You are on page 1of 16

// march 10, 2011

life. and how to have one.
LOCAL SHELTERS HELP YOU FIND THE
PET THAT’S RIGHT FOR YOU
SPIN CYCLE
TIPS ON hOW TO PrOPerly dO
yOur lauNdry
ANALOG GrOOvES
Where TO fINd ThaT rIch vINyl
SOuNd IN TOWN
MAN’S BEST FrIEND
Personal essay 15
TABLE OF CONTENTS
MARCH 10, 2011 // volume 8, issue 22
* COvEr phOTO By JErry WANg
2
03
10
11
5 How we met
hOW A FriENd’S druNkEN ANTiCS STArTEd A
LOvE STOry
6 Go for tHe bronze
7 Viral star
A Q&A WiTh riSiNg yOuTuBE BLOggEr gLOzELL
A BETTEr OpTiON FOr gETTiNg ThAT SpriNg
BrEAk TAN
ONE JAypLAy WriTEr BEAmS WiTh pridE FOr hEr
yOuNgEr SiSTEr AS ShE WATChES hEr grOW
Thursday: Ladies Night
Ladies in free before 10PM
DOORS
OPEN AT
9PM
DOORS
OPEN AT
9PM
the backyard with her.
As we both got older, our lifestyles
matured (a bit) and she continued to be my
loyal companion. Whenever I would stay
up late doing homework, Millie would be
there to keep my feet warm. Whenever
I would spend time in front of the tube,
Millie would be there to cuddle with me.
Whenever I would take Millie on a walk,
her little legs would match my fast pace
— until she could find a puddle. There she
would plop, ever so nobly, while I waited
on her Majesty to cool off. Once a queen,
always a queen.
Millie now sits on her royal throne in
doggy heaven, but these memories will
never leave me. My family gave her a
whole new life she almost didn’t have. I
hope we gave her as much joy as she gave
us.
But taking care of a pet isn’t all about
the joys of puppy love. Pets require a lot
of time, money and attention, especially
for college students. To find out if you’re
ready for a new furry friend in your life,
check out Lindsey’s story on page 8. Make
sure to take the story’s advice and adopt
from a local shelter. (Tease: The story has
lots of cute pictures of dogs and cats. You
want to take a look.)
A photo of Millie in her bikini glory still
hangs on my family’s refrigerator. Long
live the queen.
THE STAFF
EDITOR // MOLLY MARTIN
ASSOCIATE EDITOR // JONATHAN HERMES
DESIGNER // ALExANdRA AvILA
CONTACT // ALExANdRA ESPOSITO, CAROLINE
KRAFT, LAURA ERdALL
MANUAL // GABRIELLE SCHOCK, JENNIFER
dIdONATO, LINdSEY SIEGELE
NOTICE // BECKY HOWLETT, SARAH CHAMP
PLAY // BEN CHIPMAN, MICHAEL BEdNAR,
LINdSEY dEITER
HEALTH // JUSTINE PATTON, ELLIOT METZ,
JACK RAFFERTY
CONTRIBUTORS // MIKE ANdERSON, MICHELLE
MACBAIN, BRITTANY NELSON, SAvANNAH AB-
BOTT, CHANCE CARMICHAEL, LANdON MCdON-
ALd, ALEx TRETBAR, ZACK MARSH, BRITTANY
CLAMPITT, CHELSEA THENO
CREATIVE CONSULTANT // CAROL HOLSTEAd
I was seven years old when we brought
Millie home. She already knew how to pee in
the grass and demand a tummy rub like any
well-spoiled dog should. Though her stubby
legs were only a few inches long, Millie
walked around the house and gallivanted
through the neighborhood as if she were a
queen. She was a Welsh corgi after all, the
royal dog of England.
But Millie’s previous home was no palace.
My family rescued her from a local pound.
I remember making our way through the
narrow walkway of caged animals as their
piercing cries bombarded me from both
sides. At the end of the walkway was a room
with animals that were to be executed soon.
The chubby corgi was to be killed the next
day, and we couldn’t let that happen. Millie
then became a new member of our family.
As a child, Millie was the perfect play
companion. I’m assuming this is strange
behavior for kids and their pets, but we
would play dress up together. When the
weather was nice, I would dress her up in
my swimsuit and sunglasses and run around MOLLY MARTIN | EdITOR
CALENdAR
The University Daily Kansan
2000 DOLE CENTER
1000 Sunnyside Dr.
Lawrence, KS 66045
(785) 864-4810
3
03
10
11
THURS | MAR 10TH FRI | MAR 11TH SAT | MAR 12TH SUN | MAR 13TH MON | MAR 14TH TUES | MAR 15TH wED | MAR 16TH
THEOLOgy ON TAp
Henry’s on Eighth,
5:30 p.m.
THE JUNKyARD
JAzz BAND
The American Legion,
7 p.m., free, all ages
SCARy LARRy KANSAS
BiKE pOLO
Edgewood Park, 7
p.m., free, all ages
JAzz QUiNTET
Ingredient, 7 p.m.,
free, all ages
HUmANiTiES LECTURE
SERiES—mAE NgAi
Woodruff Auditorium,
7:30 p.m., free
THE “LAwRENCE 5”
Ingredient, 7:30 p.m.,
free, all ages
SNUFF JAzz
FEATURiNg HELEN
giLLET
Eighth Street Tap
Room, 10 p.m., $3,
21+
miDDAy RAmBLER, THE
pRAiRiES ACRE
Replay Lounge, 6 p.m.

FRiDAy NigHT AT THE
KiNO: “mimiNO”
Kansas Univerisity, 7
p.m., 18+
LivE DUELiNg piANOS
Barrel House, 8 p.m.,
$3, 21+

KRAzy KAT’S
Knights of Columbus
Hall, 8 p.m., $8, 21+

viCTOR wOOTEN BAND
AND STANLEy CLARKE
BAND
Granada, 8 p.m.

TRAmpLED By TURTLES
Bottleneck, 9 p.m.,
$11-$13, all ages
SECRET CiTiES, KARmA
viSiON
Replay Lounge, 10
p.m.
COvERSmiTH
Jazzhaus, 10 p.m.
RiCE AND BEANS
FUNDRAiSER DiNNER
Ecumenical Christian
Ministries, 6 p.m.,
$5-$8, all ages
$1000 FiNAL ORigiNAL
BAND BATTLE!
The Kansan Grill, 6:30
p.m., $5, 16+

“ALiCE iN
wONDERLAND”
Lawrence Arts
Center, 7 p.m., $5-$7
BRC SOUNDS
Ingredient, 7 p.m.,
free, all ages

OpEN JAm
Duffy’s, 9 p.m., free,
21+

SUA LATE NigHT pRiCE
iS RigHT
Kansas Union, 10
p.m., free, all ages
wHEATFiELD
REBELLiON
Jazzhaus, 10 p.m.
SCARy LARRy KANSAS
BiKE pOLO
Edgewood Park, 7
p.m., free, all ages
SmACKDOwN!
Bottleneck, 7:30 p.m.,
free-$5, 18+

JOiE DE vivRE
Granada, 7:45 p.m.
KU TUBA CONSORT,
THUNDER ALL STAR
ENSEmBLE CONCERT
Swarthout Recital
Hall, 7:30 p.m.

FREE ARgENTiNE
TANgO OpEN pRÁCTiCA
Signs of Life, 8 p.m.
wATCH iT SpARKLE, THE
FELix CULpA
Jackpot Music Hall, 8
p.m.
STUDENT LECTURE
SERiES: DUFF
gOLDmAN
Crafton-Preyer
Theater, 7 p.m., free,
all ages.
SCARy LARRy KANSAS
BiKE pOLO
Edgewood Park, 7
p.m., free, all ages

FORTNigHT
Lawrence Arts
Center, 7:30 p.m.,
free, all ages
TUESDAy NiTE SwiNg
Kansas Union, 8
p.m., free, all ages
TELLER’S FAmiLy
NigHT
Teller’s 9 p.m., free,
18+
LivE JAzz @ THE
CASBAH
Burger Stand at the
Casbah, 9 p.m., free,
21+

BiLLy SpEARS AND THE
BEER BELLiES
JoHnny’S TAvERn,
6 P.M.

THE AmERiCANA
mUSiC ACADEmy
BEgiNNERS JAm
Americana Music
Academy, 7 p.m.,
free, all ages

JAzz wEDNESDAyS AT
THE JAyHAwKER
Jayhawker, 7 p.m.

OTT /
pHUTUREpRimiTivE
BoTTLEnECK, 8
P.M., $13-$15, ALL
AGES

DOLLAR BOwLiNg
Royal Crest Bowling
Lanes, 9 p.m., $1, all
ages
STEvE AOKi
Granada, 9 p.m.
mOUTHBREATHERS,
BRAiN iDEA, LAzy
Replay, 10 p.m.

THE BOTTLENECk
737 NEW HAMPSHIRE ST.
THE JACkPOT MUSIC HALL
943 MASSACHUSETTS ST.
THE JAzzHAUS
926 1/2 MASSACHUSETTS
ST.
THE REPLAY LOUNGE
946 MASSACHUSETTS ST.
THE EIGHTH ST. TAPROOM
801 NEW HAMPSHIRE ST.
LAwRENCE ARTS CENTER
940 NEW HAMPSHIRE ST.
THE GRANADA
1020 MASSACHUSETTS
ST.
THE POOL ROOM
925 IOWA ST.
wILDE’S CHATEAU 24
2412 IOWA ST.
DUFFY’S
2222 W. 6TH ST.
CONROY’S PUB
3115 W. 6TH ST., STE. d
THE BURGER STAND
803 MASSACHUSETTS ST.
Tune into KJHK 90.7fm tonight at 7 p.m. for Ad Astra Radio, a weekly local culture and art show.
Tonight’s show features the Student Recipe Contest and a performance by local band Oils.
The University Daily Kansan
2000 DOLE CENTER
1000 Sunnyside Dr.
Lawrence, KS 66045
(785) 864-4810
FOLLOw JAypLAy
ON TwiTTER !
twitter.com/Jayplaymagazine
BECOmE A FAN OF THE ‘wES-
COE wiT’ FACEBOOK pAgE
and your contributions could
be published!
(785) 856-9246 | 933 Massachusetts Street
50%
OFF
Buy 1, Get 1 50% OFF
All Jeans, Pants, and Shorts
- Mens and Womens -
White
Chocolate
4
03
10
11
CONTACT
> Tackle the sticky world of relationships.
kansas in heat // CALL ME HOT, NOT THEM
a. Your f i ancé wi l l f i nd ot her women
at t r act i ve. You wi l l f i nd ot her men
attractive. Problems only arise if you act
upon sexual attraction.
Pointing out other women from television
as “hot” may make you uncomfortable. The
first step is to express your feelings to your
fi ancé. I hope, as compati bl e partners,
communi cati ng a need for comfort and
security is not a problem.
The next time he says, “(Fill in the blank)
is so hot,” respond with, “It’s a good thing
you found your (fill in the blank) right here.”
Consider turning off the TV and leading him
into the bedroom.
Take control and be his ultimate fantasy.
If he continues to point out other women,
celebrities or otherwise, please reconsider
this person as your life-long partner. You
deserve daily praises from your partner of
your unique beauty, charm and hotness.


// MICHELLE MACBAIN
Q. My fiancé always points out women on TV he thinks are “hot.” It really bothers me.
Why does he do this? Why not point out how hot I am?
Mike Anderson, Dellwood, Minn. graduate student, and Michelle MacBain, Kansas City, Kan., graduate student,
are the hosts of Kansas in Heat, a talk show about sex and relationships that airs Mondays at 9 p.m. on KJHK,
90.7fm and at kjhk.org.
a. My first guess is that he doesn’t realize
how often he is doing this. To you, he might
be doing it always. To him, he rarely does it.
I’m woried about how you feel the women
on TV are getting more attention than you. I’m
sure he thinks you are just as hot as them —
he just hasn’t said it lately.
We all need relational currencies (or
displays of affection). Some of us need them
as compliments, as physical intimacy or as
gifts. Early in relationships we use a variety
of relational currencies to build intimacy, but
as time passes we tend to fall back on two or
three, the ones that work on us.
Let your partner know what ki nd of
affection you need. Don’t say, “Well, how
would you like it if I went around pointing out
every hot guy?” That kind of language can
hurt the relationship. Instead, let him know
how you would really like to hear him say
how hot you are. If the problem continues,
ask him about it. His reaction will tell you a lot
about your relationship.

// MIKE ANDERSON
MAJOR:
Graphic Design
YEAR:
Sophomore
HOMETOWN:
Omaha, Neb.
INTERESTED IN:
Men
CONTACT
5
03
10
11
catch of the week // MICAELA CLARKE
> Our weekly peek at a fsh in the KU sea.
Favorite music: Alternative pop, but I pretty
much listen to anything and everything, so I
don’t really have a favorite.

You miGHt sPot me: At 23rd Street Brewery
or going out downtown with my friends.
HoBBies: I love having fun, being outside and
having a good dance sesh before I go out. I
like meeting new people, watching my favorite
childhood movies and cooking.

turn-ons: This sounds cliché, but someone
who is nice, tall and has a good smile. He also
has to make me laugh. Also, someone who
can be my best friend. He should get along
well with my friends and I can get a long with
his. He shouldn’t ignore me when we go out
together, but he shouldn’t be too clingy. He also
has to be a dog person, and preferably have his
own dog.
turn-oFFs: Someone who is self-centered
and cocky. Someone who changes his mind
a lot — that drives me insane. A shy guy who
doesn’t have a lot of friends is a turn-off.
I also don’t like cigarettes, and facial hair
creeps me out.

iDeaL Date: Something that’s not a typical
date — not dinner and a movie. I would like
a guy to pick something new and exciting
for our date. I am a huge sports fan, so going
to a basketball or football game would be
fun. I am always up for going to a concert,
too. I would enjoy those dates as long as my
date and I could talk about anything without
feeling awkward.
WHY i’m a catcH: I have fun wherever I go
and I make the best out of everything. I also
get along with anyone and everyone.
aWkWarD DatinG moment: One time my
mom was half-asleep when my high school
boyfriend picked me up for our frst date.
When she went outside to greet him, she
mistook him for my best friend’s little brother,
so she started asking him personal family
questions.
Favorite quote: Love the life you live and
live the life you love.
// CAROLINE KRAFT
how we met // MERAndA O’GORMAn & COLIn ROy
> All great relationships had to start somewhere.
Meranda O’Gorman and Colin Roy met at a
party, but they didn’t get to know each other
while schmoozing over drinks or playing beer
pong.
O’Gorman, Wichita sophomore, and a friend
went to Roy’s Fourth of July party in 2009. “When
we frst met, I thought she was very quiet and
shy,” Roy, Rosehill junior, says of O’Gorman.
“But throughout the night we started to talk,
and then her friend decided she liked vodka
and the bushes at my parents house.”
O’Gorman’s friend went missing after too
many drinks. They found her hooking up with
another guest in the bushes. Roy drove the girls
home and instantly connected with O’Gorman.
“Long story short, we ended up firting over a
bottle of water while watching her friend try to
stay alive in the bushes,” Roy says.
The couple isn’t upset about their friend’s
Helping hand: Meranda O’Gorman met Colin
Roy at a party, where they took care of a
drunken friend together.
Contributed photo
belligerency. “Now, nearly a year and a half
later, we both look back laughing, knowing
that if it wasn’t for her drunken stupidity we
would have never of met,” O’Gorman says.

// ALEXANDRA ESPOSITO
Joie De Vivre 3/13
Middle Brother (members of
Deer Tick, Dawes, and Delta
Spirit) 3/15
Steve Aoki 3/16
GALACTIC 3/18
Stoney LaRue 3/19
For All Mankind 3/22
Sky Smeed Band 3/23
From Quiet Arms 3/24
40oz to freedom (SUBLIME TRIB-
UTE BAND) 3/25
STIMPAC 3/26
Travie McCoy 3/27
Das Racist 3/30
Casey Donahew Band 3/31
Tickets available @ Box Ofce
12-5pm, MON-FRI
or @ theGranada.com
Victor Wooten Band and
Stanley Clarke Band
This Friday! 3/11
Doors Open @ 7:30
ADVANCE TICKETS
STILL AVAILABLE
TALIB KWELI
JUST ANNOUNCED:
4/20
BIG K R I T

This Friday! 3/11
Doors 8
ft. Smoke DZA
April 5
Doors @ 8
6
03
10
11
HEALTH
good for you bad for you //
WEARING CONTACTS TOO LONG
> Sometimes it’s hard to tell.
When the seeing-impaired get their first
pair of contacts, they often get a lengthy list of
guidelines that include, “Don’t wear contact
lenses longer than you’re supposed to.” But
just how important is it to follow this rule?
As It turns out, very.
Michelle Hansen, Victoria senior, admits
she of t en wears cont act s l onger t han
recommended. But this could be harmful.
Troy Maydew, an optometrist at Maydew
Thibault Optometry in Pratt, says mucin and
protein from tears build up on the lenses, which
is why it’s important to clean and disinfect them
on a regular basis. If not, a lens develops a
sandpaper-like texture over time. Maydew says
the small abrasions caused by wearing an old,
dirty contact lens puts your eye at high risk of
infection.
Maydew also discourages people from
wearing their contacts while they sleep —
unless the lenses are approved for overnight
use. Approved lenses allow the eye to recieve
more oxygen than lenses that are not. Maydew
Eyes wide shut: Wearing contacts while sleeping,
unless approved, can be harmful to your eyes.
Photo by Justine Patton
says studies show sleeping with any contact
lens increases the chance for lens-related
problems 800 percent. “Each person needs
to decide if the convenience is worth the
gamble,” Maydew says.
Next time you don’t feel like taking the time
to remove your contacts, think twice — your
sight may depend on it.
VErdICT: Bad for you.
// JusTINE PATTON
bETTEr oPTIoNS for bad SITuaTIoNS
// SUNLESS TANNING
> If you’re going to do it, be smart.
spring break is just around the corner,
which means time is running out to get that
bronze, beach-ready body. After all, no one
wants to be the person that shows up at the
seashore looking pale as a ghost. Instead of
risking their health with tanning beds to beat
those pasty-white, winter blues, students
should consider a safer option: sunless
tanning.
A spray tan is one form of sunless tanning.
When getting a spray tan at a tanning salon,
Marteka Carlton, an employee at suns
Resorts, says your body gets sprayed evenly
with a bronzing solution that contains large
amounts of dihydroxyacetone (DHA). This
chemical makes skin appear darker. Here’s
the cool part: clients start to see a difference
after just one session. The cost is around $35
and the tan lasts about a week.
sunless tanning lotions, like Jergens
natural glow moisturizer, can give skin a sun-
kissed façade for a cheaper price. Jergens
sunless tanning products are around $5. A
tan may take longer to appear, however, since
these lotions contain smaller amounts of DHA.
For the best results, sunless tanners should
exfoliate with a loofa and non-moisturizing soap
beforehand to prevent orange streaks. Then,
prepare for a week of kicking back on the coast,
with a favorite beverage in those sun-kissed
hands.
// JusTINE PATTON
Here comes the sun: Sunless tanning options pro-
vide a safer way to get that dark complexion be-
fore taking your spring break trip.
Photo by Justine Patton
T H U R S D A Y
$1 Wells
$1 Shots
$2 Domestics
$2 Captain & UV Drinks
The Eldridge | 701 Massachusetts Street | 785.749.5011 | www.eldridgehotel.com Street | 785.749.5011 setts Street | 785.749.50
Brunch Buffet
10:30am to 2pm
$16.95
*
Present your KU ID for $3 off!
Children 7-12 $6.95
6 & Under Free
* Taxes & gratuity not included.
$3.50 Bloody Marys
$3.75 Free State Bottles
Reservations Accepted
785.749.1005
Brunch Buffet
10:30am to 2pm
Sunday Brunch





L A W R E N C E ’ S
HOTTEST
NIGHT CLUB
CAVE OPEN THURSDAY - SATURDAY
DOORS OPEN AT 9PM
ENTER ON INDIANA
1200 Oread Ave. 785-843-1200 (located inside The Oread) www.oreadcave.com
T H U R S D A Y
Mardi Gras Rave
VOTED BEST DANCE CLUB
7
03
10
11
NOTICE
> Because we have questions. Celebrities have answers.
Q&A // GloZell GreeN
GloZell Green is best known for her hilarious YouTube videos, especially “My push up bra will
help me get my man” and her many “translation” videos in which she analyzes the lyrics of anyone
from Ke$ha to Justin Beiber. The 45-year-old YouTube superstar received her B.F.A. in musical
theatre from the University of Florida. After college, GloZell left her home in Orlando and moved to
Hollywood to pursue her dream of becoming an actress/comedienne.
With a rough start in Hollywood, GloZell began studying some of her favorite comedians’ work
— namely, Jay Leno. She attended more than 600 consecutive tapings of The Tonight Show with
Jay Leno, studying Leno and taking notes. GloZell’s notes and interviews with the show’s audience
provided material for her blog and led to the birth of her video posts in early 2008.
Today, her Leno days are behind her and she currently works as an actress, comedienne, tele-
vision personality and vocalist. GloZell spoke with Jayplay about her viral YouTube videos, life in
Hollywood and her inspirations.
What inspired you to get on YouTube and make
your frst video?
Well, at the time, I was making videos on
Blogger and it was really slow, so I was asking
the whole 10 people following my blog where
I could upload my videos. So then I started
putting my videos up through YouTube, and
then one day, my friend was like, “Do you know
you’ve got people looking at you on YouTube?”
And next thing I knew, “My Push Up Bra” was
going from 1 million views to 2 million to 3
million. So then I started paying more attention
to the whole YouTube thing, and now I hardly
ever look at my blog.
Internet personality: GloZell Green has earned
many fans with her humorous take on celebrity
gossip and Hollywood culture on her YouTube
channel. Green, a prolifc video blogger, has over
a thousand videos, with her “My Push Up Bra”
video garnering millions of views.
Contributed photo
What’s the process of making your videos
today? Any planning or preparation, or do you
just wing it?
I just look at the artist’s lyrics and go from
there, but I don’t plan it or anything. It’s all
foolishness basically. Ke$ha gets drunk, rolls
around in glitter, maybe makes out with a guy
and then writes a song about it. So then I just
sit down and read it, and even her fans love it.
Sometimes I just talk about the music videos,
and so it’s all made up. I mean, when you have
over 1,000 videos and post as much as I do, you
just don’t have the time to write, analyze and
think everything over. It’s not that serious, you
know? It’s just YouTube.
Who is your hero?
OK, this may seem kind of bizarre, but as far
as the Internet world, Perez Hilton, because he
has gone from being a blogger to an Internet
star. Now, I don’t agree with everything he says
and does, but he shows it can be done — that
someone who’s not an actor or singer, but just
a blogger, can gain a fan base and become
famous. So it just makes me think if he can do
it, I can do it.
How have you gotten to where you’re at today?
What keeps you motivated?
I watch and talk about what I like. I like the
Hollywood industry, television, celebrities and
pop culture. So I’m just talking how I normally
would anyway. I just happen to tape it and post
it and it surprises people. And where would I
be without the Internet or YouTube? I’d just be
a crazy girl talking to myself. You’re crazy until
you start making money and you’re crazy until
you start becoming famous. I mean, if I weren’t
known like I am today, I’d really just be an old,
crazy lady.
Of all the famous people you’ve met so far,
who’s your favorite and why?
Wow. I have been lucky enough to meet a lot,
so that’s tough. I’m trying to think of someone
that younger people would know. Angelina
Jolie’s father, Jon Voight, was really nice.
But as far as ever? Michael Jackson. It won’t
get any better than that in my lifetime. I wouldn’t
mind meeting Lady Gaga, though. That would
be cool, as long as she’s not in Alejandro scary
mode.
What advice do you have for college students
who are aspiring actors or comedians?
Talk about what you know and stay true to
what you want to do, because along the way
people will ask you to do all kinds of things —
crazy things — and sometimes you compromise,
but you’ve got to stay true to yourself. Especially
as a comic, if you talk about your life and things
that have happened to you and try not to be like
someone else, then you’ll make it. There’s room
for everybody. How many stations or networks
are on television? Millions? You can get on one.
Speaking of that, are the rumors true that
Oprah’s giving you a television show on her
network?
Not that I know of, nope. Right now, I’m just
my own ghetto Oprah on the Internet. Maybe
she’ll be calling me. I’ll be sitting by the phone
waiting, O.
Final words?
Every day, have fun. That’s what I do, and
people think I’m way younger than I am.
Everyone has their gifts and their talents. If you
just do what you’re supposed to do, you’ll go far.
I mean, I’m not skinny, I’m not cute, I’m not blond
or whatever else, but somehow I’m popular, and
popular with a group that’s 20 years younger
than I am.
You can see Glozell’s videos at http://www.
youtube.com/glozell1
// SARAH CHAMP
Pet connection: Before you start looking for a pet,
you need to know what kind of pet you want. A
pet needs to ft your lifestyle, or it might cause
an overwhelming and negative experience, which
is unfair for you and your pet.
Photo Illustration by Jerry Wang
“I think people need to put the same amount
of commitment into their animals as they do
their children,” Novak says. She emphasizes
the fnancial responsibility of pet ownership.
Food, veterinarian appointments and space are
all things to consider, she says, before deciding
you’re ready to adopt.
Students can make great pet parents, Novak
says, but only if they’re willing to make a lifetime
commitment to their pets. Shelter animals are
looking for what the Humane Society calls
“forever homes,” and a student must be ready
to provide support and love for the duration of
an animal’s life.
Without proper preparation, the outcome
can be grim, as Joanna Vosburg, Grinnell
senior, learned the hard way. She adopted a
dog in 2009 on an impulse. Her new pet was
a wonderful companion, but he had health
complications that started draining Vosburg’s
bank account. “With all the vet visits, medicines
and special foods, my $80 adoption turned into
a $700 to $800 investment in under fve weeks,”
public about responsible pet ownership and
overpopulation, but you can do your part, too.
If you’re considering adding a pet to your
household, taking your search to a local shelter
could be, literally, a lifesaving decision.
How do I know If I’m ready?
The ASPCA’s statistics may have you jumping
into rescue mode, but experts will urge you to
put some thought into your decision. Adopting
an animal when you’re not ready isn’t just a
bad choice for you, it’s a bad choice for your
pet, too, says Sue Novak, who writes an animal
column called “Critter Care” for the Lawrence
Journal World, and previously served as the
president of the Lawrence Humane Society
(LHS) Board.
Novak has seen numerous would-be pet
owners bring their animals back to the shelter
because they simply weren’t ready for the
commitment. “That’s a selfsh choice,” she
says, “because you don’t care what the
animal’s ultimate outcome is.”
They’re our best friends, our confdants
and our bedtime companions. Our pets have
become so important to us that many people
count them as family members. We call
ourselves “pet parents,” and even dress our
pets up for Halloween and buy them expensive
toys and shelters.
Americans are so crazy about animals, in fact,
that according to statistics from the American
Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals
(ASPCA), 63 percent of U.S. households contain
at least one pet. That comes to a whopping 75
million dogs and 85 million cats with families to
nuzzle and warm beds to sleep in.
Unfortunately, a shocking number of castoff
animals end up in shelters each year: 5 to 7
million, according to the ASPCA. Some are
adopted, but many — between 3 and 4 million
per year — are euthanized. The Humane Society
of the United States says that’s approximately
one every eight seconds.
The Humane Society of the United States
and the ASPCA both work to inform the
FEATURE
8
03
10
11
// LINdSEy SIEGELE
Pet adoPtion is a great way to find
a comPanion and save a life
Find a Furry
friend
she says. “I just couldn’t keep paying that. I had
a breakdown and told my roommate we had to
take him back.”
Vosburg admits she probably wasn’t ready
for the responsibility of pet ownership yet, and
the experience left her heartbroken.
How do I fInd tHe rIgHt pet?
If you’ve decided you’re ready for the
responsibility of pet ownership, you need to
start thinking about what kind of animal is right
for you. Are you looking for an animal that takes
care of itself, or one that requires more hands-
on care? do you already have an animal at
home that needs a cooperative buddy? do you
have enough space for a high-energy breed?
These are all questions to consider before
choosing your new pet, says Susan O’Neil, a
Fuzzy feelings: Te adoption process helps
to ensure protection for the animals. Once
approved, you have a new lifelong friend.
Photo Illustration by Jerry Wang
FEATURE
9
03
10
11
Find an animal that’s not
only cute, but Fits into
your liFestyle.
> Susan O’Neil ,
LL Dog Rescue Volunteer
Puppy love: Talk with workers at shelters to fnd a
pet that fts your criteria. Sometimes you can tell
at frst sight which animal is right for you.
Photo Illustration by Jerry Wang
volunteer at LL Dog Rescue, a no-kill shelter
based in Shawnee Mission. O’Neil adopted
her own dog from LL when she was a junior at
the University of Kansas. Research, especially
into breeds if you’re considering adopting
a dog, is an important frst step, O’Neil says.
Talk to volunteers and people who work at the
shelter to fnd out if a specifc animal fts your
criteria. “Find an animal that’s not only cute,
but fts into your lifestyle,” she says.
O’Neil picked a long-haired chihuahua when
she was a student because in her small space,
she couldn’t responsibly handle a larger dog.
In the end, a gut feeling can be a good
indicator of whether or not you’ve made the
right selection. “You will know when you’ve
found the dog that you’re meant to have,”
O’Neil says. “You’ll leave, and not be able to
stop thinking about him.”
A gut feeling played a part in Alice Claire’s
decision to adopt two cats from LHS. Claire,
Topeka graduate student, originally wanted
to adopt one cat, but decided to adopt two
when she found a good companion for the
frst. “I found out both cats had come from the
same house and had been in the shelter for
six months,” she says. “As I was reading the
information card, I looked down and they were
curled up together, grooming each other. In
that moment, I realized I was about to become
Mama to two cats instead of one.”
Claire’s cats, Titania and Oberon (named
after characters in A Midsummer Night’s
Dream), now live happily in their forever
home.
How do I adopt?
The adoption process at different shelters
varies, but many of them require the same
basic steps: fll out an application, pass a
simple background check and pay an adoption
fee and any medical bills the animal has
acquired.
At LHS, you’ll fll out a two-sided application
form with questions about your current living
situation and pets, says Midge Grinstead,
LHS’s director. On that same form, you’ll take
a quiz of sorts, explaining how you intend to
care for the animal.
Then, somebody at the shelter will call your
landlord or place of residence to make sure
pets are allowed. “You’d be surprised how
many people fb about that,” Grinstead says.
The shelter will also contact your veterinarian
if you’re already a pet owner to get an idea of
your pet-parent history. After approval, you’ll
have to wait 24 hours to take your new pet
home.
At LL, the adoption process is similar, but
slightly more in-depth. The shelter works
with you to fnd the right pet for your lifestyle,
says O’Neil, the volunteer at LL, and much
of that search is based on your application.
Because the shelter works primarily with
dogs, volunteers will also drive by your home
to check on your outdoor space — even
screened-in patios are acceptable for certain
dog breeds. “We’re looking to fnd you the
perfect dog for your home,” O’Neil says, “and
in return, the perfect family and home for that
dog.”
LHS charges a $50 adoption fee for all
animals, plus the cost of medical bills, which
varies from one animal to the next. Adopting a
pet from LL will run you anywhere from $75 to
$350 — pets on the higher end have required
or will require more medical attention.
Pet adoption isn’t a decision to take lightly,
but the rewards — for you and your new pet
— can be phenomenal. “There are so many
animals out there that are cast off, unwanted
or born on the streets,” says Claire, the happy
cat owner. “I can’t fathom paying several
thousand dollars for an animal when there are
so many who need homes.”
For more information about LHS, visit
LawrenceHumane.org.
For more information about LL, visit
LLDogRescue.org.
“Will you be my mommy?”
Check out these adorable,
adoptable animals in the area:
Shaylee: LL
Pekingese, Small, Adult,
Female.
Shaylee is 5 years old,
and her previous owner
died. An incessantly
happy individual,
she’s sweet, with a bit
of a “dumb blonde”
personality.
benji: LHS
Domestic Short Hair,
Medium, Young, Male.
Benji came to the
shelter as a stray. He
is very personable
and likes to play. He’s
lovable, and will make a
great pet.
Smoky blizzard: LL
Chihuahua, Small,
Young, Male.
Smokey Blizzard is
about 2 years old. He’s
all boy, walks well
on a leash and loves
attention. He’s friendly,
and has a confdent,
loving personality.
Alice: LHS
Labrador Retriever Mix,
Medium, Young, Female.
Alice is just over 4
months old, and very
happy-go-lucky. When
full grown, she will
probably be between
40 and 50 pounds. She’s
eager to learn, and
because she’s a puppy,
she’ll require patient
training.
Wonder: LHS
Domestic Short Hair,
Medium, Young, Female.
Wonder’s a sweetheart
with a loving, laid-back
disposition. Previous
owners brought her
to the shelter, but they
didn’t say why they
were giving her up for
adoption.
For more information on these animals, or to
browse through other adoptable animals in the
area, visit petfnder.com.
10
03
10
11
MANUAL
> Absence makes the heart grow ... ?
Doing without // FACEBOOK
It was mid-morning when I turned on my
Macbook. My fngers went on auto-pilot and I
began to type: www.facebo — STOP!
I went to my email and felt a sinking feeling
in my stomach and a slight gloom gripping my
heart. I’d have no notifcations since I’d dis-
abled them all the night before. No happy red
fags to greet me. No photos to browse through.
No comments to read.
This was the start of my seven-day Facebook
fast.
Day one was decent. But by day two, the ten-
sion had arrived. Insatiable cravings for Face-
crack haunted me. That further confrmed my
need to detox.
I began to fll my time with other things:
cleaning, organizing and studying. I even wrote
a song with a friend and recorded it.
My social network didn’t crumble, either. I
simply employed the good old-fashioned meth-
ods of calling people and meeting them face-to-
face.
John Wade, a doctor of Counseling and Psy-
chological Services (CAPS) at Watkins Health
Social cravings: Jennifer DiDonato fnds pro-
ductivity easier without Facebook for a week.
Photo by Jennifer DiDonato
Center, says that CAPS has helped students
struggling with time management. “Facebook
has come up as an issue in some of those
cases,” Wade says. “It’s helpful to make a
conscious decision to get on for 30 minutes
instead of unconsciously logging on and real-
izing three hours later that you’re still on.”
My life sans Facebook was surprisingly
satisfying. But give it up for good. . . for real?
Doubtful. However, be more strategic with my
time rather than wandering aimlessly around
Facebook for hours?
Like
// JeNNIFer DIDONATO
> It’s not all about fast food and beer pong.
get some culture // FREE TANGO LESSONS
Two to tango: Austin Jones dances tango at LTD’s
práctica and attends their monthly tango dance
events in Lawrence and Kansas City.
Photo by Jennifer DiDonato
Upon entering the art gallery-turned-dance
studio you’ll fnd dancers gliding in unison to
the bittersweet cries of a violin.
every Monday night, Lawrence Tango
Dancers (LTD) offer free Argentine tango
lessons above Signs of Life Bookstore and
Coffee Shop from 8 p.m. to 10 p.m.
“Tango i s a dance t hat f ocuses on
connection to one’s partner and to the
music,” Doug Nickel, LTD founder, says. “It’s
a very freestyle and individualized dance.”
For people who are new to tango, LTD frst
teaches them how to move intuitively with
their partners, rather than learning set steps.
For Austin Jones, Wichita senior, that skill
came with practice. After attending LTD’s
Bootcamp for beginners, he began going
regularly, where more experienced dancers
worked with him one-on-one.
Jones got t he f ever and hi s onl y
prescription has been more tango. He now
tangos three times each week in Lawrence
and Kansas City. For anyone who doubts his
or her tango potential, Jones says, “If you
can walk, you can tango.”
Nickel says that dancers of any skill level
are welcome to come as often as they choose
with or without a partner. He recommends
wearing comfortable clothing and footwear.
For mor e i nf or mat i on, vi si t www.
theprairiedogs.net/lawrencetango.

// JeNNIFer DIDONATO
A L L Y O U C A N E A T
p a s t a , s a l a d ,
& b r e a d
5 p m - C L O S E
C A R A F E S O F
P A I S A N O ’ S r e d ,
c h a b l i s ,
& s a n g r i a
8
$
2 1 1 2 W. 2 5 T H S T .
7 8 5 . 8 3 8 . 3 5 0 0
AAAAA LLLLLL LLLLL YYYYY OOOO UUUUU CCCCCCC AAAAA NNNN EEEE AAA TTTTT
p a s t a , s a l a d ,
& b r e a d
5 p m - C L O S E
CCCCC AAAAAA RRRRR AAAAA FFFF EEEEE SSSS OOOO FFFF
PPPPPPP AAAAAAAA IIIIII SSSSS AAAAAA NNNNN OOOOOO ’’ SSSSSSS r e d ,
c h a b l i s ,
& s a n g r i a
2 1 1 2 W. 2 5 T H S T .
7 8 5 . 8 3 8 . 3 5 0 0
11
03
10
11
The thought of doing laundry hasn’t crossed
your mind in weeks. Your smelly hamper is
overflowing. You finally break down and dig
around for some quarters before dragging your
basket and detergent to the laundry room.
But once you get there, the process doesn’t
get any easier. The washing machine tells
you to select a rinse cycle, but which do you
choose? Brights? Cold water only? What if you
want to wash jeans and your favorite white
t-shirt?
Though a lot of college students learn
how to do their laundry before leaving home,
remembering the basics can be hard when
faced with different scenarios. “I knew how
to do laundry all through college,” Megan
Maloney, Wichita junior, says. “But it’s hard
because the laundry units vary from apartment
to apartment, which makes it diffcult to know if
I’m doing things properly.”
If you’ve experienced the same confusion
as Maloney, here’s your guide to washing and
drying your favorite jeans, t-shirts and even
how to combine the two.
Washing
When Maloney goes to wash her clothing,
her first instinct is to combine everything and
do one load on a cold setting, which is fine if
most of your clothing is dark or colored. “For
all lighter or white clothing, always wash on a
warm or hot setting,” Jorge Ocampo, employee
at Eco-Logic Dry Cleaners, 2540 Iowa St., Suite
A, says.
Most standard washing machines include
settings such as “normal or regular,” which
are appropriate to use when washing whites.
However, if you use this setting for colored or
dark clothing, you might see some fading in
your favorite KU blue t-shirt. Instead, look for a
setting that says “permanent press,” which will
keep your colors bright.
Al so, keep i n mi nd the fabri cs of your
clothing. Marlene Showalter, general manager
of Scotch Fabric Care in Topeka, recommends
separating “gentle” clothing from tougher
items. “You don’t want to throw in a soft Ralph
Lauren polo shirt or a blouse with jeans,”
Showalter says.
When washing more delicate items, try not to
cram too much laundry into the machine. This
will allow for the washer to fill up with more
water, and gentle clothing won’t get too beat
up, says Showalter.
DRYing
Though washing your clothing properly is
important, selecting the correct dryer setting
is even more crucial — the wrong temperature
could result in too-tight jeans or a t-shirt that
could ft a toddler. “The higher the temperature,
the more clothing is going to shrink,” Ocampo,
of Eco-Logi c Dry Cl eaners, says. “That
especially goes for anything that is 100 percent
cotton or a cotton blend.”
If you want to prevent shrinkage, avoid any
setting that says “regular” or “heavy” cycle.
This setting will heat your clothing too much,
which can be harsh on most fabrics. Instead,
choose “permanent press.”
The best thing you can do for your clothes
is take them out of the dryer a few minutes
early and air-dry them. Showalter, general
manager at Topeka’s Scotch Fabric Care, says
to dry clothing 90 percent in the dryer and let
the temperature of the room do the rest. “Be
careful,” she says. “Because a dryer will hurt
fabrics way more than a washer will.”
WhEn TO Wash
So now you know the basics of washing
and drying, but how often should you put these
tips to use? Danielle Augustine, Lawrence
sophomore, says the hardest part of doing
laundry is fnding the time to do it. “I try to do my
laundry every week and a half to two weeks,”
she says. “Which doesn’t seem that often.”
Augustine is actually on the right track;
washing clothing every two weeks is ideal,
though it depends on how much you wear the
clothing or how much you’ve perspired. Letting
sweaty or dirty clothing pile up can lead to mold
or permanent stains. “Basically, the sooner
you wash your clothing, the better,” Showalter
says.
The dirT on how To geT your cloThes clean
Cycle of lights: Knowing how to do laundry cor-
rectly can be confusing when you want to mix col-
ors and fabrics, and with unfamiliar machines.
Photo Illustration | Chris Neal
RINSE, DRY &
// GABRIELLE SCHOCK
Removing StainS
Red Wine:
Wet the area with warm water and blot.
Repeat with club soda if necessary.
Deodorant:
Brush excess deodorant off of fabric before
treating. Then, rinse in cold water before
washing.
Coffee/Tea:
Like red wine, wet the area and blot with
warm water. Repeat with club soda if
necessary.
Blood:
Wet the fabric with cold water and blot.
Then, soak the garment with ½ serving of
liquid detergent for each gallon of water.
Grass:
Soak the stained area with liquid detergent
for 20 minutes before washing in warm
water.
Ink:
Use rubbing alcohol to blot the stain with a
paper towel. *Source: tide.com/stainbrain
MANUAL
13
03
10
11
MANUAL
I can’t imagine not having an iPod. I can
listen to Courtney Love wail like a banshee
on my 7:30 a.m. walks to class. I can turn
my “Sleep” playlist on for those times when
I decide to shirk academic responsibility
and take a nap instead. And I can hook Amy
Winehouse up to the speakers when I’m in the
shower, getting ready to go out for a rousing
night on Massachusetts St.
Havi ng sai d al l of thi s, after getti ng a
turntable as a Christmas present, vinyl is slowly
becoming an indispensable part of my life.
Putting the record on the turntable, pressing
start and hearing the crackle and pop as the
needle fits into the groove is unfathomably
satisfying.
I’m not the only person who feels this way.
Nielsen SoundScan reports show that vinyl
sales in the United States are increasing (2.5
million sold in 2009 to 2.8 million sold in 2010),
and LPs are no longer the exclusive domain of
used record stores, as a trip to Urban Outftters
will confrm.
So if you’re considering venturing into the
land of LPs, here are a few places in Lawrence
to get you started.
Love Garden
Perhaps you’re confused as to why Arcade
Fire won Best Record over Lady Gaga, and
you’d like to hear their new album on vinyl.
Or maybe you’re looking for a long-forgotten,
obscure Aretha Franklin record. Either way,
you’re bound to fnd some collectible goodies at
Love Garden, 822 Massachusetts St. Although
Love Garden sells both records and CDs, Kelly
Corcoran, manager of the store, says that
around 2008, sales tilted in favor of records,
and demand for classic albums of the 1960s and
1970s attracted people who were starting their
collections. “In a world that seems so artifcial
and fleeting, this seems tangible and valid,”
Corcoran says. “Vinyl manifests a tangible
feeling for what music lovers want.”
Most of Brett Haas’ records are his father’s,
but the Overland Park senior was flipping
through the classic rock section looking for
new LPs to add to his collection. He thinks
records have an authenticy that you might not
get from CDs. “That’s how the band and artist
wanted you to hear the music,” Haas says.
“It’s not remastered. That takes away from the
sound.”
Kief’s
You might not find Arcade Fire at Kief’s
Audio, 2429 Iowa St., but in its corridors you’ll
find many other bizarre, delicious treasures.
What else can you expect when a store selling
records has been open since 1959? A recent
trip revealed Bette Midler’s 1972 debut, Laura
Nyro’s magnum opus, New York Tendaberry
and Neil Young records so gloriously used and
old that they just had to be snatched up.
Kief’s takes pride in their collectible and
classic items, Steve Wilson, Kief’s manager,
says. The boom in vinyl sales has only added
depth to their collection. Wilson says Kief’s
employees sometimes go to peoples’ homes
to pick through extensive collections. Finding
treasures i n thi s way certai nl y pays off
for customers at Kief’s, many of whom are
indeed younger. “To cultivate an interest in
something analog and tangible fulflls a certain
psychological need,” Wilson says. “It’s an
individuation and separation experience.”
HaLf Price BooKs
Seeing people in their 20s buying records
amuses Kelly Cline, an employee at Half Price
Books, 1519 W 23rd St. Cline grew up on vinyl,
so for her it’s nothing special, she says. But she
understands the desire younger people feel for
LPs. “I thought CDs sounded better,” Cline says.
“Records have that pop. There’s some nostalgic
aspect of the sound. It’s the purity that people
like.”
The crackle and pop is one thing Lindin
Scott, a fellow employee, loves about records.
He started his collection with the Beatles and
has never looked back. At Half Price Books,
collectible jazz records and classic rock are the
two big sellers, and younger people are always
buying them, says Scott.
Of course, like with any used record store,
Half Price Books is full of obscurities and
oddities, and a recent trip Kelly Miller took
unearthed such artifacts. Miller, Waterloo,
Ill. senior, was particularly taken by the ‘80s
soundtracks, she says. “If I ever find a place
that has a stack of records, I always fnd myself
going through them,” Miller says. “I could sit on
the foor and go through records all day.”
if you’re LooKinG to sPin tHat record round on your new
turntaBLe, Here’s wHere to Go for aLL your vinyL needs
Old-fashioned sound: Nielson SoundScan reports
show a boom in vinyl sales. Local record stores
see many younger customers looking for LPs.
Photo Illustration | Jessica Janasz
// MICHAEL BEDNAR
Taking Care of Your Records
Vinyl records are not quite as durable as CDs. Here are a few tips every new collector should know.
Listening to LP’s
If you’re going to listen to LPs frequently,
invest in a nice turntable, says Kelly
Corcoran, manager of Love Garden. A cheap
turntable can burn through records quickly.
Cartridge Condition
If you want to get a vintage turntable, make sure
the cartridge — the part with the needle that
goes into the groove — is in good condition.
If it’s not, it could harm the album, says Steve
Wilson, manager of Kief’s.
Storing LPs
Store your LPs upright, not lying down.
Stacking them on top of each other could lead
to scratching or warping, Wilson says.
MOVIE rEVIEw // DRIVE ANGRY 3-D
> Hollywood hits, indie ficks and everything in between.
Nicolas Cage’s cash-strapped descent into
schlock cinema comes full circle with Drive
Angry 3D, a flm that at frst blush seems
indistinguishable from his recent parade of
colorful misfres (Sorcerer’s Apprentice, Ghost
Rider, etc.). But audiences willing to set aside
their preconceptions will fnd much to enjoy in
this gloriously trashy supernatural road movie,
whose grindhouse sensibilities are further
enhanced by a keen sense of self-awareness
and geysers of Looney Tune violence. This
is true berserker cinema, joining the ranks
of recent gonzo efforts Crank: High Voltage
and The Good, the Bad and the Weird (both
admittedly superior works).
The razor-thin plot involves the devilishly
monikered John Milton (Cage), who breaks
out of Hell in a tricked-out muscle car to save
his infant granddaughter from the murderous
clutches of a satanic cult back on earth. Hot
on his heels is the well-dressed Accountant
(William Fichtner), who seems to function as
both the Grim Reaper and the underworld’s
fashiest lobbyist.
After a few mid-coitus shoot-outs and
car chases, Milton hooks up with the foul-
mouthed Southern belle Piper (Amber Heard)
and exchanges gunfre and badass one-
liners with cult leader Jonah (Billy Burke),
the Manson-esque eunuch who killed his
daughter and, in a grisly touch, keeps her
scavenged femur bone as his walking stick.
Aside from the fesh and copious vehicular
carnage on display, Drive Angry features two
indelible highlights. The frst is the welcome
presence of William Fichtner, who imbues his
Accountant with a bemused deadpan charm
that makes his every utterance an instantly
quotable gem. The second is director Patrick
Lussier’s utilization of his 3D effects, which
come across as crisp, clear and purposeful
rather than lazily obligatory. And Cage himself?
Well, he always seems like he’s having fun.
And for once his audience can say the same.
// LANDoN MCDoNALD
REVIEW
14
03
10
11
MusIc rEVIEw // ShIlpA RAY & hER hAppY hook-
ERS – ‘TEENAGE & ToRTURE’ | 2011 (kNITTING FACToRY RECoRDS)
> KJHK’s weekly guide to sonic consumption.
Shilpa Ray is a girl-fronted punk group
that differentiates itself from the pack with
a distinct infuence of blues, introspective
story telling and a grungy jazz base. Teenage
And Torture is this band’s second album after
releasing A Fish Hook, An Open Eye in 2009
and touring with bands such as Nick Cave’s
Grinderman, the iconic Acid Mother’s Temple
and visits to SXSW.
The most noticeable aspect of Shilpa Ray
& Her Happy Hookers sound is their driving
punk rhythms covered up by Shilpa Ray’s
crooning, desperate and growling voice. Her
voice alone could move mountains but gets
amplifed by 10 with the enjoyable beat from
her happy hookers.
Possibly the only standard punk procedure
that Shipa Ray follows is her choice of song
topics. Lots of these songs deal with very
dark and vulgar, and often sexual, topics. one
song in particular, “Genie’s Drugs,” is about a
boyfriend who left her for a girl named Genie
because she always had better drugs, and how
Shilpa Ray needed more money so she could
keep him. However, these unfortunate situations
turned into solid punk energy for the rest of us
to enjoy.
Some songs not to be missed on this album
are the poppy, hard-hitting track “Erotolepsy,”
the opener and fuzzed-out track “Hookers” and
the single off the album, “Venus Shaver.”
// ZACK MARSH
Japanese Steakhouse & Sushi Bar
W th Street
FREE
SUSHI ROLLS

www.kobeatlawrence.com
SPEAK
Thousands of people stand outside the
Majestic Theatre in New York City. Vendors are
selling red roses and show programs. I’m in line
with my grandma, two great aunts and younger
sister Francesca, who says she cannot believe
that of all the Broadway shows we’ve seen,
we’ve never been to the longest-running show
on Broadway, Phantom of the Opera.
We enter the breathtaking Art Deco theater
and fnd our perfect seats in the center section,
nine rows from the stage. The orchestra plays
the overture and the first scene begins. An
auctioneer is selling his wares from the Paris
Opera House. The show consumes us.
Six months later, hundreds of people stand
outside the performing arts center at Blue
Valley North High School on a Thursday night.
My parents and brother walk in ahead of my
boyfriend, who I’m hiding behind to avoid faces
of teachers I didn’t like when I was a student
here three years earlier. My sister is backstage
doing her hair, makeup and vocal warm-ups.
The orchestra plays the overture to Phantom of
the Opera, and the memory attached to it makes
me cry.
When my 14-year-old sister called to tell
me that her high school was doing Phantom, I
immediately knew what part she’d get. She had
been taking dance lessons with Kansas City
Ballet for eight years and had recently switched
from dancing in simple, canvas ballet shoes to
mastering pointe. Francesca wasn’t nervous
for Phantom’s dance audition. She was excited.
When the choreographer asked for girls who
had ballet experience she stood up right away,
and did an impromptu set of padebures, pique
turns and pirouettes.
Every year I attended North, I auditioned for
that year’s musical. Voice lessons and choir
classes allowed me to nail the singing audition,
but they never prepared me to face the dance
auditions. Students had to quickly learn an
impossibly diffcult dance combination and then
perform it perfectly in front of the directors. I
have never been graceful. I stumbled over my
feet; one year, I even fell. I am not a dancer, but
this is something I have accepted.
For my freshman, sophomore and junior year
musicals, I was cast as a chorus member. My
senior year, in Thoroughly Modern Millie, I
was cast as a girl named Cora. I had one line
and a solo, and I thought I was a celebrity.
Millie was a dance-heavy show, and the same
woman who choreographed it at North also
did the choreography for North’s Phantom. The
Millie dances were tricky, but after months of
rehearsal, I was able to mimic the dancers in
front of me. Still, the choreographer suggested
to us weaker dancers to just move our arms if
nothing else. I told my friends that our moves
were “step, step, breath in, step, step, breathe
out,” a joke we still make today.
I didn’t have a single doubt that my sister
would be in the Phantom’s ballet chorus, just
like when I knew she’d win her fifth grade
science fair for inventing legwarmers that
heated up to keep dancers legs toasty. To be a
specialty dancer in a North show was an honor
given to a few of the show’s best dancers.
The five or six girls in the ballet chorus got to
do exclusive dances throughout the show.
Francesca thought that because she was a
freshman she wouldn’t get the part. When she
called to tell me she made the ballet chorus,
we were both beyond excited. I immediately
demanded that my mom buy me a ticket to see
the show each night.
Opening night, Francesca is nervous because
her last few dress rehearsals were canceled
because of snow days. My sister’s frst dance
is in a scene where the actors are practicing
the opera Hannibal. At the crack of a whip,
the slaves start dancing to an Arabian tune.
Francesca is dancing on the same side of the
stage as our seats, so we have a perfect view
of her slave costume. Her glissades and attitude
turns have precision and fow that I could never
achieve. My family and I cheer at the wonderful
job she does. It’s the most impressive dance
we’ve ever seen her do, even better than when
she was the Nutcracker in Kansas City Ballet’s
The Nutcracker.
Francesca’s next dance is in the “Il Muto”
opera scene. After a stagehand is mysteriously
hanged from the fies, the opera managers tell
the ballet dancers to perform to distract the
audience. My sister has to act frazzled, but
also has to perform on pointe. I hold my breath
as she does a perfect jump through a flower-
covered hula-hoop. For her final dance, she
waltzes to “Masquerade” in the masked ball
scene. I cry when she bows at the end of the
show, still remembering the incredible time we
had on Broadway.
Seeing Francesca in Phantom made me
realize how much she’d grown up. She is the
most mature high school freshman I have ever
met, which is a godsend, because I don’t think
I could handle my best friend turning into an
angsty teenager. She manages school, cello
and ballet lessons and still has time to visit her
sister for weekends at KU.
Each night I saw Phantom it got better, until
Saturday night, when it was flawless. This
night, our seats were three rows from the stage,
so we could see Francesca perfectly and she
could see us. During a scene where the cast
comes into the audience, my sister stood right
by my seat, so I waved at her. She couldn’t help
but break character and give me a little wave
and laugh. This reminds me of how much fun
I had in shows when I was her age. As much
as I loved being on stage, the times I spent
backstage playing pranks with my friends,
obsessing over boys and goofng around were
what really made me want to be there. I hope
my sister gets the same thing from her theater
experiences.
I never had a part as impressive as ballet
chorus at North, but it doesn’t bother me. I will
support my sister in anything she ever does.
And I like the idea she’s proving that someone
with the last name Esposito can breathe and
dance at the same time.
Gracing the stage: Alexandra Esposito (left) poses
with sister Francesca after attending Blue Valley
North’s production of Phantom of the Opera.
Contributed Photo
15
03
10
11
Some talentS don’t run in the family
SISTER ACT
// AlExANDRA ESPOSITO

·
Mardi Gras Rave
$3 Bud Fami l y Bot -
tl es. $4 Jager Barrel
Shot s. $4 Bacardi
and UV Dri nks and
Shot s. $5 Dos Lu-
nas Tequi l a Shot s.
$1. 50 Sake Bombs Everyday. Rock Chal k!
$3 Mi l l er/Coors Bot -
tl es. $4 Absol ut Arnol d
Pal mers. $4 Jack Dani el s
and Jameson Dri nks. $5
Ameri can Honey and
Gentl emen Jack Dri nks
$5 Leani ng
Towers
$5 Mart i ni s
1/2 off appet i zers
$4 It al i an
Margari t as
$8 Al l you can eat
past a, sal ad, and bread
(5pm- cl ose)
$8 Caraf es of Pai sano’s
Red, Chabl i s, & Sangri a
$2. 50 Domest i c
Bottl es
$6 Any Gl ass
of Wi ne
$5 Don
Capri ana
$3 Shark Att acks $2. 50
Tropi cal Dri nks
$2 Di rt y
Bananas
$3 Wel l s $2 Margari t as $1. 50 Al most
Anythi ng
$2 Cans
FREE HURRICANE AT 10PM EVERY NIGHT
St. Patty’s Day Party
Thursday, March 17th 2011 11:00am | NO COVER!
Get ready to part y on top of Lawrence
thi s spri ng- the Cave i s t aki ng i t up to
the 9th Fl oor Terrace

TONIC
$2 Domest i c Bottl es
$2 Wel l Shot s
$2 Si ngl e Wel l s
$1 Porch Beers $2 Si ngl e
Wel l s
$2 Si ngl e Cal l s
1/2 Pri ce Mart i ni s $4 Doubl e Wel l s
$2 Si ngl e Wel l s
$3 Bombs
$5 Doubl e
Smi rnoff Vodkas
$2 House Shot s
$5 Doubl e Ji m Beam
$5 Doubl e Three
Ol i ves Vodkas
$3 Bacardi Bombs
$1. 00 Rol l i ng
Rock Cans and
$4. 25 Doubl e
Wel l s
$2. 00 Domest i c
Bottl es and $4. 00
Doubl e Skyy
$2. 00 Si ngl e Wel l s
and $1. 50 PBR
Bottl es
$2. 75 Import Bottl es,
Speci al t y Beers and
Boul evard Wheat
Draws and $5. 00
Doubl e Absol ut
$4. 75 Domest i c
Pi tchers, $3. 75
PBR/Natt i e Pi tch-
ers, $5. 00 Doubl e
Goose
$5. 25 Domest i c
Pi tchers, $3. 75
PBR/Natt i e Pi tch-
ers, $3. 50 Doubl e
Wel l s
$5. 25 Domest i c
( Premi um) Pi tch-
ers, $3. 75 PBR/
Natt i e Pi tchers,
$3. 50 Doubl e Wel l s
$1 Al most Anythi ng
$2 Premi ums
$2 Jager Bombs
$2. 50 Domest i c Bottl es
$2. 00 Doubl e Wel l s
$2. 00 SoCo Li me Shot s
½ Pri ce Mart i ni ’s
$4 Doubl e Ba-
cardi Dri nks
$2 UV Bombs
$4 Doubl e Capt ai n,
Skyy, Beam, Honor
$2 Bacardi Bombs