Study visit group report

Group No Title of the visit Lessons from nature Topic Learning outside the classroom and sustainable development City, country Malham/Yorkshire/England Type of visit Study Visit Dates of visit 25-29 October 2010 Group reporter Ufuk Cor
Dear participants, The purpose of a study visit is to generate an exchange of experience and good practice between the country you visit and the countries you all come from. Thus, participating in a study visit can be an exciting experience and an important learning tool for you. During the visit you are invited to prepare a group report summarising your discussions and learning. This will help Cedefop disseminate what you have learnt to others, who share your interest but did not participate in this particular study visit. On the first day of the visit, you are to select a reporter who will be responsible for preparing the final report and submitting it to Cedefop. Everybody should contribute to the report by sharing their views, knowledge, and practices in their respective countries. Please start working on the report from the first day of the visit. You will, of course, be taking your own notes during presentations and field visits; but the group report should highlight the result of the group’s reflections on what was seen and learnt during the entire visit and the different perspectives brought by the different countries and participants. The report should NOT read as a travel diary, describing every day and every session or visit. Cedefop will publish extracts of your reports on its website and make them available to experts in education and vocational training. When writing the report, please keep this readership in mind: make your report clear, interesting, and detailed enough to be useful to colleagues throughout Europe. By attaching any photos to the report, you agree to Cedefop’s right to use them in its publications on study visits and on its website. Please prepare the report in the working language of the group. Please do not include the programme or list of participants. The reporter should submit the report to Cedefop (studyvisits@cedefop.europa.eu) within ONE month of the visit.

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I FINDINGS
This section summarises the findings of the group while visiting host institutions, discussing issues with the hosts and within the group. You will be reflecting on what you learnt every day. But to put them together and give an overall picture, you need to devote a special session to prepare the final report on the last day of the visit. In this section, it is important that you describe not only things you learnt about the host country but also what you learnt about the countries represented by group members. 1. One of the objectives of the study visits programme is to exchange examples of good practice among hosts and participants. Cedefop will select well-described projects/programmes/initiatives and disseminate them to former participants and a wider public, including potential partners for future projects. Therefore it is important that you identify and describe all aspects that, in your view, make these projects/programmes/initiatives successful and worth exploring.

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Describe each of the good practices you learnt about during the visit (both from the hosts and from one another) indicating the following:
title of the project/programme/ initiative country name of the institution that implements it (if possible, provide a website) Field Studies Council, Council for Learning outside the classroom Ellenmacarthurfound ation Field Studies Council contact person (if possible) who presented the programme to the group Anthony Thomas, www.lotc.org.uk Ken Webster, Craig Johnson www.ellenmacarthurf oundation.org Laurence Jarvis www.field-studiescouncil.org/eppingfore st Adrian Pickles adrian.mt@fieldstudies-council.org Themistoklis Sbarounis tsbarounis@hotmail.co m Cecilia Lohasz Hungary 1056 Budapest Szerb utca 17-19, www.energiaklub.hu/ en Birgit Paulsen whom the project/ programme/ initiative addresses what features of the project/programme/initiative make it an example of good practice

Field Studies Council

UK

Lobbying for outdoor classroom education

ESD in UK

UK

Lessons from Nature

UK

Cradle to cradle theory in economy, from linear production to circular. Emphasize in ESD the energy and nutrition flow in the nature, learning from natural systems. Show case of Lessons from Nature programme material for primary pupils and opportunities to trial and evaluate learning materials. Teachers, pupils and adult learners of all ages Teachers and pupils from Primary & Secondary Education

Malham Tarn Field Centre Forest Fires in Greece: Causes, Effects, Landscape Rehabilitation Educational materials on energy, climate change Umbrella association of environmental

UK Greece

Field Studies Council Environmental Education Centre of Argyroupolis (Athens, Greece) www.kpea.gr Energia Klub

Interactive learning, Outdoor education practices, Holistic-systematic approach, Building knowledge against misconceptions. Online posters available in English as well, on climate change, energy use at home

Hungary

Germany

Arbeitsgemeinschaft Natur- und

Professional organization for

Networking, further trainings for educators, innovative methods and subjects for ESD.

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education providers in Germany

Umweltbildung Bundesverband e.V. www.umweltbildung .de Germany Bert Brecht Gymnasium www.bert-brechtgymnasium.de Rositsa Dimova Sabine SchmidtStrehlau 137 Secondary school “Angel Kanchev” Simona.slavickumer@zrss.si

environmental educators

Secondary school, outdoor classroom learning Lessons from Nature

The German national Committee for UN Decade for ESD has set annual themes eg. Cultural diversity, water, energy, money etc. The ANU focus their activities on these themes. Good practice for outdoor classroom education. Muehlenbach project: water investigation for pupils. Best practices in Bulgaria about lessons from nature: primary and secondary school (extracurricular and experimental activities inside and outside the classroom). Project: The hidden treasures of city parks, activities of different organisations, Project Biodiversity, Contents: Animal, plant of the Year and The best natural photography, other projects, seminars, contest, summer schools on the topic Biodiversity and sustainability Examples of biodiversity researches and studies in Croatia, biodiversity lessons in schools, activities of different organizations relative to the topics of environment, biodiversity, protected species, endemic species, recycling and sustainable development Best practices of active citizenship for children. Best practices of sustainable education for children in school Overall information to all through web sites. The scientific information provided. The range of experiences covered: sea, lagoon, karst, mountain, farms,

Bulgaria

Teachers and pupils from Primary & Secondary Education

National education Institute of Slovenia

Slovenia

Simona Slavic Kumer

Biodiversity in Croatia

Croatia

University of Split – Centre of Marine Studies

Maja Krzelj, Maja.krzelj@unist.hr

Lessons from nature Best practices in the Municipality of Ravenna Some of the best practices in the region Friuli Venezia Giulia

Italy

Italy

Municipality of Ravenna www.comunediraven na.it Ufficio Scolastico Regionale Friuli Venezia Giulia Trieste

Maria Grazia Bartolini mbartolini@comune.ra .it Luigi Torchio luigtorc@tin.it Children from all schools of the region

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Biodiversity in Romania-,,The gifts of nature”

Romania

ESD in Ministry of the Environment of the S.R. Educational issues/projects in Turkey Scince project and science camp in Ege University in Turkey

Slovakia

Turkey Turkey

Corbu Nou Secondary School, Braila county, Romania http://scoalacorbun ou.webs.com Ministry of the environment of the Slovak republic www.enviro.gov.sk Ministry of national education www.meb.gov.tr Ege University/ Faculty of education www.ege.edu.tr

Cana Monica moni.cana@yahoo.com

research centers etc … Best practices in Romania about lessons from nature: primary and secondary school (extracurricular and experimental activities inside and outside the classroom). Environmental education in SR

Fancova.lucia@enviro. gov.sk ufuk_cor@hotmail.co m hulya.yilmaz@ege.edu .tr

Educational issues of Turkey, projects by organisations and government. Presentation of Ege University and departments. Science school and science camp which will be organised by the science department of Ege University.

* You can describe as many good practices as you find necessary. You can add rows to the table.

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2. The study visits programme aims to promote and support policy development and cooperation in lifelong learning. That is why it is important to know what you learnt about such policies and their implementation during your visit. You are invited to describe your findings concerning the following: 2.1 APPROACHES
TAKEN BY PARTICIPATING COUNTRIES

(BOTH

HOST

AND

PARTICIPANTS’) ASPECTS ARE

REGARDING THE THEME OF THE VISIT. PARTICIPATING COUNTRIES? DIFFERENT AND WHY?

WHAT

ASPECTS ARE SIMILAR AND WHY?

ARE

THERE ANY SIMILAR APPROACHES/MEASURES IN

WHAT

Education Sustainable Development (ESD) and outdoor classroom education is difficult to fit into school curriculum, it is depended a lot on teachers motivation and interests. During the week we learned about different approaches in the different fields, visited a lot of projects in the Yorkshire Dales and we did some practical field work. 1. UK. Field Study Council: they work with different age groups in the field of biodiversity, to gain outdoor experience. Outdoor classroom education is not a part of the curriculum, but they developed a Manifesto on this and do lobby work to raise the general awareness and implement it into the curriculum.

2. Field work “lessons from nature”: We learnt about FSC’s recent project with schools in North London. The very basic idea is the production in cycle processes from cradle to cradle. Nature shows us how it can work. The main argument of the educational program for kids is “Waste is Food”. So children first learn something about circles in the nature and then transfer it to production circles. 3. Field work “Outdoor classroom education and sustainable development”: We went for a practical investigation to a local stream. We agreed that even little experiments show better than theoratical work in the classroom how nature works. The learners can learn in a playful way about cycles in the nature and make first hand experience, develop social and science skills.

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4. “Able Project”: Visit to a successful company that has not only been inspired by the lessons from nature approach but also runs an outdoor education programme. One of the main objectives of the project is to involve children and adults from disadvantaged families, students excluded from school, adults who are supposed to do social work, etc… The project seems to be a positive and a balanced good practice bringing together social, ecological end economic ideas. The Able Project works with several partners: the Green Business Network, Yorkshire Water, Wakefield District Primary Care Trust, Wakefield District Community School, West Yorkshire Probation Service, and various Education Authorities. The scheme is a demonstration of sustainable development in action showing how fish for human consumption can be produced indoor in a highly innovative way.

We visited the whole site and the different parts of the Project such as: the BMX trail, the cultivated fields, the greenhouse, the old landfill site planted with willows and other trees, etc.and we had the chance to participate in some of the non-formal activities such as social interaction. 5. “Incredible Edible Todmorden”: Incredible Edible Todmorden is a project, aims to increase the amount of local food grown and eaten in the town, where business, schools, farmers and the community are all involved. Public flower beds are being transformed into community herb gardens and

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vegetable patches, while vegetables and fruits are springing in many places in the town. We have visited Todmorden High School which is not only the active promoter of this initiative, but still is directly involved in this project with all staff and students. We were also been told during the visit that the project has helped the school to move to better results and the work with the local community has improved a lot. The presentations and the following discussion were very helpful in clarifying the general background, the actions already taken, the planned future, but also the problems that project on sustainability might face in Todmorden and elsewhere as well.

6. “Gibson Mill”: Gibson Mill is a 19th century cotton-spinning and weaving mill that is located at the heart of Hardcastle Crags and represents a best practice of sustainable technology. The Mill has been used for several purposes during the centuries and has been brought back into the use as a facility for visitors and for the local community. This ground-breaking project has renovated the Mill as a model of sustainable development, being run with minimum impact on its environment. It is completely cut off from the National Grid and has to generate all of its own power using only solar panels and water powered turbines. The sewage water treatment is organized in the Mill in order to transform it in compost and release it in nature as compost for the trees of the forest.

2.2

CHALLENGES

(INCLUDING HOST) IN THEIR EFFORTS TO IMPLEMENT POLICIES RELATED TO THE THEME OF THE VISIT. WHAT ARE THE CHALLENGES? ARE THEY COMMON CHALLENGES? IF SO, WHY? IF NOT, WHY NOT?
FACED BY PARTICIPATING COUNTRIES

To include outdoor education into the curriculum is a challenge in each country. Some countries are a bit ahead some behind. Mostly nature science

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teachers are concerned about the topic, though it could be relevant for other teachers as well (art, language, ethics, economy, social studies). It was positive to have people from different countries and different professions in the group. We learnt that in ESD the support for creative and critical thinking is highly important instead of gaining more knowledge about `recycle and bycicle`. Through a game of designing a sustainable city, reducing its carbon use by 80% we could see how it could work in the future and that we need to rethink our current concepts of living (from school system to agriculture and mobility). Especially “Incredible Edible Todmorden” has shown us how a new approach can change not only the way we relate to nature, but the way we live. The acceptance and support of the project by the local community shows us how important practical approach are, concluding we can say that small steps are as much important as theories backing them.

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2.3

NAME

AND DESCRIBE EFFECTIVE AND INNOVATIVE SOLUTIONS YOU HAVE IDENTIFIED THAT COUNTRIES

PARTICIPATING

(BOTH

HOST

AND

CHALLENGES MENTIONED IN QUESTION

2.2. PLEASE MENTION SPECIFIC COUNTRY EXAMPLES.

PARTICIPANTS)

APPLY

TO

ADDRESS

THE

2.4

ASSESSMENT

OF THE TRANSFERABILITY OF POLICIES AND PRACTICES.

COULD

ANY EXAMPLES OF

GOOD PRACTICE PRESENTED IN THIS REPORT BE APPLIED AND TRANSFERRED TO OTHER COUNTRIES? IF SO, WHY? IF NOT, WHY NOT?

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3. Creating networks of experts, building partnerships for future projects is another important objective of the study visit programme. Please state whether and which ideas for future cooperation have evolved during meetings and discussions. Translating into the participants language a promotion video about the `cradle to cradle` economic system.

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TO SUM UP
4. What is the most interesting/useful information that the group believes should be communicated to others? To whom, do you think, this information will be of most interest?

II Organisation of the visit
This part of the report will not be published but it will be made available to the organiser and will be used by national agencies and Cedefop to monitor and improve implementation of the study visits programme. We recognise the value of ongoing feedback as a way of ensuring that the programme is at all times a responsive and dynamic initiative, meeting the needs of its various participants and target audiences. In this section you are invited to give us your feedback on several factors that, in our opinion, contribute to an effective visit.

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1. Discuss within the group and check if you agree or disagree with the following statements. Please mark only one box () that expresses most closely the opinion of the entire group. Please use Question 2 of this section to elaborate on your responses, if needed.
All agree   Most agree   Most disagree   All disagree   Not applicable  

e.g. 1.1.

1.2. 1.3.

1.4.

1.4.1. 1.4.2. 1.4.3. 1.4.4. 1.4.5. 1.4.6. 1.5.

1.6.

1.7. 1.8.

1.9.

The size of the group was good. The programme of the visit followed the description in the catalogue. There was a balance between theoretical and practical sessions. Presentations and field visits were linked in a coherent and complementary manner. The topic was presented from the perspectives of the following actors of the education and training system in the host country: government and policymakers social partners heads of institutions teachers and trainers students/trainees users of services There was enough time allocated to participants’ presentations. The background documentation on the theme provided before the visit helped to prepare for the visit. Most of the group received a programme well in advance. The information provided before the visit about transportation and accommodation was useful. The organiser

      

      

      

      

      

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All agree accompanied the group during the entire programme. The size of the group was appropriate. The group comprised a good mixture of participants with diverse professional backgrounds. There were enough opportunities for interaction with representatives of the host organisations. There was enough time allocated for discussion within the group. The Cedefop study visits website provided information that helped to prepare for the visit.

Most agree

Most disagree

All disagree

Not applicable

1.10. 1.11.

 

 

 

 

 

1.12.

1.13. 1.14.

2. If you have any comments on the items 1.1. – 1.14 above, please write them in the box below. THE CEDEFOP CATALOGUE DESCRIPTION OF THIS STUDY VISIT WAS TOO GENERAL.

III Summary
1. Having summarised all your reflections and impressions, please indicate how satisfied you are with your participation in the study visit. Indicate the number of participants for each category, e.g.

Very satisfied

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Satisfied

Somewhat satisfied

Not satisfied

Neither satisfied nor dissatisfied

2. What elements and aspects of the study visits do you think could be changed or improved? Study visits should be on school days that can be experienced during a usual day. Instead of spending all day for the able project, the trip may be combined with another visit at the same day.

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3. If there is anything else you would like to write about that is not included in the above questions, please feel free to write below or attach a separate sheet.

THANK YOU!
Please submit the report to Cedefop (studyvisits@cedefop.europa.eu) within one month of the visit.

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