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Jayplay

OCTOBER 21, 2010 life. and how to have one.
KANSAS IN HEAT
TRY NEW TRICKS WITH YOUR PARTNER
FIRST IMPRESSIONS
NAIL YOUR DREAM-JOB INTERVIEW
COMING TO AMERICA
HOW INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS
TRANSITION TO AMERICAN COLLEGE LIFE
Jayplay
TABLE OF CONTENTS
OCTOBER 21ST, 2010 | volume 8, issue 9
* COvEr phOTO By jErry wANg
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2
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13 pass go, collect a lover
hOw TwO SINgLES MET pLAyINg MONOpOLy
5 the farmer and the dell
IN ThE LIFE OF A prOduCE-grOwINg COupLE
ON MAggIE’S FArM
10 Wescoe Wit
“IT’S FuN SIMuLATINg SExuAL ACTIvITy wITh
pLANTS”
6 ghost stories
BrAvE ThE SpIrITS AT STuLL CEMETEry
Lettuce Wrap Sushi Fire Dargon Roll
Smoked Salmon
Hand Roll
Chicken Pad Thai
Late Night Hours!
Karaoke Bar!
Chinese and Pan Asian Cuisine
dine in | delivery | carry out
order online: JadeGardenOnline.com
(785) 843-8650 | (785) 841-7096
1410 Kasold Ste. A13
Bob Billings & Kasold
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PRESENTS:
317 N. 2nd Street (785) 856-4330
OUTLAW JAKE
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Record Release Party
AND
OCT. 22 LIVE 11PM
Drink Specials:
$3.50 32oz BUDS
530 Wisconsin
785.856.8188
Beer Tower
& Wing
$9.50 3L Tower
$7 2L Tower
45¢ Wings

Join our fam
ily
in celebrating our
One Year Anniversary!
715 Mass St. | (785) 856-7150
DANCE PARTY
Thursday, Oct. 21
10pm-2am
$1.25 Miller High Life Cans
$2.00 Limoncello
though our travels carried us throughout
Scotland, we always found our way back.
When my hometown tennis hero Andy
Roddick faced off against the much-
favored Scot Andy Murray in the 2009
Wimbledon semi-final, the Southsider was
the perfect setting. A few other tennis fans
and I sat in the creaking wooden chairs,
a plate of steaming fish and chips in front
of us, engrossed in the back and forth
match.
As ‘Merica prevailed with Roddick
advancing I whooped in excitement, only to
be faced with the locals who were cheering
against me. Luckily no brawl ensued, at
least one that involved me anyway. (Some
gents had a pint too many.) But that’s
the thing about the Southsider — it stays
classy through the occasional ruckus of
blokes bickering about sports and politics.
When the trip came to a close, we
gathered for one last round of drinks.
And as my whiskey cokes seemed to be
refilling themselves, the group reminisced
in merriment and said goodbye to our
beloved pub.
Like my dear affection for the Southsider
in Scotland, international students at
KU miss certain things about their home
country, whether that’s food or friends.
To see what coming to America is like for
them, check out Molly’s story on page 8.
Long live the Southsider.
EDITOR | KeLcI ShIpLey
ASSOCIATE EDITOR | AnnA ARchIBALd
DESIGNERS | ALexAndRA AvILA, MoRgAn
STephenS
CONTACT | SARAh gRegoRy, BeccA hARSch,
eLLen ShefTeL
MANUAL | jon heRMeS, BRennA Long,
AMAndA KISTneR
NOTICE | MoLLy MARTIn, joSh hAfneR,
SpenceR ALTMAn
PLAY | AMAndA SoReLL, AShLey BAR-
foRoUSh, KATe LARRABee
HEALTH | MegAn RUpp, jAcqUe WeBeR
CONTRIBUTORS | MIKe AndeRSon, BRITTAny
neLSon, SAvAnnAh ABBoTT, chAnce cARMI-
chAeL, LAndon McdonALd, ALex TReTBAR,
zAcK MARSh, ThoMAS c. hARdy, AMAndA
gAge
CREATIVE CONSULTANT | cARoL hoLSTeAd
Tucked away on West Richmond Street
in edinburgh, Scotland, sits a quaint pub
known as the Southsider. on the outside it
looks like any other drinking establishment
of traditional Scottish yore — white paned
windows anchored by black and gold
lettering above. But on the inside it houses
some of the best memories of my study
abroad trip to the United Kingdom two
summers ago.
My first encounter with the Southsider
came by accident. We were wandering
through the winding roads of edinburgh and
decided to stop for a pint, as we often did.
When in Scotland, right?
It was then we spotted the inviting
Southsider pub. As we slid into the green
leather-quilted booth, our glasses brimming
with frothy european beer, I knew instantly
it was somewhere special.
As a well-known carbaholic, I was sold
on the deadly combo of mac and cheese
and chips (American fries). The spectacular
meal effortlessly ensured cheesy, gooey
noodles, and sweet, plump potato fries. And
KELCI SHIPLEY
|
edIToR
cALendAR
THURS | ocT 21ST FRI | ocT 22nd SAT | ocT 23Rd SUN | ocT 24Th MON | ocT 25Th TUES | ocT 26Th wED | ocT 27Th
Exhibit: “body
AwArEnEss”,
LAwrEncE Arts
cEntEr
Lawrence Arts Center,
9- 9 p.m.
thEoLoGy on tAP
Henry’s On Eighth,
5:30 p.m.-7 p.m., free,
all ages
KJhK PrEsEnts
FArmErs bALL
Jackpot Music Hall,
7 p.m., 18+
wiLd And scEnic FiLm
FEstivAL
Liberty Hall, 7:30 p.m.,
$10-$12, all ages
nEon dAncE PArty
Jackpot Music Hall,
10 p.m., $1-$5, 18+
thE GivinG trEE bAnd
Bottleneck, 10 p.m.

toys thAt KiLL
Replay Lounge,
10 p.m., $3, 21+
FrEE PLAy At thE
rEPLAy, rEPLAy
LounGE,
3 p.m.-6 p.m., free, all
ages

whitE FLAG wArriors
tour-oPErAtion
rEcovEry
Alderson Auditorium
(Kansas Union), 7 p.m.-
9 p.m., all ages

thEAtEr: “JAcK And
JiLL: A romAncE”,
Lawrence Arts Center,
$10-$15, 18+
currEn$y / biG K.r.i.t. /
smoKE dZA
Bottleneck, 9 p.m.,
$17-$19, 18+
cosmoPoLitics,
Jazzhaus, 10 p.m., 21+

dEAdrinGErs
Replay Lounge, 10
p.m., $3, 21+
oF montrEAL /
JAnELLE monAE
Liberty Hall, 7 p.m.,
$21, all ages
oPEn JAm
Duffy’s, 9 p.m., free,
21+

trucKstoP
honEymoon
/ sunFLowEr
coLonELs
Granada, 9 p.m., $10,
all ages
brEAKdown with
unKnown souLdiEr,
Eighth Street Tap
Room, 10 p.m., $3,
21+
thE von Ehrics,
Replay Lounge, 10
p.m., $3, 21+

LivE duELinG PiAnos
Barrel House, 8 p.m.-
2 a.m., $3, 21+
LittLE rEd schooL
housE bEnEFit
(all-ages patio show),
Replay Lounge, 6 p.m.-
9 p.m., $2, all ages
thE FrEsh & onLys /
royAL bAths / KArmA
vision (early show),
Jackpot Music Hall, 9
p.m.-11:59 p.m.,
$8-$10, all ages
oriGinAL music
mondAys
Bottleneck, 9 p.m.,
18+
bAssnEctAr, Liberty
Hall, 9 p.m., $28, all
ages

KArAoKE
Jazzhaus, 10 p.m.,
$1, 21+
honKy tonK suPPEr
cLub
Record Bar, 7 p.m.,
free, 21+
JuLE LorEnZEn And
FriEnds
Lawrence Arts
Center, 7:30 p.m.-
8:30 p.m.

LtuEsdAy nitE swinG
Kansas Union, 8
p.m.-11 p.m., free, all
ages
tuEsdAy nitE swinG
Kansas Union,
8 p.m.-11 p.m., free,
all ages

KAnsAs union, 8
P.m.-11 P.m., FrEE, ALL
AGEs
Lawrence Arts
Center, 9 a.m.-9 p.m.
Ku JAZZ combos
concErt
Lawrence Arts Center,
7 p.m.-8 p.m., free, all
ages

tyronE wELLs
/ AndrEw
bELLE CROwn
POinT,BOTTLEnECK,
8 P.M., $13, ALL AGES

conroy’s triviA
COnROy’S PUB, 7:30
P.M.-10 P.M., $5, 21+

PEAcE corPs
inFormAtionAL
mEEtinG
KAnSAS UniOn, 7
P.M.-8 P.M., fREE,18+

biLLy sPEErs And thE
bEEr bELLiEs
Johnny’s, 6 p.m., free,
21+

sPrinG AwAKEninG
Lied Center, 7:30 p.m.,
$21-$48, all ages
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THE BOTTLENECK
737 neW hAMpShIRe ST.
THE JACKPOT MUSIC HALL
943 MASSAchUSeTTS ST.
THE JAzzHAUS
926 1/2 MASSAchUSeTTS
ST.
THE REPLAY LOUNGE
946 MASSAchUSeTTS ST.
THE EIGHTH ST. TAPROOM
801 neW hAMpShIRe ST.
LAwRENCE ARTS CENTER
940 neW hAMpShIRe ST.
THE GRANADA
1020 MASSAchUSeTTS
ST.
THE POOL ROOM
925 IoWA ST.
wILDE’S CHATEAU 24
2412 IoWA ST.
DUFFY’S
2222 W. 6Th ST.
CONROY’S PUB
3115 W. 6Th ST., STe. d
THE BOTTLENECK
737 neW hAMpShIRe ST.
FoLLow JAyPLAy on twittEr
twitter.com/Jayplaymagazine
bEcomE A FAn oF thE ‘wEscoE
wit’ FAcEbooK PAGE and your
contributions could be published!
JAYPLAY
(785) 864-4810
The University Daily Kansan
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Lawrence, KS 66045
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get the second entree
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CONTACT
kansas in heat // Braving new grounds
Q. I’m trying to get my partner to experiment
sexually, but she is not having it. How can I con-
vince her to try new things?
Mike Anderson, Dellwood, Minn. graduate stu-
dent, is the host of Kansas in Heat, a talk show
about sex and relationships that airs Wednesdays
at 11 p.m. on KJHK, 90.7fm and at kjhk.org.
THE OPINIONS OF THIS COLUMNIST DO NOT NECES-
SARILY REFLECT THE VIEWS OF JAYPLAY. KANSAS IN
HEAT IS NOT TO BE CONSIDERED AS A SUBSTITUTE
FOR PROFESSIONAL HELP.
| MIKE ANDERSON |
> Tackle the sticky world of relationships.
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a. I’m glad to hear you are willing to experiment
sexually. Sexual variety and experimentation is
linked to sexual satisfaction. To convince some-
one to experiment sexually, gradually get them
to think positively about their sexual abilities. If
you want your partner to sexually experiment
you need to get them feeling good about the sex
you are having.
A lot of times people are fearful of sexually
experimenting because they think they’ll be re-
ally bad, or won’t know what to do. Praising
someone for their sexual abilities will make
them feel a lot better about having sex, and will
make them potentially open to trying new things.
If someone sees themselves as good at sex and
knows others see them as good at sex, they will
have the confdence and knowledge that sexual
experimentation is an obtainable step.
Besides praising their sexual ability, you also
need to make your partner see sexual experi-
mentation as a good thing. Try smaller experi-
menting and show a lot of excitement. Let your
partner know that this new technique, position,
toy, whatever, feels great, and that they are
doing a great job.
Let’s say on a sexual experiment scale from
one to 10 (one being ordinary sex and 10 being
extremely kinky or taboo sex) you want to get
your partner to a nine or 10, but they are at a
three. Move gradually. Start doing sexual acts
that are a fve or six and let your partner know
how much you enjoy them.
Sexual experimentation can be addicting and
fun. Once your partner begins to associate ex-
perimentation as a good thing you can move up
the experimental scale.
A lot of people ask me how they can get their
partner to try anal sex. My answer is start ex-
perimenting with other positions or acts. Incor-
porate sex toys and try different positions.
Once your partner feels good about the
changes being made in your sex life, he or she
will be more open to trying new things. So move
gradually — don’t push too hard. Get them to
warm up to it. Nagging someone about sex and
the sex you want will never work.
Do you have a question for Kansas in Heat?
Send it in to kansasinheat@yahoo.com or check
out the Kansas in Heat Facebook page.
CONTACT
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how we met // Lauren PoLLmiLLer & Thomas harms
| BECCA HARSCH |
Contributed photo
Don’t hate the player, hate the game:
Lauren Pollmiller and Tomas Harms met
over a friendly game of Monopoly, but
collected more than fake money, as the two
blossomed into a couple.
> All great relationships had to start somewhere.
Lauren Pollmiller and Thomas Harms were
partners for a game of Monopoly in an account-
ing lab in 2008. Although they didn’t talk much,
they couldn’t take their eyes off each other.
For the next year and a half, the couple would
have awkward run-ins at the grocery store or
on Mass Street. “Neither of us had any idea
that we were both crushing on one another
pretty hard,” Pollmiller, Lenexa senior, says.
In November 2009, Pollmiller and Harms
were both at the Jazzhaus. For nearly an hour
neither Pollmiller nor Harms, Winfeld senior,
said anything while sitting next to each other.
Finally, Pollmiller spoke up. “For the next two
hours, I talked for an hour and 55 minutes while
Thomas talked for fve,” Pollmiller says. They
quickly discovered each other’s true feelings,
among other things.
Before they started talking, Pollmiller and
Harms had nicknames for each other when
talking to their friends: Pollmiller was known as
the accounting babe; Harms was the artsy guy.
Since they began dating, Pollmiller and Harms
have enjoyed several road trips to the South-
west and have avoided playing Monopoly.
catch of the week // maTT rodriguez
> Our weekly peek at a fsh in the KU sea.
Interests & hobbIes: I like to dance a
lot. Hip-hop is my passion. I can also do jazz
and modern dance. I love to sit and talk with
people and fnd out about them and what
they’re into. I also like fnding out about new
music and how to dance to it.

notIces fIrst In a potentIal
partner: I notice her eyes. Not the color
of her eyes, but the way they look and how I
connect with them. And then I work my way
down. I’m an ass guy. I like a thick girl who
has a little bit to hold onto.

turn ons: I like a girl that is confdent
enough to approach me. She has to be funny
and be able to laugh at herself. She has to
have a good time without putting walls up.
turn offs: I don’t like girls that are too
proud or stuck-up. And I don’t like a girl who
plays games. It’s not about the game. It’s
about being real and true.
HOMETOWN: Burlington, New Jersey
MAJOR: Dance
YEAR: Senior
INTERESTED IN: Women
| BECCA HARSCH |
why I’m a catch: I’m a down-to-earth,
intelligent kind of guy. I like to let loose and I
try not to be what the outside world wants me
to be. I try to avoid the norm and give people a
different perspective on life.
Friday: Grenn Day Tribute Band:
$ Dollar Night $
Thursday: Ladies Night
Ladies in free before 10PM
“AMERICAN IDIOTS”
DOORS
OPEN AT
9PM
DOORS
OPEN AT
9PM
MANUAL
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in the life of // an organic farmer
> Living vicariously through others is okay with us.
Bob Dylan once sang “I ain’t gonna work on
Maggie’s Farm no more.” Barbara Clark says
Dylan has been true to his word. “He’s never
worked a lick at this farm,” says Clark, who
owns Maggie’s Farm with her husband, David.
The farm, which was named after the Bob
Dylan song, has been a labor of love for the
Clarks, who did not plan to become farmers
at frst. “We always romanticized the idea of
farming,” Clark says. “It was a mystery to us.”
In college, Barbara studied anthropology
and David studied aeronautical engineering,
but they realized those were not what they
wanted to pursue. After moving to Lawrence,
the Clarks bought land on the north side of
town and began tilling the fields. “We didn’t
live on the land,” Clark says. “We would drive
out here each day and gauge how much
work we could get done before we lost our
energy.”
Now, 18 years later, the Clarks have built
a home, a barn and a workshop on the land.
Clark says they begin and end the day by
feeding the sheep, which Barbara sheers
in the Spring to make yarn for spinning
and weaving. The Clarks are also out early
| Jon Hermes |
You say tomato, I say tomato: Husband and
wife Barbara and David Clark romanticized the
idea of owning a farm, and 15 years later have
successfully grown tomatoes, garlic and basil for
local eateries like Genovese and Wheatfelds.
Contributed photo
working on harvesting seasonal tomatoes,
garlic or basil. In the afternoon they weigh,
package, and deliver produce to businesses in
town, including Wheatfelds and Genovese.
Everything is grown organically to support.
Clark’s philosophy behind farming: “We don’t
want to add chemicals, especially when we
know the things we grow will be consumed by
people we care for and ourselves.”
get some culture // THe evil DeaD

> It’s not all about fast food and beer pong.
The Evil Dead flms are low-budget cult
classics that have lived on in the Midnight
Movie realm for the past 30 years. Evil Dead:
The Musical is bringing the movie’s gore and
humor to Kansas City this month.
“Evil Dead is one of the frst horror movies
that tapped into how campy and ridiculous
the genre could be,” Nathan Belcher,
Overland Park senior, says. “I think the stage
would be perfect for that kind of silliness and
violence.”
Egads Theatre Production Company is
putting on the musical, which combines
elements of all three Evil Dead flms (Evil
Dead I, II and Army of Darkness) along with
Rock ‘n’ Roll and Rockabilly music numbers.
Playing at the Off Center Theatre located on
the third foor of Crown Center, 2450 Grand
Blvd, Evil Dead: The Musical is guaranteed to
get messy.
“The people in the frst several rows are
going to be soaked with blood and stage
splatter,” says Steven Eubank, the artistic
director of the show.
Evil Dead tells the story of fve college
students who take a spring break trip to a
| Jon Hermes |
secluded cabin in the woods and unleash evil
spirits by reading from an ancient text called
the Necronomicon. The original 1981 flm was
followed up by Evil Dead II, which played off of
the campiness and humor of the original.
The show runs through Nov. 6. Student tickets
are $12.50 when picked up at the box offce the
night of the show.
Contributed photo
Guts and gore galore: Evil Dead flms grace the
stage in musical fashion at Kansas City’s Crown
Center, and a few lucky audience members will
get spattered with stage blood.
Sell yourSelf
and that won’t make a good frst impression,”
Hartley says.
Next, take a deep breath and brag about
yourself. While your mouth is moving, body
language expert Patti Wood wants you to
remember eye contact, listening and posture.
Wood, who wrote Success Signals: Body
Language in Business, says students today lack
eye contact. Keeping the eye connection tells
the interviewer you are paying attention and
are interested in the job. After each answer,
remember to listen to the interviewer. “Don’t
click off,” Wood says. Along with consistent
eye contact, engage the rest of your body. Lean
forward slightly with your feet frmly planted on
the ground.
After the nerve-wracking part is over, don’t
forget to end an in-person interview with a solid
handshake, Wood says. Even if you feel like you
made mistakes, a frm handshake accompanied
by words of interest can leave the interviewer
with a good impression.
But not all interviews happen in a sit-down
environment. Ryan Watson, Mascoutah, Ill.,
sophomore, experienced brief in-person
interviews at the business career fair. “My goal
was to not look like an idiot,” he says. Watson
learned the importance of preparing a résumé
and researching employers before attending
the career fair.
Hartley at the UCC says the 30-second speech
about yourself is the most important skill to have
in career fair scenarios. “They want to know
who you are and what you are there for,” she
says.
A phone interview brings a different
challenge. The interviewer can’t see your
reaction. “Be enthused and animated,” Hartley
says. Find a secluded spot and dress up so the
mood of your conversation doesn’t turn casual.
Hartley also recommends using this type of
interview to your advantage by laying out your
résumé and cheat sheets.
Heather Luth, Olathe senior, says her stomach
flled with butterfies as she answered her cell
phone for her frst phone interview. “I just tried
to focus on sounding excited.”
Nailing a job isn’t all about the interview, but
these tips can help that part of the job hunt. If
you need more help, visit the UCC in the Burge
Union or online. They can help you organize
your résumé and send you out of their offce
prepared to land your dream job.
MANUAL
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Under pressure: Whether your in-
terview is in an ofce, at a career
fair or on the phone, remember
to be enthusiastic and engaged. If
you’re in need of practice to elim-
inate nervousness, check out the
resources at the University Career
Center, which ofers mock inter-
views and practice questions.
Photo Illustration | Jerry Wang
| BRENNA LONG |
Jp
Landing a job takes more than
a crisp résumé and friendLy smiLe
The PerfecT handshake
in 10 sTePs
A quick shake counts for three hours of continuous
interaction says Patti Wood, body language expert.
Start every interview with these 10 steps and you’ll
be closer to getting a job.

1 Walk to the person confdently with head
level and hands at your side, not in your
pockets. If carrying a purse or portfolio,
switch it to your left hand.
2 If sweaty palms or clammy hands plague you,
wipe your hands before any handshake.
3 Briefy smile but don’t go over the top and
look cheesy.
4 Make eye contact, but don’t stare. This lets
the person know you want to interact.
5 Face the person directly, not at an angle.
6 Make sure you fully extend your right arm, or
you may look timid.
7 Position your hand straight up with thumb
on top.
8 Open the space between your thumb and
index fnger so your hand easily slides
into theirs, keeping your other fngers
straight so your palms touch.
9 Wrap your fngers around their hand and
lock hands.
10 Shake frmly three times and release. The
grip is not a contest of strength. Make sure to
match the pressure of the other person.
Dressed to impress, Rachel Schallenberg
shook his hand with confdence. She had done
the simple greeting before. Then he stopped
her and made her do it again. Her professional
shake did not meet his standards.
Thankfully, this was a learning environment.
Using the career services at KU, Schallenberg,
Olathe senior, left her mock interview prepared
to pursue a real job.
Learning how to interview can help students
feel more confdent when they nervously sit
down to impress future employers. At the
University Career Center (UCC), students can get
personal guidance on preparing for interviews.
To prepare, the UCC has practice questions,
mock interviews and a virtual interview program
online. Talking through questions with family
and friends can help students get comfortable
talking about themselves, says Ann Hartley,
associate director at the UCC. For professional
advice on interviewing performance, Hartley
says the mock interviews at the UCC can help.
The staff records and watches the interview
with the student. “As much as students hate it,
seeing yourself can help you notice the umms
and pauses,” Hartley says.
When the interview has arrived, Hartley
reminds students to take a résumé, pen and
paper, but to leave the cell phone behind.
“The danger of forgetting [to turn it off] is high,
Mabel Kok’s apartment at The Exchange is
her comfort zone. It’s her temporary home that
connects her to the home she left behind. It’s
where she fnds her roommate, a friend from
her home country of Malaysia. It’s where she
talks to her parents and three younger brothers
using Skype.
But all comfort zones need to be breached,
as college life is much more than the inside of
a classroom, apartment and the bus you ride.
This can be diffcult for the international student
who misses eating fresh fsh from the sea, or
who can’t understand her fast-talking American
roommate, or who covers her head with an
Hijab scarf in public.
When international students come to the
University of Kansas they must learn to adjust to
a different culture and face new challenges. By
looking at homesickness, language, friendship
and patriotism, students from across the globe
discuss what it’s like to bleed crimson and blue
on foreign soil.
Longing for home
A tall African man steps outside of Kansas
City International Airport and into the cold
January air. Snow covers the ground. He’s
never seen anything like it. Tears fall down his
dark cheeks.
This is not Mozambique. He can no longer
feel the warmth. He can no longer feel the
breeze from the sea. He wonders, “What have I
put myself into?” This is not home.
The chilling effect left Antonio Cumbane
feeling more alone than he’s ever felt before.
He says he almost wanted to go right back
home. At the time, he knew no one. Of the 2,135
international students at KU, only one other
student was from Mozambique.
Michael Ediger, associate director of advising
and orientation at International Student and
Scholar Services (ISSS), says students like
Cumbane are more likely to feel lonely initially.
International students who are one, or one of
only a few, people from their home country often
feel more anxiety and isolation than a student
from a country that has a signifcant presence
on campus.
For Cumbane, the homesickness didn’t go
away after a semester. He had a few semesters
before he could graduate with a Master’s
degree in education. He wanted to fnish the
required classes quickly, thinking he would be
able to go home earlier, so he enrolled in fve
classes. Soon enough, the stress from the heavy
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FEATURE
Crossing borders: For many international stu-
dents, homesickness is common when frst at-
tending the University. Antonio Cumbane says
he missed his family, the weather and food of
his home country of Mozambique. He is learn-
ing English to become a teacher when he returns
home.
Photo illustration by Ben Pirotte
workload caused him to visit Watkins Memorial
Health Center with complaints of fevers and
headaches.
Cumbane says the doctor told him nothing
was wrong. He was sick because of the
overwhelming homesickness and stress. The
doctor wrote Cumbane a note to miss three
days of class to recuperate.
Aside from dealing with homesickness,
Ediger says adjusting to unfamiliar foods is a
big challenge for international students at KU.
Cumbane says Americans prefer snacks, such
as popcorn and pretzels, rather than large
meals. He misses the fresh seafood and feasts,
along with the loud music and dancing, which
are part of his lifestyle in Mozambique. “I am
African,” Cumbane says. “Those are the things
we do.”
oLd TradiTions,
new TradiTions
Hejab ALmutairi has traveled all over the
United States. He loves San Antonio and smiles
when talking about New York. But the can’t see
himself ftting in anywhere but here. Lawrence
is his favorite place in America.
ALmutairi wears khaki cargo shorts and a red
“Hill Yes” KU t-shirt. He likes this casual look —
back home in Saudi Arabia men traditionally
inTernaTionaL sTudenTs TaLk abouT whaT
iT’s Like To be The new kids in Town
BY MOLLY MARTIN
dress up for class, while women must wear
abayahs (robes) and hijabs (head scarves) in
public or where men are present.
In Saudi Arabia, Islam permeates throughout
Saudi culture and affects the lifestyles of those
who live there. Saudi international students like
ALmutairi bring aspects of their culture to KU.
ALmutairi says almost all Saudi female students
at KU continue to wear hijabs, including his
wife, who has joined him at the University.
Although Saudi culture differs from American
and Jayhawk culture, ALmutairi says he has
felt comfortable here since he arrived in May of
2008, partly due to the large population of Saudi
students at KU, which totals 143 students. He’s
also involved with and serves as president of
the Saudi Student Association at KU.
ALmutairi says he took the position because
he wants KU students to know more about
Saudi Arabia. He says he believes American
misconceptions about his country are that
all Saudis ride camels and live in tents in the
desert. His goal is to inform them that Saudis
have the same technology and education as
America. He is also concerned about Saudi
Arabia’s lack of media coverage in America.
The pride ALmutairi has for his home country
remains strong. He plans to return to Saudi
Arabia after he graduates to help his country
and community. But he also admires the
American way of life. “I wish I could split myself
and live in both places at once,” he says.
Understanding throUgh
langUage and friendship
Slang phrases and unfamiliar vocabulary of
native English speakers are often diffcult for
Rei Tsutahara to understand. Tsutahara is a
Japanese exchange student studying at KU for
the fall semester. The Tokyo senior wanted to
study in America to improve her English skills
to become an English teacher in Japan.
The Applied English Center (AEC) is a
resource for international students that
helpsTsutahara and other non-native English
speakers improve their English skills. When
international students arrive at KU, they
must take an English-language profciency
assessment to determine whether or not they
are ready for University courses. Margaret
Coffey, AEC associate director and senior
language specialist, says the center’s primary
mission is to improve international students’
English skills for academic purposes.
If the results from the assessment test
— Michael ediger
AssociAte director of Advising
And orientAtion for isss.
the most impor-
tant thing we do
is give students
a connection to
the university.
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FEATURE
show that students still need English language
improvement, AEC enrolls them in the center’s
classes to improve their English skills. Students
must complete these classes before they can
take classes through the University; however,
depending on individual assessment results,
AEC permits some students to take both AEC
classes and University classes in the same
semester. For example, Tsutahara is taking one
AEC class and three University classes.
Tsutahara says it has been easy for her
to adjust to this new environment because
the University understands international
students. Apart from AEC, the International
Student and Scholar Services also assists
the KU international community by providing
admissions, advising, programming and referral
services. Michael Ediger from ISSS says “The
most important thing we do is give students a
connection to the University.”
While Tsutahara has been adapting well, she
says other Japanese students do not feel as
Saudi style: As he has adapted to college culture,
Hejab ALmutairi prefers to dress more casually
than he would in his home country of Saudi
Arabia. Tere, men dress up for class and wom-
en wear robes and head scarves in public.
Photo illustration by Chris Neal
comfortable. She says Japanese students are
not as outgoing as American students — they
tend to wait to be spoken to rather than initiate
conversation. Such conversations may be
diffcult because of varying English-speaking
levels, but she says Japanese students wish
American students would make the effort to
talk to them more.
Ediger says students with a large number
of others from their home country may be less
inclined to adapt at KU. With 88 international
students here, Japanese students may feel
more comfortable associating only with those
from their home country, thereby isolating
themselves from interacting with others outside
of their native culture.
To encourage friendships among various
international student groups and domestic
students, ISSS hosts international student
orientation at the beginning of each semester.
International students and student volunteers
unite to ease the transition to KU, and bond
over being strangers in a foreign land. Ediger
says many students make lasting friendships,
and even walk down the hill with one another
at graduation.
Tsutahara attended orientation and says
she has made friends, although she won’t walk
down the hill with them because she is going
back to Japan at the end of the semester. “I’m
very sad when I imagine my last day in Kansas,”
she says. “I’m sure I will cry.”
international student
association (isa)
ISA merges all of the nationalities represented on
the KU campus to promote international friendships
and cultural appreciation. The organization hosts a
variety of social events throughout the academic
year, including a Halloween party. During the
Spring semester, ISA hosts a week of international
awareness programs culminating in a Festival of
Nations, which features talents and fashions from
around the world.
lawrence Friendship Family program
The community-based program matches
participating international students with local
families and individuals. It is an opportunity to
develop friendships and promote cross-cultural
understanding through occasional meals and
organized social activities. Special events include
picnics, game nights, pot luck dinners, ice cream
socials and an annual square dance.
small world
Small World is a not-for-proft, volunteer community
organization for non-student female spouses of
KU international students, faculty and scholars
who wish to improve their English and learn about
American customs.
global partners
Global Partners pairs international students
and domestic students for a cultural and social
exchange and provides social, service and
academic opportunities. The program matches
students based on interests, academic majors and
languages.
betty grimwood thanksgiving
homestay program
Named to honor the person who initiated the
program more than 50 years ago, the homestay
program is an opportunity for international students
to experience this very traditional American holiday
either by staying with area host families for the
entire Thanksgiving break or by joining them for the
holiday dinner.
international involveMent:
prograMs for both international
stUdents and doMestic stUdents.
Jp
10
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NOTICE
| spENCEr alTmaN |
wescoe wit
> Lol.
Have you overheard any Wescoe witticisms?
Become a fan on Facebook and your post could
be published in Jayplay!
let’s just go to one of those gay sports
bars where the majority of guys aren’t
actually gay.
GiRL:
It’s fun simulating sexual
activity with plants.
PRoFessoR:
I don’t want to stay much longer
— it’s, like, creepy quiet here.
Where are you?
The library.

GUY:
GiRL :
GUY 1:
GUY 2:
GUY 1:
so is God still a possibility?
Who knows? steven Hawking could just
be pulling our legs.
GiRL:
PRoFessoR:
I’ve been rear-ended by guys three times. GiRL:


Okay everyone, just for her we’re going
to dwell on nothing but kittens and but-
terfies for then next minute ... We good?
alright, back to Hitler.
GiRL:
PRoFessoR:
It’s probably not going to happen.
Too bad I can’t cash that reality check.
GiRL:
GUY:
Is she thinking about aborting it?
I hope she doesn’t, I would like want to
throw her the best baby shower ever.
GiRL:
GiRL2:
This is so depressing.
Well, what scares you
all most about public
speaking?
The likelihood of assas-
sination.
I was going to say failure
but his is better.
PRoFessoR:
GUY:
GUY 2:
GiRL(oN PHoNe) :
GUY 2:
Woah, what are these little bumps?
I dunno, close your eyes and feel them.
Yeah, that’s pretty cool. But what do
they mean?
They’re for the blind, not the dumb.
Over 1,000 Halloween Costumes.
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Over 1,000 Halloween Costumes.
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MI SSI NG
Li ed
Cent er
1/ 2 pg.
vert
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Fiddler on the rooF
A GLORIOUS MUSICAL THEATRE TRADITION
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11
10
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NOTICE
celebritweets // tim siedell
(@badbanana)
| TAKEN FROM TWITTER.COM BY SpENCER altman |
I like to draw a little Nike swoosh on my caramel apples so I look like a serious ath-
lete at the gym.
Oct. 7th at 11:54 p.m.
Bad week for Brett Favre. Bet he can’t wait to get back onto the feld and throw some
interceptions.
Oct. 10th at 3:29 p.m.
Do you still call it a harmonica holder if you’re only using it to hold fried chicken?
Oct. 10th at 8:12 p.m.
Kicking butt and faking names. Don’t want anyone tracing this back to me.
Oct. 11th at 10:28 p.m.
Military-grade explosives found at NYC cemetery. Hundreds confrmed dead.
Oct. 11th at 3:41 p.m.
Need a cigarette holder, green makeup, and a wheelchair to fnish my Halloween
costume (Frankenstein Delano Roosevelt)
Oct. 11th at 8:43 p.m.
Full of peace and calm this morning. Googled my symptoms and found out I died in
my sleep.
Oct. 12th at 11:08 a.m.
The medical profession and I agree to disagree on how to classify the French dip
sandwich. I say superfood.
Oct. 13th at 4:06 p.m.
Tim Siedell is a creative director for a communications group in Lincoln, Nebraska.
Bio: “Sometimes I just want to give it up and become a handsome billionaire.”
PITCHERS
recording his frst album in January.

Check out his music at http://www.reverbna-
tion.com/althecrownprince

STAGE PRESENCE // Al ‘The Crown PrinCe’
williAms
> Rising stars. Feel free to swoon.
For Alphonso Williams, the road to suc-
cess has been a long one. Williams, the self-
proclaimed ‘Crown Prince,’ was signed to Def
Jam records, Jay-Z’s label, this September
but says it took years of perseverance, persis-
tence and patience to make it happen.
Williams remembers sitting outside of Re-
cord Plant Studios in Hollywood at 4 a.m. after
the 2007 BET Awards. He says he saw Jazzie
Pha, a well-known producer in the industry
who has worked with Ludicrous and Nelly, pull
up. Williams walked up to him, demo in hand,
and asked Jazzie Pha for a moment of his time.
Williams says although the conversation went
well, it didn’t lead to anything.
This is just one of the many frustrating mo-
ments Williams has faced since he graduated
from Colorado State University in 2006.
“I wish it had been a fly-by-night type of
thing,” Williams says. “I defnitely had to put in
a lot of hard work to get my foot in the door.”
Williams says that although he may have
taken the long road, his recent success was
worth the travel.
His next mix tape, California Nights, will be
released in December, and Williams will begin
| KATe lArrAbee |
Roc-a-fella: Alphonso Williams, also known as
‘Crown Prince,’ hasn’t always been lucky in the
rap game, but was recently signed to Jay-Z’s label,
Def Jam records.
Contributed photo
PLAY
7
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10
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12
Party On,
Taste Buds!
Three Locations
Near You!
1408 W 23rd St, Lawrence
1220 W 6th St, Lawrence
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(6th & Wakarusa), Lawrence
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712 Mass St.
120 Teas
Bubble Tea
Espresso
Snacks
Wifi
PLAY
13
10
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10
Kansas, is skeptical.
Hefner Heitz has studied the cemetery
rumors but says she doesn’t believe them.
However, there is one thing she knows for
certain.
“Stull Cemetery is a uniquely fascinat-
i ng and enduri ng l egend of the super-
natural,” Hefner Heitz says. “It’s one of the
dominant legends in the state of Kansas.”
Visit the cemetery at your own risk. Tres-
passers will be prosecuted.
scene and heard // stull cemetery
The gateway to Hell may be closer than
you think. According to the legend, the gate-
way is in Stull, a small town only 10 miles
from Lawrence.
An abandoned church once stood on the
burial ground, and the basement supposedly
served as the Devil’s portal to Earth, making
Stull one of the seven gateways to Hell.
Although creepy rumors started circulating
in the 1970s, Stull Cemetery has been around
for 141 years. Satan is rumored to appear ev-
ery Halloween because his true love, a witch,
is buried there. One of the less than 100 graves
in the cemetery bears the name “Wittich.” The
church was torn down in 2002, but that doesn’t
keep the curious away.
Sean Morrow ventured to the cemetery in
October 2008, but he refused to get out of the
truck. “In every horror movie, if you leave the
car, you die,” Morrow says.
The Libertyville, Ill., senior says the chain
link fence surrounding the cemetery suddenly
started shaking. “There was no wind,” Morrow
says. “That defnitely added to the freakiness.”
Morrow says he believes in paranormal ac-
tivity, but Lisa Hefner Heitz, author of Haunted | Ashley BArforoush |
Scary scenario: If you’re up for a scare, head
to Stull Cemetery outside Lawrence. It’s ru-
mored to be one of seven gateways to Hell.
> New places. New faces.
Contributed photo
KOKOROKKR
kokorohouse.com
LAWRENCE’S
ORIGINAL
JAPANESE
SUSHI AND
STEAKHOUSE
601 Kasold Dr.
785.838.4134
$1.95 Sake Bombs ever yday aft er 9 pm
REVIEW
My other favorite is “Everyone Still Calls Me By
Your Name,” which anecdotes about broken-
down cars, cocktail bars, cheap motels and not
being pressured to live your life by someone
else’s rules.
“Adrift” will soothe your soul, make you
yearn for the good old days, and make you
desire a big slice of Americana.
music review //
Imagine you are out in the wilderness,
surrounded by mother nature and around
a campfre with all of your closest friends.
Now imagine a friend pulls out an acoustic
guitar, and instead of getting stuck listening
to somebody that can barely play, your friend
sounds amazing singing and playing the
guitar. Joe Foster is that friend. Foster plays a
wonderful mix of folk and bluegrass with just
a hint of classic country twang.
Most of Foster’s lyrics tell stories or
offer sweet, uplifting thoughts that he has
gleaned from growing up in Kansas. Though
he is a Kansas native, Foster has also lived
in Portland, Oregon and toured throughout
the country. In his self-released debut album,
Foster concludes with songs about stories he
encountered in “Louisiana” and “Nebraska,”
which are both soothing and hauntingly
simple, yet beautiful.
Some of my favorite tracks include the
opener “On Fire” because of the ability to
sing along as loud as you can and the elegant
background guitar, which sounds like it’s crying
and leaning on your shoulder for protection.
> KJHK’s weekly guide to sonic consumption.
Joe Foster: adriFt (selF-release)
| Zack Marsh |
14
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KANSANGUI DE. COM/ TOPOFTHEHI LL
VOTE ON
pi ck your

LOCAL
FAVORITES
for the 2010
Top of the Hi l l
For a spectacular birds-eye view of
Lawrence and an open, spacious bar,
the Nest on the Ninth at the Oread,
1200 Oread Avenue, is a great pick for a
romantic night for two or a fun outdoor
atmosphere to share with friends and
family. The rooftop terrace provides a big-
city feel in a fairly small town.
I ordered one of their specialty martinis,
the Lemocello Bellino. The lemon and
champagne made the drink slightly sweet
and bubbly, yet it was very strong. The drinks
are not cheap at nine dollars a pop, but the
prices are fair considering the atmosphere.

LemonceLLo BeLLino
3 counts Absolut Citron
2 counts Lemoncello
Dash Triple sec
Topped with champagne
| BrITTANy NeLsON |
DRINK RevIew //
Nest oN the NiNth:
LemoNceLLo BeLLiNo

> The taste of the town, one meal at a time.
15
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reVIeW
·

$1 Wel l s, $1 Shot s
$2 Bacardi s,
Cuervos, Domest i cs
& UV dri nks
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Fami l y Beers
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Vodka Dri nks
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Cockt ai l s
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$7 2L Domest i c
Towers &
$9. 50 3L
Domest i c Towers
$10 2L & $15 3L
Free St ate, Boul evard
& Sam Adams Towers
$2. 75 Coronas
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& 1/2 Pri ce Appet i zers
(St art s at 3pm)
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Burger Basket
w/choi ce of si de
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Towers & $9. 50
3L Towers
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Tourney &
1/2 Pri ce Burgers
$2 Bot t l es & Wel l s $3 Bi g Beers,
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& Jager Bombs
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& 30¢ Wi ngs
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Marys
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by t he gl ass
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Dri nks
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TEA - ESPRESSO - SNACKS - Buy 1 oz . l oosel eaf tea, get 1 oz . FREE - Buy 1 snack get a hot t ea FREE
Tast ef ul Thursday
$1 Hi gh Li f e
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1, 2, 3 Speci al
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$1 Cans
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1, 2, 3 Speci al
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Footbal l Watch
Part y
$4 Keystone
Fi sh Bowl s
$. 45 Wi ngs $5 Any Burger
Basket
$5. 75
Bi g Sal ads
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Bottl es
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Basket
$. 60 Oyst ers on
t he Hal f -Shel l ,
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or St eamed Shri mp,
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$. 45 Wi ngs
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Baskets
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$1 Shot s
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Open f or t he game
$2 Al most
Anythi ng
$1 Cans
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House Inf used
Li quors $3,
Doubl es $4. 75
$2 Off
Al l Mart i ni s
$4. 75 Doubl e
Bl oody Marys
wi th house i nf used
hot pepper vodka
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by t he bot t l e
$20
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by t he gl ass
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$2. 50
Tropi cal
Dri nks
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Bud/Bud Li ght
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Choi ce
$3. 50 32 oz.
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TE TE TE TE TE TTE TT AAA A AAA
6 E. 9
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Si del i ne w/ Taste
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$4 Keystone
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