Jayplay

life. and how to have one.
august 19, 2010
CHANGE OF SCENERY
“JUST CAUSE YOU GOT A STYLIST
DON’T MEAN YOU GOT STYLE”
»
CELEBRITWEETS
A WHOPPER OF A DEAL
A TWIST ON THE CLASSIC
AMERICAN HAMBURGER
»
HOW LOCAL BANDS
LIKE COWBOY INDIAN
BEAR KEEP LAWRENCE
VENUES ALIVE
TABLE OF CONTENTS
Jayplay
AUGUST 19, 2010 | volume 8, issue 1
11 kansas in heat
DATING IN DIFFERENT AREA CODES
11 how we met
RESIDENCE HALL ROMANCE
wescoe wit 5
“I’M INvINCIBLE...COpS CAN’T MESS
wITH ME.”
in the life 6
NOT juST STANDING ON THE
STREET CORNER
* COvER pHOTO By jERRy wANG
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EDITOR | kelci shipley
ASSOCIATE EDITOR | anna archibald
DESIGNERS | alexandra avila, morgan stephans
CONTACT | tali david, becca harsch, ellen sheftel
MANUAL | john hermes, brenna long, amanda kistner
NOTICE | molly martin, josh hafner, spencer altman
PLAY | amanda sorell, ashley barfouroush,
kate larrabee
HEALTH | megan rupp, jacque weber
CONTRIBUTORS | mike anderson, brittany nelson,
savannah abbott, chance carmichael,
landon mcdonald, alex tretbar, zack marsh,
thomas c. hardy
CREATIVE CONSULTANT | carol holstead
i found myself in a staredown with the
salad bar. i was standing in the hearst
tower cafeteria in midtown manhattan,
given the task of fetching lunch for my editor
at Harper’s Bazaar. only a few days into the
internship, i discovered that meal requests
were deceivingly tricky. in their simplicity,
there were often unforeseen obstacles. a
salad request could mean romaine lettuce
or mixed greens. the dressing was another
debacle. i was told balsamic. i think she
said balsamic, right? does that mean
balsamic vinegar or viniagrette? does she
want the homemade balsamic or fat free?
(mixed greens with homemade balsamic is
the correct answer.)
the story of my summer is an overwritten
cliché: midwestern girl travels to the bright
lights of new york city to pursue a dream.
when i informed friends of my internship at
a high-fashion magazine this summer, the
automatic response was, The Devil Wears
KELCI SHIPLEY
|
editor
calendar
THURS | august 19th FRI | august 20th SAT | august 21st SUN | august 22nd MON | august 23rd TUES | august 24th wED | august 25th
JunkyarD Jazz BanD
American Legion,
7 p.m., free, all ages
asHley Davis anD
CormaC De Barra
Gaslight Tavern,
7 p.m., $10
neon DanCe ParTy
The Jackpot Music
Hall, 7 p.m., $5-$7,
all ages
neon DanCe ParTy
Jackpot Music Hall,
10 p.m., $1-$5,18+
leeCHes of lore/
Horse mounTain/
meaTfloWer
Replay Lounge,
10 p.m., $3, 21+
roCk anD roll for
HoPe
The Granada,
9 p.m., $5, 18+
Bane/TraPPeD unDer
iCe/Cruel HanD/
alPHa & omega
Jackpot Music Hall,
6:30 p.m., $10-$12,
all ages
Jeffery BroussarD &
THe Creole CoWBoys
Lied Center,
7:30 p.m., free,
all ages
movie on THe Hill
Daisy Hill,
9 p.m., free, all ages
mouTH/zoogma/
eleCTriC THeory
The Bottleneck,
9 p.m.
sHaWn WarD & THe
sTraigHT sHoTs
Slow Ride
Roadhouse,
9 p.m., 21+
HammerlorD/
TrogloDyTe
Jackpot Music Hall,
10 p.m., $6-$8, 18+
CoTTon Jones/THe
Parson reD HeaDs/
kaTlyn Conroy anD
THe WilD anD Wooly
Jackpot Music Hall,
10 p.m., $8 to $10,
18+
Tommy ferrari &
THe fuTure moTor
maCHines
The Replay Lounge,
10 p.m., $2, 21+
BaCk To sCHool
ParTy WiTH sellouT!
The Granada, 10 p.m.,
$7, 18+
CHeCkereD BeaT
Jackpot Music Hall,
10 p.m., $4, 21+
Jeff DunHam
Sprint Center, 8 p.m.,
$40.50, all ages
emu THeaTre’s Ten
minuTe fesTival
Lawrence Arts
Center, 8 p.m., $6, all
ages
smaCkDoWn!
The Bottleneck, 7:30
p.m., free-$5, 18+
loWer Dens
Jackpot Music Hall,
9 p.m., all ages
sTiTCH n’ BiTCH
TBD, 3 p.m., all ages
Dollar BoWling
Royal Crest Bowling
Lanes, 9 p.m., $1, all
ages
larkin grimm
The Replay Lounge,
10 p.m., $2, 21+
karaoke
The Jazzhaus,
10 p.m., $1, 21+
lonnie ray oPen
Jam
Slow Ride
Roadhouse, 6 p.m.
Blues TuesDay WiTH
Bryan neuBerry
Gaslight Tavern,
7 p.m., free, 18+
TuesDay niTe sWing
Kansas Union,
8 p.m., free, all ages
CHoColaTe BroWn
THunDer
The Granada, 9 p.m.,
free, all ages
THe ProDuCers
Starlight Theatre,
8 p.m., $10-$45, all
ages
Billy sPears anD THe
Beer Bellies
Johnny’s Tavern,
6 p.m., free, 21+
Drag THe river/
Cory Branan/Ben
summers
The Replay Lounge,
6 p.m., $5, all ages
THe ameriCana
musiC aCaDemy Jam
Signs of Life,
7:30 p.m., free, all
ages
BreT miCHaels
Uptown Theater,
Kansas City, 8 p.m.,
$35
THe fruiT BaTs/
naTHaniel raTeliff/
HosPiTal sHiPs
Jackpot Music Hall,
9 p.m., $10-$12, 18+
Tyler gregory anD
THe BooTleg BanDiTs
The Granada, 9 p.m.,
$3, 18+
3
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THE BOTTLENECK
737 new hampshire st.
THE JACKPOT MUSIC HALL
943 massachusetts st.
THE JAzzHAUS
926 1/2 massachusetts
st.
THE REPLAY LOUNGE
946 massachusetts st.
THE EIGHTH ST. TAPROOM
801 new hampshire st.
LAwRENCE ARTS CENTER
940 new hampshire st.
THE GRANADA
1020 massachusetts
st.
THE POOL ROOM
925 iowa st.
wILDE’S CHATEAU 24
2412 iowa st.
DUFFY’S
2222 w. 6th st.
CONROY’S PUB
3115 w. 6th st., ste. d
THE BOTTLENECK
737 new hampshire st.
folloW JayPlay on TWiTTer
twitter.com/Jayplaymagazine
BeCome a fan of THe ‘WesCoe
WiT’ faCeBook Page and your
contributions could be published!
JAYPLAY
(785) 864-4810
The University Daily Kansan
111 Stauffer-Flint Hall
1435 Jayhawk Blvd.
Lawrence, KS 66045
Prada. and in a way it was — chic editors
at their desks, model castings in the
conference rooms and a fashion closet
bursting with louboutin heels and burberry
trenches. not everything was glamorous,
of course. opening mail certainly wasn’t
exhilarating — save for when advanced
episodes of entourage were delivered —
but working on a consumer magazine gave
me confidence in my career choice, and
furthered my drive to return.
some people loathe the city, while
others adore it. my admiration began
immediately. my 11 weeks went by too
fast, blurring together improv shows,
magnolia bakery cupcakes and notable
spontaneous happenings. the city is
a place that gets under your skin. it’s
where you drink pitchers of sangria on the
hudson river, where movies are filmed on
your block, and where a small town girl
can find an atomosphere to match her
independence and free spirit.
my associate editor anna and i were
partners in crime this summer — her at
good Housekeeping and me at Bazaar.
we hope to bring our new york magazine
experience to Jayplay this semester,
giving big city quality with the small town
lawrence appeal so dear to the students
of our university. enjoy the issue!
Jayplay Associate Editor Anna Archibald (left) &
Editor Kelci Shipley at Te Back Fence in New York.
Monday, August 23th
7:00 pm
Studio 242
Robinson Center
NO SOLO MATERIAL REQUIRED
Please warmup prior to audition
Bring character shows and pointe shoes if you have them
FOR FURTHER INFORMATION
785-864-4264
AU D I T I O N
UNIVERSITY DANCE COMPANY
ON
PANY
What show is this?
Have you ever heard of Keeping Up with the Kardashians?
That’s them? I thought they were supposed to be beautiful.
GIRL 1 :
GUY 1 :
GIRL 2 :
GIRL 1 :
Who’s she on the phone with?

Her mom.

Yeah, respect.

Penis!
NOTICE
wescoe wIt
> Lol.
GIRL 1 :
GIRL 2 :
GIRL 1 :
So after we left the restaurant
he walked fve feet in front of me.
What? Did he even open the door for you?
No. He said that I walk slow and why would you walk
slow when you have somewhere to go.
GIRL :
GUY :
I think it’d be weird to fake graduate.
You’re already fake anyways so why
does it matter?
GIRL 1 :
GIRL 1 :
GIRL 2 :
I’m not going to eat pork anymore.
Why?
I don’t know. I just like pigs so much.
GUY :
GUY :
GIRL :
GIRL : When you’re 22 you think,
“I’m invincible, cops can’t
mess with me.” But I was
wrong.
| MOLLY MARTIN |
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ceLebRItweets // KANYE WEST (@KANYEWEST)
| TAKEN FROM TWITTER.COM BY MOLLY MARTIN |
I will be a better man, friend, role model, citizen, blogger, tweeter, artist, creator,
giver, thinker, motivator and person. IFEELTHEGLOW
10:07 AM Aug 5th
Here’s a weird concept ... when I’m at home..... I use my home phone!!!
3:09 PM Aug 6th
Some days I’m feeling super positive ... some days I’m feeling super stunty .. but
I’m always feeling it!!! BAM!!! #BESTTWEETOFALLTIME!!!
3:39 PM Aug 7th
I might bless the city today with an all white suit ... why not
11:27 AM Aug 8th
Just cause you got a stylist don’t mean you got style #BETTERTWEETOFALLTIME!!!
11:37 AM Aug 9th
She asked me why I’m so dressed up?... I told her, “cause I’m not headed to the
gym right now.”
7:24 PM Aug 9th
when people are in jeans ... I got leather pants... shirt optional... chain heavy
10:20 PM Aug 10th
Rapper and record producer
Have you overheard any Wescoe witticisms?
Become a fan on Facebook and your post could
be published in Jayplay!
GIRL 1 : This morning I did pull-ups on a tree
branch with a hobo watching me.
Why couldn’t you do
push-ups on the ground?
GIRL 2 :
GIRL 1 :
GIRL 2 :
I’m going to get my notebook from
the house. Do you need anything?
Will you get the oil changed in my car?
GIRL 1 :
GIRL 2 :
It’s the way we make our money for rent.
What are you doing? Selling yourself?
GIRL 1 :
GIRL 2 :
So what is Glee? Is it a competition?
No, it’s reality.
9th
6th
C
re
stlin
e
D
r.
K
a
so
ld
D
r.
15th
y
a
W
y
e r
e t
n
o
M
University of Kansas
YOUR GO-TO GAMEDAY STORE
2 CONVENIENT LOCATIONS
905 Iowa St.
(785) 832-1860
(785) 842-1473
4000 W 6th St.
BACK TO
SCHOOL
BASICS
BUD LITE 30 PACKS
$
17.88
NATURAL LITE 30 PACKS
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MANUAL
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6
in the life of ... // a CONSTRUCTION WORKER
> Living vicariously through others is okay with us.
This summer’s dangerous heat waves can’t
stop Aaron Brooks. Brooks and his asphalt-
laying crew from Sunfower Paving Inc., 1457
E. 1832 Rd., wake up before the sun to smooth
out cracks, gaps and pesky pot holes. “We
try to beat the heat, but I think the heat is still
beating us,” Brooks says. Though this isn’t
the frst scorching summer Brooks has dealt
with in his 23 years of construction work, the
demands on his crew keep piling up. Starting at
4:30 a.m. helps lessen the burn, but cramming
14 to 16 hours of work in a day leads to a lot of
time in the open sun.
In the early morning, Brooks’ crew of six
men shovel asphalt out of the truck, leveling
the 220 to 260 degrees Fahrenheit mixture
on to the pavement of the Memorial Stadium
parking lot. Jeans, safety glasses and neon-
yellow shirts keep the workers safe from
second or third degree burns. After the crew
has the asphalt raked and fattened, they toss
their tools in the back of their truck and zoom
off to the next roadway imperfection. “People
just expect the work to be done, but don’t think
about how it gets done,” Brooks says.
Brooks says his crew does tons of asphalt
laying around campus. By tons, Brooks means
literally scooping around 12,000 to 15,000 tons of
asphalt a day. This high capacity has changed
over the years. Loaders were just being invented
in 1988 when Brooks started, so the workers
did all the heaving themselves, which meant
only laying 200 to 300 tons of asphalt a day.
More technology means more asphalt hits the
ground at more locations. For Brooks and crew,
tackling speed bumps on Jayhawk Boulevard or
31st Street is just another hot day on the job.
| BRENNA LONG |
get some culture // aRT ZYDECO aT THE

LIED CENTER
> It’s not all about fast food and beer pong.
The rhythmic sounds of Louisiana come to
Lawrence with Jeffery Broussard & the Creole
Cowboys. The group performs this Friday night
at the Lied Center, 1600 Stewart Dr., as part of a
free indoor concert and local arts festival that
kicks off the 2010-2011 season.
The concert has turned into a tradition,
running parallel with the academic school year
says Karen Christilles, associate director of
the Lied Center. “We wanted to thank all of the
people who have supported the Lied Center,”
Christilles says. “The free concert and festival
is a way for us to do that.”
Though the Lied Center hosts many priced
ticket events throughout the season, this
concert and arts festival is free.
Broussard and his band will play their own
brand of contemporary Zydeco music, a genre
that evolved from American roots and creole
music in the bayous of Louisiana. Broussard, a
Louisiana native and skilled accordion player, is
the son of famed musician Delton Broussard, a
member of the infuential Zydeco band Lawtell
Playboys.
Along with the band’s washboard grooves
| JOHN HERMES |
and accordion twang, the Lied Center is
simultaneously hosting a family arts festival
that includes more than 20 local arts and
community organizations. The festival also
features prize giveaways, crafts and activities
to help students start off the new semester.
The festival begins at 6 p.m. with the
concert kicking off at 7 p.m. Tickets can be
picked up at the Lied Center Ticket Offce or
reserved by phone at (785) 864-2787.
Contributed photo
Southern comfort: Te Lied Center brings Jefery Broussard &
the Creole Cowboys this Friday for a free indoor concert.
All in a hard day’s work: Aaron Brooks and his construction
crew spend many hot days repairing streets by mixing asphalt.
photo by | Brenna Long
recording, people are simply less focused
on live performances. playing today see in
audiences nationwide.
The DIY attitude that allowed The Get Up
Kids to successfully pick up and move its show
to a nearby house was something that the
venues themselves couldn’t offer musicians
in Lawrence. It was rooted in a communal
determination of the fans and the bands to simply
play music no matter how it had to happen.
However, even back then, the community
in Lawrence wasn’t always so enthusiastic.
Pope says when his band started out there
was an unwelcome sense of competition.
This conficted with the view of Lawrence as
a near idyllic place for musicians. It wasn’t
until The Get Up Kids forged a tight-knit
community with bands like The Appleseed
Cast and The Anniversary that things began to
turn around.
STRENGTH IN NUMBERS
Cowboy Indian Bear is one of the more
prominent acts in Lawrence today. The band
has been written about in local publications
like The Pitch and INK magazine and in the past
peaks and Valleys
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// TAYLOR BROWN
Living legend: Te Bottleneck, a music venue rooted in local band history
beginning in the 1980s, has given Lawrence artists an outlet to lanch their rock
star aspirations. Bands like Te Get Up Kids, Smashing Pumpkins and the Foo
Fighters have all graced its stage.
Lawrence earn its reputation as a prime city
for musicians. The group, which has done
extensive national and international touring,
helped inspire an entire subset of American
music. Often described as spanning the genres
of indie, emo and alternative rock, The Get Up
Kids are well acquainted with all that Lawrence
has offered musicians over the years and the
cycle its communities and venues fall into.
The band’s drummer, Ryan Pope, currently
lives in Lawrence but grew up in nearby Olathe.
Before The Get Up Kids, Pope was just another
music lover who would often make the pilgrimage
to Mass Street to go record shopping. Lawrence
represented a musical hotbed, and even as
a teenager he grabbed the city by its horns.
In fact, one of Pope’s earliest performances
was at The Bottleneck’s open mic night as a
13-year-old.
For The Get Up Kids and many other
budding bands, Lawrence was a source of
inspiration. For music lovers rooted in small
towns, Lawrence’s frst gift came in the form
of nationally touring acts passing through.
Lawrence let devoted fans see acts they
wouldn’t have seen otherwise. This feeling went
FEATURE
The ups and downs of The Lawrence music scene
full circle for The Get Up Kids in the 1990s when
they became the band locals were lucky to see.
Brett Mossiman has owned The Bottleneck
for the past 25 years. He was around when
the band began to hit its stride and became a
national force. “They prospered from being
around at a time when word spread quick,”
Mossiman says. “They became very big, very
quickly. In the scheme of things they might be
the largest band to come out of Lawrence.”
In 1992 when The Get Up Kids returned to
Lawrence on a national tour, The Replay Lounge
allowed the band to capitalize on their popularity
with an all ages show. Pope remembers
being slated to play and having the show get
called off right as they were about to go on.
Not wanting to forgo the appearance,
the band moved the concert to a house
three blocks away and the show went on.
Today, a local band can seldom create a
draw big enough to sell out The Bottleneck. The
shift has been hard on the local music scene.
In part, this is due to a trend that many bands
playing today see in audiences nationwide.
It seems, thanks to advents in technology like
Facebook, Myspace and the ease of home
| JAKE LERMAN |
PHOTOS BY | MIKE GUNNOE
The walls and doorways of downtown
Lawrence have known the taste of countless
fiers. The neon papers jockey for attention with
loud fonts begging passersby to take notice.
But behind the miles of sticky tape lies
more than mere brick and mortar. These walls
have held up the ambitions of generations of
musicians hoping to one day trade their fiers
for billboards and maybe even fame. Some have
prospered and are still remembered. Others are
long forgotten.
This cycle continues today. Old names have
been exchanged for new and the music keeps
fowing steadily out the doors on Mass Street.
Lawrence is still the most essential music town
between Denver and Chicago, but it isn’t as easy
as it once was for local bands to make it here.
The economic downturn has made audiences
less eager to pay for tickets to see local
bands, and has left some venues struggling.
Social media sites like Myspace, Youtube
and Facebook have made the need for self-
promotion even greater. Musicians without
the know-how or want to promote themselves
online to drive audiences to local clubs have
found it increasingly harder to get bookings.
What Lawrence still has, of course, are
multiple venues, several talent buyers and
eager performers forging a fertile music
community. Discussions with band members
and others highlight some of the challenges
Lawrence has offered over the years.
A MUSICAL HOTBED
It is bands like The Get Up Kids that helped
members take pride in the fact that what
they value most is putting on a good show.
By urging musicians to support each other,
members of Cowboy Indian Bear hope to inspire
a new community like the one they remember
growing up with. “We try to step up creatively
and be recognized as the suc cessors of what
we grew up seeing. We want to be counted
among that,” Hillard says.
A NEW ERA
Formed from the ashes of a previous group,
OhOk is a trio best described as toiling in funk
rock. Consisting of guitarist Ross Stewart,
bassist Peter Longofono and drummer Cameron
Pestinger, the relatively new group is no
stranger to playing gigs in Lawrence. However,
since adopting a new name and honing their
style they’ve been forced to start from scratch.
“We did a lot of beneft shows for a while.
And a lot of them had a really bad turn out. At
one of them we were playing for kids,” Stewart
says. “We’re a rock band, we’re not an easy-
listening soft pop group. To play gigs like that
and have people come out and say ‘Could you
turn the volume down a little bit?’ is diffcult.”
Members have spent years developing their
craft and musicianship, but have also found their
efforts less than rewarded. Though Longofono
is a former student of the KU Jazz department,
he’s found that knowledge less valuable than
he hoped in terms of building an audience.
OhOk has found diffculties drawing big
audiences because the band’s style is different
from the modern indie rock mold that has
pervaded the scene here and elsewhere.
The group also has an aversion toward what
it considers shameless over promotion and
unlike some bands, does not want to go so far
as to extend individual invitations to people
before every gig to get them to come out.
“I fnd it harder to be successful in a niche
style that isn’t popular. I don’t want to play
gigs [if] I have to change stylistically. It’s
all in the statement,” Stewart says. What
would that statement be? “Probably sex and
disappointment. You have the pure enjoyment
of playing but the disappointment of small
turnouts,” he says.
Mossiman knows better than most how the
changes in technology have affected Lawrence.
“This last fve-to-10 years has been really
hard for local bands to fnd strong fan bases.
Sometimes people spend their energy putting
up websites, which can’t be as gratifying of an
experience as being on stage with a bunch of
girls singing their songs.”
For OhOk that’s been exactly the case.
“Every time I try to set up a Myspace, it sucks.
I don’t want to set up a Myspace. I want to play
guitar!” Stewart says.
OhOk members, much like The Get Up Kids
and Cowboy Indian Bear, remember a time
when audiences were more engaged with live
music, when the only way to get your fx was to
actually leave your computer and go to a show.
Mossiman is optimistic that Lawrence will
continue to value and support aspiring and
accomplished musicians. “The live concert
can never go away,” he says. “There are those
magic nights when 800 people are sweating at
Liberty Hall and you’re talking about it in class
the next day.”


year has played with nationally known acts like
Peter Bjorn and John, Republic of Tigers and
The Appleseed Cast, as well as performing at
Austin’s South By Southwest Music festival.
It was Lawrence’s fabled music scene that
drew the band members of Cowboy Indian Bear
here from their hometown of Topeka in August
2007. “Knowing that Lawrence had the history
in place and regularly touring musicians and
acts coming through, we recognized it as a hub
for all of that,” says band member Marty Hillard.
But the band expected the music community
to be more embracing and less competitive
than what they found when they arrived, says
guitarist CJ Calhoun. As a result, the group
members kept an eye out for artists who
refected their passion for music and who saw
the same faws in the community. The Noise
FM was one of those bands.
Though musically and stylistically
different, the two bands formed a kinship.
What began as a “band friendship” soon
turned to a frmer relationship that may have
been the key to the success of both groups.

The two know if they share the marquee,
it’s easier to get people in the door. However,
the bands also recognize that the number
and nature of Lawrence’s music clubs and
operators provide the springboard for most
successful bands. Over the last two decades,
Lawrence has had four-to-six national buyers
bringing in hot acts and nearly a dozen live
music clubs in an eight-block strip of downtown
playing local and national bands.
“The venues are great,” Hillard says.
“You have to pay to play even in St. Louis, a
community that’s four to fve hours away. You
get presale, and you have to sell your amount
of tickets or you don’t make any money on the
show.” But for many local bands, flling venues
is still a problem, even on a national level. “A
lot went away as the Internet become more
impactful for bands,” Hillard says. “We hit
Lawrence at a time when all the stuff we grew
up seeing here in town was really waning.”
Although Cowboy Indian Bear takes
advantage of social media, which is almost
a prerequisite for any band with the hopes
of getting its name out nationally, the
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Writing on the wall: Fliers advertising appearances of local bands are a staple decoration in downtown Lawrence music venues.
Places like Te Bottleneck, Granada and Jackpot Music Hall have all helped up-and-coming bands make it big.
FEATURE
Jp
— ROSS STEWART
guitarist of ohok
I don’t want to
set up a myspace.
I want to play
guItar!
CONTACT
catch of the week // MIKE KOMOSA how we met // HAnnAH RutzIcK & KEvIn KItSIS
kansas in heat // GOInG tHE DIStAncE
> Our weekly peek at a fsh in the KU sea.
nicknames: I’ve been called various
names but the most common one besides
my last name is McLovin’.
interests & hobbies: In my busy time I
work. However, in my free time I watch mov-
ies, play competitive things and hang out
with my family and friends.
favorite quote: “It only takes a second
when you wait until the last one.”
notices first in a potential
partner: If they’re real or fake.
turn ons: Must be fun and smart.
turn offs: Nothing turns me off more than
blind judgment.
why i’m a catch: I’m the most interest-
ing person I know.
favorite music: Floyd, Zeppelin, Ray
Charles, Beatles, Radiohead, Rage and
Trina.

HOMETOWN: Overland Park, Kan.
MAJOR: Community health
YEAR: Senior
INTERESTED IN: Women
| BeCCA HARsCH | | TALI DAvID |
Growing up a few miles from each other,
Hannah Rutzick and Kevin Kitsis didn’t know
one another existed. They went to preschool
together and her sister had play dates with his
brother, but they never met.
When they arrived at KU, Rutzick, Plymouth,
Minn., sophomore, and Kitsis, Golden valley,
Minn., sophomore, both lived at Naismith Hall.
They had the usual “firty freshman” thing going
on, but it didn’t go much farther. However, that
fall her sorority and his fraternity had a function
together and the sparks began to fy. Kitsis went
after Rutzick, and they began talking.
At home for winter break, Kitsis took Rutzick
on a date. “He didn’t tell me where we were go-
ing,” Rutzick says. “We got ice cream and then
he took me to a park, where we looked at the
stars through his sunroof. I love surprises, so I
thought it was really cute and special.” Rutzick
says they rarely have bad dates because they
have fun together no matter what they do.
Back at school, the couple enjoys concerts
at the Granada, hanging out with friends or
watching Tv together. Friends say they are a
great pair who are lucky to be close at home
and school.
q. This is the frst time I will start the year
with a boyfriend–a guy I met on summer
vacation in Florida. How can I make a long
distance relationship work?
-Tiffany
Mike Anderson, Dellwood, Minn. graduate stu-
dent, is the host of Kansas in Heat, a talk show
about sex and relationships that airs Thursdays at
7 p.m. on KJHK, 90.7fm and at kjhk.org.
THe OPINIONs OF THIs COLUMNIsT DO NOT NeCes-
sARILY ReFLeCT THe vIeWs OF JAYPLAY. KANsAs IN
HeAT Is NOT TO Be CONsIDeReD As A sUBsTITUTe
FOR PROFessIONAL HeLP.
a. Long distance relationship — three
words that I hear frequently. The prob-
lem you face, Tiffany, is all too common.
Research and millions of young college
students have attempted to answer your
question. My answer is similar to what
those results have found — don’t try. I rec-
ommend breaking up the relationship un-
less he is willing to move to Lawrence, and
even that is not the greatest situation.
sure, there are a lot of techniques and
strategies I could suggest to make a long
distance relationship work. There are en-
tire websites devoted to that kind of ad-
vice. I recommend that you avoid those
websites and let this guy know the fol-
lowing: Long distance relationships rarely
work for college students — if ever. But
that isn’t necessarily a bad thing. In my
opinion college students don’t need the
stress of a long distance relationship. In-
stead, I recommend exploring other dating
options in your zip code. Now is the time to
date many people and immerse yourself in
different dating relationships. Through this
you will gain dating experience, and learn
more about yourself. This will help you bet-
ter understand what you are looking for in
a partner and in a relationship.
A lot of relationships fail when we’re
younger because we don’t know what we
want. We fnd that out four years later when
we’re in a dead-end relationship. That be-
ing said, I also am not 100% convinced that
long distance relationships that evolved
from a vacation will work out. studies back
me up on this one.
The emotion and positivity we experi-
ence from the vacation is placed on the
people we meet. Therefore, we are more
likely to look at potential suitors on vaca-
tion through rose colored glasses. We tend
to overlook the faults and focus only on the
positives. eventually, however, the spell
wears off. And soon you will put too much
pressure on the relationship to succeed.
I’m not saying what you have isn’t real, or
that it isn’t the perfect ft for you. I just think
the odds, research and cosmic ethers are
all against you on this one. Put all that en-
ergy you were willing to spend on a long
distance relationship, and put it into dating
a variety of individuals in closer proximity
to you. What you learn about yourself and
what you want in a relationship will make
this decision well worth it.
| MIKe ANDeRsON |
Do you have a question for Kansas in Heat?
Send it in to kansasinheat@yahoo.com or check
out the Kansas in Heat Facebook page.
Contributed photo
Te girl next door: Hannah Rutzick and Kevin Kitsis were
neighbors growing up, but kindled their romance in Nai-
smith Residence Hall during their freshman year.
> All great relationships had to start somewhere.
> Tackle the sticky world of relationships.
11
08
19
10
Forget the dollar menu

trY a new spin on the classic beeF pattY
GOURMET BURGERS
PLAY
13
08
19
10
| Beth BeAvers |
best burgers
Codi Bates, co-owner of The Burger Stand, says the Black & Blue burger is the
most popular burger on the menu. The Black & Blue Burger is made with a black-
ening spice, maytag blue cheese and granny smith apple chutney. Pair it with
some truffe fries for the ultimate Burger Stand feast.
Sean Gerrity, owner of Henry T’s, says the most popular style of burger is the
Pepper Jack & Bacon Style. This style comes with pepperjack cheese & smoked
bacon and a side of Henry T’s jalapeño mayonnaise.

Pachamama’s, 800 New Hampshire, serves various versions of the Star Bar
Burger, a delicious, thick steak burger. Get it with emmentaler cheese, apple
wood smoked bacon and portabella mushrooms for a unique but familiar taste.
Michael Bednar sinks his teeth into a thick,
all-beef patty covered with smoked bacon
and cooked to a perfect medium, still a little
pink in the center. the burger is smothered in
a creamy, almost sweet gouda cheese and a
homemade chipotle-cocoa ketchup.
Bednar, Kansas City, Mo. junior, waited in a
continuously growing line for at least 15 minutes
for the burger. But this burger is special—and
worth the wait — because it’s a smoke burger
prepared at the Burger stand, a small kitchen
that operated out of the back of Dempsey’s
Irish Pub, 623 vermont st., before relocating to
the Casbah, 803 Mass st., this summer. “I like
how they take the burger, which is an American
institution, and add unique ingredients,” Bednar
says.
the owners
of the Burger
stand know
everyone likes
burgers, and
opened the
restaurant to add
their own spin to
a classic. “the
burger is a good conveyer for any favor,” Codi
Bates, co-owner of the Burger stand, says.
“Burgers are familiar, but just adding different
ingredients changes it.”
Part of what makes the Burger stand
unique is co-owners simon Bates and robert
Krause’s experience with fne dining. While
creating new menu items, they draw inspiration
from around the world, from
Latin America to Ireland.
“simon is always coming up
with new favors,” Codi Bates
says. “It’s like fne dining, but
much simpler and special.”
she says the burgers
are special because of the
superior quality of the meat.
the owners also buy and use
local produce and products
when they can. their buns
come from Wheatfelds
Bakery, 904 vermont st., or
Farm to Market, a bakery
based in Kansas City. the
Do you want fries with that? Don’t settle for the
standard quarter pounder from a local fast food
joint. Try options like the falafel burger at the
Burger Stand or Pepper Jack & Bacon at Henry
T’s. Both venues ofter tasy and diverse burgers to
choose from.
photo illustration | Sarah Hockel
It’s lIke fIne dInIng,
but much sImpler
and specIal.
— CoDI BAtes
Co-owNer of THe BurGer STaNd
micro greens are
grown locally and, if
a customer requests
a tomato, it probably
came from the
personal garden of one of the chefs.
however, the Burger stand isn’t the only
place specializing in gourmet burgers. henry
t’s, 3520 W. 6th st., gives their customers the
option to take a basic, half- pound or three
quarter-pound ground sirloin burger and jazz
it up with eight different styles, says owner
sean Gerrity. options include burgers dipped
in buffalo sauce, basted in barbecue sauce,
or sprinkled with Cajun spices. there is even a
“Burgundy style,” which is covered with onions
and mushrooms that have been sautéed in steak
sauce and Burgundy wine. henry t’s expanded
the burger options eight years ago because of
customer demand. even vegetarians can enjoy
the unique styles offered, Gerrity says. henry
t’s serves a black bean burger and a garden
burger.
At the Burger stand, vegetarian options
like the falafel burger and romesco lentil
burger are always big sellers, Bays says. “We
like to have different options for people who
don’t want red meat,” she says. “they crave
the burger, but not the meat.”
true to form, these burgers also come with
a twist. the falafel burger is served with a
cool tzatziki sauce, red onions and pickled
caulifower while the lentil burger is served with
feta cheese, marcona almonds, green beans
and a roasted red pepper sauce. Jp
REVIEW
Animal Collective’s latest project, ODD-
SAC, is an intensely psychedelic visual album
that spans the various sounds the group has
played around with over the years. It’s not ex-
actly what you would expect after listening to
2009’s blissful Merriweather Post Pavillion.
The ever-shifting and mood-altering tunes
match the visuals perfectly. There are highly
disturbing images, like a vampiric fgure foat-
ing in a canoe that creeps up on children mak-
ing s’mores, a woman peeling back yellow
wallpaper as oil spills from behind it, a knight
hand-washing brains on a riverbank and a
crazed fsh-like man playing autoharp in front
of swirling, spinning fames. But the scary im-
ages are paired with humorous, euphoric and
childish scenes. If you’re a fan of AC’s earlier,
more abrasive albums like Here Comes The
Indian, you’ll enjoy the avant-garde sound-
scapes and disorienting imagery.
The music is a strange blend of droning
tribal-pop with plenty of acoustic and elec-
tronic instrumentation. There are individual
tracks, but it’s often hard to tell when one
ends and the next begins. One minute you’ll
hear brain-frying, looped computer noise
while staring at melting, visualized sound-
waves, and then you’ll see an anonymous
long-haired albino grunge freak setting up a
drum kit on a sea of rocks in a gorgeous Pacifc
Northwest landscape.
The songs are entrancing to say the least,
and recall the repetitive, noisy pop of Feels and
Strawberry Jam, along with the acoustic/elec-
tronic clashing dissonance of Spirit They’re
Gone..., Danse Manatee and Sung Tongs.
ODDSAC is a breath of fresh air, and it’s en-
couraging to see a band step out of its realm
and experiment with a seemingly forgotten art-
form.
| AlEx TRETBAR |
15
music review //
Ceephax Acid Crew’s latest album is a
collection of ridiculously danceable acid
house music that is way more developed
than much of the heavy-thumping and re-
petitive electronic music today. Ceephax,
as he is sometimes known, is actually Andy
> KJHK’s weekly guide to
sonic consumption.
CEEPHAX ACID CREW — ‘UNITED
ACID EMIRATES’ (PLANET Mµ)
movie review //
Contrary to
popular belief,
this flm is not
just another
Michael Cera
vehicle. Fans
of the graphic
novel series
might think it
impossible to
adapt the book
into a movie.
However, Scott
Pilgrim Vs. The
World has no qualms admitting its comic book
roots. The flm is a living breathing doodle on
the back of some guy’s notebook in your English
class.
However, Edgar Wright, the director of new
cult classics Shaun of the Dead and Hot Fuzz, is
the true doodler. In this walking, talking graphic
> Hollywood hits, indie ficks and everything in between.
| CHANCE CARMICHAEl |
SCOTT PILGRIM VS. THE WORLD
Jenkinson, the younger brother of the famous
electronic musician Squarepusher. One thing
that will have electro junkies drooling over
this album is the fact that Ceephax relies
very little on the use of computers to make
his music. The artist generally prefers to use
vintage synthesizers like the Roland TB-303,
recording straight to casette, which gives this
album its very distinct, heady acid vibe. Some
of the standout tracks off of this electro-gem
include the opener “Cedric’s Sonnet,” which
could get any dance foor poppin’, and “Sid-
ney’s Sizzler,” which sounds like it could be
a great breakbeat Aphex Twin track, but is
defnitely soaked in Ceephax’s sultry, drippy,
acid fun. Although fall is looming, give this
electronic fun-in-a-box a spin or two before
your summer grinds to a halt.
music review //
ANIMAL COLLECTIVE –– ‘ODDSAC’
(FATCAT RECORDS)
> KJHK’s weekly guide to sonic consumption.
The best burger in lawrence might also be
lawrence’s most unusual burger.
The Burger Stand at The Casbah, 803 Mass
St., and formerly located in Dempsey’s, is
known for its many burger variations. Ditching
the usual lettuce/tomato/onion toppings, The
Burger Stand hosts a menu laden with gour-
met options, such as the Fire burger, topped
with fresh avocado and habanera-cactus jam,
or the Smoke, with Applewood smoked bacon,
Gouda cheese and chipolte-cocoa ketchup.
The burgers are tasty — a refreshing new
take on America’s favorite way to serve beef.
But the thing that truly makes any burger joint
is the fries. And this is where The Burger Stand
shines.
Though I wasn’t able to sample all the va-
rieties of fries, the two I did
try were delicious — the kind
of delicious that makes you
wish you had more stomach
space to stuff. The truffe
fries are sprinkled with par-
mesan cheese and favored
with truffe oil, a deadly com-
bination that gives their favor
a kick followed by a smooth,
satisfying, complicated fn-
ish. The sweet potato fries
rival them—crunchy with a
| THOMAS C. HARDY |
restaurant review //
THE BURGER STAND
> The taste of the town, one meal at a time.
cinnamon-y favor, perfect with ketchup.
Ranging from $7 to $9, the burgers are
perhaps the priciest in town, but certainly
nothing to complain about, given the atten-
tion spent on each one. A side of fries runs
$1 to $4, with the truffe and sweet potatoes
at a reasonable $2. There isn’t much to offer
a sweet-tooth, and the options for sides are
minimal. But between the hefty burgers and
the delectable fries, who needs ‘em?
With a full bar and industrial-infuenced
décor, there is a hip atmosphere, making it
a good date location (if you don’t mind get-
ting a little down-and-dirty with some greasy
food) and the service is superior, too.
novel, Scott Pilgrim (Michael Cera) falls for
mysterious, pink-haired Ramona Flowers
(Elizabeth Mary Winstead). But before they
can happily date, Scott must fght her sev-
en evil exes who vow that if Gideon (Jason
Schwartzman), Ramona’s most recent ex,
can’t have her, no one can. Videogame and
pop culture references are abundant in this
flm, but the realistic romance proves that it
also has a real heart at its center.
The flm is as delightfully funny as it is
visually striking. Michael Cera steps out of
the awkwardly shy teen character he has
been perpetually playing since Arrested
Development. If you can’t decide between
reading a comic book, playing videogames
or watching a movie, do it all in one with
Scott Pilgrim Vs. The World.
08
19
10
| zACk MARSH |
·

$3 Pi tchers $8 Fi sh Bowl s
$2 UV Bombs
$2 Bot t l es & Wel l s $3 Bi g Beers &
$3 Vodka Energy
$3 Bi g Beers
& 30¢ Wi ngs
$2 Any Bot t l e $5 Pi tchers &
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$2. 50 UV Bombs
$2 ULLR Shots
$1 House Shot s
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Marys
$3 Ameri can Draws $5 Wi nes
by t he gl ass
$2 Off
Si gnat ure Cockt ai l s
$3. 75 Boul evard
Unf i l tered Wheat
Feat ured
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Hal f Pri ce
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