools to develop their own training materials,” Everitt said. “It’s much more appropriate to have a few people as coordinators. Still, we have had hundreds of teachers involved in the development process — having people from every school come together for this.” Common Core provides a framework for teaching and will not stifle teachers’ creativity in presenting the instructional material, said Everitt. Several years ago, Silver
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an evaluation structure for principals is already in place. However, a key component of the proposed system — which would begin in 201415 if the system is approved — would call for teachers and principals to receive

letter grades A through F, much like schools and school districts are now being graded. State Department officials have indicated that such grades would be used for evaluation purposes at the

school and district level. Currently, there is no consideration that such grades would be publicized. In other instructional news, Everitt said, the Aiken County Career and Technology Center is

introducing new programs. Five high schools also received additional technical education funds and are adding such programs as health science, sports medicine and emergency management.

In this file photo, Aiken Superintendent Dr. Beth Everitt, left, presents a poinsettia to Midland Valley High School music teacher Vanessa Cox after Cox’s show choir presented a holiday music fest at an Aiken County Board of Education meeting.

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Thanks to new regulations, meals will be healthier
By RoB Novit rnovit@aikenstandard.com Student meals in the Aiken County public schools will maintain their current prices, although adult meal costs will increase, as mandated by the U.S. Department of Agriculture. The student meals themselves, however, will be different — as in healthier. “We have new regulations based on the Healthy HungerFree Act,” said Glenda Wafford, the school district’s food service director. “Students will have age-appprioate calorie limits and larger servings of vegetables and fruits. They also must have at least one serving of produce every day, either fruits or vegetables.” Providing more produce will be more expensive, but schools need to cut back on saturated fats, Wafford said. There won’t be any change in breakfast items in 2012-13. However, Wafford anticipates requirements for more whole grain the following year. Eight elementary schools provide universal breakfast for all students. All schools in the district offer breakfast. The food service department will offer two choices of fruits and vegetables every day - among them collards, broccoli, romaine lettuce, red bell-peppers, carrots, sweet potatoes, tomatoes, linguini, peas and pinto beans. Wafford readily acknowledged that cafeteria managers and staffers will have to be creative. “We’re going to use our imaginations to make lunches as scrumptious as we possibly can,” she said. “We’ll test them before we have the kids try them.” Wafford’s office did a pilot project in the past school year, providing pre-packaged meals Breakfast $1.60 (Reduced fee .30) Lunch $2.00 (Reduced fee .40)

Meal prices
Elementary Students

Middle/High Students
Breakfast $1.60 (Reduced fee .30) Lunch $2.15 (Reduced fee .40) Breakfast $1.95 Lunch $3.35

Adult

In this file photo, as cafeteria staffer Catherine Adams’ family members look on, food service director Glenda Wafford presents her with a certificate in recognition of Adams’ 53 years service at Warrenville Elementary School. at nine schools. All elementary schools will get them this year. The meals are prepared by the firm Preferred Meal Systems and save costs and time, Wafford said. Earlier this year, the company picked up the district’s commodity food and will put it in pre-portioned containers. “We’ll heat it and serve it to the students,” Wafford said. “They’ll have the same nutritional content, and they’re looking for the same kinds of recipes as I am. I’ll borrow some of theirs and they’ll do that too. This is a team effort with the same goals.” Children can continue to bring their own lunches. The district has no control over the contents, and Wafford encourages parents to make them as healthy as possible. “We want children to eat to learn,” she said. “If kids are hungry, they’re not going to learn.” Wafford said she’s proud of several employees for recent accomplishments. Cafeteria managers Linda Morris of Greendale Elementary School and Gwen Kaney of LBC Middle School were named staff members of the year by their schools. Four other managers and three food service supervisors attended a state training program on their own time and attained recognition as certified nutritionists. The managers are April Ingram, North Aiken Elementary School; Tammy Fields, the Center for Innovative Learning at Pinecrest; Sheila Adams, Redcliffe Elementary School; and Marie Davenport, Warrenville Elementary School. The newly-certified supervisors are Eileen Drum, Michelle Chavis and Emelina Coleman.

Parents now can apply on-line at www.LunchApplication.com so that their children can receive free or reduced price school meals. Your application will be sent from a secure website directly to Aiken County Public Schools, so parents don’t need to worry about filling out a paper form that could be lost or misplaced. (Parents have their student’s Power School ID number available when they sign in). The Power School Student ID number can be obtained through the school office, the School Food Service Department at 641-2520 or school schedule. The website has been designed to make it easy for parents to know exactly what information they need to provide and to guide them through the process. Once the application has been received, the district office will determine eligibility and send parents a letter with the results.

Applying online for free, reduced lunch

By AMy BANtoN abanton@aikenstandard.com

Educators embracing technology for e-learning
when it comes to speech therapy as these devices can record voices. Pat Keating, Wagener Salley High School principal, has been with Aiken Public Schools for about 24 years, starting as a physical education teacher. He remembers the days of paper grades and attendance which has long been out of existence in the local schools. He has seen things progress a lot over the last two decades. Keating said they have enough iPods for every freshman and sophomore in his school. The iPads are used for small group instruction. Every classroom has an interactive SMART board. The school, which is equipped with Wi-Fi, also has several computer and mobile labs. Keating said that the students have definitely picked up this form of supplementary instruction as they are growing up with the advancing technology. It’s not only fun for the kids, but they learn that an iPod is more than just a cool toy, he said. Keating added that the days of lectures are over -- saying rather than just hearing about the Lourve, students are now taking virtual tours of it. “Technology has definitely made us more efficient,” Keating said. Another important advancement in technology that’s helping local schools is e-learning. Dr. Randy Stowe, director of administrative services, said online instruction is useful in various areas of the school system. Online instruction is used in summer school and was the primary method used this year. Stowe said this new method was very successful. It’s also routinely used in the school district’s alternative programs. Lastly, it’s used in the credit recovery program that allows students who failed a class by less than 10 points to go online, take a test that finds their areas of weakness and improve on them. Keating has been impressed with the advancements made in his school and thinks the future is bright. “You want something that will last,” Keating said. “I think that our district has done a very good job making sure that we are using technology that is relevant. It’s not fleeting and you get the best bang for your buck.”

The classroom has changed a lot in the last decade or so as technology continues to advance. Educational institutions around the country are embracing technology including Aiken County Schools. From iPads to online learning, Aiken County schools are riding the technology wave. Terry Hallman, the school district’s lead instructional technology specialist, said a recent grant has made it possible to purchase Apple iPads and iPods which have gone to Area 4 schools. They also bought a few more devices so area teachers from around the county can check them out for use. “It’s growing leaps and bounds,” Hallman said. “Once it was introduced, it took off.” Hallman said these popular tech items have been used to supplement teachers’ instruction. The variety of applications are easily integrated into lesson plans. She said special education teachers have really enjoyed the technology especially

STAFF PHOTO BY AMY BANTON Aosten Priester (front), Damarius Jamison, and Austin Wyszynski work online at Silver Bluff High School.

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(Staff photo by Rob Novit) School bus driver trainees Sarah Sarchet, left, and Olivia Curry share a laugh during practice for the driving test.

As school year begins, bus driver shortage remains issue
By RoB Novit rnovit@aikenstandard.com were using all the subs we had and every other source available. I was on the buses occaSarah Sarchet had just sionally when I could.” finished practicing for her Drivers currently make upcoming school bus driving $10.71 an hour. About twotest recently, backing up the thirds are full-time with 30 vehicle carefully until it rested hours or more. Those drivers within a foot or so of a small supplement their hours by fence. working as custodians, food After getting off the bus, service staffers and other jobs Sarchet was greeted with a within a school like that. high-five from another student, “We’ve had so many people Olivia Curry, who grinned and come in and apply,” McClure said, “Good job!” said. “When they realize all Both will be welcomed into the responsibilities and the pay, the Aiken County School Dis- many are just not interested. trict’s transportation family It is an ongoing headache, when they start driving after something we deal with all the the school year gets underway. time.” Challenged by a shortage of For all of that, two driver/ drivers in recent years, transtrainers, Diane Williams and portation supervisor Maria Josephine Green, were having McClure said the situation is a good time with trainees Sarlooking somewhat better. chet and Curry. “We’ve had several people “They’ve gotten their classcertified over the summer,” room and on-the-road training, she said, “so we should be bet- and they’ll take their written ter off when school starts.” At and driving tests soon,” Wilthe end of the year we were 20 liams said. It’s fun for us to drivers short. That was bad, as give back. We love what we do

and enjoy sharing with them.” Curry pointed out she drove five-ton trucks while serving in the military. “But these school buses are at another level, bigger than the trucks,” she said. “Driving in the military was a lot easier.” McClure’s department will pick up buses from the staterun bus shop on the Columbia Highway Aug. 14. They’ll check to make sure all video cameras are working. All school buses have cameras on board. “They do help with discipline,” McClure said. “But we still have issues and are working with the administration to try to improve discipline even more.” The supervisors often take a look at video randomly and have discovered infractions that busy drivers couldn’t see. When students and parents see the videos and the students subsequently are disciplined, that too has led to a reduction of problems.

American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry
www.aapd.org
This symbol verifies that the pediatric dentist listed has completed requirements of the American Dental Association to permit announcement as Specialist in Pediatric Dentistry.

Member of the

Rocky L. Napier, DMD
Pediatric Dentist
143 Trafalgar Street SW, Aiken, SC 803.641.1000

• Every child should have their 1st dental visit no later than12 months of age. • Specializing in infants, toddlers and small children.

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Belk sales associate Erica Padgett checks out a display on back-to-school fashion, featuring trendy colored denim.

School style
By Haley HugHes hhughes@aikenstandard.com What Old Navy is seeing as a fashion-forward trend are colored, skinny jeans, according to Aiken store assistant manager Sarah Chatelain. Denim in bright, flashy colors like hot pink and lime green is replacing the traditional stonewashed blue. Chatelain recently visited Seattle where colored denim was clearly all the rage. “Literally everyone was wearing them,” she said. Bold colors seem be on tap everywhere. “Bold color is at the top of the list. Color clashing, color blocking, color banding … it’s all on trend,” said Arlene Goldstein, Belk’s vice-president of trend merchandising and fashion direction. Aiken store manager Amy

Dressing for success
For Emily Hawks, 7, it’s all about tween fashion line D-Signed for back-to-school clothes. The fashion line, with designs inspired by popular Disney Channel characters like Ally Dawson from “Austin & Ally,” is sold exclusively at Target. That’s where Emily and her mother Ashley Hawks shopped for clothes recently. “She’s got a closet full of it now,” Ashley said. D-Signed launched in 2010 and pieces can be mixed and matched for tween girls sizes 4 to 16. The collection includes graphic tees, skirts, knit dresses, shorts and jackets.

Bourne confirmed it. “Bold colors have been a big seller. Jewel tones are always popular in the fall,” she said. Puffed-shoulder blouses and jackets, a fashion trend from the 1980s, appear to be making a comeback, according to popular teen magazines Seventeen and Teen Vogue, as are ballet flats and high-top sneakers. Oversized blazers and tunic tops are trending, too, as is chunky jewelry. “For young men, you are seeing denim in boot cut and skinny jeans as well as cargo shorts and pants,” Goldstein said. Local clothing retailers like Target, Old Navy and Belk carry uniforms for those schools which have dress codes.

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EDITED Back to School BY: • Aiken Standard

Parents: vaccinate students for 2012-13 school year
By Suzanne Stone sstone@aikenstandard.com As the 2012-13 school year approaches, parents are taking their rising grade schoolers to the doctor’s offices to update the required immunizations and vaccinations. South Carolina schools require diphtheria, tetanus and pertussis vaccinations; the polio vaccine; rubeola (measles) and rubella (German measles) vaccinations; mumps, hepatitis B and varicella vaccines. Students in grades 5K through 8 must have four doses of the diphtheria, tetanus and pertussis vaccines, including one dose on or after the fourth birthday; students in grades 9 through 12 must have three doses, including one on or after the fourth birthday. Grade 5K students must have three doses of oral and/or inactive polio vaccine, including one dose on or after the fourth birthday. Students in grades 1 through 12 should have three doses of oral and/or inactive polio vaccine including one dose on or after the fourth birthday, and the fourth and final dose in the vaccine course after age four. Students in all grades must have two doses the rubeola vaccine on or after the first birthday and separated by at least one month. All students must have one dose of the rubella vaccine and the mumps vaccine on or after the first birthday. All grades are required to have three doses of the hepatitis B vaccine, and one dose of the varicella vaccine either on or after the first birthday or at the first sign of an outbreak or after a positive test result for the disease. Medical and religious exemptions are available with certifications. For more information on vaccination requirements and exemptions, go online to www.scdhec.gov.

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Aiken Standard • EDITED BY:

Back to School

aikenstandard.com

Thursday, August 9, 2012: 9S

Kingsley Priester, 15, a South Aiken High School student, gets behind the wheel for a lesson from Aiken Driving Academy owner and instructor Steve Deibel.

Safe driving
between 15 and 24,” he said. “Cell phones are the number- one distraction and the It’s been a rite of passage for number-one crash is the singlegenerations: getting behind the vehicle crash.” wheel, taking one unforgettable Young drivers who leave the step on the road to adulthood. roadway overcorrect and often But it’s not your father’s set off a chain of events that Oldsmobile, and vehicles now ends in a crash. come equipped with touch “Typically they are leaving screen GPS units and satellite the road and over-correcting radios, not to mention access because of a distraction,” he to cell phones. said. “They panic and they get All these take your focus scared.” away from driving, said Steve A distraction that all parents Deibel, owner/operator of Aishould be aware of is other ken Driving Academy. teenagers in the car. “Even hands-free devices…,” The graduated driver prohe said. “These are all systems gram in South Carolina allows we need to adjust to.” a legal driver under 17, driving Deibel has a law enforcement without an adult 21 or older, to career that spans nearly 20 have two passengers in the car years, and has found a passion with him, unless he is driving working with young drivers. to or from school. “The overall problem is that “Then, you can have as many they don’t see themselves as in the car as you have seat new drivers,” Deibel said. belts for,” he said. “I kind of “They want to be light years disagree with that, anyone who ahead of where they really are.” is around when school is let out Couple their inexperience knows why.” with the distractions and drivThat’s where parents come in, ing can be a dangerous and he explained. often deadly proposition. Just because the law allows “Speed is the number-one for it doesn’t mean parents driving violation of drivers should. By Karen Daily kdaily@aikenstandard.com

Rules of the road

“Parents need to have their own rules,” he said. The parents know their children. But, children also know their parents. When Deibel asks his class how many of them have seen their parents talk or text while driving, he said typically every hand goes up. “Parents have to lead by example,” he said. “As we all know, everything from the way we talk to the way we drive is influenced by the example of our parents.” Deibel said he’s taught exceptional 15- and 16-year-old drivers, but he said he’s also seen where inexperience can be a problem. “Experience makes all the difference, and you can’t teach that,” he said. Deibel said he won’t sugarcoat the grim statistics. The number-one killer of young drivers between 15-24 is car crashes. “Understanding that the choices you make behind the wheel can have catastrophic consequences is very important,” he said.

In a perfect world, school and work hours would run concurrently. But the average school day begins at 9 a.m. and continues until 3 p.m., while the average work day lasts from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. As a result, parents must arrange for child care during those hours when school is out, but Mom and Dad are still at work. The two-income family is more common than ever before. Up until the 20th century, a dual-income family was rare. Today, however, roughly 80 percent of families in North America have both parents working, and many find it is impossible to live on one income. Dual-income families often have to make difficult choices about child care. If a mother returned to work shortly after giving birth, day care was probably arranged early on. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, in 2010, 48 percent of children ages 0 to 4 with employed mothers were primarily cared for by a relative. Twenty-four percent spent the majority of their time in a center-based arrangement. As children grow and attend elementary school, traditional day care is usually not an option and parents have to make other arrangements.

After-care options for dual-income families
low working parents to drop off their children before the parents head to work. The students are kept in the school’s gym or cafeteria until the regular school day begins. The same scenario applies to after school programs. At dismissal, after-care students will return to the designated location to work on homework or engage in some activities with other after-care participants until their parents arrive to take them home.

ents are home from work. These programs vary depending on the region of the country and the particular school district. Personal finances also play a role in the type of care families can afford. When the decision is made, there are some questions parents should ask before enrollment. • What is the ratio of caregivers to students? • What is the cost of the program? • How are delayed openFamily and friends ing days and early dismissal Parents who prefer a difdays handled? Holidays and ferent situation than schoolbreaks? based care frequently turn to • What happens if I arrive friends or family members to late? bridge the gap between school • What activities will take and work. Students who carplace? pool may be dropped off early • Is there ample time for at the driver’s home and stay homework? there after school until their • Are caregivers teachers or parents get home. volunteers? In addition, many families • Are background checks have welcomed older relatives conducted? back into their homes in light • Is financial assistance of the struggling economy. In available? such instances, grandparents • What is the turn-over rate or aunts and uncles can look of staff? after the kids once school has • Is there a nurse available? ended for the day. • Who oversees the program? available? After-school programs • Is busingemergencies • How are Some children are enrolled handled? in care centers that watch chil• How is poor behavior dren before school, bus them handled? to school and then return in • May I visit the program for School-based care the afternoon to pick up the a check-in? Many schools offer prochildren again. This is one • With whom do I speak if I grams both before and after of the more costly options in have a problem? school, many of which are child care. However, it may be • If my child is absent, do I reasonably priced. This helps more educationally structured receive a refund for that day? dual-income families, but may than the care programs pro• How long is the waiting not be practical during early- vided at school. list? release days, during teacher Students who participate in These are just some of the planning days or holiday sports or academic clubs may questions to ask, and parents breaks. have an arrangement to stay are encouraged to come up Programs that help parents with a teacher, coach or club with their own to find the best before school typically aladministrator until their par- program for their children.

Aiken County Public Schools website: http://acps.schoolfusion.us/

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12S: Thursday, August 9, 2012

aikenstandard.com

EDITED Back to School BY: • Aiken Standard

Two Campuses. One School. One Vision.

153 Years of Academic Excellence

... and Lots of Smiling Faces
Mead Hall Episcopal School and Aiken Preparatory School are proud to announce they have merged their traditions of academic excellence into one strong school, Mead Hall Episcopal School, with two campuses in downtown Aiken.

Now Welcoming Students in Grades 3K through 12

3K - Grade 4 St. Thaddeus Campus 129 Pendleton St., SW Aiken, SC

Grades 5 - 12 Aiken Prep Campus 619 Barnwell Ave., NW Aiken, SC

(803) 644-1122
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