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Jayplay

life. and how to have one.
February 4, 2010
a novel idea
From paper to screen, your Favorite
book gets a digital makeover
scary movie
‘carnival oF souls’ haunts
on location in lawrence
»
»
A look inside Yo La Tengo’s
performance at The Granada
TENGO
TAKES TWO TO
2
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TABLE OF CONTENTS
February 4th, 2010 // volume 7, issue 19 * Cover photo by Chance Dibben
KANSAS IN HEAT 10
Can’t get no satisfaction?
SPEAK 15
Writer Anna Sobering’s
battle against food allergies
IN THE LIFE 4
A drinker’s dream job
WESCOE WIT 6
‘It’s our code for when
we want to have sex’
Jayplay
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CALENDAR
3
thursday, feb. 4th friday, feb. 5th saturday, feb. 6th sunday, feb. 7th monday, feb. 8th tuesday, feb. 9th
THEOLOGY ON TAP
Henry’s on Eighth,
5:30 p.m., free, all ages
POKER PUB
Conroy’s Pub,
6 p.m. & 9 p.m., free,
all ages
TITLE FIGHT/ RUNAWAY SONS/
CAN’T STOP
The Jackpot Music Hall,
6:30 p.m., $8, all ages
THE JUNKYARD JAZZ BAND
American Legion, 7 p.m.,
free, all ages
PANEL DISCUSSION
WITH GEORGE FOREMAN
The Kansas Union, 7 p.m.,
free, all ages
“LIVING SHAKESPEARE”
The Hall Center for the
Humanities, 7:30 p.m., free,
all ages
TRIVIA AT ZIG & MAC’S
Zig & Mac’s, 9 p.m., $10,
all ages
FLOYD THE BARBER
Pachamama’s, 9:30 p.m.,
free, all ages
INTERNATIONAL ESPIONAGE/
MAGIC CYCLOPS
The Replay Lounge,
10 p.m., $2, 21+
GORILLA PRODUCTIONS
BATTLE OF THE BANDS
The Granada, 7 p.m.,
$8-$10, all ages
PILOBOLUS DANCE THEATER
The Lied Center, 7:30 p.m.,
$15, all ages
JUS’ MARLEY
Liberty Hall, 8:30 p.m.,
$12-$15, all ages
LATINO NIGHTS FRIDAYS
WITH DJ LUIS
Cielito Lindo, 9 p.m., $3-$5,
18+
DJ NICK REDDELL
Abe & Jake’s Landing,
9 p.m., 18+
MAMMOTH LIFE/ TALKING
MOUNTAIN/ BEAR COUNTRY/
TRANSMITTENS
The Jackpot Music Hall,
10 p.m., $5, 18+
HYBRID MOMENTSSS
WITH IGGY BABY
The Eighth Street Tap
Room, 10 p.m., $3, 21+
HERMIT THRUSHES/
BOO AND BOO TOO
The Replay Lounge,
10 p.m., $3, 21+
MEN’S BASKETBALL:
KANSAS VS. NEBRASKA
Allen Fieldhouse, 5 p.m.,
all ages
BOB MARLEY BIRTHDAY
CELEBRATION WITH RAS NEV-
ILLE AND THE KINGSTONIANS
The Granada, 9 p.m. $7,
18+
FILM SCREENING: “SOUL
POWER”
Liberty Hall, 7 p.m., $7-$10,
16+
OUTLAW JAKE’S BIRTHDAY
BASH WITH SLEEPING DOGS
The Gaslight Tavern, 7 p.m.,
free, 21+
THE ENTRANCE BAND/
LIGHTS/ CONTINENTS
The Jackpot Music Hall,
10 p.m., $8-$10, 18+
MOONLIGHT DRIVE
The Jazzhaus, 10 p.m., $5,
21+
SATURDAY SOULCLAP WITH
SCENEBOOSTER SOUND-
SYSTEM
The Eighth Street Tap
Room, 10 p.m., $3, 21+
POKER PUB
The Pool Room, 7 p.m. &
10 p.m., free, 21+
SMACKDOWN!
The Bottleneck, 7:30 p.m.,
free-$5, 18+
DJ PROOF
The Jackpot Music Hall,
10 p.m., $5-$7 18+
MATT HIRES/ JASON CASTRO/
CAITLIN CROSBY
The Bottleneck, 8 p.m.,
$9-$11, all ages
DOLLAR BOWLING
The Royal Crest Bowling
Lanes, 9 p.m., $1, all ages
ORIGINAL MUSIC MONDAYS
The Bottleneck, 9 p.m.,
18+
KARAOKE
The Jazzhaus, 10 p.m.,
$1, 21+
BLUES TUESDAY WITH
BRYAN NEUBERRY
Gaslight Tavern, 7 p.m.,
free, 18+
TUESDAY NITE SWING
Kansas Union, 8 p.m., free,
all ages
NOMO/ MOTORCYCLE
(ID OF ARCHETYPE)
The Jackpot Music Hall,
9 p.m., 18+
NEWMATICA/HI DIVE
The Replay Lounge,
10 p.m., $2, 21+
BILLY SPEARS
& BEER BELLIES
Johnny’s Tavern, 6 p.m.,
free, 21+
POKER PUB
The Pool Room, 7 p.m.
& 10 p.m., free, 21+
LIVE ACTION PUB TRIVIA
SHOW AT CONROY
Conroy’s Pub, 7 p.m., $5,
21+
“JOHN BROWN & HIS IMPACT
ON KANSAS”
The Lawrence Public
Library, 7 p.m., free, 16+
THE AMERICANA MUSIC
ACADEMY JAM
Signs of Life, 7:30 p.m.,
free, all ages
VISITING ARTISTS SERIES:
DR. PAUL HUNT, TROMBONE
The Swarthout Recital Hall,
7:30 p.m., free, all ages
PRIDE NIGHT
Wilde’s Chateau 24, 9 p.m.,
$5, 18+
$1 DRINK DANCE PARTY
Fatso’s, 10 p.m., 21+
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The Bottleneck
737 New Hampshire St.
The Jackpot Music Hall
943 Massachusetts St.
The Jazzhaus
926 1/2 Massachusetts St.
The Replay Lounge
946 Massachusetts St.
The Eighth St. Taproom
801 New Hampshire St.
Lawrence Arts Center
940 New Hampshire St.
The Granada
1020 Massachusetts St.
The Pool Room
925 Iowa St.
Wilde’s Chateau 24
2412 Iowa St.
Duffy’s
2222 W. 6th St.
Conroy’s Pub
3115 W. 6th St., Ste. D
The Bottleneck
737 New Hampshire St.
venues //
wednesday, feb. 10th
editor’s note //
Growing up, I never much liked crowds.
I was very much my slightly agoraphobic
mother’s child — anxious, timid, afraid of being
touched, dreadful of ever being noticed. Malls
made me squirm. Te roller rink on feld-trip
day gave me fts. I would’ve rather stayed home.
I always wanted to be able to perform like my
beauty queen aunt, who waited tables between
soap opera bit parts in California, but my mother
and I, it seemed, had inherited all of our family’s
ambition, but none of its joy. We’d been left with
all the practicality of life, and none of the art.
Around my house, it was only my grandmother,
with her classic country records and early-evening
gin and tonics, who knew how to dance.
During my frst year at the University, after
EDITOR // Alex Garrison
ASSOCIATE EDITOR //
Kelci Shipley
DESIGNERS // Laura Fisk,
Liz Schulte
CONTACT // Lindsay Cleek,
Leslie Kinsman, Katy Saunders
HEALTH // Adam Vossen
MANUAL // Emily Johnson,
Ben Sullivan
NOTICE // Mary Henderson,
Abby Olcese, Anna Sobering
PLAY // Beth Beavers,
Taylor Brown, Anna Kathagnarath
CONTRIBUTORS //
Savannah Abbott, Mike Anderson,
Chance Carmichael, Mia Iverson,
Molly Martin, Landon McDonald,
Jacob Muselmann, Brittany Nelson,
Adam Rydell, Amanda Sorell
CREATIVE CONSULTANT //
Carol Holstead
CONTACT US //
jayplay10@gmail.com
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JAYPLAY The University Daily Kansan
111 Stauffer-Flint Hall
1435 Jayhawk Blvd.
Lawrence, KS 66045
(785) 864-4810
FOLLOW JAYPLAY ON TWITTER AT
twitter.com/JayplayMagazine
// ALEX GARRISON, EDITOR
moving out, beginning to keep my room messy
and throwing caution to the wind, I applied to be
a DJ with the campus radio station on a whim.
And so began my love afair with noise.
Part of growing into my own skin and
beginning to let go and enjoy my college
experience became intertwined with music and,
especially after I turned 21 and was allowed into
more venues, with live music.
Last week, I attended indie legend Yo La
Tengo’s show at the Granada. After working on
Jayplay nearly all day, I was tired, cranky, entirely
uninterested in dealing with the walk in the cold,
the withdrawal of cash, and especially not with
the throngs of people I knew would be there.
But I also knew it was going to be a great
show, knew I’d regret missing it, so I forced
myself there, knowing I’d enjoy it once there.
And then, during the band’s energetic rendition
of a cover of a band called Te Clean, something
struck me — the enjoyment I was getting from
the show didn’t just stem from the energy of the
band, the reason the show was so good stemmed
from the energy of the crowd. Everyone at the
Granada that night, it seemed, fed of each other;
each one of us was individual, but we become
one in that we experienced something made
better by being together. In the moment, I
couldn’t be happier than to be a small part of
big, formerly scary crowd.
Check out Kansan photographer Chance
Dibben’s photo essay on the concert on page
8 to get a visual sense of the experience.
Concerts may not be exactly your thing, but
chances are you’ve had at least one moving
collective experience.
As for me, I still can’t dance very well, but
I’ve come closer to fnding my joy.
MANUAL
in the life of ... // A BREW MASTER
living vicariously through others is ok with us.
Geof Deman doesn’t come home to an ice
cold beer. He brews it.
A Lawrence native, Deman has been
professionally brewing for 15 years, the
last seven of which have been at Free State
Brewery, 636 Massachusetts St. He is the
assistant head brewer there.
After spending a semester with a friend in
Berkeley, Calif., Deman says he discovered
his love for brewing in college. Later, Deman
returned to Lawrence and started brewing like
crazy, eventually leaving for Seattle, where he
worked for the Pike Brewing Company.
When a spot opened back in Lawrence at
Free State, he took it.
As assistant head brewer, Deman’s days
are spent checking fermentation levels of the
two-to-four batches of beer that Free State
pumps out a week and prepping the various
containers that beer moves through in each
stage of its creation. Each batch yields 14
barrels at 31 gallons each. Deman says Free
State rolled out 3,200 barrels last year.
Since Free State opened a new production
facility across town, batches of its fagship beers
have shifted to the new building, allowing the
downtown site to shift focus to new specialty
and seasonal beers, which Deman says has
// BEN SULLIVAN
Photo by Ben Sullivan
Glass half full: Geoff Deman brews quality beer, ensur-
ing customers of their local favorites at Free State
Brewery, 636 Massachusetts St.
been a lot of fun and has expanded the brewery’s
repertoire.
Deman’s advice to aspiring young brewers
is persistence. He says the profession takes a
certain fortitude, an attention to detail as well as
a balance of brawn and a keen mind. Oh, and of
course, love and respect for a good beer.
essential life skills // BLOG YOUR PORTFOLIO
in case of emergency, read quickly.
Te web is a great way to put yourself out there,
whether it’s chatting with friends or searching for
a job.
Hosting your portfolio on a blog is an easy and
accessible way to keep your work displayed and
up-to-date year-round for employers to fnd.
Meaghan O’Connell, director of outreach for
Tumblr.com, one of many similar user-friendly
blogging sites, says Tumblr’s dashboard has post
icons for text, photo, quote, link, chat, audio and
video. Tis feature makes it simple for students
of many diferent majors to publish their work,
whether it is art, flm, writing or design.
Another advantage of blog culture is its ability
to bring people together based on their shared
passions. O’Connell says communities form
amongst bloggers with similar interests, which is
great for inspiration and networking with your
target audience.
If your followers really love something you
post, or vice-versa, Tumblr.com allows you to
re-post others’ blogs on your own site. However,
if you do this you should always use proper
attribution and make sure others are giving you
credit for your work. Plagiarism is not a skill you
should add to your resume.
Publishing your work with simple blogging
sites such as Tumblr gives potential employers easy
// EMILY JOHNSON
Photo by Emily Johnson
Blog for a job: With websites such as Tumblr.com,
blogging can help enhance your portfolio and score
you that dream job you’ve been searching for.
access to your work and contact information
and shows you have the social networking skills
key to growth in several felds.
Your frst spring job interviews may still
be a few weeks away, but perhaps it’s time to
jump on the blog bandwagon and catch those
employers in your web.
2
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Q&A // BRYCE AVARY — THE ROCKET SUMMER
because we have questions. celebrities have answers.
JP:
BA:
Bryce Avary writes, produces, sings and plays
every instrument for indie-rock solo project Te
Rocket Summer. Avary, who releases his fourth
full-length album, Of Men and Angels, Feb. 23,
recently took some time to talk with Jayplay about
music, life and his love of performing.
Summer lovin’: Bryce Avary writes, produces, sings
and plays every instrument for his solo project the
Rocket Summer. Avary’s fourth album, “Of Men and
Angels,” will be released Feb. 23.
Contributed photo
Jayplay: How would you describe the
style of your music in one sentence?
Bryce Avary: When my frst record came
out, Tim Wheeler, the singer of Ash from
the U.K., said, “Te Rocket Summer is like
sunshine in a can.”
What instruments do you play?
I know how to play the sort of standard
rock band outft instruments — piano,
drums, guitar and bass. I can kind of mess
around on other things, but I really only
know how to play one thing. Like on Do
You Feel [the band’s third album] I play
harmonica on one song. I just went and
got a harmonica, practiced for a couple
hours and fgured out the part. I wouldn’t
call myself a harmonica player, I just know
how to play that one part that I wrote.
// LINDSAY CLEEK
BA:
JP:
BA:
JP:
BA:
Have you ever considered recording with
a full band or do you prefer going solo?
I’ve defnitely considered having a full
band play on the record, in fact on this
newest record our guitar player that plays
live played on two of the tracks. But I
really enjoy going in the studio and I push
myself really hard to be efcient on each
instrument.
What is the meaning of your new album’s
title, Of Men and Angels?
Te title actually comes from a Bible verse,
1 Corinthians 13:1, which says, “if I speak
in the tongues of men and angels, but have
not love, I have become sounding brass or
a tinkling symbol.” And then it goes on to
talk about how nothing matters except for
love, how we treat people and how we put
things in our life down to lift others up.
What is your favorite song to perform?
It’s always fun to play “So In this Hour,”
because there’s so much power and you can
really feel it in that song, especially live. It’s
just something about the spiritual meter in
the room kind of goes to ten on that song.
JP:
BA:
JP:
BA:
JP:
BA:
What is the most fulflling thing about
performing?
I think the most fulflling thing is seeing
what the music does to people. I perceive it
as how God works through the music.
What is something people would never
guess about you?
I’m actually a black belt in karate. Also, I
think that a misperception about me is that
I’m some extremely lighthearted, happy-
go-lucky person, which is defnitely not
the case. Not that I’m some angry person,
but I’ve defnitely had a lot of real struggles
and a lot of private things, so I feel like
I’m constantly fghting some sort of battle.
So it’s kind of funny when people are like
“Bryce Avary is the happiest guy in the
world,” and people in my life that know
me are like “that is the weirdest perception
of you.”
What do you hope the future holds?
I hope for a journey of learning more about
life and God with good health along the
way. And lots of good songs.
JP:
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// MARY HENDERSON
tomorrow’s news // BOOK CADDY

just call us Cleo.
// ABBY OLCESE
Read on the road: The Performance Book Caddy allows you to
catch up on some light reading, but be sure to watch out for
oncoming traffc.
Contributed photo
wescoe wit
lol.
GIRL : This guy was saying ‘Mufasa’
and his girlfriend said it back to
him. I sat there with a confused
look and he said, ‘It’s our code
for when we want to have sex.’
GIRL 1 : Two hundred dollars on a purse?
GIRL 2 : Coach, baby.
GIRL 1 : I haven’t seen all the episodes
of “Glee.”
GIRL 2 : What’s wrong with you?
GUY : Tucker Max is the shit.
GIRL : Who’s Tucker Max?
GUY : What do you do with yourself
all day?
GIRL : That’s inappropriate for school.
GIRL : Wow, Brody Jenner is getting
old.
GUY 1 : I get paid on Friday.
GUY 2: So you’re taking me to the strip
club, right?
GIRL : Hey, I don’t have sex with just
anyone.
GUY : Wow, I’m honored.
GUY : Do you think your mom will like
me if she knew we’re having
wild, crazy sex?
Don’t take your eyes of the page.
Easier said than done.
For those looking to combine
self-propelled transportation and
literature (and who don’t fear serious
injury), Te Performance Caddy,
which sells for $14.99 at Amazon.
com and Performancebike.com, is a
book stand that attaches to bicycle
handlebars so you can read while you
ride.
It’s one more way to get in some
last-minute reading before class or
squeeze in a quick chapter of Into the
Wild on a weekend mountain biking
trip.
Just don’t let the book caddy distract
you too much from the scenery. Or
the trafc. In fact, if you do hear
about this product in the future, it
may be because it’s caused a bicycle
accident. But that extra fve minutes
of reading on the way to work will be
totally worth it.
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NOTICE
ick up a book. Feel the weight and the
texture of the cover. Flip through the
smooth and glossy pages. Te smell is
indescribable. A book, sitting on a shelf,
is like a trophy representing time spent and lessons
learned. Whether a book serves as a signifcant
reminder or not, it nevertheless sits proudly next
to others, endlessly waiting to be picked up and
read again.
But what happens when this is no longer how
you interact with the written word?
In 2007, Amazon.com released the Kindle, a
wireless reading device commonly known as an
e-book reader. Other companies quickly jumped
on the bandwagon, releasing similar devices to
read books and other content digitally.
But these products weren’t without their faults
and shortcomings. Te Kindle, for example,
experienced complaints about its lack of
backlighting and limited utility.
In 2008, Michael Eckersley, professor of
interaction design, taught a graduate design
class that took part in a theoretical project to
redesign the frst generation Kindle. Te project,
based on consumers’ hopes and expectations for
future e-book readers, allowed the students to
practice redeveloping products for commerce and
industry.
Eckersley says the students redesigned it to be
more functional, developing the ability to share
books and access wireless internet.
In the fall, because of student feedback, the
University became involved in the growing
circulation of e-books, making four Sony Readers
available for check out at Anschutz and Watson
Libraries.
Rebecca Smith, communications and
advancement director for KU Libraries, says
the Sony Readers have been so popular they are
planning on purchasing four more.
“We’re trying to meet and anticipate student
needs,” Smith says. “E-book readers are something
students are incredibly interested in. So far, we’ve
had overwhelmingly positive feedback.”
However, not everybody is enthusiastic about
reading a screen instead of a traditional paper
page. Ian Hrabe, 2009 graduate, doesn’t think
e-books could ever replace the real thing.
// ANNA SOBERING
Easy read: e-books have changed the way readers appreciate literature, replacing paper pages with digital
screens. The e-book’s advanced features even include note-taking and highlighting for studious college kids.
Photo illustration by Adam Buhler
of books
the
“Tere’s something incredibly satisfying about
reading a book that does not translate to a digital
medium,” says Hrabe. “I guess it’s like comparing
an MP3 to an LP. Sure, they ofer the same
content but there are huge diferences in the way
you’re actually experiencing the music.”
Te infux of e-book readers, however,
don’t necessarily mean the death of traditional
print. Marian Schembari, contributing editor
of digitalbookworld.com, doesn’t deny the
disadvantages of e-books.
“First of all, as a book lover I’d prefer to curl up
with a book, not some device,” she says. “I also
love the smell of books, and that’s not something
you can get with a Kindle or a Sony Reader.”
Schembari also says she doesn’t think that print
books will ever completely cease to exist. “People
also collect books. It’s hard to collect PDFs,” she
says.
One aspect of e-book readers that’s exciting for
students is the possibility of replacing traditionally
heavy and expensive textbooks with one digital
device.
“Tere are so many cool options like looking
up words directly on the device, highlighting,
note taking capabilities and videos embedded
directly into the ‘book,’” Schembari says.
Te newly released Apple iPad mentioned the
ability to download textbooks, but did not go
into detail about future capabilities. Te iPad
is less of an e-book reader and more like an
oversized iPod Touch on a 9.7 inch LED-backlit
screen. Among its features, the iPad allows for
application downloads, internet browsing, e-mail
access, photo and video display, GPS access, and
an iBook reader through the iBook app. Te Wif
version will be available at the end of March and
ranges from $499-$699. Te 3G version will
be available at the end of April and ranges from
$629-$829.
Te biggest problem holding back e-book
sales is the cost. Ranging from roughly $250
to $1,000, people are still hesitant to put their
money into something that is likely to improve as
the technology develops. However, for frequent
book buyers, it may be more economical to buy
an e-book reader.
Over time, as new devices are released with
more functions and sleeker formats, e-books
will become more entrenched in our everyday
lives. Whether we are checking them out from
the library or buying one for our own personal
convenience, e-books have a place in the future
of book and media formats.
PRODUCTS ON THE MARKET
Of the slew of e-book readers available
on the market to date, this list of second
generation products refects items at a
variety of diferent price points. Each
reader features diferent attributes
including touch screens, wireless access,
and additional applications.
>
iRex iLiad 2nd Edition
$699.00
QUE proReader
by Plastic Logic
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As e-books become popular, technology changes the way we read
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Longevity is always mentioned with the band
Yo La Tengo. During their January 26 show at the
Granada, guitarist and vocalist Ira Kaplan even
joked about it. “We’ve been together for what 12,
13 years?” he asked the other members jokingly. Try
26 years. Most bands are lucky to have a successful
10, but like that other alternative rock institution
Sonic Youth, YLT remains resilient as the years let
on, improving with age. It’s not so much maturity —
the overused term that seeks to explain late-period
fourishes in artists’ career — but rather instinct
and insight. In fact, like their youthful cohorts and
tourmates, Times New Viking, YLT were decidedly
noisy, tight, and expressive, playing a two-hour set
that never waned.
YO LA TENGO
// WORDS AND PHOTOS BY CHANCE DIBBEN
PHOTO ESSAY
Jp
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YO LA TENGO
PHOTO ESSAY
Ira Kaplan, guitarist and vocalist for Yo La Tengo, an
indie-rock band from Hoboken, New Jersey, plays at the
Granada, 1020 Massachusetts Street, Jan. 26.
James McNew, Yo La Tengo bassist, sings back-up vo-
cals at the concert.
Georgia Hubley, who is married to Kaplan, sings one of
her songs.
CLOCKWISE, STARTING TOP LEFT:
»
»
»
For more photos and an audio interview with James McNew, check out
Kansan.com/Jayplay. *
CONTACT
// MIKE ANDERSON
Sexual satisfaction isn’t the only aspect of a
healthy relationship, but research shows it is a big
part of the puzzle.
Indeed, an increase in sexual satisfaction
is accompanied by an increase in love and
commitment, as shown in research by Sue
Sprecher. In my opinion, a couple’s sexual
satisfaction is a good barometer for the overall
strength of the relationship.
But the tricky part, of course, is exactly how
to go about increasing sexual satisfaction within
a relationship.
Te frequency of sex is important to a sexual
relationship, but it is the quality of sex that can
predict a relationship’s outcome. Tere’s also a
connection between achieving orgasm during sex
and achieving higher relational and overall sexual
satisfaction.
To increase the overall likelihood of orgasm and
satisfaction, I highly recommend taking the time
to get to know yourself and your partner’s wants
and desires as well as likes and dislikes. Research
by Cupach and Comstock discovered the quality
of communication about sex promotes positive
sexual encounters.
Communicating about your sexual desires and
preferences is one of the most important things you
can do to facilitate a healthy sex life and improve
the quality of your sex. Tis communication
allows you to negotiate an enjoyable sexual script
and know what turns your partner on.
Open communication about your sex life will
also help you broach important topics such as
sexual fantasies and your desires to experiment.
A 2004 study by Sprecher and Cate found that
couples with sexual variety and experimentation
were more sexually satisfed than couples with
little to no variety or experimentation. Getting
stuck in a routine can be a major hurt to your
sexual fulfllment.
But “experimentation” can mean what you want
it to; I’m not saying that you have to experiment
with S&M tomorrow. Experimentation can come
from trying new positions, incorporating sex toys
or even role playing.
Couples who feel comfortable and open enough
to talk about their sexual desires and fantasies are
those who will end up having the best sex lives.
But what really feeds into our sexual satisfaction
is the ratio between sexual rewards and sexual
costs in a relationship. Tat ratio, along with
an overall satisfed relationship, accounts for 75
percent of the variance in sexual satisfaction.
In our relationships we need to discover ways
to increase the sexual rewards. Again, I think
these rewards come from knowing our partner’s
preferences. If we treat sex as a medium of
expression for our love, then our sexual behavior
becomes strongly connected to our romantic
love. For the majority of individuals, sexual
satisfaction is strongly associated with relational
satisfaction. A lot of our sexual satisfaction comes
from positive communication.
You may be amazed to discover what fantasies
and desires you share with your partner. But
whatever you fnd, I’m confdent you’ll be glad
you asked.
Relationship researcher Mike Anderson tackles the sticky world
of relationship advice, one weekly Jayplay column at a time
*THE OPINIONS OF THIS COLUMNIST DO NOT NECESSAR-
ILY REFLECT THE VIEWS OF JAYPLAY. KANSAS IN HEAT IS
NOT TO BE CONSIDERED AS A SUBSTITUTE FOR PROFES-
SIONAL HELP.
Mike Anderson, Dellwood, Minn., graduate stu-
dent, is the host of Kansas in Heat, a talk show
about sex and relationships that airs Thursdays
at 7 p.m. on KJHK, 90.7fm and at kjhk.org.
kansas in heat (print edition) // GET SOME SATISFACTION
Do you have a question for Kansas in Heat?
Send it in to kansasinheat@yahoo.com and it
may be answered in a future column.
710
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catch of the week // ALLISON RICHARDSON
our weekly peek at a fsh in the KU sea.
CONTACT
Turn ons: Nice hands, because I hand model.
Seriously, I do. Te lumberjack look, aka beard/
scruf, fannel, boots. I think that it might have
something to do with the Brawny man. Not
being an asshole, I think that this one may be
self-explanatory.
Turn ofs: Really short, bitten-of fngernails.
Men who chew with their mouth open — this
is honestly the most disgusting thing in the
world and it’s not the image, it’s the noise. Not
showering. Guys with a funky sack (please catch
the Dane Cook reference).
Hobbies: I play soccer with a co-ed team for the
Lawrence Adult Soccer League and we’re pretty
badass. I also take photos! I love photography and
I’m currently interning at a photography studio
in Kansas City. I also like to totally geek-out and
play video games, read some comic books and
watch horror movies. I’m basically a 15-year-old
boy’s wet dream.
Ideal frst date: My ideal frst date can basically
be summed up in two words: not awkward.
Beyond not being awkward, it’s really cool when
a frst date is something completely unexpected,
like laser tag or roller skating.
HOMETOWN: Lenexa
YEAR: “Perpetual student — I
graduated in May of 2009, but I
just keep taking classes. I can’t quit
Lawrence, I can’t. “
MAJOR: Art History and French
INTERESTED IN: Men
Contributed photo
Are you a catch of the week? Or do you know
any good catches? E-mail us at jayplay10@
gmail.com.
// LESLIE KINSMAN
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Ideal characteristics in partner: Te ability to
grow a beard and being tall. I’m six foot tall, so
fnding someone that is as tall or taller than me is
pretty awesome. Te ability to grow a beard goes
back to the whole lumberjack thing. Confdence
is always hot, but being cocky or arrogant is not.
Humor is extremely important. I like it when
boys can laugh at themselves, because more than
likely, I’m also going to laugh at them.
Turn on frst statement: “I love George’s Pizza.”
Tey can’t just say it of course, they have to truly
love George’s Pizza (it’s in Overland Park at
95th and Antioch). I think it’s the best pizza in
the world and I’ve been eating there since I was
in the womb (ask my mom). Actually, I might
marry a guy if he said that line and brought me a
hamburger pizza with provel cheese.
Worst date: Tere are a lot to choose from, there
has been a (sort of ) dine and dash, dates that I
didn’t realize were dates, etc. However, I think
that the best worst date would have to be junior
year prom. I went with someone because they
caught me of guard when they asked me. It was
horribly awkward all night. He literally wouldn’t
give me any breathing room (he waited outside
the bathroom door for me), and then asked me to
be his girlfriend at the end of the night. It caught
me so of guard that I laughed in his face. It was
bad.
Best date: I don’t think I’ve had it yet.
Type: My “type” is awesome. I know it’s really
cliché to say that you want the cool, nice guy, but
that’s really what every girl wants. Te bad boy is
nice for a crush or a few dates, but that’s really all
he’s good for.
Interests: Photography pretty much consumes
my life, but, beyond that, French, really bad
movies, weird music and soccer.
Favorite quote: “I never regret anything. Because
every little detail of your life is what made you
into who you are in the end.”
— Drew Barrymore
Notices frst in a potential partner: Te frst
thing I notice on a guy is his jawline. Kind of
odd, but a strong jawline is very attractive.

Getaway: Paris. It’s my goal to have a movie-style
kiss under the Eifel Tower.
PILOBOLUS
DANCE THEATRE
DON’T MISS
KU GRADUATE
Jun Kuribayashi
and the
world premiere
of HITCHED
FRIDAY, FEB. 5
7:30 p.m.
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this weekend // ART OF UTOPIA AT THE SPENCER
because those CSI marathons are getting old.
Our tragic human faw may be our desire
for perfection. From plastic surgery to hippie
communes, people are constantly looking to
improve themselves and society. But, is a utopian
society tangible or ultimately unattainable? Te
Spencer Museum of Art, 1301 Mississippi St.,
unveiled the exhibition “Te Conversation VII:
Utopia/Dystopia,” on Monday to explore this
concept.
From photographs to prints, more than 40
works are on display on the south wall of the
20/21 gallery. Each artist questions utopia as an
expression of a communal dream.
Te art is intended to promote discussion
about western ideals of perfection, says Olena
Chervonik, graduate research assistant with the
Spencer. “Utopia is an embodiment of a perfect
future as it’s envisaged by a particular society.”
Often, the distinction is not clear whether what
mankind has created is improving or damaging
society. Chervonik says the idea of a utopia
depends on your point of view, which became the
driving force behind the project. It becomes both
a private concern and a social interest. “What’s
perfect for one person might be a nightmare for
another person,” Chervonik says.
Te exhibition is divided into two sections.
“Te Age of Technology” explores the pre-
// ANNA KATHAGNARATH
Ideal world: ‘Astute sizing up perfume trends’ by
Eduardo Paolozzi is one of the many works cur-
rently on display at the Spencer Museum of Art,
1301 Mississippi St., that look at the idea of utopia.
Contributed photo
modern world’s scientifc and technological
achievements. “Te Ideal City/Te Ideal
Society” examines the creation of a perfect
community.
You can create your own discussion and
explore the exhibition, which is open until the
end of May. Admission is free.
PLAY
out & about //
random people. random answers.
If the world ended tomorrow and you knew it was your
last day on earth, how would you spend it?
“I would defnitely see my family and friends
and not wear shoes because I’d want to feel the
earth before I die.”
Audrey Bellendir
Great Bend freshman
“I would spend the entire day on a trampoline
with boots and spurs so I can ruin the trampo-
line, and because trampolines are awesome.”
Sam Groth
Overland Park senior
“I would sit here and wonder about what I
should do, and then die.”
Kelsey Hunter
Overland Park sophomore
“I would get a whole bunch of my friends and
throw one big party. If you have a hangover the
next day, it won’t matter.”
Michael Fee
Hiawatha junior
“Spend it with my friends and family dancing
and eating sushi. I’d want to spend it moving,
not moping.”
Janet Summerfelt
Seattle, Wash., junior
// ANNA KATHAGNARATH
“I’d max out a credit card and spend it on a vaca-
tion because I wouldn’t have to pay for it.”
Jayme Hoag
Waverly sophomore
“I’d lock myself in a room full of junk food
because then I wouldn’t feel guilty.”
Shawna Bragg
Overland Park sophomore
“I would try something that I’m scared of, like
bungee jump, because there wouldn’t be an-
other opportunity to do it.”
Haley Harrington
Lawrence freshman
A car with two young men pulls up next to a car
flled with three girls. “Look what we got here!”
one of the men tells his friend. “Wanna drag?” he
asks the girls. His friend revs his engine.
Te driver of the other car listens as he tells
her: “See that telephone pole right there? We’ll
take you to it.”
“Sure,” she replies. Her passengers look at
each other, a little worried. Te two cars rev their
engines and take of. Te drivers race each other
down the road and onto a bridge. Halfway across,
the girls scream as their car is run of and falls
into the river below. Te boys in the other car
jump out, run to the edge of the bridge, and look
down. Te girls’ car is gone.
After dragging the lake for three hours, a lone
survivor emerges. She climbs onto the river’s
muddy bank looking dazed, claiming she can’t
remember what happened.
So begins Harold A. “Herk” Harvey’s 1962
movie, Carnival of Souls, a horror flm made in
three weeks with a budget of $30,000. Carnival
of Souls tells the story of Mary Henry, the survivor
of the drag race car crash, who moves to Utah
after the accident to become an organist. Once
there, she becomes fascinated with an abandoned
carnival on the outskirts of town, and is haunted
by the ghosts who inhabit it.
Carnival of Souls was shot on location in
Lawrence and Saltair, an abandoned amusement
park on the Great Salt Lake in Utah, by Harvey,
a former KU professor of flm, who made
educational flms for the Centron Corporation.
Matthew Dessem, creator of the flm blog “Te
Criterion Contraption,” says the amusement park
is one of the flm’s more striking qualities.
“I immediately responded to the location stuf
at Saltair,” Dessem says. “Tat’s such a great,
creepy location.”
Perhaps the most impressive scenes in Saltair
involve the main pavilion, a massive room
decorated like a dance hall with chandeliers,
streamers and ornaments hanging from its
ceiling and littering the foor. During Mary’s frst
exploration of Saltair, she ventures onto a balcony
overlooking a part of the Great Salt Lake. She
throws a stone into the water, and as it sinks the
audience sees a pale corpse lying just below the
surface.
Te movie’s enduring characteristics, however,
are the B-movie elements that stem from its low
budget. Te movie’s main ghoul, for example, is
played by Harvey himself, who wanders around
the flm staring eerily at Mary, wearing white
PLAY
greasepaint with black around his eyes. Dessem
admits that the frst time he saw Carnival of Souls
he thought of it mostly as a campy B-movie.
According to Bill Sellner, who worked with
Harvey at Centron and played a small role in the
flm, the movie’s premiere in Lawrence received a
lot of attention. “Maybe it was because the idea
of a theatrical flm production by local guys was
astonishing,” Sollner says.
Unfortunately the movie didn’t do too well in
its initial release. Sollner says it went on to have a
cult following in Europe, but Harvey never made
a proft from his flm. He continued to make
movies for Centron, and went on to teach flm
production at the University. Oldfather Studios,
situated in the former Centron headquarters, has
a soundstage named after Harvey, who died in
1996. Over the course of his career, Harvey made
400 flms for Centron, but “Carnival of Souls”
was the only feature flm.
In the years since, however, Harvey’s $30,000
movie has found its place in cinema history,
inspiring directors like David Lynch, Francis Ford
Coppola, Stanley Kubrick and George Romero,
who modeled the zombies in Night of the Living
Dead on the ghosts in Carnival of Souls. In 2000,
Criterion, a company that collects and releases
high-quality editions of important classic and
contemporary flms, released Carnival of Souls on
DVD as part of their collection.
Robert Butler, flm reviewer for Te Kansas
City Star, says it’s Harvey’s creative ability to work
within a tiny budget that has made “Carnival of
Souls” so infuential.
“Carnival is a classic example of seat-of-the-
pants, low-budget moviemaking in which pure
creativity triumphs over fnancial constraints,”
Butler says. “Beyond which, it has a visual sense
unequaled even by some big-budget flms.”
Dessem says the infuence of the movie can
be considered even beyond the flmmakers it
originally inspired, because the directors who
drew from it became so infuential themselves.
“Romero’s zombie movies would have been
diferent had he not seen Carnival of Souls, and
the same could be said for David Lynch’s flms,”
Dessem says. “If you take just those two guys and
consider the number of flms that have drawn
from their work, you can trace a pretty widespread
ripple efect of people who have been infuenced
by Carnival of Souls without necessarily knowing
it.”
Coming to a nightmare near you: Former KU Professor Herk Harvey (above), directed the 1962 thriller, “Car-
nival of Souls.” The movie was flmed on location in Lawrence, costing a mere $30,000.
// ABBY OLCESE
MADE IN KANSAS — LOCAL CLAIMS TO FAME
Ride with the Devil, 1999
Director: Ang Lee
Starring: Tobey Maguire, Jewel
Filmed in Doniphan, Leavenworth,
Miami and Ellis counties
Kansas City, 1996
Director: Robert Altman
Starring: Jennifer Jason Leigh,
Miranda Richardson and Harry
Belafonte
Filmed in Kansas City, Kansas and
Baldwin
Kansas, 1987
Director: David Stevens
Starring: Andrew McCarthy, Matt Dillon
Filmed in Lawrence, Topeka, Valley
Falls and Edgerton
Stills from ‘Carinval of Souls’
SOULS’
‘CARNIVAL OF
3 13
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The Day After (made for TV), 1982
Director: Nicholas Meyer
Starring: Jason Robards, Steve Gutten-
burg and John Lithgow
Filmed in Lawrence and Kansas City
Paper Moon, 1973
Director: Peter Bogdanovich
Starring: Ryan O’Neal, Tatum O’Neal
and Madeline Kahn
Filmed in Wilson, Hays and Hiawatha
Source: The Kansas Film Commission
Jp
REVIEW
music review //
Realism is, I’ve heard, the conclusion to the
Magnetic Fields’ post-69 Love Songs “no synth
trilogy.” After 2008’s shoegazey Distortion,
Realism is Magnetic Fields’ “folk album.”
I will always love (and often gush about)
Stephin Merritt’s song-writing genius, which
is again on display in Realism. However,
something about the album is familiar but
a little empty, like Merritt’s signature but
with the soul sucked out slightly. Rather
than being totally relatable and complete
narratives present on the tracks indicative of
Merritt’s unique style, Realism tracks such as
“Te Dolls’ Tea Party,” “Walk A Lonely Road”
and “Painted Flower” come of as irrelevant
aural still lifes.
I think my hookups with Realism stem from
the fact that the stripped down folk concept
isn’t quite right for Merritt’s (literal and
fgurative) voice – there’s not just enough to
play around with like there was on Distortion
and the result isn’t as fun.
All things considered, though, the majority
of the songs here are smart, sardonic, cathartic,
funny and tightly-structured – all the things
that make the Magnetic Fields great. Even if
the psychedelic-folk inspired instrumentation
KJHK’s weekly guide to sonic consumption.
THE MAGNETIC FIELDS –
// ALEX GARRISON
‘REALISM’ (NONESUCH)
isn’t all that much to write home about, the
lyricism and melody make up for it.
“I Don’t Know What to Say” is gorgeous and
sweeping; “Te Dada Polka” gets the folk concept
the best and the gang vocals are super sweet and
enjoyable.
If you like Magnetic Fields, give this a shot
and then decide for yourself. If by chance you’re
not familiar, give this a shot and then go get the
rest. You can thank me later.
music review //
Te pre-hype consensus among Sterogum
stafers and people I know seems to be that Odd
Blood isn’t as good as the Brooklyn threesome’s
2007 debut, All Hour Cymbals. Indeed, noting
the albums’ inclusion of love songs and depar-
ture from Yeasayer’s previously successful “lo-f
haze,” Te New York Times led its review with the
statement “Yeasayer is braced for backlash.” But
I apparently wasn’t cool enough in 2007 to hear
All Hour Cymbals, and, dammit, I really like Odd
Blood.
Te synth-driven, dancey-but-dark, world-
infuenced sound fts in well with comparisons
to (a more eighties-infuenced version of ) Dirty
Projectors, (a more straightforward version of )
Animal Collective or (a more accessible version
of ) Health, but still manages to sound fresh.
“Te Children” is a really diferent, crunchy
digital opener that manages to be both melodic
and unintelligible. It leads into “Ambling Alp,”
the motivational, high-energy lead single. “I Re-
member” is a standout as a good rotay track in
that it has a really killer hook in its catchy (for-
shadowing?) chorus of “you’re stuck in my mind
all the time.”
Odd Blood is a little front-heavy, but there are
a lot of good beats, strategic clapping, well placed
KJHK’s weekly guide to sonic consumption.
YEASAYER – ‘ODD BLOOD’
(SECRETLY CANADIAN)
sitar and interesting vocals to explore and I,
for one, think people will warm up to it quite
a bit once it gets some deserved airplay.
// ALEX GARRISON
movie review //
With all the populist ballyhoo surrounding
James Cameron’s Avatar steadily building into
legitimate Oscar buzz, it would be tempting
to dismiss a flm such as Crazy Heart as just
another haggard face in the awards season
bum’s rush. But resist the temptation. Crazy
Heart is an elegant, if uneven, meditation on
heartbreak and redemption, elevated by a fear-
less lead performance from Jef Bridges and a
reliably rustic country soundtrack by 10-time
Grammy winner T-Bone Burnett.
Bridges inhabits the whiskey-clogged soul
of Bad Blake, a faded country music star
whose once promising career was swept away
in a food of booze and broken marriages.
Meanwhile, Bad’s former musical protégé,
Tommy Sweet, (Colin Ferrell) has become a
full-fedged country superstar, playing Bad’s
greatest hits to sold-out crowds every night;
generally riding the coattails of his teacher’s
busted dreams.
After years of hard living, Bad grudgingly
accepts Tommy’s ofer to open for him in San-
ta Fe and soon meets the lovely reporter, Jean
(Maggie Gyllenhaal). Teir eventual romance
sparks a creative renaissance, inspiring Bad to
pen his frst new material in more than three
years.
Te basic plot bears many striking similari-
ties to last year’s comeback saga, “Te Wres-
tler.” And like that earlier Mickey Rourke
flm, “Crazy Heart” often veers into a glut of
Hollywood hits, indie ficks and everything in between.
// LANDON MCDONALD
‘CRAZY HEART’
saccharine sentiment. Bad’s attempts to overcome
his alcoholism and reconnect with his estranged
son would smack of overindulgent melodrama if
it weren’t for the strength and soulful dignity of
Bridge’s performance.
Te veteran actor, equally at home in comedy
or drama, imbues his character with a rough-
hewn, laconic charm that gives way to startling
wellsprings of honest, aching emotion. He won’t
be forgotten in the Best Actor race. And Colin
Ferrell, in his best performance since “In Bru-
ges,” makes us sense Tommy’s concern for his old
mentor without ever expressing it.
Both actors even sing, including a poignant f-
nal ballad entitled “Te Weary Kind.” Te song,
a stirring ode to love and loss, is alone worth the
price of admission, especially Bridges’ serene fnal
cut. Te Dude still abides, man. Now give him
an Oscar.
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// ANNA SOBERING
he smell emanating from the
kitchen flls the house and my
mouth begins to water with the
thought that soon I will be able to
enjoy a warm, homemade chocolate chip cookie.
All I have to do is ask my roommate if I can have
one. But for me it’s not so simple anymore. I can
eat the cookie. But I really shouldn’t.
About a year ago, I found out that I am both
gluten and lactose intolerant. Tis means my
body has a hard time digesting foods containing
wheat and dairy.
In the past I have been known to have
gastronomic issues, but I never thought they
were actually caused by anything. It was always
perfectly normal for regular meals to feel like a
rock or even a balloon in my stomach. But all of
this was before my allergic revelation.
Gluten, a protein found in grains like wheat
and oats, is known to be difcult for humans to
break down during digestion. Still, intolerance
to this protein is commonly misdiagnosed, even
though, according to www.foodreactions.org, as
many as 10-15 percent of people may have some
form of gluten intolerance.
Te prevalence of the more commonly known
sensitivity, lactose intolerance – the inability of
the body to digest lactose, which is found in milk
and other dairy products – depends on genetics
and ethnicity.
Many times if a parent has a food allergy or
sensitivity their children will have it too. So,
things didn’t look good for me when my mother
found out she was gluten intolerant. Especially
because of my history of digestive problems, I
was sent in for testing.
Sitting in my bedroom, about to go out for
dinner at an Italian restaurant, I read my test
results. Te biggest regret I felt as I read that
I’m both gluten and lactose intolerant was that I
wouldn’t be able to have lasagna at dinner.
After getting my results, things going on with
my body began to make sense. No wonder pizza
never sat well with me. But how would I ever
enjoy eating without these two majorly delicious
components of a meal?
Out of all the relationships I have sustained in
my life to date, the most tumultuous has been
with food. I now struggle saying no to certain
crusty breads and creamy cheeses that I used to
enjoy so thoroughly. My body has decided to
spite me with an intolerance to yumminess. I can
do nothing to stop it or change the outcome. I
Photo by Adam Buhler
Batter up: Anna Sobering makes a gluten-free and dairy-free yellow cake with raspberry flling and chocolate
frosting. Sobering was diagnosed as gluten and lactose intolerant about a year ago, forcing her to give up some of
her once favorite foods.
My struggle with gluten and lactose intolerance
have to live with it.
What makes me so upset about the whole
situation is that I love good food, and I eat it with
pleasure. But now I can no longer savor some of
my favorite foods such as warm Brie on crackers,
crepes and banana cream pie.
When I found out about my intolerance, it felt
like a little part of me had died. And naturally,
like any major loss, I went through stages of
grieving.
Initially I was in denial. Continuing to eat
gluten and dairy, I ignored my test results and
sufered the repercussions. Tey’re not pretty. For
some it may be skin problems or headaches and
for others it may be gastro-intestinal problems
like bloating, diarrhea and excessive fatulence.
Another reason gluten intolerance is so
consequential physically is because it damages the
stomach and intestines and doesn’t allow for the
absorption of nutrients. So, even if I eat a bunch
of healthy foods, I won’t beneft from them.
I soon became angry as I began to understand
that my body really hated me for what I was
eating. I blamed my mother for passing on her
faulty food genes, temporarily forgetting all the
pain and sacrifce she went through to produce
and raise me.
I began bargaining with myself after I
apologized to my mother for my unappreciative
attitude. I thought, “Maybe I could try eating
just a little bit of this sandwich?” Or “Just a little
piece of this Cotswold cheese?”
Tat didn’t work out so well either. My stomach
would have none of it. Finally, I gave in to my
sadness and went into a full blown gastronomical
depression.
It took me a while to accept my condition. I
struggled, cheated and sufered the consequences.
I would be really good for awhile, then I would
get a craving and give in to my urges.
Over time, however, I found out that being
sensitive to gluten and lactose these days isn’t the
end of the world. I didn’t want any more drama.
I just wanted to feel good again. So I did my
research and found tons of cookbooks and web
sites for people with food allergies.
Ultimately, I had to change the way I thought
about food and learn how to eat balanced meals
again. Especially as a college student, completely
controlling what I put into my body is a
challenge.
Over time, however, I have come to appreciate
foods that I might not have tried otherwise.
BREAKING UP
WITH BREAD AND CHEESE
Grains like basmati rice, quinoa and faxseed
bread have become substitutes for foods I used
to eat like pasta and whole wheat bread. I use
almond milk in my cereal and soy milk when I’m
cooking. As for cheese, I have not come across
anything completely lactose-free that has satisfed
my cravings. So I eat cheeses that are said to be
easier to digest, such as goat cheese and feta.
After I got though my dramatic “what will I
ever do with out bread and cheese?” phase, I had
to move on and eat foods that are better for me.
I’m still making progress. My next goal? Breaking
up with that oh so satisfying glutinous beverage
that we all know and love — beer. Jp
“Out of all of the
relationships I’ve
sustained in my
life, the most
tumultuous has
been with food.”
T