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August 25, 2011

life. and how to have one.
SLOUCHY STUDIES
HOW POOR POstuRE IN tHE
CLAssROOM HuRts YOuR BODY
HOOP DREAMS
HOW BAskEtBALL CHANgED ONE
jAYPLAY WRItER’s gOALs
CHANGING NORMS ON YOUNG MARRIAGE
PUT A RING ON IT
TABLE OF CONTENTS
AUGUST 25, 2011 | volume 9, issue 1 * COvEr phOTO By MIKE GUNNOE
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kansas in heat 4
NEW yEAr, NEW rELATIONShIpS
Get sOMe CULtURe 6
A rOCKIN’ ArT EXhIBIT hITS LAWrENCE
PeRsOnaL essaY 15
hOW ONE jAypLAy WrITEr ChANGEd hEr GOALS
that’s DisGUstinG 7
TEXTBOOK CrEEpy-CrAWLErS
EDITOR | GABrIELLE SChOCK
ASSOCIATE EDITOR | SArAh ChAMp
DESIGNER | MAX AyALLA
CONTACT | BAILEy ATKINSON, ChrISTINE
CUrTIN, TAyLOr LEWIS
MANUAL | ChrIS NEAL, KATIE jAMES
NOTICE | AMANdA GAGE, NAdIA IMAFIdON,
MATT GALLOWAy
PLAY | drEW WILLE, jEFF KArr, MAX
GrEENWOOd
HEALTH | BrE rOACh, ChrISTy NUTT, KyLE
NUTT
CONTRIBUTORS | ChANCE CArMIChAEL,
dyLAN dErryBErry, jArOd KILGOrE,
LANdON MCCdONALd, ,MAGGIE yOUNG,
SAvANNAh ABBOT
CREATIVE CONSULTANT | CArOL hOLSTEAd
FOLLOW JAYPLAY ON TWITTER
twitter.com/JayplayMagazine
bEcOME A FAN OF ThE ‘WEscOE
WIT’ FAcEbOOk PAgE and your
contributions could be published!
JAYPLAY
(785) 864-4810
The University Daily Kansan
2000 DOLE CENTER
1000 Sunnyside Dr.
Lawrence, KS 66045
upcoming nuptials. Maybe it’s the voyeur
in me, but I love watching a bride-to-be
find that perfect dress.
But getting married isn’t just about
saying “yes” to an a-line gown and a veil.
Sometimes, it’s easy to forget that the
real commitment isn’t to a dress and a big
reception, but to another person. Couples
in college are moving in and getting
married quicker and more often. For more
on young marriage, check out Michael’s
story on page eight.
While I’m not ready to say “I do”
anytime soon, I am commited to making
Jayplay great this semester. I can hear
my boyfriend sighing in relief all the way
from my desk in the newsroom.
I have a lot of guilty pleasures.
Candy is my kryptonite; if you haven’t had
pretzel M&Ms, get yourself a bag as soon
as possible. I’ll admit that I love watching
horribly acted movies (i.e. anything on the
Lifetime Movie Network or Clueless). My
iTunes library is full of embarrassment, with
everything from Spice Girls to slow jams.
Surprisingly, reality TV is one guilty
pleasure I don’t indulge in. I’ve only watched
a handful of Jersey Shore episodes. Ask me
who won the Bachelor last season and I
couldn’t give you her name. And, I have no
desire to “keep up” with the Kardashians.
However, I will admit to loving one reality
show: Say Yes To the Dress. The show
revolves around young women hunting for
the perfect wedding dress at an upscale
bridal boutique in New York City.
There are lots of tears, squeals of
excitement and plenty of talk about the GABRIELLE SCHOCK | EDITOR
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KANSAS IN HEAT // Back on the air
> Tackle the sticky world of relatonships.
Welcome to your new semester at KU!
Along with a new semester comes all new sex
and relationship advice every Thursday from
Jayplay. I am thrilled to be returning as your
sex and relationship expert and I’m eager
to answer all of your sex and relationship
questions. As always, no topic is taboo!
In addition to this advice column, you can
tune in every Monday night at 9 p.m. on KJHK
90.7 FM or connect online at www.kjhk.org
for the only sex and relationship radio talk
show in Lawrence. Call 785-864-4044 with all
of your questions and comments.
Don’t want to be on air? Submit any
questions or comments via email to michelle@
michellemacbain.com. Again, no topic is
taboo and your submission is completely
anonymous.
Wishing you a happy, successful, healthy
and fun fall semester.
Michelle MacBain is a graduate
student from Kansas City. She studied
sexuality, psychology and com-
munication studies at KU and The
University of Amsterdam.
Contributed photo
| MICHELLE MACBAIN |
ALL DAY
7am - 2am
6 East 9t h St r eet
785. 843. 1001
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COCKTAILS
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CATCH OF THE WEEK // DANIELLE FUHRMAN
> A weekly peek at a fsh in the KU sea.
HOW WE MET // RyANN PINNEy & ToNy CAMPbELL
> All great relationships had to start somewhere.
Year: Senior
Hometown: Tulsa, Okla.
major: Journalism
Interested In: Men
InTErEsTs: movies, reality television and
music.
HObbIEs: I like working out and running.
Also, hanging out with friends, tailgating and
shopping.
Turn-Ons: His sense of humor, and if he is
spontaneous, tall, athletic and genuine.
Turn-OFFs: If a guy’s conceited, jealous,
controlling and has bad breath.
nOTICE FIrsT In pArTnEr: His eyes and smile
WHy sHE’s A CATCH: I like to watch sports
and play Mario Kart and I think I have a fun
and easygoing personality.
You could say that a bathrobe played
matchmaker for Ryann Pinney, a senior
from Springfeld, Mo., and Tony Campell,
an alumnus from Overland Park. After all, if
Campbell hadn’t lent his friend his bathrobe,
then the couple might not have met.
“It was the frst week of classes, and I
was riding down an elevator in McCollum,”
Pinney says. “There was a guy on it wearing
a bathrobe. I thought it was funny, so I
commented on it and struck up a conversation.
We both happened to be going to E’s to eat
lunch, and I didn’t know anybody at school,
really, so I asked to sit with him. Tony was at
that table.”
The two hung out as friends for the frst
month but the couple knew that a romantic
relationship was inevitable.
“I thought she was fun,” Campbell
says.“She laughed at my jokes, and that
mattered.”
Four years later, Pinney and Campbell are
happier than ever. They made the decision
to move in together and have learned to
appreciate each other. The couple loves
dancing and hosting game nights for friends.
spEnds THE MOsT MOnEy On: Shoes
pErFECT FIrsT dATE: Getting dinner and then
meeting up with friends to go out.
Follow Danielle on twitter: @d_fuhrman
After Pinney graduates, she hopes to
become a high school math teacher, but
wherever that job takes her, the couple plans
on moving and settling down together.
And what happened to the catalytic
bathrobe? “We still have it; it’s hanging up in
our room,” Pinney says. “It’s mine now.”
Contributed photo
Contributed photo
Match made in Mrs. E’s: Pinney met Camp-
bell while grabbing lunch with new friends
in Mrs. E’s cafeteria.
| BAILEY ATKINSON |
| TAYLOR LEWIS |
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MANUAL
Get some culture // BARON WOLMAN EXHIBIT
Although today’s traditional college stu-
dents weren’t alive in the 1960s, the Law-
rence Arts Center is bringing an exhibit to
town aimed to interest all generations. The
exhibit features the work of Baron Wolman,
the frst chief photographer for Rolling Stone
magazine. It’s made up of portraits he took
of artists from the 60s, such as Jerry Garcia
of the Grateful Dead and Jimi Hendrix, along
with the covers of Rolling Stone and the con-
tact sheet of photographs to show the pro-
cess that went into choosing a cover shot.
The iconic quality of those artists is some-
thing that infuences people young and old,
Ben Ahlvers, Exhibitions Director for the Law-
rence Arts Center, says. “You can’t imagine
music today without those artists. They are in-
tertwined with the social and political changes
of the time,” Ahlvers says.
The exhibit opens Friday, August 26, and
will run until Saturday, October 1, at the Law-
rence Arts Center. Admission will be free.
There will also be several special events
related to the opening of the exhibit. It starts
with a panel discussion of photojournalists, in-
cluding Wolman, at 2 p.m. on the 26, followed
by the opening ceremony at 5 p.m. Wolman will
attend the opening and will sign copies of his
book.
The Arts Center will also give away an
acoustic guitar from Mass Street Music and a
signed photo of Jerry Garcia. Saturday, the 27,
at 2p.m., Wolman will give a lecture about his
experience working for Rolling Stone. Tickets
are needed for this event and are available for
free at the Arts Center.
>It’s not all about fast food and beer pong.
| KATIE JAMES |
Contributed photo
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FEATURE FEATURE
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Valerie Gustafson left Paris with much more than an architecture internship and an
appreciation for French culture, as she would discover October 8, 2010. It was an unusually
warm night in Paris and Gustafson, School of Architecture alumnus from Ulysees, and her
boyfriend, Andrew Gindlesberger, also from Ulysses, had spent a leisurely afternoon in
the Louvre among ancient statues and 5th-century Dutch paintings, and were meandering
along the tiny streets around the Louvre untouched by Hausmann’s remodeling of the city.
Gindlesberger was insistent the couple go to a nicer place for dinner, but Gustafson was
determined not to spend an exorbitant amount on dinner. The two settled on a little café run
by a British man. After dinner, they went for a stroll on the lowest sidewalk by the river Seine,
stopping to crack open a bottle of wine and stare at the water and revelers crowding around
the river at nighttime.
“He gave me this whole speech about howhe loved me,” Gustafson says. “I was like, okay,
great.”
As she and her boyfriend were getting up to leave, he grabbed her, turned her around and
– voila – an engagement ring.
“I was like, ‘Oh my God, what are you doing?,” Gustafson says.
It’s the kind of proposal story that usually happens only in Julia Roberts flms or people’s
fantasies. Gustafson is unusual not only because her husband proposed to her in Paris, but
also because she’s engaged to be married in the frst place.
CH-CH-CH-CHANGES
Not too long ago, it was expected that you’d come out of college with a partner. Now, that’s
most certainly not the norm, and indeed, many people frown upon marriage at such a young
age, as Mark Regnerus, author of the book Premarital Sex in America: HowYoung Americans
Meet, Mate, and Think About Marrying, found while he was interviewing college students
for his research. “You have to keep it private, your interest in fnding a spouse in college,”
Regnerus says. “Twenty years ago that wasn’t the case.”
While most college students might be either casually dating, cohabitating or perfectly
content to ride solo, a brave few decide to marry; according to the U.S. Census Bureau, 13.6
percent of Americans aged 20-24 are currently married. So what makes them feel they’re
ready for marriage? And how do they handle being engaged or married during college in a
culture that, at times, is very open in its scorn for such arrangements?
“Today’s young people also are questioning the value of marriage: Why do it? I don’t think
other generations wrestled with this so much,” Vicki Hull, a marriage and family therapist in
Lawrence, says. “It was just considered a normal developmental phase of life. Now, it is more
of a choice, an option of only one way to live a fulflling adult life.”
Regnerus says that another factor in the increasing age of marriage is the economy. As
more and more Americans see education as necessary to make a decent living, people feel
more drive to develop their careers and settle into their jobs before they even think about
marriage.
EVERYDAY PEOPLE
In high school, Bailey Olsen, a senior from Overland Park engaged to be married, was
one of those people who felt there was no way that she’d be committed to marriage before
she graduated college. She’d always subscribed to the idea that she had to fgure out who
she was and fnd her career before she could even think about marriage. But, she says, her
attitude changed after she attended Accelerate, a leadership conference at which organizers
encourage participants to examine and develop concrete life goals.
“I realized that I did want to be in a relationship, and that I wanted to be part of a family,”
Olsen says. “It was okay if I started making goals towards achieving that.”
Olsen, and others like her, do face the inevitable questions: are you sure you’re ready? Don’t you
want to wait a while longer and see what else is out there? Are you sure you want to be tied down
to one person so early in your life?
Caity Lothamer, a senior from Olathe currently engaged to be married, fnds these questions
fairly ridiculous. “I’ve always been a little bit of an old soul, so I feel like I’mready,” Lothamer says.
“I’m not a huge partier and I don’t go out a lot, so I never felt like I was missing that whole singles
scene. It never was for me in the frst place.”
Burk Nordling, a married senior from Hughton, also feels being married has advantages when
it comes to college social life. “If anything, it’s a lot better. It’s a lot less social pressure,” Nordling
says. “You’re married so you have a partner through the social life. You defnitely don’t get as
harassed to go out.”
Becca Braun, a senior from Hutchinson, got a more surprising reaction when she told her
friends she was engaged. “I hear sometimes, ‘Well, I wish my boyfriend would propose,’” Braun
says.
LIVING IN SIN?
As cohabitation has become more socially acceptable, more young couples are opting for
that as opposed to marriage, Regnerus says. According to the Centers for Disease Control and
Prevention, 41 percent of American women, ages 15-44, have lived with a signifcant other at some
point. But for some young couples, living together is simply not enough. When asked why she
didn’t merely cohabitate as so many young couples do, Braun was immediate in her response.
“Maybe some people do it as a trial period; I guess I didn’t need that. We knewthat was the next
step for us. I was ready to marry him. I couldn’t imagine not being married to him,” Braun says. “At
a certain point in a relationship, you realize that you want to take that next step and after dating
for 6 and ½years, both of us wanted that next level of commitment that cohabitating wouldn’t have
gotten us to.”
Part of the reason why so many young people live together today is the idea that if people
are going to commit to each other for life, they need to make sure there’s not something better
out there, Hull, Lawrence marriage and family therapist, says. This means that it can be more
challenging for young couples to commit.
Regnerus agrees; although, he reiterates that young people are still interested in meaningful,
loving relationships – the relationships are just outside the realm of marriage.
“They feel like they have to be really picky and really try something out and put it through the test
of years and cohabitation,” Regnerus says. “And then after several years, [they] can maybe move
forward with this thing. We’ve become a lot more skeptical and slow to move towards marriage.”
Regnerus is quick to point out that moving in together isn’t necessarily a sure sign of failure, and
Chris and Lindsay Martin are a testament to that notion. Married for two years (Chris proposed
to her in the Birmingham, England, airport while she was studying abroad), the two lived together
before they were married. Lindsay attributes part of the success of the marriage to their ferce
distance streak, which allowed both of them to study abroad separately during their marriage.
“We’re really independent. I was the one that said to Chris, you need to go to England for the
summer,” Lindsay says. “I don’t mind that. I think it’s important to have experiences even if we are
married.”
AGE AIN’T NOTHING BUT A NUMBER
AVERAGE AGE OF MARRIAGE
MALES FEMALES
WHO WAS MARRI ED AT WHAT AGE?
21%
42%
54%
of our generation married between the ages of 18- to 28 years old
of our parents generation married between the ages of
18- to 28 years old
of our grandparents generatoin married between the ages of
18- to 28 years old
28 26
* Source : U.S. Bureau of the Census
Besides the shift in reasons for marrying and average age of frst marriage,
the way people approach their wedding planning has also changed. While
some people may dream about the extravagant wedding, the economic
realities of today’s fnancial climate – especially for college students – means
such a thing isn’t always realistic for two 22-year-olds getting married. But
that’s another thing that sets millennials apart – many of them are opting
for less traditional weddings, Carmen Hocking, a wedding planner and
consultant in Lawrence, says. Bailey Olsen is one such person. She says
she’s more interested in her wedding expressing the commitment she and
her fancé have made towards each other than in having the expensive,
extravagant affair.
Regnerus says she has the right idea, and that weddings can be as
expensive or as affordable as the bride and groom wish to determine.
“It’s expensive if you want it to be,” Regnerus says.
Yolanda Crous, senior articles editor at Brides magazine, says there are
several ways young couples right out of college can cut costs on their
weddings. A do-it-yourself approach to certain projects can help, as can
fnding a venue that lets you buy your own alcohol. Crous says that marrying
on Fridays and Sundays, or early on Saturdays is much less expensive than
a later Saturday marriage.
As a wedding planner and consultant in Lawrence for two decades,
Carmen Hocking says she’s seen frsthand the fact that young couples
want their weddings to be different. Young couples want “more fair, more
color,” and some brides are adding colors like hot pink and orange to their
wedding outfts. Not exactly the traditional white wedding, but Hocking says
it’s little unique touches like this that the millennials really want as part of
their wedding. One couple she worked with wanted a cotton candy machine
at their ceremony.
CHEAP, BUT UNIQUE
[what young couples want in a wedding]
| MICHAEL BEDNAR |
You have the cold from hell. Your nose is
stuffed, your head is heavy and all you want to
do is breathe again. Then, you remember the
bottle of medicated nasal spray tucked away
in your medicine cabinet. But, before you
squirt and sniff away your symptoms, does
nasal spray actually help you get well?
Jessica Stafford, a junior from Lawrence,
used a medicated nasal spray when she
caught a cold last year. Stafford says the
spray worked so well that she used it all 10
days that her cold persisted.
Mark Smith, a pharmacist at Orchards
Drug in Lawrence, says decongestant nasal
HEALTH
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Good for you bad for you// nasal spray
> Sometimes it’s hard to tell.
ThaT’s disGusTinG // Booklice
> Dude...gross.
Students expect to find certain things in
their textbooks: a table of contents, chapter
summaries and pages of text. But what about
tiny, creepy, crawling bugs? That’s right, I’m
talking about booklice-- or, as your nerdy
science friend might say, psocoptera.
These ti ny bugs get thei r ni ckname
because of their lice-like features, but don’t
be confused, they are not lice. According
to a professional report from Pennsylvania
State University, these wingless bugs feed on
mold and fungi that grow on the starchy paste
used to bind books and in book ink. Besides
Photo by Chrristy Nutt
Snif Wisely: Nasal spray can slow a cold if used
too often.
sprays can have a quick and severe effect on a
stuffy nose. “It can really help open you up, and
fast, like a stick of dynamite,” Smith says. This
can help people with severe congestion to get
through the initial phase of their colds.
Using more than three consecutive days,
however, can cause rebound congestion,
where the symptoms return soon after usage,
and are often worse, Smith says. “The only way
to get rid of the symptoms again is to use the
nasal spray, creating a vicious cycle.”
Thi s i s exact l y what St af f ord began t o
experience while using medicated nasal spray.
“The more I used it, the sooner it stopped
working,” Stafford says.
Although sprays don’t consist of any
addictive ingredients, people can feel like
they have to continue using it to get rid of their
symptoms. Because the medicine restricts
blood vessels in the nose repetitive use can be
harmful on the nasal passage, Smith says.
Verdict: Good for you, if used correctly for a
short period of time.

being disgusting, these little critters don’t pose
much of a threat. The report says they don’t bite,
transmit disease or cause damage to fabric.
Ken El dredge, ent omol ogy graduat e
student from Tokyo, occasionally fnds booklice
scurrying inside of old books at his house, but
they don’t bother him. “I might be biased, but I
actually think they are kind of cute,” Eldredge
says.
If you don’t view booklice in the same way
as Eldredge, control the pests by eliminating
moisture around your books.
| CHRISTY NUTT |
| CHRISTY NUTT |
Photo by Chrristy Nutt
Don’t bug out: Booklice can be easily eliminated.
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HEALTH
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As you enter your classrooms for the frst
time this semester, you’ll have about 15 sec-
onds to make your frst decision: which seat
should you take? As you scan the room, weigh-
ing the benefts of a window view against the
spot with the beautiful neighbor near the front,
you should remind yourself that it’s how you
sit, not where you sit that affects your health.
Besides affecting the way you look, slouch-
ing contributes to poor posture, resulting in
negative effects on your overall health. “Your
spine is the foundation of your health,”Shane
Fishbin, owner of Café of Life, a chiropractic
cinic located in Boulder, Co., says. “If your
foundation is weak or damaged, the house will
not work well and everything inside of it to take
on more strain,”
Think of your body as a house. Bad class-
room posture can lead to the following:
POOR VENTI LATI ON
Signifcant time spent performing activities
with the arms raised in front of the body, such
as using a computer is the leading cause of
what is referred to as “rounded shoulders.”
When in correct position, the shoulders should
align the back along the natural curves of the
spine and be straight above the hips. In the
world of chiropractics, this posture is referred
to as “neutral spine alignment.”
When the shoulders become hunched for-
ward, it restricts the rib cage, which can re-
duce lung capacity up to 30 percent, according
to Dr. Randall Wheeler of Westport Chiroprac-
tic and Rehab in Louisville, Ky.
HOW CLASSROOM POSTURE AFFECTS YOUR HEALTH
SHODDY WI RI NG
When the head is hunched forward, the pres-
sure applied to the c-1 vertebrae (top verte-
brae) is signifcantly increased. “From every
one inch increase in forward head posture, it
results in a greater load on the muscles in the
neck,” Dr. Steve Agocs, associate professor
at Cleveland Chiropractic College in Overand
Park, says.
When the arteries and nerves at the base
of the brain are compressed, it affects the
body’s autonomic nervous system, which is
responsible for regulating several functions of
the body, including heart rate, respiration and
digestion. When the bones are misaligned, it
can hinder the autonomic nervous system’s
ability to properly function resulting in several
health conditions, such as high blood pressure.
After receiving a neck adjustment, participants
in the study saw their blood pressure drop an
average of 17 points.
ROTTI NG LUMBER
Poor posture puts tremendous irregular
weight on the frame of the body, causing pain,
soreness and aching. The added strain on your
back is the result of certain muscles having to
work harder to compensate for the misalign-
ment. If not addressed, the additional strain
can result in tearing of the muscle fbers.
In addition to muscle tearing, muscle fa-
tigue is one of the most common effects of bad
posture. “My back muscles always feel less
tight, which allows me to relax,” Storm Josiah
Shaw, a sophomore from Olathe, says. Shaw
began seeing a chiropractor two years ago for
muscle tension in his back.
The pinching of nerves along the spine also
causes reoccurring back and neck pain. When the spine is out of alignment, nerves become
irritated as a result of additional strain. If the disk between two vertebrae is forced into a posi-
tion that places pressure on a spinal nerve, the result is commonly referred to as a “herniated
disc.”
LEAKY ATTI C
The body system and mind operate in integrated patterns, meaning the mind responds to
changes to the body system, such as the tightening or relaxing of muscles. The mind associ-
ates muscle tension with feelings of anxiety, frustration and fear. Because the muscles in
the back and neck are strained from poor posture, the mind produces correlating emotions to
alert the body system that something is wrong. “Because the muscles are tight, the body will
struggle in getting enough sleep, which adds to the feelings of stress felt by the individual,”
Fishbin says.
The constricting of the rib cage caused by “rounded shoulders” also contributes to the
mind’s emotional state. If the lungs are not capable of full expansion, it reduces oxygen levels
to the brain causing symptoms associated with stress including constant worrying, depression
and memory problems. “I’ve noticed that the weeks following an adjustment, I not only physi-
cally feel better, but more importantly, I feel happier and seem to have a better outlook on life,”
Shaw says.
A HOME MAKEOVER
Spinal adjustments done by a chiropractor will not only improve overall health, but will pre-
vent avoidable future health problems. “I use chiropractic adjustments done in a very specifc
way to help with posture,” Agocs says. “As well as stretching, strength exercises, retraining
movement patterns, types of traction procedures and other supportive measures to correct
postural problems.”
While chiropractic treatments are typically covered by health insurance, few college stu-
dents receive regular spinal adjustments. “I think people look at chiropractics as a lesser sci-
ence when compared to other forms of medical treatment,” Shaw says. “But it may also have
to do with most people’s frst instinct when dealing with pain is medication, and chiropractors
work to correct the problem instead of just handing out drugs.”
AT HOME EXERCISES
If you are still warming up to the idea of chiropractic treatment, but want to correct your posture, listed below
are simple exercises that will help get you started today according to Dr. Miller, chiropractor and owner of Miller
Chiropractic Health Center in Olathe.
ARM AND LEG LIFTS: STRENGTHEN HIP, SHOULDER AND BACK MUSCLES.
1. Lay on stomach with head turned to the side.
2. Push pelvis to the foor and lift left arm and right leg 2-4 inches off the ground.
3. Hold in the air for 5-10 seconds and then alternate to right arm, left leg.
LOWER BACK STRETCH: STRENGTHEN BACK MUSCLES. (Requires Exercise Ball)
1. With your feet planted on the ground, place upper half of body on top of the ball. (Only hips touching the ball)
2. Pull arms and upper arms and back towards ceiling until you feel muscles tighten. (Body should be a 'u' shape)
3. Hold position for 3-5 seconds and repeat.
NECK EXERCISE: STRENGTHENS NECK MUSCLES TO PROMOTE PROPER HEAD POSITION.
1. Sit in relaxed position.
2. Place one hand on back of head near the base, or top of spine.
3. Gently apply pressure pushing the head forward, but use the neck muscles to prevent the head from moving
forward.
Your head should remain in proper position, but also feel the resistance applied by your hand. Hold for 20-30 seconds.
| JACK RAFFERTY |
Photo Illustration by Travis Young
Sit tall: Slouching while in class or studying is bad for your health.
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SCENE AND HEARD // COLLEGE NIGHT AT QUINTON’S
> New places. New faces.
STAGE PRESENCE // THE COOL KIDS
Every Tuesday at Quinton’s Bar and Deli,
615 Massachusetts St., students set aside their
studies for a weekly ritual: College Night.
“It’s a fun place to be because we always
have a great DJ and the Ice Bar upstairs has
good specials too,” Scott Montana, senior and
door man for the bar, says. “The free cover is
defnitely a big part of it.”
During the day, the traditional deli serves a
variety of soups and sandwiches, but at night,
its bar scene comes to life. Cover is free with a
valid KU ID. For $2 more, the upstairs bar offers
an outdoor patio with full bar service, a DJ and
dance foor, and Quinton’s own “Ice Bar” inside.
The L-shaped bar is covered with a sheet of ice
that is kept frozen all night.
“It’s the only bar on Mass that’s fun on
Tuesdays, besides Jazzhaus and Brother’s,”
Sarita Petersen, a senior from Syracuse, Kan.,
says. “It’s always been the place to be.”
For those who put off their studies until
Sunday night, College Night is the perfect
excuse to let loose early in the week and relieve
some stress.
The Cool Kids sold out The Granada
Theater two years ago and they’re back to do
it again. The two emcees, Mikey Rocks and
Chuck Inglish, who make up the hip-hop duo,
met in 2005 via Myspace.
Last month, The Cool Kids released a new
album titled When Fish Ride Bicycles. “It’s kind
of like ‘when pigs fy’ but a little bit cooler,”
Mikey says.
The idea for the album’s title came from
a Fresh Prince of Bellaire episode, and it
represents the struggle they went through
legally to get the album released.
“We thought the album was going to come
out ‘when fsh really rode bicycles’ because
we had a bunch of legal B.S. going on with
our former partners, so it was a little hectic,”
Mikey says.
After working with artists like Travis Barker,
Lil Wayne and Maroon 5, The Cool Kids are
excited for their future and their upcoming tour
this fall, especially their show in Lawrence.
“The kids there are real hype,” Mikey says.
“Everyone is dope in Lawrence.”
Contributed photo
Contributed photo
Too cool: Te Cool Kids return to Lawrence to
perform at Te Granada Saturday night.
“I study so much that I want to take a
break from it,” Emily Deutch, Overland Park
senior, says. “I love the free cover. Not a lot of
bars do that, and we’re in college so it’s great
for me.”
Quinton’s Bar and Deli is open seven days
a week from 11 a.m. to 2 a.m., with different
specials every night. The upstairs bar opens
around 11 p.m.
Mike Logan, owner of The Granada Theater,
says he’s excited to have the duo back. “They
are 100 percent energy, and all of the local
supporting acts bring energy to the stage,”
Logan says.
To see The Cool Kids preform live, be sure to
head downtown to The Granada tonight. Tickets
are available for $15 at The Granada box offce for
anyone 18 or older, and the show starts at 9 p.m.
> Feel free to swoon.
| MAX GREENWOOD |
| DREW WILLIE |
PLAY
Tuesday Transformation: Quinton’s celebrates
College Night with a dance foor and “Ice Bar.”
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MOVIE REVIEW // FRIGHT NIGHT
The original Fright Night from 1985 was a bona
fde horror comedy that delighted in subverting
audience expectations at every turn. Now, its
inevitable remake arrives at a time when the
vampire is suffering another fate worse than
death-- one that any sun-fearing bloodsucker
would know to avoid: the danger of overexpo-
sure. From Twilight to True Blood, vampires are
everywhere these days and their modern desig-
nation as brooding romantics has robbed them
of much of their original grandeur.
So how does this newest entry fare? Well, it
gets points for moving the action to Las Vegas,
which has a largely nocturnal population, and
for the inspired casting of Colin Farrell as Jerry
Dandridge, the pallid, predatory charmer who
moves in next door to Charlie Brewster (Anton
Yelchin) and proceeds to seduce both the hap-
less teen’s mother (Toni Collette) and girlfriend
(Imogen Poots) into becoming fellow children of
the night.
Despite its slick direction, the flm suffers from
an uneven screenplay that tries too hard to
please fans of the original by shoehorning in
characters that have no place in the restruc-
tured plot. .
Charlie’s friend, Evil Ed (Christopher Mintz-
Plasse), is relegated to expository dialogue
and his third-act encounter with Charlie reeks
of slapstick instead of unanticipated tragedy.
These characters only serve to steal valuable
screen time from Farrell and when he’s not
around, this new Fright Night often resembles
what its protagonists fear most: a pale, blood-
less imitation of life.
>Hollywood hits, indie ficks and everything inbetween.
PLAY
| LANDoN MCDoNALD |
PONG TOURNAMENT EVERY THURSDAY
$200 CASH PRIZE
STARTS AT 10PM
CITY PONG CHAMPIONSHIP
SATURDAY 8/27 | 4PM
$500 CASH
TO WINNING TEAM 23RD & IOWA
ORDER TODAY 785-864-2787 lied.ku.edu
LIVE
PERFORMI NG
ARTS
2011–12 SEASON HIGHLIGHTS
Open House and
Community Arts Festival
FREE and open to the public
Join us for a fun evening of music
and more as we celebrate the new
Lied Center Pavilion
SATURDAY, AUG 27 – 5-9pm
The National Acrobats of
the People’s Republic
of China
Extraordinary feats, martial arts,
gripping illusions and high-flying
acrobatics
FRIDAY, OCT 21 – 7:30pm
The Intergalactic Nemesis
Live-action graphic novel
SATURDAY, OCT 29 – 7:30pm
Herbie Hancock
American jazz icon
SUNDAY, OCT 30 – 7:30pm
An Evening with
Davi d Sedari s
Humorist, author and
public radio contributor
WEDNESDAY, NOV 9 – 7:30pm
Rodgers & Hammerstein’s
SOUTH PACI FI C
An epic musical romance
WEDNESDAY, JAN 18 – 7:30pm
MAMMA MI A!
The smash hit musical based
on the songs of ABBA
TUESDAY, FEB 14 – 7:30pm
FREE CONCERT featuring
KELLEY HUNT 7:30pm, Lied main stage
Special Ticket Prices for KU Students, Faculty and Staff!
For details: 785-864-2787
SPEAK
It was a hoop dream. A fairytale for a kid like
me who spent hours outdoors in the driveway
with a basketball, pretending to be Michael
Jordan, John Stockton or Kansas’ own Jackie
Stiles. A real-life blood, sweat, grit and tears
Cinderella story, and it was happening to me. I
was being recruited to play college basketball.
I jogged off the hardwood of the main gym of
Benedictine College in Atchison after a workout
session with the 2006-2007 women’s basketball
team. Completely out of breath, I squirted icy
water from my bottle and tried nonchalantly to
mask the sheer astonishment I felt at this team’s
intensity in an off-season scrimmage. The team
was talented and played fuidly, and I imagined
myself joining the ranks of those players next
year. I began to regain my breath as well as my
bearings while the rest of girls milled around
casually.
Thrilling possibility, pride, anxiety and
fatigue swirled inside my head as what I refer
to as “basketball zen” lifted its trance on me.
This is when total concentration leads to a loss
of consciousness of all things except the game
you’re playing. It’s like getting wrapped up in a
good book, except instead of getting lost in your
imagination, you’re actually living it.
The scrimmage replayed itself in my head.
I had run at the team’s speed, learned its
basic motion offense, and put up more than
a couple good shots— and I hadn’t missed.
Not one shot. I couldn’t believe it. The coach
seemed impressed and the world of collegiate
sports was at my fingertips. One more short
conversati on wi th Coach and I verbal l y
committed myself to the women’s basketball
squad at Benedictine College.
All right, so I wasn’t signing a contract with
the Boston Celtics, but I was going to be a
Lady Raven, and I felt a surging sense of pride
that a four-year college wanted me to play for
it— for a successful team. With many recent
conference titles, seasons with 20-plus wins,
and an appearance in its conference’s national
tournament last year, this was a program with a
winning tradition. I was going to be a part of it.
I’d fallen in love with basketball at a young
age and played every chance I got since joining
a team in fourth grade. I went to camps every
summer of junior and senior high school. Most
of the time, I did it alone, without any of my
teammates.
Contributed photo
Lady Raven: Working her way to the collegiate level, Deiter’s (middle row,
left) college basketball experience made her reexamine her goals.
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HOW ONE WritEr’s BAsKEtBALL stiNt CHANGED HEr pErspECtivE
HIGH GOALS
I went to high school at Wabaunsee High in
Alma, a 2A school in rural Northeast Kansas.
We won four games my senior year. I never
had a winning season. Women’s basketball
at WHS has a history of mediocrity, to say the
least. Female basketball players from my high
school rarely played at the college level, but
I continued to play every game and practice
every day with careful intensity. I took my
leadership role (probably too) seriously. I stayed
after practice as long and often as possible,
drilling, shooting, dribbling, driving and blowing
past imaginary defenders. I wanted to prove to
myself, and everyone else, that I could make it.
There I was, about to join a team stacked
wi t h ski l l ed pl ayers who were j ust as
passionate as I. The first few months were
what I’d expected: weekly team commitments;
6 a.m. weight training twice a week; grueling
afternoon agility and conditioning workouts;
an eight-month-long calendar schedule of
our daily pre-, regular-, and post-season
workouts, practices, games and other team
commitments. It was exhausting, but a sense of
accomplishment accompanied the end of every
long, tiring day.
As the season progressed, so did our
practi ces. Condi ti oni ng got tougher and
expectations rose. As a freshman, I’d likely
see little floor time; I knew I was a rookie. I
worked hard to improve myself and my team.
But very slowly— minutely— a gap began to
grow between my performance and that of
my teammates. I saw them become quicker,
smarter, more enduring players. I saw myself at
a standstill. I
It was disheartening. I fed off that feeling
and worked harder, but the gap kept growing.
Why wasn’t I getting better? Frustration,
embarrassment and bitterness began to eat at
me deeply.
I refused to believe I was incapable of
something that before was so within my control.
I felt like I’d failed. Disappointment replaced
my anger, which gave way to indifference. But
as those emotions slowly dulled, I came to a
realization; sometimes, despite your strongest
passions and effort, some things cannot be
forced. It was brutally humbling to come to
terms with the fact that I couldn’t make myself a
better athlete. Sports— basketball primarily—
had been part of my identity for so long. Now, it
was nothing.
A hole began to grow in me— a void that
basketball had flled with a sense of ability and
worth, of being challenged and either rising
to success or coping with defeat. But in time,
something else found a home in that empty
space: writing.
I declared my major in journalism upon
starting college, but only then, as a sophomore,
did I fall in love with writing. I joined the campus
newspaper, The Circuit, and began writing
on my own. I found myself using the same
critical mindset, the same intense attention
to detail and perfection that I had demanded
of myself on the court. With basketball as my
central focus, I had ignored parts of my life in
the peripherals. New interests came into view,
and before I knew it, something new took hold.
The next fall I transferred to KU to focus on my
career as a journalist and to explore a future
that basketball could never offer me.
I sti l l enj oy a fri endl y (but defi ni tel y
competitive) pickup game at the rec center on
occasion. As much ethic as I learned from the
sport, I learned more about myself by letting
it go. Even if you miss, always keep shooting.
Sometimes you just need to shoot at a different
goal.
| LINDSEY DEITER |
Your Pics,
Your Captions
Your Friends!
Be a contributor, and send your pics to
weeklyspecials@kansan.com
HAPPY BIRTHDAY KRISTEN PELZ!!!
21 at last!
Bud Family: $2.50
Fireball Shots: $2.00
2 for 1 cover for +21
Crown Royal, Jim Beam,
Captain Morgan, JackDaniels
Drinks & Shots: $3.00
Miller Light, Coors & Coors
Light: $2.50
Rumple Shots: $3.00
All Wells: $2.50
Heineken Bottles: $3.00
Grey Goose, Crown Royal
Black, Don Julio Drinks or
Shots: $4.00
Pinnacle Vodka (all flavors)
Drinks & Shots: $4.00
All Import Bottles: $3.00
Jager Bombs: $4.00
All Bottled Beer: $2.00
Big 22 oz. Domestic Draft
Beers: $3.00
Jumbo Rocks Margaritas:
$3.99
Lime Mug O’ Ritas: 99¢
12 oz. Domestic Draft Beers
including Boulevard Wheat:
¢99
1/2 Price House Margaritas
Carlos GoldMargaritas $4.99
Jumbo Margaritas & Long
Island Iced Tea: $4.99
TONIGHT – INK Magazine
Presents: The Cool Kids:
$15 advance or $2 at door
$ellout: $7 advance
Any Wine By the Glass:
$5.00
Wine Carafes: $8.00
All you can eat Pasta:
$8.00
Martinis: $5.00
1/2 price Appetizers
(5-close)
Italian Margaritas: $3.00
Leaning Towers: $5.00
Don Caprianas: $5.00
Bellinis: $3.50
Desserts: $3.00
Mudstop Monday: $2 at the
door
Big Gigantic: $14 advance
or $16 at the door
Big Beers: $3.00
30¢ Wings
$5.00 Pitchers, NFL Sunday
Ticket
Any Bottle: $2.50
Pitchers: $3.00
Cash Pong Tourney
1/2 price Burgers
Bottles & Wells: $2.50
Big Beers, Vodka Energy &
Jager Bombs: $3.00