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// february 24, 2011

life. and how to have one.
CAMPUS OFFERS A VARIETY OF OPTIONS
FOR VEGETARIANS ANd VEGANS
GOOD VIBRATIONS!
local KaraoKe nights provide
weeKly entertainment
VEGGING OUT
mOVING ON Up
how to prepare for graduate
school applications now
TABLE OF CONTENTS
FEBRUARY 24, 2011 // volume 8, issue 20
* COvEr phOTO By ChriS BrONSON
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4 Kansas in Heat
hOw mANy SExuAL pArTNErS iS TOO mANy?
7 Liquid energy
15 personaL essay
AFTEr AN ArduOuS jOurNEy, ONE jAypLAy wriTEr
FiNdS pEACE ON ThE mOuNTAiN TOp
ThE prOBLEmS ANd BENEFiTS OF CAFFEiNE
ThE ATLANTiC ArE BuiLdiNg A FANBASE By
rELEASiNg FrEE EpS ONLiNE.
beHind tHe music 12
Thursday: Ladies Night
Ladies in free before 10PM
DOORS
OPEN AT
9PM
DOORS
OPEN AT
9PM
COMING SOON
Come celebrate Mardi Gras
at our Fat Tuesday party
W
IN
TE
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W
A
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M
U
P
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5
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5
%
O
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White
Chocolate
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THE MORE YOU BUY...
THE MORE YOU SAVE

The University Daily Kansan
2000 DOLE CENTER
1000 Sunnyside Dr.
Lawrence, KS 66045
(785) 864-4810
sweets are sparse.
The underlying reason for my peanut
butter attachment might stem from
laziness. I don’t give myself much time to
prepare meals, nor am I a very imaginative
cook. But I don’t always stick with the
simplicity of peanut butter and crackers.
Here are a few of my favorite concoctions
when I prefer something a bit more sweet
to go with my PB:
- Oatmeal mixed with a spoonful of peanut
butter
- Peanut butter spread on granola bars
- Peanut butter on banana slices
Peanut butter and I are stuck like glue, so
I sometimes pack a jar of it in my backpack
when I need a little protein power during
the day. But students who prefer more
traditional vegan or vegetarian meals can
find plenty of accommodating options
on campus. Check out Lindsey’s story on
page 8 to learn where to look.
“Peanut-butter vegan” is the perfect
label to justify my peanut butter intake, but
could I stick to the commitment of living
a meat-free and dairy-free lifestyle? I am
attracted to the benefits of feeling healthier
and looking healthier, but realistically, I
know a vegan lifestyle would be a struggle
at first. Before making such a serious
commitment, I’d like to explore various
cuisines for both vegetarians and vegans.
I’m open to a gradual dietary revolution, as
long as peanut butter can be the leader.

THE STAFF
EDITOR // MOLLY MARTIN
ASSOCIATE EDITOR // JONATHAN HERMES
DESIGNER // ALExANdRA AvILA
CONTACT // ALExANdRA ESPOSITO, CAROLINE KRAFT, LAURA
ERdALL
MANUAL // GABRIELLE SCHOCK, JENNIFER dIdONATO,
LINdSEY SIEGELE
NOTICE // BECKY HOWLETT, SARAH CHAMP
PLAY // BEN CHIPMAN, MICHAEL BEdNAR, LINdSEY dEITER
HEALTH // JUSTINE PATTON, ELLIOT METZ,
JACK RAFFERTY
CONTRIBUTORS // MIKE ANdERSON, MICHELLE MACBAIN,
BRITTANY NELSON, SAvANNAH ABBOTT, CHANCE CARMI-
CHAEL, LANdON MCdONALd, ALEx TRETBAR, ZACK MARSH,
BRITTANY CLAMPITT, CHELSEA THENO
CREATIVE CONSULTANT // CAROL HOLSTEAd
A friend of mine recently brought to my
attention that I could be a vegan. The idea
was laughable. Imagining my life without
juicy hamburgers and Moose Tracks ice
cream seemed impossible and joyless.
But, she said, my vegan lifestyle wouldn’t
be about what I can’t eat; it would be about
what I can eat.
“You could be a peanut-butter vegan.”
In Jayplay’s issue last week, for Out &
About, Michael asked people “If you could
only eat one kind of food for the rest of your
life, what would you pick?” Mine would be
peanut butter and Ritz crackers. Not only is
the combo my ultimate go-to snack, it also
works as a substitute for any meal (yes, even
breakfast). My friends express mother-like
concern about these meal substitutes, but I
can’t refuse the power of the PB. Plus, I eat
enough of it to argue I am getting plenty of
calories and a healthy helping of protein.
Maybe they are more concerned by my
habit of eating spoonfuls straight from the
jar. But for me, a spoonful of peanut butter
is the perfect dessert option when other MOLLY MARTIN | EdITOR
CALENdAR
The University Daily Kansan
2000 DOLE CENTER
1000 Sunnyside Dr.
Lawrence, KS 66045
(785) 864-4810
3
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THURS | FEB 24TH FRI | FEB 25TH SAT | FEB 26TH SUN | FEB 27TH MON | FEB 28TH TUES | MAR 1ST wED | MAR 2Nd
THEOLOgy ON TAp
Henry’s on Eighth,
5:30 p.m.
THE JUNKyARD
JAzz BAND
The American Legion,
7 p.m., free, all ages
SCARy LARRy KANSAS
BiKE pOLO
Edgewood Park, 7
p.m., free, all ages
JAzz QUiNTET
Ingredient, 7 p.m.,
free, all ages
KU’S DANCiNg wiTH
THE STARS
Kansas Union, 7 p.m.,
free, all ages
THE SpENCERS:
THEATRE OF iLLUSiON
Lied Center, 7:30
p.m., $10-$28
THE BEAUx’
STRATAgEm
Crafton-Preyer
Theater, 7:30 p.m.,
$10-$18
FiNAL FRiDAyS
Downtown Lawrence,
5:00 p.m., free, all
ages

THE gLOvES,
ExTRAORDiNARy
Replay Lounge, 6 p.m.
THE vAgiNA
mONOLOgUES
Hashinger Hall, 7 p.m.,
$7, all ages

THE BEAUx’
STRATAgEm
Crafton-Preyer Theater,
7:30 p.m., $10-$18,

OpUS
Lawrence Community
Theatre, 7:30 p.m.

ROBERT EARLE KEEN
Granada, 9 p.m., $20-
$25, 18+
TANgENT ARC CD
RELEASE pARTy
Jackpot Music Hall, 10
p.m., 18+
THE vAgiNA
mONOLOgUES
Hashinger Hall, 7
p.m., $7, all ages
THE BEAUx’
STRATAgEm
Crafton-Preyer
Theater, 7:30 p.m.,
$10-$18, 10+

LAwRENCE JEwiSH
FiLm FESTivAL “yOO-
HOO, mRS. gOLDBERg”
Lawrence Jewish
Community Center,
7:30 p.m.
OpUS
Lawrence Community
Theatre, 7:30 p.m.

ARNiE JOHNSON & THE
miDNigHT SpECiAL
Knights of Columbus
Hall, 8 p.m., $7, 21+

OpEN JAm
Duffy’s, 9:00 p.m.
free, 21+
KARAOKE
Set’em Up Jacks, 10
p.m., free
SCARy LARRy KANSAS
BiKE pOLO
Edgewood Park, 7
p.m., free, all ages
iNSTRUmENTAL
COLLEgiUm mUSiCUm
Swarthout Recital Hall,
7:30 p.m., free, all
ages

SpEAKEASy SUNDAy
Jazzhaus, 8 p.m., $3,
21+
pEACE CORpS
pRESENTS RETURNED
vOLUNTEER pANEL
Kansas Union, 7 p.m.,
free, all ages

HEALTHy LiFESTyLE
wEEK: DOvE mODEL
STACy NADEAU
Woodruff Auditorium,
7 p.m., free, all ages
FiLm SCREENiNg:
THE yES mEN Fix THE
wORLD
Liberty Hall Cinema, 7
p.m., $4, all ages
SCARy LARRy KANSAS
BiKE pOLO
Edgewood Park, 7
p.m., free, all ages
wHiTECHApEL
Granada, 7 p.m.

gEOgRApHER OF THE
UNiTED STATES LEE
SCHwARTz
Dole Institute of
Politics, 7:30 p.m.
TUESDAy NiTE SwiNg
Kansas Union, 8
p.m., free, all ages
TUESDAy
TRANSmiSSiONS
Bottleneck, 9 p.m.,
$2-$3, 18+
LivE JAzz @ THE
CASBAH
Burger Stand at the
Casbah, 9 p.m., free,
21+
iT’S KARAOKE TimE
wiTH SAm AND DAN
Jackpot Music Hall,
10 p.m.
BiLLy SpEARS AND THE
BEER BELLiES
Johnny’s Tavern, 6
p.m.

THE AmERiCANA
mUSiC ACADEmy
BEgiNNERS JAm
Americana Music
Academy, 7 p.m.,
free, all ages

JAzz wEDNESDAyS AT
the Jayhawker
Jayhawker, 7 p.m.

CONROy’S TRiviA
Conroy’s Pub, 7:30
p.m., $5, 21+

DOLLAR BOwLiNg
Royal Crest Bowling
Lanes, 9 p.m., $1, all
ages
CASBAH KARAOKE!
Burger Stand at the
Casbah, 10:30 p.m.,
free, 21+

THE BOTTLENECk
737 NEW HAMPSHIRE ST.
THE JACkPOT MUSIC HALL
943 MASSACHUSETTS ST.
THE JAzzHAUS
926 1/2 MASSACHUSETTS
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THE REPLAY LOUNGE
946 MASSACHUSETTS ST.
THE EIGHTH ST. TAPROOM
801 NEW HAMPSHIRE ST.
LAwRENCE ARTS CENTER
940 NEW HAMPSHIRE ST.
THE GRANADA
1020 MASSACHUSETTS
ST.
THE POOL ROOM
925 IOWA ST.
wILDE’S CHATEAU 24
2412 IOWA ST.
DUFFY’S
2222 W. 6TH ST.
CONROY’S PUB
3115 W. 6TH ST., STE. d
THE BOTTLENECk
737 NEW HAMPSHIRE ST.
Tune into KJHK 90.7fm tonight at 7p.m. for Ad Astra Radio, a weekly local culture and art show.
Tonight’s show features Lucky you Bakery and a performance by Spirit is the Spirit (Seafarer).
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CONTACT
> Tackle the sticky world of relationships.
kansas in heat // HOW MANY IS TOO MANY?
a. Having sexual experiences, which could
be with one or more partners, is necessary
for sexual understanding and development.
Sex is so much more than penile-vaginal
intercourse, anal sex, oral sex, etc. Sex
includes seduction, selflessness, passion,
trust and intimacy, which, I believe, doesn’t
fully develop during a one-night stand or a
few weeks of dating.
Let’s consider your 21-year-old friend’s
theory. If each of his 20 partners “meant
something,” and that “something” is the
trust and intimacy I mentioned above, then
your friend has dedicated much of his few
years as a sexual expl orer to courtshi p
and relationship development. Poppycock!
I’m sure he’s had a few short-lived sexual
encounters, maybe as short as one night.
This leads me to believe he is trying to save
face and justify his increasing number of
sex partners.
If you are using the “meant something”
theory, you are on the ri ght track. Thi s
doesn’t mean the only sex you will ever
want is with a long-term partner — that’s
OK. Don’t let fear of ridicule prevent you
f rom sat i sf yi ng your expl orat i on as a
sexual being. But you must be responsible
wi th your sexual i ty. Not onl y does thi s
mean your sexual heal th, but al so your
sexual safety and the protection of you and
your partner’s emotions.
Havi ng an i nt i mat e connect i on wi t h
someone f eel s amaz i ng. But you’ l l
never get there i f you’ re worri ed about
what others will think. Take your sexual
development by the horns, find the path
you want to take and make it your own.

// MICHELLE MACBAIN
Q. Recently I was talking with my boyfriend about how many sexual partners is considered
“too many.” A 21-year-old friend of mine says he’s had over 20 partners but they each
meant something to him, so he doesn’t see a problem with the number. What do most
people consider to be too many partners and at what age?
Mike Anderson, Dellwood, Minn. graduate student, is the host of Kansas in Heat, a talk show about sex and
relationships that airs Mondays at 9 p.m. on KJHK, 90.7fm and at kjhk.org. Michelle MacBain is his co-host.
a. Studies show that the typical American
mal e and femal e say over 15 partners
is “too many.” I am not a huge believer
i n these numbers and studi es because
they rely heavily on young, college-aged
students. My guess is that most people
associ ate “too many” partners wi th a
number north of 20. I think that’s BS.
Are peopl e wi th a hi gher number of
sexual partners more l i kel y to have an
STI? Not if they use protection.
Peopl e mi ght t hi nk t hat t oo many
partners makes a person less attractive.
Some studi es show that peopl e want a
partner with less sexual history, but those
studies include younger individuals who
haven’t had many years of experience.
In some si tuati ons, I’ d rather date a
girl with 20 partners in the past six years
than a girl who has dated the same guy for
those six years. The girl with 20 partners
i s probabl y better at dati ng and knows
what she wants. The gi rl wi th onl y one
partner has limited experience and will
probably compare me to her past partner.
That strong level of comparison is often
detrimental to relationships.
Some consider people with “too many”
par t ner s t o be pr omi scuous. I don’ t .
Promiscuity means haphazard encounters
without discrimination. Your friend, who
says he has st rong connect i ons wi t h
partners, doesn’t seem promiscuous.
A person’s “number” means little to me
until I meet that person and see who they
really are. I think it’s important to look at
the nature of a person’s sexual past before
you judge his or her number.

// MIKE ANDERSON
Texas’ Own Robert Earl Keen
Texas’ Own:
Robert Earl Keen
This Friday! Feb. 25 | Doors 8
ADVANCE TICKETS
STILL AVAILABLE
DIRTY DIRTY DIRTY
TIGA STYLE & SHEPPA
OF NOMATHEMATICS
PRESENTS:
Tickets available @ Box Offi ce
12-5pm, MON-FRI
or @ theGranada.com
FEB 26
WhiteChapel 3/1
BLACKOUT 3/3
California Voodoo: an honest
interpretation of widespread
panic 3/5
THE KANSAN PRESENTS: FAT
TUESDAY 3/8
Cold War Kids 3/9
Victor Wooten Band and Stan-
ley Clarke Band 3/11
Joie De Vivre 3/13
Middle Brother (members of
Deer Tick, Dawes, and Delta
Spirit) 3/15
Steve Aoki 3/16
St. Patty’s Day 3/17
GALACTIC 3/18
Stoney LaRue 3/19
For All Mankind 3/22
Sky Smeed Band 3/23
From Quiet Arms 3/24
40oz to freedom (SUBLIME TRIB-
UTE BAND) 3/25
STIMPAC 3/26
Travie McCoy 3/27
Das Racist 3/30
Casey Donahew Band 3/31
HOMETOWN:
Edina, Minn.
MAJOR:
Education
YEAR:
Junior
INTERESTED IN:
Men
CONTACT
5
02
24
11
catch of the week // Natalie terwilliger
> Our weekly peek at a fsh in the KU sea.
Interests & HobbIes: I love working out. I
try to make it a daily routine to go to the Rec.
I enjoy cooking and cleaning; both are great
stress relievers. When I have the opportunity, I
like to travel to warm places. In the future I plan
on traveling to France to visit family.

FavorIte Quote: “Never say never”
– Justin Bieber
CelebrIty CrusH: Ashton Kutcher

turn-ons: I like a guy who has high self-
esteem but who also can recognize his faws. I
like a guy who sets goals for himself, believes
his education is important and is reliable. I
want a guy who isn’t afraid to laugh and be
himself around me.
turn-oFFs: I don’t appreciate a guy who
comes off as acting needy or desperate. I
also don’t like a guy who is insensitive to my
feelings or someone who chooses to ignore
me. I defnitely can’t have a guy that is a slob.
notICes FIrst In a potentIal partner:
The way a guy dresses and his smile. I am
attracted to guys who are ft because that
shows they stay active. I am also drawn to
guys with dark hair.

WHy I’m a CatCH: I am a loyal friend who
can get along with almost anybody. I’m
non-judgmental and I don’t like to gossip. My
friends compliment me on my spontaneity
and my ability to balance school, work and
fun.
// LAuRA ERdALL
FEB
24
A MAGICAL SPECTACULAR
ORDER TODAY lied.ku.edu 785-864-2787
THURSDAY, FEB. 24 — 7:30 p.m.
THEATRE
OF ILLUSION
THE SPENCERS
$11 STUDENT TICKETS
Mum. I’m of my nut on crack and I’ve got to train Marky Mark to be the new Rocky.
I’m getting too thin. Send condoms.
6:26 p.m. Jan 8

Jar Jar Binks is almost an anagram for Justin Bieber.
6:48 p.m. Jan 8
Thanks for my award, you beautiful British bastards. Comedy is our best defence
against pain. In conjunction with medical expertise.
11:58 p.m. Jan 22
Forgetting Sarah Marshall? I’m in this flm! I sing “Inside Of You” by Jason Segel
which could be about the heart, mind or anus.
11:09 p.m. Jan 24
I am hosting Saturday Night Live, Feb 12th. If you have any sketches/jokes please
send. Remember, I will ONLY play drug addicts.
3:58 p.m. Feb 1
Yesterday was Groundhog Day, today is Chinese New Year; this is too much pres-
sure. Tomorrow I’m going to shred my calender.
3:14 p.m. Feb 3
Start SNL today. What they don’t tell you is, tuesday is also live. Everyday is live.
Except Monday which I record on thursday.
3:37 p.m. Feb. 8
6
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wescoe wit
> Lol.
It’s a condom and a toothbrush! PRoFessoR:
GiRL:
GUY: Some girl was saying how she hated
The Burger Stand.
Whatever, she’s possessed by Satan.
PRoFessoR:
GUY: Does that make sense?
It sort of suggests what I’m
asking you to do is stupid. And I resent that.
PRoFessoR: So what can you do on the
Sabbath? Anythng that’s not work. If you want
to have hot and crazy sex all day, go for it.
GUY: I fnd it surprising they would let him
have the university e-mail address “mfucker.”
Here they regulate stuff like that. My friend got
censored because his las name was Cumminigs.
My last boyfriend and I got to the point
where we pooped with the door open.
Yeah you can’t recover from that.
GiRL 1:
GiRL 2:
Your crouch looks so big when you stand up.
I need every optical illusion I can get.
GUY 1:
GUY 2:
My mom said word for word
“this couch sucks balls.”
GUY:
Don’t play gay “chicken” with me. You will lose. GUY:
I want a shirt with a wolf on it;
because wolves are majestic.
GiRL:
Have you overheard any Wescoe witticisms?
Become a fan on Facebook and your post could
be published in Jayplay!
// BECKY HOWLETT
ceLebRitweets // @rustyrockets
// TAKEN FROM TWITTER.COM BY BECKY HOWLETT
Russell Brand is a British actor and comedian who recently married
singer Katy Perry. He is known for his eccentric style and irreverent
comedy.
NOTICE
The Eldridge | 701 Massachusetts Street | 785.749.5011 | www.eldridgehotel.com Street | 785.749.5011 setts Street | 785.749.50
Brunch Buffet
10:30am to 2pm
$16.95
*
Present your KU ID for $3 off!
Children 7-12 $6.95
6 & Under Free
* Taxes & gratuity not included.
$3.50 Bloody Marys
Reservations Accepted
785.749.1005
Brunch Buffet
10:30am to 2pm
Sunday Brunch
BLACK LIGHT PARTY
1200 Oread Avenue | Enter on Indiana
Doors open at 9pm | www.oreadcave.com
T
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DDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDoooooooooooooooooooooooooorrrrrrrrrrrrssssssssssssssssssss ooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooppppppppppppppppppppeeeeeeeeeeeeeennnnnnnnnnn aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaatttttttttttttttttt 9999999999999999pppppppppppppppppppppmmmmmmmmmmm ||||||||| wwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwww............ooooooooooooooooorrrrrrrrrrrrrrreeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeaaaaaaaaaaaaaaddddddddddddddccccccccccccccaaaaaaaaaaaaaaavvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvveeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeee.......ccccccccccccccccccooooooooooooooooommmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm
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02
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HEALTH
It is 7 a.m. My ear-piercing alarm interrupts
my dream, causing me to roll over and moan in
sleep-deprived annoyance. Mornings are not
my thing. Once I’ve snoozed about 10 minutes
too long, I make a slow, trudging beeline to the
kitchen. I take out my coffee grounds, pour tap
water into the coffee maker, hit “Brew Now,”
and wait impatiently for my liquid energy, just
like I do every morning.
With each delicious gulp, I feel the hazy
cloud around my head being lifted. By the end
of my first cup of java goodness, I feel alert
and ready to take on the day. My fatigue is long
gone.
I have a confession to make: I am a caffeine
addict. Or at least that’s what I’ve convinced
myself. But is caffeine addiction actually an
“addictive disorder?” What is caffeine anyway?
Is it really such a bad thing?
For “caffeine addicts,” like myself, there’s
good news. Staci Hendrickson, a registered
dietitian in Lawrence, says taking caffeine in
daily can be perfectly healthy, as long as it’s
done correctly.
Caffeine is a chemical compound that is
naturally found in a lot of foods that already
have some health benefits. Coffee, tea, and
cocoa, which all contain caffeine, also contain
antioxidants, which can help prevent a number
of problems, including diabetes and heart
disease. So when you drink a cup of coffee or
tea, you’re doing more than just fghting fatigue,
Hendrickson says.
Caffeine can also help your brain function,
which for students is a pretty good deal. Studies
have shown that caffeine can help individuals
think and recall information more efficiently,
Hendrickson says.
However, not everything with caffeine in it is
healthy — not by a long shot. Hendrickson says
she usually advises individuals to stay away
from energy drinks, such as the popular 5-hour
Energy, because products like that aren’t
always well regulated, and it’s hard to tell what
is actually in them. “You literally don’t know
what you’re getting,” Hendrickson says.
Hendrickson suggests that people stick with
foods that naturally contain caffeine, such
as coffee. “We have a really good idea about
what’s in coffee and what effect it has on the
body,” Hendrickson says.
That’s good news for Erika Meltzer, a junior
from West Bloomfeld, Mich., who drinks iced
coffee with soy milk about four times a week.
Meltzer says she likes to drink the iced java
drink in the summer especially, because it’s
refreshing and a nice substitute for soda. She
also drinks it when she needs an energy boost.
But can a person actually get addicted to
those daily jolts of energy?
Nancy Hamilton, an associate professor in
psychology at the University of Kansas and a
“coffee addict” herself, thinks so. Hamilton
says for people to have an “addictive disorder,”
they must meet the follow criteria:
1. They l i ke t o use t he subst ance
recreationally, because it affects the dopamine
pleasure centers in the brain. Hamilton says
caffeine defnitely does this.
2. When they don’t get the substance,
they don’t feel normal and suffer withdrawal
symptoms. Marissa Gedis, a freshman from
Plymouth, Minn., can vouch for this. During
her first semester of college, Gedis drank
caffeinated beverages frequently. She slowly
weaned herself off of them starting in January,
and she says in the process, she suffered
headaches. Hamilton says headaches are
common, and people often get irritable and
cranky as well.
3. Lastly, people have to use the substance
habitually, or do it on a regular basis. Hamilton
says, for example, many people get into a habit
of having their first cup of coffee when they
wake up.
Hamilton says being addicted to caffeine
isn’t necessarily a bad thing, as long as it
doesn’t get too severe. She says drinking too
much caffeine can increase cortisol, a stress
hormone, and it can also increase a person’s
heart rate and blood pressure, which can cause
heart complications.
What exactly classifies as “too much”
caffeine varies from one person to the next.
Hendri ckson, the di eti ti an, says peopl e
respond differently to caffeine just like people
respond differently to alcohol and illicit drugs.
Some individuals’ brains react stronger than
others. The trick is to pay attention to the body.
Hendrickson says drinking some caffeine to get
the day going is fne, but if individuals continue
needing it throughout the day to ward off
headaches and mood swings, they may want to
reexamine their diets.

Jonesing for Java
Why being a caffeine addict isn’t so bad
Cafeine recall: Studies show that drinking cofee
can help students remember information learned
while studying.
Photo Illustration | Ashleigh Lee
// JUSTINE PATTON
caffeine content for:
Coffee (8 oz, brewed) 95-200 mg
Monster Energy (16 oz) 160 mg
Full Throttle (8 oz) 144 mg
Rockstar (8 oz) 80 mg
Red Bull (8.3 oz) 76 mg
Vault (12 oz) 71 mg
Mountain Dew (12 oz) 54 mg
Coca-Cola Classic (12 oz) 35 mg
Lipton Iced tea (12 oz) 26 mg
Warm welcome: Te ECM encourages vegetarians,
vegans and all those exploring diferent dietary
options to enjoy the positive social environment.
Photo Illustration | Chris Bronson
soups and a salad bar daily, in addition to
veggie or cheese pizza from Pizza Hut.
John says KU Dining is constantly looking
for new ideas and options for vegetarian and
vegan eaters, and encourages feedback and
ideas from students, vegetarian or not. “We’re
seeing more and more students today being
drawn to organic, vegetarian, healthy diets,”
John says. “It’s of utmost importance to us at
says Carlee John, assistant manager of the
Market at the Kansas Union. Each concept,
or mini-restaurant, within the Market has at
least one vegetarian option. Brellas Sandwich
Crafters has the popular Mega-Vega Delight
Wrap, Fresco! Cuisine has a daily vegetarian
special and Boulevard Grill now features a
veggie burger from Local Burger, a Lawrence
restaurant. The Market also offers organic
With antibiotics and hormones being injected
into our beef supply, and YouTube videos
showing us how chicken nuggets are really
made, making the decision to live a vegetarian
or vegan lifestyle comes with plenty of positive
reinforcement. Jill Wenderott, Alma freshman,
made the choice to drop meat from her diet
as a Lenten sacrifce last year. After 40 days
of going without it, meat had lost its appeal to
her. “I noticed how much the change affected
me and I just felt better, healthier,” Wenderott
says. “So I decided to stick with it. It wasn’t
hard.”
Wenderott’s decision was a personal choice.
She’s not dead set against eating meat, but
chooses not to because of the health benefts
she feels she gains. “I just don’t feel like meat
needs to be such a central part of every meal,”
she says.
But fnding meatless or non-animal-based
dining options can be the tough. Fortunately,
even in this agro-centric Midwestern state,
vegetarians and vegans can fnd many
accommodating options on KU’s campus.
KU Dining Services aims to be very sensitive to
students with diet restrictions or alternatives,
FEATURE
8
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Handmade donations: Local bakeries give their
day-old bread to Ecumenical Christian Ministries
each week for patrons to enjoy at Veggie Lunch.
Photo Illustration | Chris Bronson
// LInDSEY DEITER
KU Dining to cater to students and their needs
and desires.”
Students interested in exploring a vegetarian
diet or looking for a little variance in meat-free
campus dining have another option once a
week. Ecumenical Christian Ministries, or ECM,
hosts a free-will donation, vegetarian lunch
every Thursday from 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. The
meal is served in the main hall of ECM, located
at 12th and Oread, across from the Oread Hotel.
Different volunteer groups each week prepare
the meal fresh. The meal is open to people of
all dietary habits, religions and appetites. “Our
purpose is hospitality,” ECM director Thad
Holcombe says.
Veggie Lunch has been a weekly tradition at
ECM since 1999, when a small group of around
WHERE TO FIND MEATLESS &
DAIRY-FREE MEALS ON THE HILL
ECM enthusiasm: During the spring semesters, Veggie
Lunch serves 200-250 students each Tursday.
Photo Illustration | Chris Bronson
FEATURE
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Diet diversity: Various vegetarian dishes served
at ECM’s Veggie Lunch include curry, chick pea
salad, rice dishes and vegetarian soups.
Photo Illustration | Chris Bronson
it’s of utmost importance
to us at ku dining to cater
to students and their
needs and desires.
> Carlee John, Assistant Manager
of the Market at the Kansas Union
20 PETA (Peope for the Ethical Treatment of
Animals) and Environs club members began
meeting there weekly to share a vegetarian
meal together. The group slowly began to
grow, and eventually ECM took the reigns.
Now, when at the height of its popularity in the
spring semester, Veggie Lunch serves 200 to
250 students each week.
Each volunteer group prepares meals each
week with a wide variety of vegetarian dishes,
such as curry, chick pea salad, rice dishes and
vegetarian soups. In addition to the prepared
meal, every week a sprawling mountain of
handmade bread sits on a table at the front
of the dining hall. Several local bakeries
donate their day-old bread “very generously,”
Holcombe says.
Veggie Lunch has become increasingly
Interested In explorIng
vegetarIan optIons
around lawrence?
Try these local spots with vegetarian-
friendly meals.
The deli at the Merc
The Free State Brewing Co.
Wheatfelds Bakery
Tenth Street Vegetarian Bistro
Aladdin’s Café
Local Burger
The Burger Stand
The Orient
Panda & Plum Garden
popular, especially over the past two or three
years, Veggie Lunch coordinator Miles Gray
says. In previous years the event hosted
about 100 students and since that time,
Veggie Lunch’s average attendance has
grown by more than 100 people. He doesn’t
know whether that is a specifc increase
in vegetarian diets on campus, or if more
students are exploring alternative diet options
- probably both, he guesses. “Veggie lunch is
a great option for people who don’t eat meat,
or just as a social environment for anyone,”
Gray says. “We get vegetarians, hippie kids…
all kinds of people.”
Being aware of the food we eat and thinking
critically about the food industry as a whole
are other components of vegetarian and
vegan eating. For Rachel Vaughn, Lawrence
graduate student, being vegetarian or vegan
isn’t about the rules of what you can and
cannot eat, but thinking globally about what
you’re eating and how that affects you and
the world around you. Vaughn became a
vegetarian as a teenager and remained one for
13 years until she became a vegan fve years
ago. “Being vegan isn’t diffcult, but it means
thinking about food in a different way - how we
eat, the food industry and how it affects our
land, our lives and other countries as well,”
Vaughn says. “It’s defnitely thinking globally.”
Connotations of a vegetarian or vegan
lifestyle include limitations of food, bland
favors and hippie snobbery. But all facets of
vegetarianism and veganism are matters of
personal choice, Vaughn says.
“You need to be fexible, open minded,
understanding and have a curiosity about food
cultures, food preparation and techniques,”
she says. “When people see how excited I
am about [vegan] food, it’s an open door for
people to explore food options, beyond the
label ‘vegan.’”
10
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MANUAL
> Absence makes the heart grow ... ?
Doing without // Coffee
Some call it “the elixir of life.” But most of
us just refer to it as coffee. For busy, sleep-
deprived people the world over, it’s more than
just a tasty beverage; it’s the fuel that gets us
going and keeps us going. So what happens
when you do without it for a week? If you’re
like me, you don’t. I only made it fve days.
The frst few days without coffee were
rough. I dragged through classes and work
in a haze. It was hard to ignore the heavenly
light that shone down on every Pulse store.
My usual 3 p.m. to 5 p.m. slump now lasted
from 3 p.m. to whenever my head hit the pil-
low at night.
Mug shot: Doing without cofee for a week was
a difcult task for Jennifer DiDonato.
Photo by Jennifer DiDonato
In the mornings, no tantalizing aroma was
there to greet me — only a splitting headache
and a lonely coffee pot. Overall, it wasn’t terribly
bad. Then again, I did give up two days early.
Daily coffee drinker Brittany Welch, Olathe
junior, made it two whole weeks without coffee
over winter break. “It’s not pretty,” Welch says.
“I’m not as alert, not in a good mood — espe-
cially in the mornings.”
The headaches and daily battle to stay awake
and focused are telltale signs of caffeine addic-
tion, says Nancy Donahey, a dietitian at Law-
rence Memorial Hospital.
Donahey says that “moderation is the key
when it comes to caffeine.” Health experts con-
sider moderate daily caffeine intake to be about
200-300 milligrams of caffeine per day. In coffee,
that translates to one or two eight-ounce cups.
So for those of us who are chained to our
cups of wonder brew, here’s to staying awake
and alert in those 8 a.m. classes. Drink up!
// JeNNIFer DIDONATO
www.thesandbar.com | 17 E. 8th st.
must be 21 to enter
home of the indoor hurricane
Bermuda,
Bahama,
Come on
pretty
mama
11
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MANUAL
When you’re in the process of earning
an undergraduate degree, the prospect of
more school may seem every bit as attractive
as hugging an angry porcupine. However,
a graduate degree may help you score a
higher-paying job after graduation, and some
professions even require more than a four-year
degree.
Considering taking your education to the next
level? Here’s what you need to know.
The clock is Ticking
It’s never too early to start preparing for
going back to school. John Augusto, Assistant
Dean of Graduate Studies at the University of
Kansas, recommends beginning the process
as early as the summer before junior year by
researching programs in your feld of interest.
“You want to learn what the feld is doing,” he
says. “That takes time to process.”
Another important step, he says, is getting
to know faculty members at the schools you’re
considering. They can help you figure out the
application process and, more importantly,
whether a program is the right ft for you.
Ghadir Ishqaidef, a doctoral student from
Jordan, allowed herself plenty of time to
prepare before applying to graduate schools,
and she recommends that others do the same.
“Research as many schools as you can,” she
says. “Take time to learn about their programs
and talk to people.”
gPA: is yours good enough?
Many students spend a lot of time focusing
on their GPAs, and rightly so — most graduate
schools weigh grades heavily. But will that C+
in Algebra ruin your chances of entering the
world of higher education?
Not necessarily, says David Mumby, author
of Graduate School: Winning Strategies for
Getting in With or Without Excellent Grades.
However, students with GPAs lower than 3.0
have a significantly steeper hill to climb than
those with a 3.4 or higher. A good relationship
with faculty members in your prospective
school is essential in such cases.
If your GPA i s sl i ghtl y l ower than an
institution’s published GPA requirements, you
may still have a shot. “The publication of GPA
requirements can be extremely misleading,”
Mumby says. “These things are almost never
written in stone, and exceptions can be made.”
Of course, a high GPA can be helpful when
applying for scholarships, and many programs
will be more likely to accept a student who
receives financial support outside of the
institution.
“My MoM sAys i’M AwesoMe”
Letters of recommendation are required by
many graduate programs, but don’t think you
can get away with a letter from a relative or
close friend. If you’re interested in chemistry,
for instance, a letter from your church pastor
probably won’t cut it, says Augusto, KU’s
Assistant Dean of Graduate Studies. “I need
to figure out if you’re a good chemist first,”
he says. “Then I’ll figure out if you’re a good
person.”
Augusto says that most good letters of
recommendation come from faculty members
who know the student well. These professional
sources will be able to attest to a student’s
academi c abi l i ti es better than personal
sources. Ishqaidef, for example, had two of her
professors and a research advisor write her
letters. They were more than happy to do it, she
says.
A cosTly ProPosiTion
Preparing for graduate school is no picnic for
your pocketbook, something Danielle Packer,
Topeka senior, discovered the hard way. Packer
is interested in social work and law, and she’s
narrowed down her graduate school choices to
KU and Washburn University.
To help shoulder the financial burden of
standardized tests (see sidebar), ordering
and sending transcripts and application fees,
Packer took out a new credit card. Ordering
transcripts, she says, has been the most
frustrating financial obstacle. “Paying for
transcripts is incredibly ridiculous to me,
considering how much I’ve paid in tuition,” she
says.
A shoulder To leAn on
If you’ re ready to start thi nki ng about
graduate school, your resources are virtually
endless. Augusto, KU’s Assistant Dean of
Graduate Studies, recommends speaking with
faculty members in your current program and
students already in the you’re prospective
programs.
Author David Mumby’s informational website,
www.mygraduateschool.com, contains tons of
tips for applying to graduate school.
Are you reAdy To APPly To grAduATe school?
Higher education: It’s never too early to start thinking about graduate school applications. Taking the
time to prepare for the application process will make your life easier.
Photo Illustration | Karlie Brown
// LINDSeY SIeGeLe
BAck To The
GRADUATe SCHOOL ADMISSION TeSTS:
the rundown
Gre: There’s a good chance you’ll have
to take this test if you’re applying to a
graduate program outside of law, medicine
or business. The test has three sections:
analytical writing, verbal reasoning and
quantitative reasoning.
Cost: $160
GMAt: If you’re hoping to get into business
school, this is the test you’ll probably be
taking. The test has two analytical writing
segments, a quantitative section and a
verbal section.
Cost: $250
LSAt: Heading to law school? You’ll have
to take the LSAT, which is composed of fve
sections: reading comprehension, analytical
reasoning, two logical reason sections and
a fnal section that varies from one test to
the next.
Cost: $136
MCAt: The MCAT is a standardized test for
medical school hopefuls. The test includes
sections in verbal reasoning, physical
sciences, writing and biological sciences.
Cost: $235
12
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PLAY
STAGE PRESENCE // The aTlanTic
STAGE PRESENCE // Versus The collecTiVe
> Rising stars. Feel free to swoon.
> Rising stars. Feel free to swoon.
Overland Park’s The Atlantic has been
together for just over a year, but they’re
already making waves in the local music
scene for their blend of dirty rock and lighter
indie sensibilities. They’re also getting
attention for how they distribute their music
— by giving it all away for free.
“We’re still a pretty new band, and it’s a
great way to get it out to everybody,” singer
Patrick Robinson says.
For The Atlantic, it’s a promotional thing. “If
you tell people to download your music, they’ll
Many artists and bands around Lawrence
tend to embrace an indie or folk sound. Not so
for Baldwin’s Versus the Collective, a heavy
metal outlet who are making a name for
themselves for their double-bass kicks and
complicated guitar harmonies.
“I call it aggressive, progressive metal,”
Josh Wood, bassist for Versus the Collective,
says.
Following a previous band’s breakup,
Wood and guitarist Daniel Gomez sought
out new members to form a new group. The
band’s current lineup has been active since
last summer, and they’ve been playing gigs
since the fall.
The band has garnered attention in the
Kansas City music scene, playing venues
ranging from the Uptown Theater to the Riot
Room. They have secured a spot opening
for Hester Prynne and Nightshade at the
Bottleneck at the end of May.
Versus the Collective is currently trying to
fnish an EP to release in the next few months.
The band’s music is conceptual in nature; the
songs come together to tell an overarching
tell their friends about it,”guitarist Brandon
Gardner says.
This method is all a part of the plan for the
four-piece, which also includes bassist Matt
Lane and drummer James Wooten. The band’s
two EPs have helped them build up a local fan
base, leading up to a recent appearance on
radio station 96.5’s Homegrown Buzz program,
where they debuted a new single, titled “Dixie
is Dead”. But they’re not letting their early
success distract them from their music.
“We decided our mission would be, ‘let’s be
loud as fuck,’” Robinson says.
The Atlantic’s music can be found at
theatlantic.bandcamp.com.

// BEN CHIPMAN

story that the musicians hope to reveal over
several releases.
“We just try to capture the emotions of the
story in our songs,” says Wood.

// BEN CHIPMAN
Conceptual metal: Baldwin’s Versus the Collective
formed after a previous band broke up. Tey are
now recording music and playing shows around
Kansas City.
Making waves: Te Atlantic, a four piece band
from Overland Park, are giving their music
away for free online. Te attention they’ve re-
ceived for their EPs have helped them play on
96.5’s Homegrown Buzz program.
Contributed photo
Contributed photo
13
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PLAY
From sassy gay bars to costume nights,
Kansas City and Lawrence offer a diverse
array of karaoke experiences, sure to please
all those souls who want to spend their nights
gulping down drink specials and singing ‘80s
classics. Unsure where to go? Lost in a sea of
choices? Haven’t yet realized your potential to
slay ‘em with your rendition of “If I Could Turn
Back Time?” Never fear. Here are three starting
points for your entry into the world of karaoke.
Hamburger Mary’s
Need a little camp with your karaoke? Head
over to Hamburger Mary’s, at 101 Southwest
Boulevard in downtown Kansas City, Mo.,
on Monday nights. The walls are outrageous
shades of blue, purple and red, and pictures
of gay icons adorn the walls (Liza Minnelli and
Donna Summer, just to name a couple). You
don’t need to sing like Judy Garland to have
a good time, though, which is precisely what
keeps Garrett Robinson, a senior from Wichita,
coming back. He says the bar’s intimate setting,
song variety and friendly atmosphere are what
make the experience so appealing.
Although Robinson usually enjoys watching
people more than singing, he’ll indulge every
once in a while. “I’ve never considered myself
a soloist,” he says. “I’m more of an ensemblist.
But I’ve done a couple duets and some show
tunes to get the gay out of me.”
Even if you’re not there to sing, you’ll likely
get a show. “It was pretty wild,” Jennifer
Stevens, Shawnee senior, says. “Random
people would get on the tables. This guy was in
a leotard busting it to ‘Single Ladies.’”
But the entertainment doesn’t stop at singing.
Chad Slater, Hamburger Mary’s’ karaoke DJ,
likes to play short clips from Saturday Night
Live or from movies to break up the monotony
of singing, he says.

Wayne and Larry’s
You might not see anyone busting a move
in a leotard at Wayne and Larry’s, 933 Iowa,
on Tuesday nights, but patrons are sure to be
no less entertained. Alex Fischer, a graduate
student from Jefferson City, Mo., doesn’t sing in
public, but that hasn’t stopped him from going
at least once a month. “It’s an interesting place
in that you can have people in their 50s and 60s
and people in their 20s in the same atmosphere,
Here are some places to sing to your
Heart’s content in lawrence and beyond.
In the spotlight: Karaoke nights at local bars are
a fun excuse to go out with friends during the
week.
Photo Illustration | Chris Bronson
Unchained melody: Stretch your vocal chords and
cheer on your friends at places like Wayne and
Larry’s, or explore your options and fnd a bar
with the right atmosphere for you.
Photo Illustration | Chris Bronson
// MICHAEL BEDNAR
AMericAn idoL
without the judges
and they’re all having fun,” Fischer says.
On a typical night at Wayne and Larry’s you
might see anything from spirited renditions of
Katy Perry’s “California Girls,” complete with
wild dancing around the room, to the standard
Meat Loaf and Celine Dion epics. Wayne and
Larry’s’ karaoke DJ Marc Garcia also praises
its laid-back, anything-goes atmosphere. Of
course, $4 Long Island Iced Teas on Monday
nights may be a contributing factor to that.
Jazzhaus
At Jazzhaus, 926 1/2 Massachusetts Street,
every Monday night is like a mini-Halloween,
with singing to go along with the costumes. Past
themes have included clowns, homecoming,
‘80s attire, Christmas attire and even a “dress
like a bathtub” night. “I like to find creative
ways to entertain people,” Tanya “McNaughty”
McNeely, DJ and Jazzhaus co-owner, says.
“Even if you’re not a great singer, you can still
have fun.”
McNeely saw how successful open mic
nights were at Jazzhaus and decided to buy the
equipment for karaoke, and people’s interest
has been growing ever since. Maddy Smith,
Shawnee senior, says that Jazzhaus’ karaoke
night is her favorite in Lawrence because of the
unique atmosphere and the effort people put
into their costumes. The creative vibe extends
to people’s performances, too. McNeeley
recalls one time that a group of boys turned
Bob Dylan’s protest classic “Blowin’ In the
Wind” into a hip-hop song.
If you’re a frst-time karaoke star, trying to fnd
the right song in long karaoke books can be
daunting. Here are popular song requests from
local karaoke DJs to give you ideas on how to
make your frst experience successful.
marc garcia | wayne and larry’s
Neil Diamond – “Sweet Caroline”
Carrie Underwood – “Before He Cheats”
Grease Cast – “Summer Nights”
chad slater | Hamburger mary’s
Garth Brooks – “Friends In Low Places”
Any Lady Gaga
Any Matchbox 20
tanya mcneely | Jazzhaus
4 Non Blondes – “What’s Up”
Michael Jackson – “Beat It”
Radiohead – “Creep”
14
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REVIEW
MOVIE rEVIEw // Blue VAleNTINe
> Hollywood hits, indie ficks and everything in between.
There is an extraordinarily misanthropic
saying that happy endings are just stories
that haven’t fnished yet. Derek Cianfrance’s
anti-date movie Blue Valentine would seem to
validate that cynical boast, unfurling with all the
sting and vicious intimacy of a freshly opened
wound. The flm opens amidst the ruins of a
rapidly crumbling marriage. Dean (Ryan Gosling)
is an amiable layabout who is seemingly content
with his directionless path through life, wishing
only for his wife’s love, his little daughter’s
happiness and a job that permits him to start
drinking at eight in the morning. Cindy (Michelle
Williams) is an ambitious medical student who
fnds that her initial attraction towards Dean’s
slacker charm has wilted into bitter resentment
and even outright physical repulsion.
In a last-ditch effort to resuscitate their
devastated love life, the unhappy couple check
into a sleazy sex hotel and struggle to recapture
the physical and emotional freworks that held
them in dual rapture for the better part of their
fve years together. As the evening unfolds,
the flm periodically fashes back to happier
times, outlining the entire trajectory of their
romance from their tender frst encounter to
their sexually-charged courtship to the painful
circumstances that preceded their wedlock
and paved the way for future discontent.
Perhaps Blue Valentine’s most engrossing
quality is its heightened sense of impartial
benevolence. Cindy and Dean might be deeply
fawed and emotionally crippled, but both are
intrinsically good at heart and the audience is
never asked to take sides against one or the
other, merely to observe and refect. Williams
and Gosling’s performances are nothing short
of a double revelation, especially because
their dialogue here was largely improvised
after living together in-character while the
cameras rolled.
We feel every sling and salve, every ounce
of misplaced rage and misguided atonement.
In life, and especially in a flm this adrift in
vicarious suffering, these are the moments to
savor.
MusIc rEVIEw // BARDO POND – ‘BARDO POND’
2011 (FIRe) > KJHK’s weekly guide to sonic consumption.
Bardo Pond plays a grungy style of
psychedelic drone rock. The prolifc group
has released nearly 20 LPs since forming in
1991 and is known for long and sprawling
songs with heavy reliance on repetition and
sustained soundscapes. It’s like Mogwai’s
brand of post-rock but less progressive and
more concerned with a trudging, dark kind
of shoegaze. Many of the records confront
esoteric topics such as space, drugs, sex and
spirituality.
On the band’s latest self-titled offering,
the subject matter seems to remain the
same and the heaviness is still far-out and
ear-wrenching. But Isobel Sollenberger’s
sweet cry softens the blow. The opener “Just
Once” begins with a simple backbeat that
allows twisted guitars, harmonica and fute to
wander listlessly before really launching into
chaos - heavy bass repetition and screaming
hot guitars burn for another four minutes.
The second track, “Don’t Know About You” is
much more aggressive with heavy riffng and
thick distortion underneath Sollenberger’s
muttering: “If Jesus is comin’ / Well, I’m willing
to wait / I don’t know about you / But I’m willing
to wait.” It’s menacing and not as uplifting as
the lyrics might suggest. After repeating that
lyric and the same basic structure a few times
the song dissolves into the next track with a
pair of strumming acoustic guitars and ambient
swells on top. It makes sense that the song is
titled “Sleeping,” as it’s Bardo’s softest moment
on the record. The next track must be the
demented dream that goes with the slumber.
“Undone” is nearly rhythmless for the frst
half, with Sollenberger’s strange phrases and
penetrating guitar noises along with it. It’s the
album’s longest track at 21 minutes — drums
don’t even come into play until exactly the
halfway point. The fnal ten minutes are spent
plummeting through noise; this is not for the
faint of heart.
This beautiful and haunting monster will put
you into a trance and send you through heaven
and hell along the way.
// LAnDOn MCDOnALD // ALEx TRETBAR
Japanese Steakhouse & Sushi Bar
2907 W.6th Street 785-838-3399
FREE
SUSHI ROLLS
SUNDAY - THURSDAY
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SPEAK
I couldn’t see more than 3 feet in front of
me. I felt like I was in a dark, unfamiliar room,
cautiously moving my feet forward while feeling
around for a light switch.
It was 4 a.m. and my friend Louisa and I were
an hour into our 13-mile hike when the batteries
fell out of my headlamp.
We were climbing the 14,197-foot Mt.
Pri ncet on, one of Col orado’s 54 peaks
exceeding 14,000 feet in elevation. We set out
from the 8,900-foot trailhead at 3 a.m. in order
to summit and get back to tree level before the
usual afternoon rainstorm moved in.
The cl i mb wasn’t supposed to be that
t echni cal , and we had bot h cl i mbed a
“fourteener” before this, but nothing with
such a drastic elevation increase. We faced an
elevation gain of 5,297 feet in six miles, so time
was precious. Sufficient lighting or not, we
needed to keep moving if we wanted to summit.
The moonlight exposed the silhouettes of
the towering mountain peaks around us and
our only headlamp illuminated just enough of
the trail for us to see our next step.
We continued in the darkness for nearly two
hours, shuffing along, unable to see the ground
we had covered or what lay ahead — a mystery
that both exhilarated and terrifed me.
Eventual l y, the trai l di sappeared i nto
what seemed like a field of jagged rocks and
boulders. Hell on the ankles. We didn’t have
enough light to both see where we were going
and search for trail markers (directional cues
Trek to the top: After losing their way in the dark-
ness, Sarah Champ, along with her friend Louisa,
reached the mountain top and found peace.
Contributed Photo
15
02
24
11
Mountain cliMbing, beyond the suMMit
usually formed by a stack of rocks).
It was 6 a.m. and the sun would be rising over
the Rockies before long, so we decided to wait
for daylight before maneuvering through the
rocky road ahead.
Hues of red and orange broke the darkness
as the sun rose over the mountains, revealing
the vast mountain range, blue sky and our
whereabouts.
Steep ridges of weathered rock expanded as
high as I could see. We had guided ourselves
off of the trail, which was visible 400 yards
above us.
Finally able to gauge our situation beyond
the glow of a headlamp, we faced a vertical
climb to get back on the path or we could try
to backtrack. We had come almost four miles
already and had 2,000 feet to gain before
reaching the summit.
“We don’t have time to go that far back,”
Loui sa sai d as we packed up our bags,
preparing to move forward. “But I don’t know
how we’re going to get up there.”
As I pulled my backpack over my shoulders,
I looked straight up to where we needed to be.
Standing there, on the side of Mt. Princeton, I
felt as though I had to lean forward just to keep
from plummeting like a boulder down into the
valley below.
“We’ll just have to climb in a zigzag,” I said
as I began trekking.
Louisa followed me and we scaled the side
of the mountain, meticulously stepping on loose
rocks that slipped beneath the movement of our
feet. I bent forward and used my hands to fnd
boulders secure enough to help push myself
upward.
We kept moving in meditative silence for 20
minutes. I hadn’t looked down, not until I heard
Louisa scream, anyway. She slipped and now
lay awkwardly on the rocks, paralyzed by fear.
“Champ, seriously, this is ridiculous,” she
yelled, not even looking at me, but instead down
at the valley below us.
Ridiculous?
Of course it seems that way when you
lose your footing and nearly fall 13,000 feet,
especially when you’re face-to-face with the
marker where someone died — an ambitious
climber just like yourself who also challenged
inertia, but instead got struck by lightning.
You’re also moving like a two-man glowworm
through the dark of night, knowing one step too
far to your right could be the end of you.
So, maybe it was ridiculous.
“Are you OK?” I asked Louisa who was now
on her feet. Her face was showing annoyance
and exhaustion as she nodded her head, “Yes.”
“We’re almost there,” I said, trying to foster
any ounce of hope she had remaining. “You get
ahead of me this time.”
And so we pressed on.
Another 20 minutes and we finally reached
the trail, which sat atop the mountain ridge at
13,500 feet. At this point, the last leg of our hike
was more like a leisurely stroll up the side of the
peak. At 7:45 a.m, we made it to the top.
I could go on about the incredible beauty
I saw and the satisfaction of ascending a
summit, but it all means very little compared to
the signifcance of the climb itself.
Never had I felt so small or such a sense of
wonder. After pushing through darkness, ankle
pain, shortness of breath and the prospect of
death, I have never felt so tranquil.
Each step and each struggle of my ascent
stripped me from my daily worries and the busy
life I had created for myself, putting reality in
perspective.
There was no place for distractions, anxiety
or fear. Nothing but my next step, my next
breath and surviving the present mattered.
In a more eloquent nutshell from James
Ramsey Ullman’s The Age of Mountaineering:
“The climbing of earth’s heights, in itself,
means little. That we want to try to climb them
means everything. For it is the ultimate wisdom
of the mountains that we are never so much as
we can be as when we are striving for what is
beyond our grasps, and that there is no battle
worth the winning save that against our own
ignorance and fear.”
// SARAH CHAMP

·
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