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// march 31, 2011

life. and how to have one.
WHY SEASONAL ALLERGIES ARE SO
ANNOYING AND HOW TO FIGHT THEM
A ‘Shore’ Thing
StudentS are faScinated by
the anticS on ‘jerSey Shore’
CoSTUMe CreATiViTY
themeS can invigorate and
inSpire fun houSe partieS
SPring FeVer
MARCH 31, 2011 // volume 8, issue 24
* Cover photo by AShLeIGh Lee
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4 KANSAS IN HEAT
ShoULD A GUy teLL hIS GIrLFrIeND he CheAt-
eD oN her DUrING SprING breAK?
11 WHAT IT’S LIKE
to be AttACKeD by A LIoN AND LIve to teLL
AboUt It
tAbLe oF CoNteNtS
17 STAgE PrESENcE
PErSoNAL ESSAy 21
bLUeprINt JAZZ pLAyS JAZZ StANDArDS eACh FrI-
DAy NIGht At IbAr
oNe JAypLAy wrIter FINDS optIMISM throUGh
trAGeDy
Thursday:
Ladies Night
Ladies in free before 10PM
DOORS
OPEN AT
9PM
DOORS
OPEN AT
9PM
I offended him with the association. I was
embarrassed. Did I really stoop so low just
to make small talk?
I wonder, is the outsider who identifies
New Jersey with Jersey Shore similar to
the the oursider who identifies Kansas
with The Wizard of Oz? I’d rather people
didn’t know about Kansas because of
The Wizard of Oz, but no one can ignore
the film’s long-standing legacy as a pop
culture phenomenon. I’m proud of the film’s
identification with Kansas. But are people
from New Jersey proud of Jersey Shore’s
identification with the state? I can’t say.
But I doubt The Situation and JWoww will
reach the icon level of Dorothy and Toto.
Ridiculous as the characters may be, the
Jersey Shore cast is surprisingly likable.
They get drunk and act stupid, but their
behavior is so convincing — and real. In
their best moments, they allow you to see
them as real people, with real emotions,
who have real relationships.
Check out Sarah’s story on page 12 to
better understand how Jersey Shore has
become a college-culture phenomenon
and learn the cast’s lingo. Season three
may be over, but take a look at the Shore’s
place in pop culture and get ready for next
season, when the gang goes to Itay.
I’ll admit, watching these 20-somethings
have have fun and act silly makes me want
to let loose, too. But with more class and
less trash. Fist pump if you’re with me.
THE STAFF
EDITOR // MOLLY MARTIN
ASSOCIATE EDITOR // JONATHAN HERMES
DESIGNER // ALExANDRA AvILA
CONTACT // ALExANDRA ESPOSITO, CAROLINE
KRAFT, LAURA ERDALL
MANUAL // GABRIELLE SCHOCK, JENNIFER
DIDONATO, LINDSEY SIEGELE
NOTICE // BECKY HOWLETT, SARAH CHAMP
PLAY // BEN CHIPMAN, MICHAEL BEDNAR,
LINDSEY DEITER
HEALTH // JUSTINE PATTON, ELLIOT METZ,
JACK RAFFERTY
CONTRIBUTORS // MIKE ANDERSON, MICHELLE
MACBAIN, BRITTANY NELSON, SAvANNAH AB-
BOTT, CHANCE CARMICHAEL, LANDON MCDON-
ALD, ALEx TRETBAR, ZACK MARSH, BRITTANY
CLAMPITT, CHELSEA THENO
CREATIVE CONSULTANT // CAROL HOLSTEAD
“Get crazy, get wild. . .”
I used to roll my eyes every time I heard
the theme song coming from the living room.
I didn’t understand how my roommates could
watch that low-grade Jersey Shore crap.
The show’s depiction of outrageous, sloppy,
hard-partying behavior screams trashy. And
I’m not a fan of trashy.
But I have a confession to make. I
watched a few episodes. . . and I liked it.
And I laughed. I’m worried I may have
liked it too much, because I want to keep
watching it.
Who am I? What happened to the girl set
in her convictions of disdain for the show
and the wealth of money the cast makes on
media appearances, commercials and book
deals? Snooki help me if I ever buy A Shore
Thing by Nicole “Snookie” Polizzi. That’s the
book she wrote. I just cringed.
I even tried to make a Jersey Shore joke
with a new friend from New Jersey. I made
a G.T.L. (Gym, Tan, Laundry) reference and it
fell flat. He could care less about the show.
He’s not from the Jersey Shore, and I think MOLLY MARTIN | EDITOR
CALENDAR
The University Daily Kansan
2000 DOLE CENTER
1000 Sunnyside Dr.
Lawrence, KS 66045
(785) 864-4810
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31
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THURS | MAR 31ST FRI | APRIL 1ST SAT | APR 2ND SUN | APRIL 3RD MON | APRIL 4TH TUES | APRIL 5TH wED | APRIL 6TH
THEOLOgy ON TAp
Henry’s on Eighth,
5:30 p.m.
SCARy LARRy KANSAS
BiKE pOLO
Edgewood Park, 7
p.m., free, all ages
JAzz QUiNTET
Ingredient, 7 p.m.,
free, all ages
MiSHKA
Bottleneck, 8 p.m.,
$11-$13, all ages
JOKE NigHT
Jackpot Music Hall,
8 p.m.
CASEy DONAHEW
BAND
Granada, 9 p.m.
FREE MORAL AgENTS
(MEMBERS OF MARS
vOLTA) ODiST
Replay Lounge,
10 p.m.
ApRiL FOOL’S WiTH THE
ANTS, THE gLEANERS
Replay Lounge. 6 p.m.

MUSEUM ART OpENiNg
AND MUSiC EvENT
Museum of Natural
History, 6:30 p.m.,
free, 10+
NATHANiEL RATELiFF
& THE WHEEL AT THE
BOTTLENECK
Bottleneck, 7 p.m.,
$10-$15, all ages

KU WiND ENSEMBLE
Lied Center, 7:30 p.m.

FREEKy FRiDAy’S AT
DUFFy’S WiTH DJ Biz
Duffy’s, 8 p.m., free,
21+

Hip HOp BENEFiT FOR
COMMUNiTy OUTREACH
WiTH BEN KRESS,
DUTCH NEWMAN, SOUL
SERvERS
Jackpot Music Hall,
9 p.m.
SUA gALLERy:
“iNNER WORKiNgS”
RECEpTiON
Kansas Union Gallery,
6 p.m., free, all ages
THE CRUMpLETONS
Jazzhaus, 7 p.m.

OUTLAW COUNTRy
Knights of Columbus
Hall, 8 p.m., $7, 21+
HAyES CARLL
Bottleneck, 8 p.m.,
$13, all ages

OpEN JAM
Duffy’s, 9 p.m., free,
21+

THE MAJESTiCS
Jazzhaus, 10 p.m.
DJ gTRAiN, ON THE
pATiO
Replay Lounge, 10
p.m.
SCARy LARRy KANSAS
BiKE pOLO
Edgewood Park, 7
p.m., free, all ages

SpEAKEASy SUNDAy
Jazzhaus, 10 p.m.,
$3, 21+
DOLLAR BOWLiNg
Royal Crest Bowling
Lanes, 9 p.m., $1, all
ages

FREE ARgENTiNE
TANgO OpEN pRÁCTiCA
Signs of Life, 8 p.m.
MUDSTOMp MONDAyS
Granada, 9 p.m., $2,
21+
KARAOKE iDOL!
Jazzhaus, 10 p.m.
CORy HiLLS
Lawrence Arts
Center, 7:30 p.m.,
free, all ages
SCARy LARRy KANSAS
BiKE pOLO
Edgewood Park, 7
p.m., free, all ages

DRAKKAR SAUNA,
BUSMAN’S HOLiDAy
Jackpot Music Hall,
9 p.m.
THE SEEDy SEEDS
Replay Lounge, 10
p.m.

BiLLy SpEARS AND THE
BEER BELLiES
Johnny’s Tavern, 6
p.m.

JAzz WEDNESDAyS AT
THE JAyHAWKER
Jayhawker, 7 p.m.

THE AMERiCANA
MUSiC ACADEMy
BEgiNNER’S JAM
Americana Music
Academy, 7 p.m.,
free, all ages

zOOgMA AT THE
BOTTLENECK
Bottleneck, 7 p.m.,
$10-$15, all ages
“LEADERSHip AND
gLOBALizATiON iN
SpORTS” By BRENDA
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WHiTE FANg
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THE BOTTLENECk
737 NEW HAMPSHIRE ST.
THE JACkPOT MUSIC HALL
943 MASSACHUSETTS ST.
THE JAzzHAUS
926 1/2 MASSACHUSETTS
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THE REPLAY LOUNGE
946 MASSACHUSETTS ST.
THE EIGHTH ST. TAPROOM
801 NEW HAMPSHIRE ST.
LAwRENCE ARTS CENTER
940 NEW HAMPSHIRE ST.
THE GRANADA
1020 MASSACHUSETTS
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THE POOL ROOM
925 IOWA ST.
wILDE’S CHATEAU 24
2412 IOWA ST.
DUFFY’S
2222 W. 6TH ST.
CONROY’S PUB
3115 W. 6TH ST., STE. D
THE BURGER STAND
803 MASSACHUSETTS ST.
Tune into KJHK 90.7fm tonight at 7 p.m. for Ad Astra Radio, a weekly local culture and art show.
Tonight’s show features a story on a UFO conference last weekend at Liberty Hall and the Lawrence ghost Tour, plus some SXSW coverage.
The University Daily Kansan
2000 DOLE CENTER
1000 Sunnyside Dr.
Lawrence, KS 66045
(785) 864-4810
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CONTACT
> Tackle the sticky world of relationships.
kansas in heat // SPRING BREAK CHEATER
a. You’ re i n qui t e a pi ckl e. Fi rst , ask
yoursel f how commi tted you are to the
relationship. The fact you did cheat, either
under the influence (poor excuse, by the
way) or not, may be a si gn of your true
commitment and dedication in establishing
a trusting relationship with your girlfriend.
Wi th that bei ng sai d, an ei ght-month
relationship is still very young. Confessing
your one-night stand may not be necessary
at this point. If you remain silent about this
majorly stupid act, you must be consciously
committed to the future of your relationship
and know you will never, ever, cheat again.
If you ever again find yourself in a similar
situation, think back to this moment and
the guilt and embarrassment you feel right
now. But keep in mind, a secret always
has the potential to come back to bite you
in the rear. This current loser activity may
affect your relationship in the future.
I f you do deci de t o come cl ean, be
pr epar ed f or any emot i onal r eact i on
she may t hrow your way. I t seems as
though you establ i shed a monogamous
rel at i onshi p wi t h your part ner bef ore
spri ng break; you refer to her as your
girlfriend. Therefore, she trusted you. It
is then up to your girlfriend to give you a
second chance or kick you to the curb.
Infi del i ty i s di srespectful and total l y
unnecessary. You made a choice, now you
live with the consequences. Unfortunately,
either choice that lies ahead of you will not
erase your actions. Good luck, and I hope
you won’t be such an idiot in the future.
// MICHELLE MACBAIN
Q. My girlfriend of eight months and I spent spring break apart. I went to Mexico, and
one night after a lot of drinking I had sex with a girl I met at a bar. Should I tell her I
cheated or keep it to myself?
Mike Anderson, Dellwood, Minn. graduate student, and Michelle MacBain, Kansas City, Kan., graduate student,
are the hosts of Kansas in Heat, a talk show about sex and relationships that airs Mondays at 9 p.m. on KJHK,
90.7fm and at kjhk.org.
a. “The Tell Tale-Heart” by Edgar Allen Poe
taught me keeping things like that a secret
never works. And cheesy teen movies have
taught me keeping a secret like that one from
your girlfriend rarely works out either.
If you decide not to tell her, then you better
understand she may never forgive you for
lying about this, but she might forgive you if
you tell her what happened. Here’s what you
have going for you: It wasn’t with her best
friend, it was outside the country and it was
spring break. The bad news is that might not
matter to her.
I would recommend being honest with
her. If you never tell her and she finds out,
it will probably be over. In that situation you
will have probably lost her trust forever.
Relationships have gotten past spring break
cheating at eight months; few have gotten
past a lie about cheating that lasted for
years.
Don’t worry so much about how to tell her.
Just try it. Whatever you do though, do not
use the booze as your key argument for why
you won’t do it again. You can mention that
you are going to cut back, but don’t give her
the I-got-caught-up in-the-moment-of-spring-
break-and-had-too-much-to-drink excuse.
Don’t mention who the girl was. Simply use
straight mortification and explain why your
actions were stupid. The less imagery you
use from that night the better. You don’t want
her to be able to picture you with someone
else if you still want her back.
// MIKE ANDERSON
CONTACT
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> Two people. Five questions. See how they stack up.
FIVE QUESTIONS // jacob wilcox & whitney dean
jacob wilcox
> Jacob Wilcox is a motocross racer. He competes in supercross
and motorcross track racing, usually in intermediate to experi-
ence racing.
whiTney dean
> WHitney dean is a Junior from stillWell. sHe maJors in Human
biology and Works at tHe zlb plasma center in laWrence. sHe loves
to bake and WatcH gilmore girls and true blood.
WhAT’s yOur fAvOriTe
kArAOke sONg TO siNg?
WOuld yOu like TO kNOW
The dAy yOu die AheAd Of
Time? Why Or Why NOT?
WhAT did yOu geT iN TrOuble
fOr WheN yOu Were A kid?
WhAT’s The mOsT
expeNsive gifT yOu’ve
ever giveN sOmeONe?
WhAT’s sOmeThiNg ThAT
yOu regreT?
Al green’s “love and happiness.” Anything spice girls. They were my favorite pop group in elementary
school, so the songs remind me of my childhood.
No, i wouldn’t want to know when i die because i think it would take the
point out of living life to the fullest.
No, because it would always be in the back of my mind; there would
always be a countdown.
i spray painted “69” on my friend’s golf cart at the lake. i would draw on the wallpaper in my parent’s family room with crayons.
i few the girl of my dreams out to California to spend the weekend with
me, even though i made it a complete disaster. When she came to visit, i
had to to let her know i had just met another girl; it was a love triangle all
weekend long.
A betsy Johnson necklace. i gave it to my best friend for Christmas. she
gave me betsy Johnson jewelry as well, so it was worth it.
The frst time i ever stopped believing in Christ. in six months i had every-
thing that was valuable to me stripped away. i went on probation, my
bikes were stolen, i broke both my ankle and elbow and i was in two fst
fghts.These were problems that could be solved.
Absolutely nothing.
// lAurA erdAll
Party on the Rooftop
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CONTACT
catch of the week // Michael Yabut
> Our weekly peek at a fsh in the KU sea.
Interests & HobbIes: I like to work out
and keep ft. I really like dancing, sports of all
types and listening to music.

turn-ons: I like girls who are athletic
and like to dance. Being optimistic and
trying to have a good time in any situation is
important. Physically, I like nice legs, and if a
girl has those two dimples on her lower back,
that’s a huge turn on.
turn-offs: Crooked and yellow teeth are bad.
Wearing too much makeup, being too dramatic,
being too outgoing and arrogance are turn-offs.
Also, if a girl has a fve o’clock shadow in her
armpits, that’s probably the hugest turn-off.

PersonalIty traIts: I’ve been told that I’m
trustworthy, responsible, easy to get along with
and unselfsh.
aWKWarD DatIng moment: When I was
in high school, I wanted to invite my girlfriend
to a dance. For some reason, I let my cousins
come with me to her house. As I waited at her
doorstep, one of my cousins managed to run
over my other cousin’s feet. So when I met her
parents for the frst time, I had to ask for ice for
his feet. I felt so stupid.
WHy I’m a catcH: Because I am Filipino. I’m a
genuine, down-to-earth, nice guy. Plus, I have
some good dance moves.
// CArOlINe KrAFT
HOMETOWN:
Overland Park
MAJOR:
Pre-Nursing
YEAR:
Junior
INTERESTED IN:
Women
ZODIAC SIGN:
Scorpio
South Lawrence Trafficway Trail
$15 Student Registration
$20 Non-Student Registration
registration starts at 9am
Race begins at 10am
Sat 4.2.11
th Lawrence Trafficway Trail
5 Student Registration
0 Non-Student Registration
stration starts at 9am
ce begins at 10am
at 4.2.11
tauphilanthropy@gmail.com
dr eams can come t r ue.
now open unt i l 3am.
( 785) 843- 8650 or ( 785) 841- 7096
1410 Kasol d St . A13
Bob Bi l l i ngs & Kasol d
JadeGar denOnl i ne. com
M: 11am- 10pm
T/ W/ Su: 11am- 12pm
Th/ F/ Sa: 11am- 3am
DI NE- I N
DELI VERY
CARRYOUT
Allergists can use two methods to see if a
patient has seasonal allergies. The frst method
is a skin allergy test, where many different
allergens prick the skin. Then the allergist looks
to see if the skin around a certain allergen
develops small hives. These tests often get a
bad rep, because needles used to be involved
in the pricking. However, some allergists, like
Meth, have switched to small, plastic tongs,
which make the test more comfortable. If the
skin allergy test still sounds unappealing, Meth
says a blood test can help determine a patient’s
allergies as well.
Bottom line: Seasonal allergies are no
fun, but they are treatable. If you think you’ve
caught “hay fever,” visit your doctor so you can
enjoy the spring weather and welcome back
the sun, and not stay cooped up indoors.
> Avoid going outside during peak pollen
times, which are often early morning and early
evening.
> Find a website, such as www.pollen.com, that
will email you the weekly pollen count. Then
you will know what days to expect high pollen
and more severe symptoms.
> When you come inside from being outdoors,
change your clothes and leave your shoes
at the door. That way, you don’t track pollen
throughout the house.
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HEALTH
Every year from the time she was two until
her sophomore year of college, sinus infections
and bronchitis cloaked Rachel Janose’s life.
“I had to miss a lot of school, work and social
events because I was constantly sick,” Janose,
Kansas City, Mo. senior, says.
A doctor finally narrowed down Janose’s
problem after almost 20 years of misdiagnosis:
she suffered from seasonal allergies.
Janose isn’t alone. Marc Meth, an allergist
at Century City Allergy in Los Angeles, says
30 to 40 percent of the population suffer from
seasonal allergies, and more and more people
join that category each year, for reasons Meth
says are unknown.

Sneeze, Wheeze and Itch
For allergy sufferers, spring and fall can bring
sneezing, nasal congestion and a runny nose,
says Neeta Ogden, an allergist at Englewood
Hospital and Medical Center in Englewood,
N.J. Itchy, watery eyes often join in the party,
making eyes red and puffy. Ogden says people
often complain of a sore or scratchy throat from
post-nasal drip.
Sometimes the fun doesn’t stop there, either.
Ogden says people can often develop sinusitis
and ear infections from ongoing allergies.
People with asthma can face even bigger
problems during allergy season. Asthmatics
can experience shortness of breath, chest
tightness and wheezing on top of the other
symptoms.
Wheat, GraSS and treeS
Kansas isn’t the greatest place for those
seeking to escape seasonal allergies. Meth
of Century City Allergy says the most common
villains individuals face are wheat pollen,
EvErything you nEEd to know about
that pEsky hay fEvEr...
A serious itch: Kansas in spring can be both beautiful and uncomfortable. Common allergies trace
back to wheat pollen, trees and grass pollen, which can cause the body to release histamines.
Photo Illustration by Aaron Harris
// JuSTINE PATTON
SeaSonal
allergies
trees and grass pollen. That’s why allergies
fare up most often in the spring and the fall —
those are the times when trees and grasses
are pollinating. Outdoor mold can also cause
symptoms as well.
Once these allergens pass through the skin
or the mucosa of the nose, eyes or lungs, the
body goes into defense mode. Meth says once
those antibodies are bound to an allergen, the
body releases all sorts of chemical mediators
that contribute to allergies — the most common
being histamines — which lead to those
irritating symptoms.
Luckily, for most people allergies aren’t that
serious of a condition. While these symptoms
can be annoying, Meth says people generally
aren’t keeling over from allergies. However,
Ogden of Englewood Hospital says long-term
sufferers can experience some debilitating
symptoms that can interfere with focusing at
school or work.
MoM, dad and Me
If you suffer from allergies, odds are your
parents are to blame. Meth of Century City
Al l ergy says i f someone’s parents have
allergies, he or she is likely to develop them
as well. However, the type of allergy rarely
matches up. So if your mom is allergic to grass
pollen, that doesn’t necessarily mean you will
be, too. It just means that you’re much more
likely to develop some type of allergy during
your lifetime.
Meth says genetics don’t account for all
seasonal allergies. He says environmental
factors could be partly to blame as well, but that
side of the equation isn’t understood as well.
Prevent, MedIcate and Breathe
Individuals can fight back against those
pesky seasonal allergies. A good idea for
people who know they have seasonal allergies
is to start on medication two to three weeks
before allergy season, because some allergy
medicine takes time to reach peak efficacy,
says Ogden of Englewood Hospital. “If you have
the medications on board, your body won’t be
surprised when the pollen hits, and you can
avoid the vicious cycle of allergy symptoms,
which can be hard to get under control once in
full effect.”
For those who aren’t sure whether or not
they have seasonal allergies or just a head
cold, Ogden suggests giving some of the over-
the-counter antihistamines a try. Odds are, if
they help symptoms, seasonal allergies are
the proper diagnosis. However, if they don’t
work, Ogden suggests possibly scheduling an
appointment with an allergist.
MedIcatIon ISn’t the only PreventatIve MeaSure allerGy SuffererS can take to
eScaPe hay fever. Neeta Ogdenan, an allergist at Englewood Hospital and Medical Center in
Englewood, N.J., says the following precautions can help make the season change even more
enjoyable:
> Wash your hair before going to bed.
> Close all windows in your home.
> use air conditioning when it gets hot, and
make sure your filters are clean. In the car,
keep the vents pointed away from you.
> If you have pets, wash them often so they
don’t track pollen from outdoors.
NOTICE
> Because we have questions. Celebrities have answers.
Q&A // The Beards of Comedy
It all started with an off-handed comment about his friends’ beards. Little did Joe Zimmerman know, he had just come up with the name and idea
for his future career. The Beards of Comedy, comprised of Andy Sanford, Dave Stone, TJ Young and Joe Zimmerman, have been together for two and
half years now.
Don’t let their Southern backgrounds fool you; this isn’t Blue Collar Comedy Tour. The Beards, who range in age from 26 to 34, tour in small, eclectic
venues and their comedy is generally geared toward a younger audience. Although based in traditional stand-up, the troupe also combines more
modern elements like music, improv and group sketches into their shows. Last summer the Beards released their debut album Comedy for People,
which is available on iTunes.
The Beards will be performing at the Czar Bar in downtown Kansas City, Mo. tonight at 7 p.m. Tickets are $10. Joe Zimmerman spoke with Jayplay
and gave us the rundown on the Beards and their tour.
How did the Beards frst get together?
We were all friends and the other three had
really good beards, so I jokingly suggested they
should do a tour and call it “The Beards.” Then
I realized I wanted to be a part of it, so I had
to grow a beard. It came in pretty nicely. If it
hadn’t, I would have just been the patchy guy.
Do you guys ever have beard competitions
amongst yourselves?
People always think it’s about how good our
beards are and not about how good our comedy
is. We did perform at the New York Beard and
Mustache Championship though. Actually a lot
of the “beardos” were kind of creepy. As far as
competing over the quality of your facial hair,
you have to be pretty strange to do that.
Hairy funny: Te Beards of Comedy will be
performing at the Czar Bar in Kansas City, Mo.
Te group adds elements of stand-up, improv,
music, sketch comedy and facial hair into their
live show.
Contributed photo
What inspired you to become a comedian?
I feel like a lot of people go through that deep
spiritual thing in college and ask themselves
what’s the purpose of life. I couldn’t really fgure
it out. I came to some dumb conclusion that the
best thing I could do for people was to make
them laugh.
In retrospect that’s kind of selfsh. It’s not
just about you. They’re giving you something
because they’re giving you their laugh.
You guys are all from the South. Do you draw
from the region for any of your material?
We kind of have this love-hate relationship
with the South. It’s hard to explain, but we love
it and are ashamed of it at the same time. None
of us have cliché accents or do jokes about how
we love NASCAR.
Has the overall success of the tour changed the
dynamic of the group?
We’re just touring around being happy, getting
better and making a stronger show. I mean,
we’re not sitting there sipping champagne,
being like “everything we say is gold.” You’re
only as successful as your newest joke.
Are you guys planning on staying together in
the troupe?
A lot of people ask us when the beard tour is
over, but we plan on continuing for the rest of our
careers. We could tour together intermittently
whenever we want. I don’t see us breaking up
the band anytime soon.
Do you have a career plan after comedy?
Well, I majored in English during college. My
dad’s an English professor; my grandpa’s an
English professor. I’m really just resisting grad
school at this point. I’ll probably go back later
when I want to hang out in an offce full of books
and have young kids come to me blurry-eyed
asking me to move their B to an A.
Are you allowed to shave?
As soon as one of us shaves that person
will be immediately disbanded. It’s part of the
sacrifce you have to make; nobody can see
your chin.
What can people expect if they come to the
show tonight?
If they’re single, they’ll probably fnd their true
love. If they’re married, they’ll have renewed
love and if they’re poor they’ll probably fnd a
million dollars. It’s gonna be a good time.
// BECKY HOWLETT
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NOTICE
> Because we have questions. Celebrities have answers.
Q&A // Remy Ayesh
Remy Ayesh has done everything but play it safe when it comes to her career. After almost three
years of college, she started over and switched majors. She took the fve-year plan, but Remy
graduated from KU in 2005 and promptly moved to New York City to become a food writer. Once in
New York she realized she wanted food to be her “9 to 5” so she took out a loan and attended the
French Culinary Institute.
After school, Remy got a call about working for a resort in Aspen — free ski package included.
Within two weeks her bags were packed. She worked every job she could at the resort, from
catering to breakfast service. But after a year and half in Colorado she craved life in the big city,
so she packed up her bags again and took a job as the formaggiaio, or in-house cheese expert, at
Spiaggia — the only four-star Italian restaurant in Chicago.
Today she is a chef instructor in New York City at the French Culinary Institute where she origi-
nally cultivated her passion for cooking. Remy will soon be appearing on an episode of Chopped on
the Food Network. Each episode features four talented chefs who face-off in a head-to-head cook-
ing competition for a grand prize of $10,000. The 29-year-old took a moment to talk with Jayplay
about her experiences and tell us how she has applied her KU education in the real world.
Your name is so unique. What ethnicity
are you?
I’m half Lebanese and half Deep South. My
mom’s from Arkansas. My parents actually
named me after Rémy Martin cognac.
You were recently invited to participate in the
show Chopped. What was flming like?
The restaurant business is so unstable
on a day-to-day basis that I thought I was
totally ready for it. But then you throw in the
TV element. I can’t produce creatively when
tripping over cables. It was mayhem. But I
became best friends with the other contestants.
The producers want better TV so they try to get
you to talk bad about each other. We wouldn’t
do it.
You graduated from KU with degrees in
journalism and Spanish, but like so many
others you changed your majors along the way.
Why?
I was in the business school and I had three
and a half majors. In my third year of school I
got to calculus 3 and I had the realization that
there was no way I was ever going to use this
in real-life. I had a mini meltdown. You think it’s
the end of the world if you change majors. But I
dropped everything and switched.
You’ve reinvented yourself in the food industry
so many times already. Your creativity is evident.
Why were you in the business school?
I know, right? I really wanted to make my
parents proud. My mom’s in real estate and my
dad’s an attorney. There’s no room for creativity
there. Somewhere along the line I had to be
true to myself.
From KU to Cuisine: Remy Ayesh, a KU alumnus, is an instructor at the French Culinary Institute in
New York City. She will appear on the Food Network in an episode of Chopped.
Contributed photo
How has journalism helped you in your
career?
It made me very aware of marketability.
Hard work doesn’t get recognized on its own.
You really have to build your own brand.
Unfortunately you can’t just be great; you have
to put yourself out there. But I’ve also learned
along the way that no matter how much you
prepare for something, you just have to give it
up to the universe. Do your best. It’s really one
of those old adages.
Do you use your Spanish now?
Oh my god. More than anything in my life.
When I work in kitchens, I use my Spanish every
single day. It helps me win over my staff, which
is almost always Hispanic in the food industry.
It’s bizarre and fabulous all at the same time.
When you major in a language you major in a
whole culture. I love it.
If you could go back would you do anything
differently?
Absolutely not. I recently had a student
inquire about all the choices I’ve made in my
career and he asked, “Was it worth it?” And I
had this huge realization: yes, it was. Live your
life with no regrets. I’ve done nothing but follow
my heart. Not my brain, my heart.
Are you still true to your Jayhawk roots?
I was at a bar by myself watching the Big
12 Championship game and I was literally
screaming at the TV. The bartender was so
confused and I told him, “You don’t understand
KU basketball is my religion.” But there are
other Jayhawks in NYC. I’m thinking of forming
a posse so we can watch games and curse at
the TV together.
Be sure to keep an eye out for Remy on May 24th when she’ll compete on Chopped on the
Food Network.
// BECKY HOWLETT
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Gadhaf has said, “My people love me.” I think I’ll go bomb a few of my fans, too.
February 28

There’s a rumor that a recent Oscar host is going to play Catwoman. Waiting by
my phone for the call.
March 1
Doing a sit-up in preparation for my Catwoman role.
March 2
One sit-up has created ripples on abs. Embarrassing when in tight tee, with light
hint of perspiration, walking dog in bright sunshine.
March 2
I have decided to be “bad,” like Charlie. Going over the details with my wife.
March 2
Consulting trusting wife about ramifcations of being “bad” like Charlie, and using
Coke® & cheaper porn extras rather than “stars.”
March 2
HI, I’M STEVE’S CAPS LOCK KEY, AND I’D LIKE TO MEET OTHER CAPS
LOCKS KEYS. I’M INTERESTED IN BOATING AND HIKING.
March 5
Long day: Rehearse Letterman, sound check at Highline Ballroom, tape
Letterman (on Wednesday), then show at Highline. Walk dog. Google self.
March 14
Out on the town today. I tried to tweet but couldn’t fnd a tweet booth. Maybe
they’re a thing of the past.
March 18
Tweet outft complete. Wearing straw fedora with alpine feather and groovy mir-
rored wraparound sunglasses. Tweets sheer poetry now.
March 19
Added to twitter outft. Got rubberized day-glo vest that fts over nylon twitter
tee. Tweets sure to improve.
March 19
Found some great new twitter pants. Tight red spandex with calf protectors. I’m
sure the quality of tweets will improve now.
March 19
Thinking of canceling Libyan bluegrass tour.
March 25
Trusting wife angry at me for violating sacred pact of marriage. A married man,
she claims, does not wear a bustle.
March 26
An Egyptian cobra has escaped and is hiding in the Bronx zoo. I’m sitting in my
King Tut hat by the phone awaiting their call for help.
March 28
Just saw a duck in the shape of a cloud.
March 28
Had that dream again last night where the GEICO lizard makes me hold his legs
down while he does sit-ups.
March 28

I am really experiencing “pain at the pump.” I am also really hurting from the
price of gas.
March 27
My plan is to buy a ticket for “The Lincoln Lawyer” and then sneak into “Sucker
Punch.”
March 26
Thanks @charliesheen for the compliment. To clarify, I’m 7’1” a super genius,
and those aren’t freckles -- it’s male menopausal acne.
March 25
Worst pick up line for this time of year: “Want to see my fnal four?”
March 25
Charlie Sheen is doing a 21-city comedy tour. Being a mentally unstable out of
work TV star on tour was my idea.
March 24
Just got a new iPhone app that lets me shorten “app” to “ap.”
March 23
Ah, Springtime in L.A.! It reminds me of Fall in L.A.
March 22
Sometimes I worry that we Americans have lost sight of the true meaning of Bam-
pfugnax Day.
March 21
According to a new study, drinking too much soda can reduce a man’s fertility.
Guess I’d better stop drinking “Doc Brown’s Vasectomy Pop.”
March 20
The Spider-Man musical is ineligible for next year’s Tonys, which is a shame — it
was a shoo-in for “Best Shrieking Plummet From A Ceiling.”
March 18
Saint Patrick’s Day is named for Saint Patrick, the frst guy to feed Guinness to a
snake.
March 17
Why did that soothsayer tell Caesar to “Beware the Ides of March” when he
could’ve more helpfully said, “Beware the knives of stabbers?”
March 15
Already flled out my March Madness brackets. I picked “The King’s Speech” over
UConn.
March 14
I forgot to set my clock forward and ended up sleeping right through my clock-
setting class.
March 13
Subway has surpassed McDonald’s to become the world’s largest restaurant
chain. If you thought Jared was an unbearable prick before...
March 12
celebritweets // @StevenMartintoGo celebritweets // @conanobrien
// TAKEN FROM TWITTER.COM BY sARAh ChAMp
// TAKEN FROM TWITTER.COM BY JONAThAN hERMEs
Steve Martin is an actor, writer, comedian and musician. Conan O’Brien is a writer and comedian, whose show Conan airs
weeknights on TBS at 10 p.m.
NOTICE
I slowly realIze they aren’t
hungry; they’re possessIve,
claImIng me as theIrs. were
they hungry, I wouldn’t
have made It thIs far.
> Dane Kieser
On why he thinks he survived the lion attack.
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wescoe wit
> lol.
If I don’t get grandma’s cookies, I’m
going to go on a homicidal rampage.
GUY:
GiRL 2:
GiRL 1:
GiRL 1: It smells like a cough drop.
It smells like my life’s a joke.
It smells like teen spirit.
GUY: I’m giving up emoticons for Lent.
PRoFessoR: I have a good cock block.
GUY: I don’t know what I’m going to do about
getting a job… all signs point to career fair.
It’s not as bad as when your roommate
walks in with his parents and you’re standing
there naked.
GUY:
I guess I should make a resume if
I’m going to graduate in two months.
PRoFessoR:
I am going to dropkick the frst
person who pinches me for not wearing green.
PRoFessoR:
Golden arches: it’s a lifestyle. GiRL:
Have you overheard any Wescoe witticisms?
Become a fan on Facebook and your post could
be published in Jayplay!
// sarah champ
NOTIcE
> we know you’re curious.
what it’s Like // To survive a lion aTTack
All smiles: Dane Kieser, who moved to Lawrence
six months ago to play rugby for the mens team,
in his hometown of Johannesburg, South Africa.
Survivors tale: Dane Kieser, in the hospital after the attack, has a photograph taken of his wounds.
Contributed Photo
Contributed Photo
my family and I are visiting a private farm
for a barbecue. Loads of people are at the farm
that day. also at the farm are fve male lions the
owners keep in a fenced-in area, so of course
I go out with this girl to see them. We sit down
about a yard away from the fence.
We see one lion come over and sit in front
of us, right on the other side of the fence. It’s
chilling. What we don’t see is that standing wa-
ter has rusted out the bottom part of the fence,
making it weak. The lion, however, knows this.
suddenly a paw that would dwarf a man’s hand
slings toward me under the fence. his nails land
deep in my ankle, pulling me in. at frst I think I
can unhook them, but the nails are an inch deep;
it’s just not possible. as the frst lion pulls and my
knees drag through the rusty fence, a second
lion approaches and bites down into my calf. I
yell at this girl to call for my parents; I know I’m
not breaking free. The fence now scrapes past
my hips as the third lion’s teeth clench into my
upper thigh. his strength adds enough force to
pull me inside the fenced-in area.
I’m no expert on big cats, but I know enough
to immediately turn onto my stomach, cover-
ing my neck and face. and then, for whatever
reason, two of the lions walk off, leaving just
me and the dominant male, the one who frst
pulled me in. With his claws still in my ankle,
he yanks me across the thick brush another 10
or 15 yards. I slowly realize they aren’t hungry;
they’re possessive, claiming me as theirs. Were
they hungry, I wouldn’t have made it this far.
I decide to play dead. The thing with lions is
that if you kick them, it triggers the same preda-
tory instinct that struggling prey does. You can’t
scream either; their prey screams too. I lie there
for minutes that feel like eternities.
people say that during a near-death experi-
ence you see your entire life fash before you,
and I’ve always thought that was bullshit. But
it’s true. I see myself growing up. I see myself
playing rugby for the frst time. Everything.
I notice the dominant lion left me, charging
toward the other two. With a strange calm, I
think to myself, this is it. This is my time. I man-
age to stand up, but the dominant lion notices.
he reels back on his hind legs and gives me
a swipe. In doing so, one of his nails plunges
deeply into my chest, in and out. I later fnd out
the nail missed my aorta by a millimeter. I fall
back to the ground.
Dominant leaves me again for the other two.
This time I grab a nearby stick. I back up to the
fence, and as he notices I start swinging, keep-
ing him a yard away. Further down the fence
was the gate, my best chance for escape. I
slowly slide toward it, swinging at the beast. By
the time I reach the gate, everyone has arrived.
The owner has a huge ring of keys. Luckily, the
frst key he tries works. The gate slides open
and I’m pulled through.
By this point I’ve lost so much blood that I’m
seeing in black and white, standing only on pure
adrenaline. I look down at what was once my
calf and see only a chunk of hanging meat. I
stop surveying my wounds. The last thing I need
is to faint.
// BY DaNE KIEsEr
as TOLD TO jOsh haFNEr
A love/hate relationship: Jersey Shore has
connected with its audience. Tough people
hate to admit it, they can relate to the cast.
Contributed Photo
roommates in their 20s (Big Brother, The Real
World), but Jersey Shore capitalizes on the fun-
loving, hardly working cast’s Italian-American
culture.
The season-three premiere on Jan. 6, 2011,
set MTV network and Cable TV records with
8.45 million viewers, according to The Nielson
Company’s live-plus-same-day ratings. The
following episodes of Jersey Shore’s third
season have only continued to up the ante,
Whether you’ve seen an episode or not,
you’ve likely heard about grenades, guidos,
t-shirt time, beating up the beat, the poof and
the situation.
The outlandish, terracotta-colored cast of
MTV’s top-ranked series, Jersey Shore, has
fst-pumped its way into the hearts of college
students across the country.
It’s one of several reality shows that take an
uncensored look at the lives of hard-partying
FEATURE
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// SARAh ChAMp
What’s in the Water at jersey shore?
drawing nearly nine million viewers per
episode, half of whom are 18- to 34-year-olds.
So what’s the Shore’s secret? What sets it
apart from other reality shows and why does it
so strongly attract the college-aged audience?
While a specifc genre of television will
certainly appeal to a particular demographic,
Brian Ott, visiting professor of media and
rhetorical studies at the University of Colorado-
Denver, says the type of confict on Jersey
Shore is what draws the younger viewers. “The
show’s confict is almost exclusively relational
and college-aged students relate to that,” Ott
says. “They compare their own relationships
to those on television and they seem normal
compared to [Jersey Shore]. It’s a train wreck
on television.”
A large part of that train wreck’s success,
Ott says, is how viewers connect with and
root for a specifc cast member; what media
studies call “parasocial relationships.” people
watch Jersey Shore and form some sort of
interpersonal relationship with one or more of
the characters, making the Seaside heights
gang feel like real people.
A loyal viewer since season one, Stephanie
Naar, a senior from St. Louis, sees the cast as
real people, describing each of them and the
relationship dynamics as though they are her
eight roommates.
Get to know the cast in their own words.
From jerseyshorequotes.com
“We’re beatin’-up-the-
beat, that’s what we
say when we’re doing
our fst pump. First, we
start off by bangin’ the
ground. We’re bangin’ it as the beat builds
‘cause that beat’s hittin’ us so we’re fghtin’
back, it’s like we beat up that beat.”
– Paul DelVecchio, “Pauly D”
On his signature dance move
“Tall, completely jacked,
steroids, like mulitple
growth hormones...that’s
the type I’m attracted to.”
– Jenni Farley, “JWoww”
On her ideal man
“I don’t go tanning
anymore because
Obama put a 10-percent
tax on tanning. And
I feel like he did that
intentionally for us. McCain would never put
a 10-percent tax on tanning because he’s
pale, and he would probably wanna be tan.”
– Nicole Polizzi, “Snooki”
On what’s wrong with Washington
“And then there are
some girls that are
respectful, that you
actually have to treat
like girls — like human
beings.”
– Vinny Guadagnino, “Vinny”
On chivalry
“G.T.L baby. Gym, tan,
laundry.”
– Michael Sorrentino,
“The Situation”
On his daily routine
“That’s what you get
for putting a fat girl’s
ass in your face. That’s
how you get pinkeye.”
– Ronnie Ortiz-Magro, “Ronnie”
On contracting eye infections
be like its cast,” Thompson, the Syracuse
professor, says. “I think most people watch
that show to feel superior to it. You have to
bring a lot of mockery to that program.”
The last episode of season three aired last
Thursday and MTV has renewed Jersey Shore
for a fourth season, which will be flmed in
Italy, tentatively set to air next fall.
Jersey following: Te cast of Jersey Shore (and their hot tub) have become a television phenomenon. Te show’s third season premiered to record numbers.
Contributed Photo
FEATURE
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“I don’t think we’re used to watching reality
TV like this just because of how real it is.
They’re basically just like us — they’re normal
people,” Naar says. “I mean, yes, they got
famous off this show, but we can all relate to
them; they’re just a little crazier.”
Even though Jersey Shore is a highly
structured, mildly bogus situation, Robert
Thompson, professor of television and pop
culture at Syracuse University, says it’s a lot
closer to listening in on real people than a
scripted program. It feeds people’s natural
curiosity about others.
Emphasizing the success of Jersey Shore’s
casting, Thompson compared watching the
show to what it would be like if humans grew
up to adulthood with absolutely no infuence
of civilization. “They look like us, sound like us
and talk like us — as in, they’re human beings
— but then they behave like zoo animals. It’s
endlessly entertaining to watch,” Thompson
says.
That outrageous behavior is exactly what
got Bradley Brooks, a sophomore from Olathe,
they’re human beings —
but then they behave like
zoo animals. it’s endlessly
entertaining to watch.
> Robert Thompson
Professor of Television and Pop Culture at Syracuse University
watching the show from week to week. Even
though he didn’t watch the frst season, Brooks
always heard about it and how out of control it
was, so he watched an episode of the second
season and discovered how compelling it was.
“Once you start watching a show like Jersey
Shore, you can’t stop,” Brooks says. “I heard
how out of control it was, and had to give it
a try. It took me a little bit to understand who
everyone was and what was going on, but it
was completely worth it.”
Like Brooks, not everyone who religiously
follows the antics of Jersey Shore actually
likes the show and admires the cast, but rather
tunes in for sheer entertainment.
“I think the mode in which most people
watch that show is not to imitate or want to
expand your lexicon
with these Jersey shore
catch phrases:
From flm.com
Creepin’ // On the prowl for a hook-up at
the bar. Example: Ronnie and Sammi got
into a fght and now he’s out creepin’.
Gorilla // A very muscular man; a
meathead. Also referred to as gorilla
juicehead. Example: I got myself a gorilla!
Grenade // “A bigger, ugly chick,” says
The Situation. Example: The club was full of
grenades.
MVp // Acronym for Mike, Vinny, and
Pauly. Example: It’s MVP night! No girls
allowed -- unless they’re in our beds!
Sloppy Joe // This is when a person is
drunk times 10 million. Example: Did you
see her rolling around the foor over there?
She’s Sloppy Joe, man.
SMooSh // To engage in sexual
intercourse. Example: Bro, I smooshed her
last night!
Looking for other theme ideas
to spice up saturday night?
cowboy country party // Pull yourself up by
your bootstraps and rustle up some fun in a
pearl snap shirt and a ten-gallon hat.
toga party // A college classic for the animal
in you. Bedsheets are a very inexpensive
costume.
White trash Bash // For an added touch, keep
your PBR frosty in a bathtub on the front lawn.
heaven and hell // Dress as an angel or a
devil… you decide.
tacky sweater // Best near Christmastime,
put that awful sweater your aunt bought you to
good use.
15
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PLAY
You walk into a friend’s house late Saturday
night and Sandy and Danny from the movie
Grease greet you at the door. On the couch
Pri ncess Lei a and Han Sol o are getti ng
dangerously close. You spot Waldo and his
girlfriend Wenda, clad in their red and white
striped sweaters and matching hats, in the
kitchen pouring shots. Over by the stereo,
Pebbles and Bamm-Bamm are rocking out to a
primal jam.
You know you’re a little buzzed, but what’s
going on? Is this some sort of space/time warp
or a Hollywood movie set? No, you’re still in
Lawrence and it’s still 2011. You just walked into
a Famous Couples party.
If you feel as though you see the same faces
at the same places every week, a theme party
can break the monotony of the weekend party
scene. Ann Whittington, premier event and
party planner, says theme parties can make an
event memorable and give a party a distinct,
individual personality.
“Normal parties can get monotonous,”
Nadina Goddard, Wichita sophomore, says.
Theme parties give her and her friends the
opportunity to get crazy and creative, without
having to travel or spend a lot of money. “It’s
always fun to see how outrageous people get,
to see the variety of costumes that people come
up with,” Goddard says.
freshen up Weekend festivities With fun theme parties
Secret ‘stache: A mustache party can bring out the creative side of people, even those who can’t grow
facial hair. Drawing a mustache on your fngers can achieve the desired efect for a night of fun.
Stone-age couple: Brett Lisher and Alexa Cole
pose for a photo at a couples theme party.
Contributed Photo
Contributed Photo
// LINDSeY DIeTeR
ThemaTically Speaking
It’s not always easy to attract a large crowd
of participators though. The four theme party-
goers and party-throwers featured below all
agree that a fun, creative idea is the key to
rounding up revelers.
Two of a kind

In addition to the prominent pairs mentioned
earlier, other impersonators such as Mickey
and Minnie Mouse, Carrie Underwood and her
hockey hunk Mike Fisher, Alice and the Mad
Hatter and doctors McDreamy and Meredith
from the TV show Grey’s Anatomy all attended
the same Famous Couples party that emily Cox,
St. Louis junior, and her boyfriend did. The duo
dressed as Sandy and Danny at the party, which
the Pi Beta Phi sorority hosted. “It was fun to
try and guess who each couple was,” Cox says.
People came as famous actors, musicians,
movie and TV couples, cartoon characters and
even famous historical pairs. “Picking a pair is
more fun and challenging than putting together
a costume just for yourself,” Cox says.
ParTying, exPosed
Goddard hosted this crazy bash for her 20th
birthday on March 4. “I wanted to think of the
wildest, craziest party idea that I hadn’t really
seen or been to before,” Goddard says, and an
ABC — that’s “anything but clothes”— party
fit the bill perfectly. Goddard, who crafted a
dress out of the cardboard from six-packs of
beer, gave her friends a few weeks notice so
they could brainstorm ideas and assemble their
costumes. It worked, and people came scantily
clad in trash bags, boxes, tissue paper, plastic
tubs, a suitcase and even lollipops and plastic
wrap. “No one could really move or go to the
bathroom, but it was worth it,” Goddard says.
“It was a night of limited mobility, but maximum
fun.”
say hello To your liTTle friends
When Jessica Cox, Olathe senior, turned 22,
she wasn’t interested in hitting the bars. After
being of the legal drinking age for a year, the
bar scene had lost a bit of its luster, and she
thought a house party would be more fun and
get more people involved.
Cox threw a 1920s gangsters and mafa party,
complete with fedoras and feathers, pinstripe
suits, hard liquor and fake $100 bills. She says
it was fun to see people’s different costumes,
and that people were trading accesories and
giving away parts of their costume so everyone
was dressed up. “Theme parties are a blast
because for one night, you don’t have to act like
yourself,” she says.
a noT-so-secreT ‘sTache
Claire Wilkinson came up with the idea to
throw a “Mustache Bash” to do something
di f f erent and get peopl e exci t ed about
something new. Wilkinson, a 23-year-old
Lawrence native, has thrown theme parties
before but never had quite the participation to
make the party great. She must look trustworthy
and convincing with a mustache though,
because she says nearly everyone joined in the
facial hair fun.
“There’s just something about mustaches,
I guess,” Wilkinson says. There were furry
mustaches, some drawn on, paper ‘staches
and others that were drawn on the index fnger
to be worn on command. “I looked just like my
dad,” Wilkinson says.
Depending how far you want to take them,
theme parties can be as simple or as complex
as you want them to be. So if your night life
seems repetitive, or you feel the urge to step
into someone else’s shoes (or facial hair, or
guise, or into no shoes at all), don’t be afraid
to get creative. Give your party-goers plenty of
heads-up, let the creative juices flow and the
ridiculous photo ops will present themselves.
Just don’t forget a camera.
Seth BrookS
Lawrence | Freshman
A rubix cube. It’s cool and fun, yet complicated.
tommy Cheng
wichita | Freshman
A rock. I guess I don’t really like to move; I just like to chill
and stay where I’m comfortable.
AlexAndrA Vogl
chicago | Freshman
A TV. I watch a lot of it, and I’d always want to be
entertaining people.
CryStAl yAkel
Leawood | Junior
A banana, because it’s convenient, tasty and healthy. Plus,
who doesn’t love a little sexual innuendo?
CArlo BArAjAS
wichita | senior
An iPod, because I’d constantly be getting felt on. People’s
lives seem to revolve around [iPods].
SAmmi golden
chicago | Freshman
Jewelry — probably a ring. Jewelry is pretty and it makes
people feel good about themselves.
rAfe elenBerg
wichita | senior
A bedroom wall. Then I could know everyone’s deepest,
darkest secrets.
16
03
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PLaY
out & ABout // If you were an InanImate object,
what would you be?
> Random people. Random answers.
// LindseY deiter
17
03
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11
PLAY
STAGE PRESENCE // Blueprint jazz
> Rising stars. Feel free to swoon.
Jazz and bebop pioneers Charlie “Bird”
Parker, Louie Armstrong and Dizzy Gillespie
are no longer alive to make music, but their
infuence lives on. It’s easy to hear just how well
through the sounds of Blueprint Jazz.
Led by trumpet player Tommy Johnson,
Blueprint Jazz has a fexible lineup of Lawrence-
area jazz musicians. The usual lineup features
Max Allsbrooks on drums, Lucas Parker on both
bass and guitar, and Addison Frei on piano.
“Our sound is a culmination of all of
our infuences,” Johnson says, citing the
aforementioned artists. “We started out playing
standards, but the more we play together,
the more we incorporate our own works into
Blueprint.”
The jazz combo uses standards from 30s,
40s and 50s jazz, most in the bebop style that
is upbeat, roaring fast and improvised, but fnds
room to mix in their own modern sounds and
style. The band almost always opens their set
with their version of vibraphonist/composer
Milt Jackson’s “Bag Groove,” and closes the
evening swing with “Bring it On Home to Me”
by soul crooner Sam Cooke.
Blueprint Jazz plays every Friday night
Standard players: Blueprint Jazz plays near the
entrance of iBar. Te band includes a fexible
lineup of Lawrence Jazz musicians who play
songs by Milt Jackson and Sam Cooke.
Contributed photo
from 7-9:30 p.m. at the iBar at Ingredient,
947 Massachusetts St. Ian Sotomayor, a
Lawrence resident who regularly goes to
jazz shows at the iBar, says you can always
count on hearing “accomplished musicians
and incredible jazz,” but Johnson says the
experience is unique and different every time.
“One week we sound this way, another week
maybe we sound totally different. I guess
that’s good,” Johnson says. “It’s fun.”
// LINDSEY DEITER
Japanese Steakhouse & Sushi Bar
W th Street
FREE
SUSHI ROLLS

www.kobeatlawrence.com
A L L Y O U C A N E A T
p a s t a , s a l a d ,
& b r e a d
5 p m - C L O S E
C A R A F E S O F
P A I S A N O ’ S r e d ,
c h a b l i s ,
& s a n g r i a
8
$
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7 8 5 . 8 3 8 . 3 5 0 0
REVIEW
18
03
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11
music review // BEADY EYE – ‘DiffErEnt gEAr,
still spEEDing’ (DAngErBirD)
> KJHK’s weekly guide to sonic
consumption.
Beady Eye is a britpop band truly from the
heart of the scene itself. Including four previ-
ous members from the 90s British sensation
Oasis (“Wonderwall,” “Champagne Super-
nova”) and located in Manchester, Beady
Eye brings a fresh style to an old sound. The
best part about Different Gear, Still Speeding
is how professional and close-knit the band
members are after honing their skills on the
way to the top of the charts with Oasis, and
how free they are to create a new image with
their new name.
If Beady Eye really is at the heart of the
britpop scene, then it makes sense that their
sound would ft there as well. Their sound
is not nearly as “Madchester” as acts like
Happy Mondays or The Stone Roses, nor as
angsty and tense as Joy Division, yet fnds
its own niche where it can rock out. Beady
Eye defnitely relies on catchy hooks like their
former band but strays away from the pop in
favor of a more down-to-earth rock style.
“It’s not the end of the world, oh no it’s not
even the end of the day” from the new track
“The Beat Goes On” speaks to Beady Eye’s
unwielding optimism and the fervor with which
they crafted this album. The opener and closer
“Four Letter Word” and “The Morning Son”
are both standouts, as well with the frst one
being exciting and the latter providing a sense
of calm and closure to the album. The track
“Roller” is one of the fastest on the album and
very easy to groove to. Also, make sure not to
miss the single “Bring the Light,” which has
been made available as a free download on
their offcial website.
// ZACK MARSH
$4 Double Wells
$2 Single Wells & Shots
$3 Bombs
THURSDAY - SATURDAY
REVIEW
19
03
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11
STYLE rEviEw // DIP-DYE HAIR
> Get it while it’s haute.
As the days are growing warmer, you’re
probably reconsidering many aspects of your
look, including your hair. Your mind is buzzing
with the repetitive question: to lighten your hair
for the summer or keep it dark? Well, you can
do both — with dip-dye hair, where half your
hair is dark and half is light — and no it doesn’t
look trashy. Celebs like Rachel Bilson, Drew
Barrymore and Alexa Chung have all sported
the look and it radiates effortless boho-chic.
You can incorporate it into your look by
adding a hint of golden blond highlights around
your face, or you can fully support the trend by
dying the bottom half of your hair with a caramel
or champagne color. Just make sure the hues
aren’t more than two to three shades apart to
perfect that just-got-home-from-vacation look.
Dip-dye hair can be done at the salon or at
home. For a cheaper option, buy an at-home
color kit that is no more than three shades
lighter than your current color. Highlight as
you normally would, but start midway down
the hair shaft instead of at the roots. It’s also
wise to blend in the look a bit by placing random
Chic contrast: Update your hair color this spring
by dying the bottom half of your hair a lighter
hue. Celebrities make the look a boho trend.
Contributed Photo
MOviE rEviEw // suckER PuncH
> Hollywood hits, indie ficks and everything in between.
With a dark, mysterious, gothic like look to it,
Sucker Punch, will leave almost any videogame-
loving guy begging for more.
Baby doll (Emily Browning: The Uninvited,
Lemony Snicket) has been locked away in
a mental institution for girls by her vicious
stepfather after she accidentally killed her
sister. Through her imagination and grief, Baby
doll creates a fantasy world after she arrives.
The world she creates has the mental patients
becoming female dancers. They perform for
specifc clients and have to cater to these men’s
every need. In reality these men are the workers
in the mental institution. In this fantasy world
Baby doll decides to let her mind go wherever
it takes her. Once she starts dancing she goes
into yet another world. Here she discovers a
plan to try to escape her imprisonment. Baby
doll encourages a few of the dancers (Abbie
Cornish, Jena Malone, Vanessa Hudgens, and
Jamie Chung) to join her in this escape for
freedom. Once in this other fantasy they have
to fght to obtain an object that will help them
escape. With a similar videogame feel, their
fghting will lead them to their fnal destiny.
This flm has a constant twist of fantasy
that makes actual reality a blur, giving off
a futuristic feel. It appears that the point
of this movie would be to promote women
empowerment. But with the small outfts that
are being worn it seems as if the real fans of
this movie would be males and not females
searching for a life like heroin.
// SAVAnnAH ABBOTT
highlights toward the crown of the head so
the sudden color change isn’t as obvious. And
don’t worry about perfection — the trend here
exemplifes Mother nature at her best.
// BRITTAnY nELSOn
Plaza Shopping. Vampire Movies. Psyc 300.
Take a summer class at KU in KC.
12600 Quivira Road
r
Overland Park, KS 66213
(913) 897-8400 r JayhawkSummer.com
OF
It’s your summer. Make the most of it.
SPEAK
When I picked up the phone that brisk
November night in 2010, I could tell that all
wasn’t well. Phil, one of my best friends, asked
if I could come over. “Of course,” I told him. “Is
everything OK?”
His simple response terrifed me.
“No.” A click, then. . . silence.
I sped across town, my mind racing through
the horrible things that could await me at the
guys’ house on Garfeld Street. I trudged up the
same walk that I had hundreds of times before
with a new feeling of dread and absolute fear.
I opened the door to fnd the couches full of
my friends, sobbing uncontrollably. Phil saw me
arrive and approached me. He wasn’t crying,
but his eyes were heavy with. . . something. I
guess the best word would be sorrow.
“Matt shot hi msel f, ” was al l he coul d
manage.
Suddenly my mind felt unattached from the
rest of my body. My stomach sunk into itself like
some kind of terrible black hole. And the grim
parade of questions began to barrage my brain.
Matt Adair was one of my random roommates
in Lewis Hall, room 202 my freshman year. I met
him and his family while my mom and I were
moving stuff into the room. And, like everyone
who knew Matt, I remember his laugh. Even
though we had just met, we found things to
laugh about with our families as we began this
Coping through tragedy: Elliot Metz (right) and
his friend Matt (left) recline in the “Birthday
Lounge” they created behind Lewis Hall. Elliot
has learned about the power of friendship after
Matt’s unexpected death last fall.
Contributed Photo
21
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new experience.
I remember my birthday freshman year. It
was May 14th, 2008, and everyone was moving
out. As the clock hit midnight and I uneventfully
turned 19, Matt had an idea. “You know that
furniture out back that everyone’s throwing
out? Let’s make it the ‘Birthday Lounge,’” he
said, with a familiar glint in his eye.
Along with our friend Sean, we dragged
three beaten-up recliners to the top of the hill
behind Lewis. We sat, smoked terrible cigars
and looked out over the whole campus.
It was supposed to be a grand beginning.
Once I got a hold of myself, I was on the
couch, head in my hands, too shocked to cry.
And as I sat there, seemingly melting in my
own grief, one thought kept flashing in my
head.
“What the hell?”
This isn’t supposed to happen. Matt was
21. We thought he was happy. We thought we
would always be there for him, as he always
was for us. And now. . . we were just lost.
As a group, we excel at having a good time
and laughing at ourselves. But this? We didn’t
know what to do with this.
Matt left us with one phrase, one mantra,
one tiny thing we could hold onto throughout
the day.
“The greatest man who ever lived.”
It’s perfect. The boldness, the confidence,
the attitude of “this is me, like it or not.” And
we did. We loved Matt, because he was always
laughing, making us laugh or very likely both.
And he always seemed to have time for a late-
night chat if one of us was feeling mad, sad or
otherwise.
That mantra is still there, the lone sentence
in his About Me section on Facebook. But now
it sits alongside the social media version of
eulogies, messages from loved ones who still
reach out to Matt.
The days between the night we got the news
and the wake are still a haze to me. Somehow I
made it to most of my classes, even though I felt
like I was walking through thick, murky Jell-O
every time I left my apartment.
The one thing I do remember from those
days was when I was asked to be a pallbearer.
At frst, I was deeply honored that Matt’s family
asked me, along with four of my best friends, to
be a part of the service.
But then fear, that sneaky son of a bitch,
crept in.
The more I thought about it, the more I
pictured actually carrying Matt down an aisle in
a casket, the more I thought that I simply wasn’t
up for it.
During an afternoon drive, I told one of my
other best friends (and fellow pallbearer) Austin
that I didn’t think I could do it.
“Of course you’re gonna do it. And yeah, it’s
going to suck. It’s going to be absolutely terrible.
But we’re all going to do it together, and we’re
going to be there for each other.”
So that’s what we did. We fulflled our duties
as pallbearers. And we sat in one row at the
wake, and we cried.
One thing I’ve learned from the experience
is that, with tragedy, the questions just don’t go
away. You really hope they will. You think that,
magically, you’ll eventually go through a day
without thinking about that horrible, dark thing.
But it doesn’t work like that. We all think
about Matt each and every day. And the more
I think about him, the more I think that it must
be for the better. I know we have to keep him
in our hearts. What happened with Matt was
unspeakably awful, but good things have come
out of it. We have to realize that good things are
happening in our lives.
We all take better care of each other now.
We know the true importance on those late
night heart-to-hearts when one of us is feeling
low. We know how vital it is that we check in
with each other, with the terrible realization
that none of us really knew what Matt was
going through. And we never will.
We’re slowly learning to let the little things
go. So many of the problems that people our
age have with each other are little things,
when it comes right down to it. The commonly
accepted word for this is “drama.” The better
word for it is “bullshit.”
I’ll never forget the first time I saw Matt’s
father Jeff that weekend. The rest of the
pallbearers and I had just arrived, some time
before the wake. We walked into the church,
and there was Jeff. After giving each of us a
bear hug, he looked around at all of us, tears in
his eyes.
“That’s the thing about Matt. . . he knew how
to pick good friends,” he told us. Or something
very similar; I can’t remember because I was
bawling by the end of his sentence.
Later that night, we held the first annual
“Mattsgiving,” and we did exactly what Matt
would have told us to do. We ate, we drank and
we laughed.
// ELLIOT METZ
OUT OF THE DARK
THE WORST QUESTIONS ARE THE ONES WITHOUT ANSWERS
SPEAK
I’m exhausted, nervous and pacing back and
forth in the exhibition hall. We’re all holding our
breath, eyes glued to the computer. I’m running
on a diet of chocolate pretzels and I haven’t
slept in who knows how long. And if this tape
doesn’t pop out soon, we’re all toast.
Let me rewind. It’s my senior year of high
school and I’m in Anaheim, Calif., with some of
my friends from our flmmaking class. My high
school had an advanced filmmaking program,
equipped with advanced cameras and editing
software, and every year our teacher, Mr.
Kapeller, would take some of his students to the
Student Television Network (STN) conference,
a convention dedicated to student flmmaking
across the country.
The convention took place in the Disneyland
Hotel, with roughly 50 schools in attendance.
The centerpiece of the whole shebang was
the Sweet 16 contest. Simply put, every school
had 16 hours to write, shoot, edit and turn in a
three-to-four minute film. If it sounds easy, it
was anything but. Getting a team of high school
kids to sit down and plug away at a script, all
with conflicting ideas about what would be
most likely to win, was just the beginning. After
a rigorous schedule of shooting, re-shooting,
arguments and tempers, we managed to sit
down to start editing with about seven odd
hours to go until the movie was due.
The editing room was a massive exhibition
hall in the hotel. Every team had its own little
booth to themselves, arranged in a grid, next to
neighboring booths. Our school was in a back
corner of the exhibition hall, far from the judges
booth.
We had just finished about nine hours of
flming (some of which had to be redone) so it
was already my most rigorous film day ever.
We were assigned to make a movie somehow
relating to the convention itself. We settled on
a story of two kids at the hotel, one of whom
is bound for STN, the other there for Model
UN; hijinks ensue. We had seven hours until
deadline, but who knew if it’d be enough.
16-hour photo: Ben Chipman (bottom left) and classmates visit the Disneyland Hotel to make a three-
to-four minute flm for the Student Television Network conference. His school took second place after
a stressful 16 hours of writing, shooting, re-shooting and editing.
Contributed Photo
23
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Turning a sTressful film inTo success
Besides time, our greatest enemy was our
technological limitations — we had to import
the footage straight from the camera into the
computer, which is more complicated and
time-consuming than putting a tape in a video
deck connected to the computer. Just waiting
for the video to transfer to the computer was
a nail-biter. Not only was it taking longer than
normal, but it could spit out an error message at
any time, which would mean we’d have to start
over or, even worse, lose the footage.
While we waited, I looked at the booths of the
teams around me. The booth to our left seemed
to be playing Guitar Hero rather than working.
The other two booths seemed to be well into
the thick of editing. It was a bit discouraging,
but not as discouraging as what would happen
next.
“Don’t worry,” Zach, our main editor, said. “I
brought a secret weapon.” He produced a shot
of 5-Hour Energy.
“Oh no,” I remember saying.
“Oh yes,” he replied. “With this I’ll have this
movie done in no time. Just wait and see.”
I had a bad feeling about this. I’d never had
any good experiences with 5-Hour Energy, and
this wasn’t the time to experiment. We didn’t
stop him, though; I just crossed my fngers and
hoped it wouldn’t come back to bite us.
About an hour later, Zach’s eyes were wide
and his leg was twitching uncontrollably. He
assured us that he was getting plenty done.
An hour after that he was all but exhausted.
He was nodding off to sleep every couple of
minutes and mumbled about feeling sick when
he was awake. We took him back to his room
and discussed the fact that we were fve hours
from deadline and our head editor was out of
commission.
Going into the convention, I had felt pretty
sure of my skills. After all, most high schools
dreamed of having the kind of equipment and
training we had. I thought we’d clean up, no
problem. But here we were, doing our best to
recover from mechanical malfunctions and an
out-of-commission editor. Meanwhile, Guitar
Hero team was still going strong and another
team halfway across the convention hall was
building giant pyramids of plastic cups. Were
we not as good as we thought we were? Was
our advanced training and equipment all for
nothing? As time ran shorter and shorter, we
put those thoughts out of our minds as we
focused everything on fnishing the movie.
Several hours of manic editing later, we had
a fnished video on our computer. The problem
was the judges wanted the video burned
to a tape, which takes time. As we started
up the process, the judges announced that
submissions were due in 10 minutes. Burning a
video to a tape could take anywhere between
fve minutes and 50. If our luck ran out, the last
16 hours were for nothing. As it burned, we
paced and pulled our hair. Is this good enough
to win? What will it say about us in ten years?
After the work we’d just put in, it would be for
nothing.
The most dramatic moment took place at
the last second. The tape popped out of the
computer, fully finished and ready to go. This
happens just as the judges announce that only
one minute remains to submit our movie, but
their table is at the other end of the convention
hall. Fortunately, we brought a member of the
track team, Ritchie, along with us. We handed
him the tape and told him to run faster than
ever. It was good enough: Ritchie got there with
15 seconds to spare. We all breathed a sigh of
relief and slept the sleep of kings.
The wi nners of t he cont est weren’ t
announced until the huge closing ceremony
at the end of the conference. Though we’d
submitted our video, we weren’t going to be
able to stay; our fight back to Kansas wouldn’t
permit it. On the bus out, everyone seemed
downcast — we had to miss the ending of the
conference, and didn’t know how our big effort
would go over. Just after the bus started going,
our teacher stood up and said, “I bet you guys
wanted this, huh?” and pulled out the second
place trophy. Needless to say the bus went
hysterical; we’d proven to ourselves and to
others that we can really achieve anything if
we work on it. Second place never felt so good.
// BEN CHIPMAN
BUSINESS

·
Openi ng Day Bash!
Wear your bl ue KC
basebal l gear & get i n
f or j ust $1
$5 Leani ng
Towers
$5 Mart i ni s
1/2 off appet i zers
$4 It al i an
Margari t as
$8 Al l you can eat
past a, sal ad, and bread
(5pm- cl ose)
$8 Caraf es of Pai sano’s
Red, Chabl i s, & Sangri a
$2. 50 Domest i c
Bottl es
$6 Any Gl ass
of Wi ne
$5 Don
Capri ana
$2 domest i c bottl es, $2
any bomb
$4 pi tchers $4 doubl e Ji m Beams
and Capt ai n Morgan
doubl es
$4 pi tchers $2 domest i c bottl es
$2 any bomb
$2. 50 i mport s $1 wel l s,
$2 cal l s,
$3 premi ums
Terrace on Ni nth openi ng f or
dri nks at 4pm

TONIC
$2 Domest i c Bottl es
$2 Wel l Shot s
$2 Si ngl e Wel l s
$1 Porch Beers $2 Si ngl e
Wel l s
$2 Si ngl e Cal l s
1/2 Pri ce Mart i ni s
Opens at 11am. .
$3. 50 Al umi num
Cans
$5 Iri sh Carbombs
$2 Si ngl e wel l s
$5 Doubl e
Smi rnoff Vodkas
$2 House Shot s
$5 Doubl e Ji m Beam
$5 Doubl e Three
Ol i ves Vodkas
$3 Bacardi Bombs
$1 Al most Anythi ng
$2 Premi ums
$2 Jager Bombs
$2. 50 Domest i c Bottl es
$2. 00 Doubl e Wel l s
$2. 00 SoCo Li me Shot s
½ Pri ce Mart i ni ’s
$4 Doubl e Ba-
cardi Dri nks
$2 UV Bombs
$4 Doubl e Capt ai n,
Skyy, Beam, Honor
$2 Bacardi Bombs
$3 Mi l l er/Coors Bot -
tl es | $4 Absol ut Ar-
nol d Pal mers | $4 Jack
Dani el s and Jameson
Dri nks | $5 Ameri can
$3 Bud Fami l y Bottl es
| $4 Jager Barrel Shot s
| $4 Bacardi and UV
Dri nks and Shot s |
$5 Dos Lunas Tequi l a
$1.50 SAKE BOMBS every day after 8:30 pm
$1. 00 Rol l i ng
Rock Cans and
$4. 25 Doubl e
Wel l s
$2. 00 Domest i c
Bottl es and $4. 00
Doubl e Skyy
$2. 00 Si ngl e Wel l s
and $1. 50 PBR
Bottl es
$2. 75 Import Bottl es,
Speci al t y Beers and
Boul evard Wheat
Draws and $5. 00
Doubl e Absol ut
$4. 75 Domest i c
Pi tchers, $3. 75
PBR/Natt i e Pi tch-
ers, $5. 00 Doubl e
Goose
$5. 25 Domest i c
Pi tchers, $3. 75
PBR/Natt i e Pi tch-
ers, $3. 50 Doubl e
Wel l s
$5. 25 Domest i c
( Premi um) Pi tch-
ers, $3. 75 PBR/
Natt i e Pi tchers,
$3. 50 Doubl e Wel l s