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Jaylay

LIFE. AND HOW TO HAVE ONE.
March 29, 2012
LOVE 'EM
*
Signs your relationship
just isn’t meant to be.
Rock n’ Roll magic
tales of mass. stReet
Local duo Harry and the
Potters ushered in a new
genre, “Wizard Rock”
The rich history of Lawrence’s
oldest buildings.
OR LOSE 'EM:
LINDSEY DEITER | ASSOCIATE EDITOR
From the Editor} {
WhAT’S hOT ThIS WEEk
All in the family
EDITOR sss NADIA IMAFIDON
ASSOCIATE EDITOR sss LINDSEY DEITER
DESIGNERS sss EMILY GRIGONE, ALLIE WELCH
LOVE sss SASHA LUND, ALIZA CHUDNOW, RACHEL SCHWARTZ
SCHOOL sss ALLISON BOND, MEGAN HINMAN
CAMPUS + TOWN sss KELSEA ECKENROTH, JOHN GARFIELD, BRITTNEY HAYNES
ENTERTAINMENT sss KELSEY CIPOLLA, RACHEL SCHULTZ, ALEX TRETBAR
PLAY sss SARA SNEATH, RACHEL CHEON
CONTRIBUTORS sss MICHELLE MACBAIN, LANDON MCDONALD, LIZZIE MARX
CREATIVE CONSULTANT sss CAROL HOLSTEAD
INSIDE ThIS ISSuE
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ThuRSDAY mARCh 29
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fRIDAY mARCh 30
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SATuRDAY mARCh 31
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SuNDAY ApRIL 1
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mONDAY ApRIL 2
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TuESDAY ApRIL 3
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WEDNESDAY ApRIL 4
WhAT: BLUE MARTIAN TRIBE WITH MEATPOP & ROLLING FOLIAGE
WhEN: 10 P.M.
WhERE: JAZZHAUS, 926 1/2 MASS ST.
WhY YOu CARE: WITH A NAME LIKE THAT, DO YOU REALLY WANT TO MISS THIS
MIXTURE OF FUNK, ROCK, ELECTRONIC AND BLUEGRASS MAGIC? $3 TICKETS.
WhAT: SEUN KUTI & EGYPT 60
WhEN: 9 P.M.
WhERE: GRANADA, 1020 MASS ST.
WhY YOu CARE: THE YOUNGEST SON OF NIGERIA’S LEGENDARY FELA KUTI IS
PERFORMING, AND PERFORMING ALONG WITH THIS BAND IS HEARTS OF DARKNESS
AND LAWRENCE’S AFROBEAT FUNK BAND SUNU. $20 TICKETS.
WhAT: MEN’S BASKETBALL CHAMPIONSHIP- FINAL FOUR AT NEW ORLEANS
WhEN: 7:49 P.M.
WhERE: ON YOUR TELEVISION
WhY YOu CARE: YOU AREN’T GOING TO WANT TO MISS THIS MASS STREET
CAMARADERIE.
WhAT: ROALD DAHL’S WILLY WONKA
WhEN: 2 P.M.
WhERE: LAWRENCE ARTS CENTER, 940 NEW HAMPSHIRE
WhY YOu CARE: THIS PERFORMANCE FEATURES SONGS FROM THE 1971 FILM
WILLY WONKA AND THE CHOCOLATE FACTORY. $18 TICKETS.
WhAT: ELECTRIC SIX WITH AFICIONADO, ANDY D
WhEN: 8 P.M.
WhERE: BOTTLENECK, 737 NEW HAMPSHIRE
WhY YOu CARE: THIS ROCK AND ROLL BAND WANTS TO PERFORM WHERE IT
GOT ITS START RIGHT HERE IN LAWRENCE. $13 TICKETS.
WhAT: ELDRIDGE WINE TASTING, WINES FROM SOUTHERN ITALY
WhEN: 6 P.M. TO 10 P.M.
WhERE: ELDRIDGE HOTEL, 701 MASS ST.
WhY YOu CARE: FOR 21+ ONLY, HAVE A CLASSY EVENING ON A TUESDAY
NIGHT. $15.
WhAT: STUDENT LECTURE SERIES: BILL RASSMUSEN
WhEN: 7 P.M. TO 9 P.M.
WhERE: KANSAS UNION
WhY YOu CARE: HEAR STORIES FROM THE DARING ENTREPRENEUR AND
FOUNDER OF ESPN, ALONG WITH HIS VIDEO-ILLUSTRATED PRESENTATION.
G
iddy. It’s that feeling you get
when you step outside afer
your last class on Friday afer-
noon to the sun’s warm embrace, enticing
you to cure your cabin fever in the playful
freedom of an ideal spring day. Especially
when that Friday marks the beginning of
spring break — here in Lawrence it was
84 degrees that day. I know it seems like
years ago already, but rewind back two
weeks and try to remember how you were
feeling as the temperature began to rise
and your week-long plans far away from
the school grind became real. Tat feeling
is perfectly summed up for me by quint-
essential feel-good summer jam “Feel It
All Around” by Washed Out. Youtube it,
folks. Really.
Spring inevitably ushers in another
kind of giddyness in young people — that
of a blossoming romance. As the trees
regain life and the fowers blossom, so do
our hearts and hormones. New relation-
ships come to fruition, new crushes
develop and lovin’ is on many minds as
students ditch the winter blues in favor of
summer love.
But I must give credit to Rachel Cheon
for her use of “giddy” in this week’s is-
sue. Her feature story on the common
mistakes students make in relationships
examines that excitement felt in the early
stages of a new relationship and how you
can fnd out if it’s truly meant to be. See
page 11 for more.
Whether or not it works out long-term,
that giddyness is a feeling we’ve all prob-
ably felt, appreciate and love. So enjoy it!
Let the firting and the chases commence.
But remember, when it comes time to
hibernate through the winter again, make
sure you can stand the person you’re
slated to cuddle up with.
CONTRIbuTED phOTO
A still frame from Washed Out’s video of “feel It All Around”
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table of contents
love: olympic swimmers
Maintaining a healthy sperm
count.
6
school: better options
for cursing
entertainment:
movie review
8
10
How to clean up your dirty
mouth (at least when you
have to).
Was sending a Civil War soldier
to Mars the key to success or a
major disaster in “John Carter?”
entertainment:
album review
14
Another Tennis album tops
the KJHK charts.
campus & town:
17
You know you love their
products, but what don’t
you know about The Love
Garden?
speak: personal essay
23
From brother to best
friend—one Jayplay writer’s
experience truly getting to
know her younger sibling.
OF
Power & Light. Ping Pong. Engl 320.
Take a summer class at KU in KC.
It’s your summer. Make the most of it.
Overland Park, KS 66213 t SummerOfYou.org
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Major Turn ons?
I can be really shy when I frst meet some-
one, so if I meet someone who is really
funny and can break me out of my shell, I
fnd that really attractive.
Major Turn offs?
Someone that comes across as arrogant. If
they are rude to their parents, especially
their mom, I fnd that really unattractive.
How is someone going to treat me if they
don’t treat their mom well?
Catch of the Week
LOVE
// aliza Chudnow
GinnY Brown
hoMeTown: olaThe
Year: junior
Major: CoMMuniCaTions
inTeresTed in: Men
whY i’M a CaTCh?
I think I’m pretty funny and pretty laid
back. I can go with the fow and do what-
ever.
favoriTe lawrenCe hanGouT?
Probably the Hawk. Tere is always some-
body to talk to there. And it is a bar with
a lot of diferent rooms so the change of
atmosphere is fun.
dreaM daTe?
I love animals so I would love to go to
the Kansas City Zoo for a whole day with
someone. It would be fun to walk around,
see the animals and get to know that
person better.
TheMe sonG To Your life?
“What a Wonderful World” by Louis
Armstrong. Tat song is about appreciat-
ing all the little things in life and that is
how I like to be. It’s good to appreciate
everything you have in your life.
firsT ThinG You noTiCe in a GuY?
His smile and the way he carries himself.
I like someone who is really confdent.
whaT are Three ThinGs You Can’T live
wiThouT?
My family, my sorority sisters and Diet
Coke.
if You Could spend one daY in soMeone
else’s shoes, who would iT Be?
Miranda Kerr because she is a Victoria’s
Secret Model and she is married to Or-
lando Bloom.
CeleB Crush?
Josh Hutcherson because he’s really cute
and he said in an interview that in real
life he is similar to the character Peeta,
who he plays in the movie “Te Hunger
Games.”
ConTriBuTed phoTo
MAR
31
7:30 p.m.
MNOZIL BRASS
FROM AUSTRI A
Where talent, tubas, trombones,
trumpets and tomfoolery converge
STUDENT
TICKETS: $10
(Additional $1 service fee will apply)
lied.ku.edu 785-864-2787
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love
In addition to culture, the media and
other factors, religion plays a large role in
romantic relationships.
Religion is an integral part of some
people’s relationships. Whether it is going
to services together or reading religious
books, religion is a main factor that plays
a large role. Some people will only date
people of their same religion, while others
who value religion are open to dating
people with other beliefs. Religion is also
important in some relationships because
of how the religion defnes love and rela-
tionships.
Emily Brenner, Fellowship of Catholic
University Students (FOCUS) missionary,
tries to help cultivate a Christian culture
on campus in many aspects of life includ-
ing romantic relationships. Love is a
fundamental and innate vocation of every
human being, Brenner says. “Dating is
supposed to help you discern and lead to
marriage, not meaning every person you
date you have to think you have to marry.
But every person is part of your story for
a reason,” Brenner says.
Brenner is dating Brandon Gargus, a
non-denominational Christian who at-
tends McKendree University in Lebanon,
Ill. When she frst met him, she thought
he was cute, but didn’t think she could
date him because of his religion. She
decided to give it a try, but within two
weeks, she says she had an emotional
breakdown thinking about the religious
barrier. When Brenner talked to Gargus,
he said he was open to being married in
the Catholic Church, and Brenner was
relieved.
“People ask would I marry him if he
wasn’t Catholic. I wouldn’t be dating him
if I couldn’t see myself marrying him,”
Brenner says. “I believe love is willing the
good of another and doing everything
to help them get to heaven. Me loving
him was sharing my Catholic faith and
lifestyle.”
Katie Hayes, a sophomore from
Pittsburg, was raised Catholic, and was
taught from an early age that the greatest
love comes from Jesus because he died for
us. “If someone loves you so much that
they’ll do anything for you, that’s ulti-
mately what love should be,” Hayes says.
For Hayes, loving someone also means
you will do anything to help that person
get to heaven. Tat is what Hayes and
her boyfriend of the same faith, TJ Wal-
lace, try to do for each other. One way
they try to help each other is by staying
abstinent.“If I love him, I’m not going to
try to tempt him and he feels the same
way about me. We don’t want each other
to sin, so we try to keep it pure,” Hayes
says. Te two decided the best way for
them to keep a pure relationship was with
prayer; the two try to pray together on the
phone each day.
Because the religious aspect of her
relationship with her boyfriend is so
important, Hayes doesn’t know if she
could date someone who wasn’t a devout
Catholic. “If I don’t have a boyfriend
supporting me, that would be hard. A lot
of people don’t understand and misun-
derstand the Catholic church, so, if he
didn’t understand my views, that would
be really hard,” Hayes says.
Robert Shelton, professor of religious
studies, says it’s hard to determine what
religion dictates because culture always
plays a big role in religion. “Culture is a
given in human experience. It can change
and vary. Sometimes people make a
change in religion and in the process they
make adjustments in what they have prac-
ticed through culture,” Shelton says.
To Mike Marcus, Shawnee fresh-
man, God is the essence of love. Mar-
cus, a Methodist, says it is important
in a relationship to be able to grow in
faith with that person. To grow in faith
together, Marcus and his girlfriend Sam
Hinrichs, Kansas State freshman and
non-denominational Christian, send each
other Scripture passages via text every
morning and then talk about it that night
when they Skype. But he knows everyone
doesn’t see love in that way, and there’s
no universal defnition. “Tere are always
difering opinions on what a relationship
is,” Marcus says. “Even in my own church
there are people who have complete op-
posite thoughts. Ultimately love is what
you make of it.”
Love Your Partner As You’re Taught
Different variables, including religion, influence how we see and
express love. //Rachel schwaRtz
photo illustRations by taRa bRyant
Diverse Devotions
KU religious studies professors
Robert Shelton and Jacquelene
Brinton share how other religions
view relationships and love.
-In Hinduism in India, parents fnd
families for their sons to marry into. The
parents have the fnal say on the marriage.
Sometimes the future married couple won’t
meet until after the marriage has been
arranged.
-In Islam, the Koran has teachings about
relationships and spousal roles. It says
that males and females were created to
be companions. A couple is supposed to
complement each other through fulflling
the different roles they have. This has been
interpreted to mean that a man has a more
worldly role and a women has a role at
home.
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LOVE
// AlizA Chudnow
Couples Advice: AnnA smith And Andrew mCCrACken
Te
Hookup
michelle macBain, kansas City, is a graduate student
in Communication studies. she studied Psychology
and human sexuality at ku and the university of
Amsterdam.
Email questions to michelle@michellemacbain.com
Dear Michelle,
I want to know what advice can you
give me to maintain a healthy sperm
count and quantity.
Wanting Powerful Swimmers
Dear WPS,
Te average volume of semen pro-
duced during ejaculation is between 2 and
5 milliliters; 5 mL being approximately
1 teaspoon. Lower volume may occur
afer frequent ejaculation and higher afer
prolonged abstinence.
According to the World Health Orga-
nization, “normal” sperm count should:
be at least 40 million in number; have at
least 75 percent of the spermatoza be liv-
ing; at least 30 percent should be of nor-
mal shape and form; at least 25 percent
should be swimming rapidly; and at least
50 percent should be swimming forward,
even if only sluggishly. A “normal” sperm
count does not guarantee fertilizing suc-
cess — too high of sperm count can also
result in fertility problems.
You can increase your chances of pro-
ducing healthy sperm by increasing your
vitamin intake, eating plenty of fruits and
vegetables, managing stress levels, exer-
cising frequently, and lowering your body
fat (too much fat can disrupt production
of reproductive hormones).
Your little guys are sensitive to envi-
ronmental factors and toxic chemicals.
Terefore, to keep them strong and
healthy:
* Avoid tobacco, excessive alcohol, and
drugs. Marijuana can decrease sperm and
cocaine can cause erectile dysfunction
* Avoid excessive and prolonged heat to
the genitals. Although, don’t be like Mike
“Te Situation” on “Jersey Shore” and
think you won’t get a girl pregnant if you
have sex in a hot tub. I would not recom-
mend taking any sex advice from him.
* Limit time on your bike, throw out
tight underwear, keep your laptop of of
your lap, and if you’re taking steroids,
stop.
If you continue to have low quantity
or have reproductive difculty, ask your
doctor about a semen analysis.
ContriButed Photo
It’s karaoke night and Andrew
McCracken stands on the stage at Set ‘Em
Up Jacks, waiting patiently for the music
to begin. As soon as the song starts and
with a big smile on his face, he begins
singing “Everything” by Michael Bublé.
As he gets comfortable with the song,
he looks out into the audience, his eyes
fxated on the only person he will ever
sing it to; his girlfriend Anna Smith.
Music has always been a huge part of
Anna and Andrew’s relationship, both
seniors from Overland Park. Anna, who
is a music therapy major, met Andrew
during homecoming week their freshmen
year. Afer they both decided they wanted
to be a part of the homecoming jingle,
they ended up sitting next to each other
during a practice. “I texted my friend
and said ‘Who is the girl in the yellow
sweatshirt?’” Andrew says. “Te frst
thing I thought when I saw her was ‘I
absolutely have to talk to her.’”
Now, three years later, Anna and
Andrew know that the constant support
they give one another is what has kept
them together.
Dating Tp: Make each other a priority and
always support one another.
Tis past summer, Anna studied
abroad in Ireland while Andrew held an
internship in Overland Park. Andrew
worked 40 hours a week and Anna was
halfway across the world, but at the end
of the day, they made it a priority to talk
and catch up on their separate endeavors.
Even now, if Anna is having a bad day,
Andrew will surprise her with a Coke or
send her pictures of dogs wearing hats
and mustaches, just to make her smile.
“Whenever I am sad he talks to me in
an Elmo voice,” Anna says. “Tat always
makes me laugh.”
No matter where they go afer
graduation, Anna and Andrew know that
they will always be each other’s biggest
fans. Just like their song “Everything”
says, “You’re every line, you’re every word,
you’re everything.”
“Te best way to explain why I love
Anna is because she’s my moment,”
Andrew says. “She is constantly on my
mind and she is always there for me
through all aspects of our lives.”
6TH & MAINE, 23RD & OUSDAHL
AND 23RD & HASKELL
������������
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school
Recently, the University created a new
position on campus to better accommo-
date people with disabilities. Jamie Simp-
son started her work as the director of
Accessibility and ADA (Americans with
Disabilities Act) Education on March 22.
She will coordinate campus-wide activi-
ties to promote the ADA and she will be
the go-to person for ADA compliance.
She will also help professors better ac-
commodate students with disabilities on a
more personal level, like suggesting ways
to work with each student’s individual
disability in class.
On the search committee for that posi-
tion was Glen White, who is a professor
of Applied Behavioral Sciences, direc-
tor of the Research and Training Center
on Independent Living (RTCIL), and a
wheelchair user. He says Simpson will be
the person for professors to go to when
they don’t know how to best educate
a student with a disability. “If I had a
student that was blind, and I didn’t know
what to do to accommodate that person,”
White says, “she could give me some ideas
about Brailling or when I do my presenta-
tions, describe what’s in the pictures.”
White advocates for all people with
disabilities. Te RTCIL is meant to help
people with disabilities fully participate in
society, and that includes students. “We
have a lot of students with disabilities
on campus,” White says. “I think the key
thing is to try to provide equal opportu-
nity, equal access for all students so they
can compete on equal footing.”
One of those students is Lauren Wismer,
junior from Overland Park, who is deaf.
If you didn’t already know, you prob-
ably wouldn’t be able to guess that Wis-
mer is deaf. She can read lips and speak
to people who don’t know sign language,
but in classes, it’s difcult for her to try to
read every word her professors say and
take notes at the same time.
Two years ago, before her hearing loss
“bottomed out,” as she says, she could use
hearing aids. Now, the hearing aids don’t
help much because she can’t hear noises
that are less than 120 decibels, which is
as loud as a chainsaw. Anything much
higher can cause pain in an average ear.
Wismer must only focus on her sign
language interpreters, which she uses
in all of her classes, tutoring sessions
and advising appointments. It can be
very confusing to switch her thoughts
from speaking to signing, Wismer says.
Because of this, she also uses in-class note
takers. And, the fre alarm in her dorm
fashes to alert her to the sound she can’t
hear.
However, Wismer doesn’t want people
to think that her accommodations are
giving her more help than necessary. “Te
accommodations that people with disabil-
ities get are to make the playing ground
equal. It’s not to make things easier for us
than it is for other people,” Wismer says.
“We’re not just getting it easy.”
Wismer is in the majority of students with
disabilities on campus who have non-
obvious disabilities. Of the approximately
700 registered students with disabilities,
about 85 percent of them have non-
obvious disabilities, says Andrew Shoe-
maker, director of Disability Resources.
Non-obvious disabilities include learning
disabilities, attention defcit hyperactivity
disorder (ADHD), psychiatric, health or
medical issues.
In the other 15 percent of those
students are the ones with mobile dis-
abilities. A person in a wheelchair cannot
use a single one of the hundreds of stairs
on campus — Strong Hall alone has 595
stairs, inside and outside combined, ac-
cording to KU Info. To accommodate for
the stairs, every building has a wheelchair
accessible entrance.
Because it can be so difcult to climb
the hill using a wheelchair, if a person
who uses a wheelchair requests to have
his or her classes moved to more eas-
ily accessible buildings (for example, all
along Jayhawk Boulevard), the Univer-
sity makes every efort to accommodate
that request. Similarly, when an elevator
breaks, the Disability Resources ofce
notifes the students who have reported
mobility disabilities, and then works with
the Registrar’s Ofce to try to relocate the
class, Shoemaker says.
Anyone who wants accommodations
on campus must provide the appropriate
documentation of his or her disability to
Disability Resources. Ten that person
and Disability Resources work together to
determine the appropriate accommoda-
tions, Shoemaker says. Te most com-
mon accommodation for a person with a
disability to receive is extended time on
tests, followed by an in-class note taker,
like Wismer has.
Elizabeth Boresow, a senior from
Overland Park with autism, receives less
common accommodations. Loud noises
and commotion make her uncomfortable.
When a fre alarm goes of, she is excused
from class for the rest of the day to calm
down. When she becomes distressed
or tired, she is unable to communicate
verbally and must use sign language. “It
makes me a little diferent, but I think it’s
okay,” Boresow says. “People with disabili-
ties can do everything other people can.”
Accomodating people with
Disabilities on Campus
Providing equal opportunity and equal access. //megan hinman
photo by travis young
elizabeth boresow, senior from overland park, has austism but knows her rights are the same as any
other person’s.
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You might call it cussing, cursing, or
swearing. If you’re my mom, you call it
“using toilet-tooth, potty-mouth words.”
No matter what you call it, other people
may perceive your foul language nega-
tively, depending on your social context
and your intent, says Wes Crenshaw,
psychologist at Family Terapy Institute
Midwest in Lawrence.
“What is acceptable among friends
is not with family, and may meet with
consequences,” Crenshaw says. “Cursing
at a bar is seen as part of the conversa-
tion. Cursing at a nice dinner date, even
just with a partner, would not be seen as
acceptable.”
For Greg Pach, sophomore from Ath-
ens, Ohio, cursing comes naturally. He
says it is habitual for him. “I just do it a
lot at inappropriate times,” Pach says, like
while watching the KU basketball game
school
Getting involved:
KU Habitat for Humanity
developing communities with people in need. // Allison Bond
Cursing —It's pretty common, but
not always acceptable. // MeGAn HinMAn
Better options:
against Missouri in the presence of young
children, or in class. “I don’t think it’s a
bad thing. I think I just need to choose
appropriate times wisely.”
He’s right. It’s not a bad thing. Several
studies have found that cursing can liter-
ally relieve pain. One 2009 NeuroReport
study showed that when two groups of
college students held their hands in freez-
ing water, the ones who were allowed to
repeat a curse word reported less physi-
cal pain than the group who could only
repeat a normal word. However, the more
ofen you use a curse word, the weaker its
efect becomes.
To lower your usage of ofensive
language, try replacing curse words with
G-rated words. Nocursing.com ofers
a flter for swear words. Just type in the
word you need to replace and an equal,
more socially acceptable word will appear.
Standing on a roof, I’m holding basic
nails and a hammer. I have no experience
building a house but here I am, volunteer-
ing with Habitat for Humanity, putting a
roof on a house. I know I’m out of my ele-
ment, but I feel good and useful building
a house for a family in need. “Tere is no
experience necessary to volunteer,” says
Brittany Krutty, a junior from Olathe and
president of the KU Habitat for Human-
ity. “Anybody can do it.”
Te KU chapter of Habitat for Human-
ity works with Lawrence Habitat, and
together the groups work to build houses
for low-income families in the greater
Lawrence and Kansas City area. At their
monthly meetings, this KU club focuses
on learning about the Habitat mission,
hears from Habitat homeowners, fnds
out about upcoming volunteer oppor-
tunities and plans events such as the fall
semester Crunchy Chicken Challenge
fundraiser.
Helping out with Habitat for Human-
ity since fall 2009, Krutty says that while
getting to build houses is why she started
to volunteer, today her favorite part is
getting to know the people that will
eventually live in the house and hear their
stories. “Working with the people that
will eventually live there is the best part of
the experience,” Krutty says.
One recipient of a Habitat house, Phyl-
lis Bia, helped Krutty realize that there
was more you can do with Habitat than
building houses. You can build relation-
ships with the people you are helping.
“Phyllis helped me realize that these
people work hard and they just need a
helping hand at that point in their life,”
Zach lee and dakota Henke secure an inside wall with a good, old-fashioned hammer and nails.
Hear no evil: dirty words should be reserved for appropriate situations. pHoto By MeGAn HinMAn
left side, from top to bottom: dakota Henke, lauren
Ferris, Brittany Krutty
Right side, from top to bottom: Katrina Rivera, Julia
Martinez, Caitlin perry, ellen Frizzell, loryn Goebel,
sammy Forbes
posing behind the fence and gate they just built from
recycled materials.
Krutty says.
To get involved with KU Habitat for
Humanity or learn more about the orga-
nization, email Brittany Krutty at kuhabi-
tat@gmail.com or visit their website at
www.kuhabitatforhumanity.org.
If that doesn’t do the trick, try cursing in
another language if you know it, or just
make up a word. Or, try replacing curse
words with similar sounding words, like
“shoot” instead of “shit.”
Actively trying to change your
language can make you more aware of
how ofen you use these words, and could
better prepare you for a time when curs-
ing is unacceptable.
ContRiButed pHotos
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If the only diference between genius
and insanity is success, Tim Heidecker
and Eric Wareheim are two of the most
daring, transgressive comedians working
today.
From their early viral videos to cult TV
favorites “Tom Goes To Te Mayor” and
“Tim and Eric Awesome Show, Great Job,”
the deadpan duo’s anomalous blend of
aggressively absurdist humor and public-
access channeled grotesquerie has earned
them scores of loyal pep-peps and beaver
boys, along with a band of equally pas-
sionate detractors. I personally fnd them
hilarious, so perhaps this review of “Tim
and Eric’s Billion Dollar Movie” should be
taken with a Chippy-sized grain of salt.
Like the slack-jawed, khaki-loving
spawn of Andy Kaufman and David
Lynch, Tim and Eric embrace a very
specifc comic aesthetic, one that fore-
goes nuisances like plot or character
development in favor of delivering one
gut-busting gag afer another. Te story,
such as it is, involves the boys’ failure to
entertainment
Movie Review
Tim and Eric's Billion Dollar Movie
// Landon McdonaLd
recoup their losses afer a billion-dollar
flm shoot produces only three minutes of
usable footage starring an obvious Johnny
Depp impersonator and the interminable
services of self-help guru Jim Joe Kelly
(Zach Galifanakis).
With a price on their heads courtesy of
wrathful billionaire Tommy Schlaaang (a
nearly mummifed Robert Loggia), Tim
and Eric shed their spray-tanned Hol-
lywood personas and skip town. Afer
weeks of awkwardly galloping through
the desert, they arrive at the derelict Swal-
low Valley Mall, a wolf-infested hellhole
run by a deranged “Top Gun” enthusiast
(Will Ferrell) and inhabited by a horde
of post-human wretches, including an
ill-tempered sword salesman (Will Forte)
and the loveable but diseased man-child
Taquito (John C. Reilly). In exchange for
safe harbor, the boys pledge to revitalize
the mall using their apparently unrivaled
(and previously non-existent) PR skills.
Te flm is populated by a bevy of bona
fde movie stars, ranging from Jef Gold-
blum (credited here as Chef Goldblum)
to “Twin Peaks” veteran Ray Wise as the
mall’s resident spiritual healer, whose
patented “Shrim” baths are the stuf of
nightmares. But it’s Reilly’s phlegm-
choked, yogurt-loving dummkopf who
truly steals the show.
While “Billion Dollar Movie” will
doubtlessly please longtime fans, the
uninitiated may emerge dismayed or even
repulsed by what they’ve seen. Tis is
exactly what Tim and Eric want. Comedy,
whether it’s meant to induce fts of laugh-
ter or unrepentant squirming, is one of
the most subjective pursuits imaginable,
and these guys have found its sweet spot.
Great job!
FInaL RaTInG:
10
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entertainment
Movie Review
John Carter
// Landon McdonaLd
Since their publication nearly a cen-
tury ago, Edgar Rice Burroughs’s John
Carter novels have represented a literary
benchmark for geeks, a sci-f touchstone
that has gone on to infuence everything
from “Star Wars” and “Avatar” to Stephen
King’s “Te Dark Tower” saga.
Now Andrew Stanton, the Pixar-
schooled futurist behind “Wall-E” and
“Finding Nemo,” is attempting to kick-
start a new franchise with “John Carter,”
an ambitious but dramatically inert
swashbuckler that sufers from uneven
plotting, lackluster visuals and a mythol-
ogy rendered obsolete by decades of re-
fned imitation. To be fair though, almost
any movie involving a Civil War soldier
who gets zapped to Mars to battle giant
white apes and save a princess who’s also
a professor is bound to seem inherently
goofy when presented on an enormous
screen in murky, post-converted 3-D.
Afer a ponderous prologue featuring
a fctionalized Burroughs (Daryl Sabara
from “Spy Kids”) and the discovery of a
desert cave lined with Apache gold, John
Carter (Taylor Kitsch) awakens on Mars,
referred to here as Barsoom. Rendered
superhumanly light and agile by the red
planet’s gravity feld, the former Confed-
erate quickly fnds himself caught up in a
sectarian war between two city-states: the
embattled citizens of Helium, represented
by the spunky scientist Princess Dejah
(Lynn Collins), and Zodanga, led by an
evil autocrat (Dominic West) and his
ominously bald advisor (Mark Strong).
Tere’s also a proud warrior race of four-
armed green creatures led by the bom-
bastic Tars Tarkas (Willem Dafoe), who
insists on calling our hero Virginia afer a
conversation about home states is lost in
translation.
Despite the flm’s notoriously troubled
pre-production, one would expect Stan-
ton’s vaunted direction to combine these
disparate elements into a rollicking ad-
venture full of breathless spectacle and a
genuine sense of wonder and afection for
the characters. Yet “John Carter” stumbles
where all his previous eforts have soared.
Much fault can be found with the screen-
play, which seeks to replicate Burroughs’s
pulpy prose with embarrassingly stilted
dialogue.
It doesn’t help matters that Kitsch
chooses to play Carter as a sneering, gut-
tural meathead instead of a noble savior
of worlds. Te attractive Collins fares a bit
better as Dejah, although Carrie Fisher’s
Leia remains the bun-headed standard by
which all warrior princesses are judged
and then summarily dismissed. Strong
and Dafoe, both consummate actors, rail
against the constraints of the script and
in Dafoe’s case, the woefully uninspired
creature design that turns a passionate,
rousing performance into a gawky, scut-
tling blob. Is it too late to call Pixar?
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Signs a relationship won’t last
means in your mind “I’ve been thinking
about you too and want to talk to you.”
Yay! You become giddy.
Simply liking someone can make a
short, mediocre text an endorphin-in-
ducing experience. But if liking someone
and falling in love is so wonderful, why
do so many romantic relationships fall
apart? According to the book, “A General
Teory of Love” by Tomas Lewis, Fari
Amini and Richard Lannon, people fall in
love seven times in a lifetime on average.
Tis means we tend to have more failed
relationships than successful ones that
last.
Dennis Dailey, retired social welfare
professor at KU, taught about human
sexuality for more than 37 years, and
ofers private counseling for couples. He
says the biggest mistake college students
make in relationships is holding on too
long. “Of all the time you explore, before
you make the decision to commit to
somebody, all of those other relationships
broke up, because they were supposed to,
because of wrong timing, wrong person,
or wrong match,” Dailey says.
Romantic relationships have diferent
phases that the authors and other experts
acknowledge, and the failed relationships
Y
ou are thinking about texting your
crush. You want to talk and firt,
but you are afraid that person
might think you are being too obvious,
too smitten, too easy, or you’re afraid of
possibly getting ignored. You want to play
hard to get, but you don’t want the crush
to think you are not interested. While
pondering the possibilities, you get a text
from your crush. “What’s up?” which
feature
// Rachel cheon
Meant to be...
oR not?
photo illustrations by ashliegh lee
may come from mistakes common in
these phases.
( GettinG to know each other
and the chase )

Wearing rose-colored glasses
Isabella Sangui, a KU graduate, has
counseled students about relationship
problems for eight years as a psychologist
for the University of Oriente in Cumana,
Venezuela, and Central University in
Caracas, Venezuela. She says when getting
to know each other, students commonly
make mistake of not seeing the person
clearly, and moving too fast. “Everybody
in this stage is nice, gentle, sweet, and
hiding whatever would make the other
person have doubts about being in a rela-
tionship,” Sangui says.
David Kim, a senior from Wichita,
agrees people ofen act to impress their
crush. “You might have to change up your
game depending on what kind of girl you
are firting with,” Kim says. “But if you
want to keep this girl around for a long
run, it’s important to show her who you
really are.”
Tis phase can determine if the attrac-
tion is mutual, but because of the natural
desire to show only the best sides, Sangui
suggests slowing down to get to know the
person.
Expecting too much
Another common mistake in this stage
is acting like a couple, even though the
two aren’t ofcially together.
Irene Smith, graduate student from
Chicago, says she expected too much,
too soon. During her sophomore year
in college, she was seeing someone who
seemed to be her potential boyfriend.
Tey firted daily, and she thought they
would become ofcial in a matter of time.
However, when she found out that he was
going on a trip for two days with a stu-
dent organization, she worried he would
meet new girls and firt with them. She
told him not to go, but he went and they
had a fght aferwards and never ended up
together. “He was still single,” Smith says.
“In my mind, I was already expecting to
be treated like an exclusive girlfriend.”
Remember to slow down, and enjoy
the light, fun part of the phase.
( in a relationship )
Thinking the honeymoon phase is
real and eternal
Te beginning part of the actual
relationship is referred to as the “hon-
eymoon” phase because it’s when two
people feel like they are falling in love
with each other. Sue Olson, marriage
and family therapist at Sunfower Fam-
ily Terapy, 729 ½ Massachusetts St.,
says there’s a neurological explanation
behind the honeymoon phase because
endorphins, or the “happy hormone,”
and oxytocin, the “cuddle hormone,”
create intensely fuzzy, positive happiness.
“Tese hormones don’t let us think very
clearly,” Olson says. “We tend to think, ‘I
can’t even begin to see your faws. You are
perfect in every way.’”
Kevin Kline, a junior from Seattle, says
he likes everything about a girl during
this stage. “If I’m in this phase, I like even
the freaking dirt in the air as long as I’m
with her,” Kline says. He warns, however,
that he starts to see faws of the woman
he’s into afer this phase and realizes that
everything he’s been seeing in her so far
has been more of the perfect, impossible
version of the real person.
Olson says even if you see a potential
problem in this phase, you don’t think
it will be an issue. “Much of the phase is
physiological, reacting from neurologi-
cal perspective, and we are just enjoying,”
Olson says. Realizing that honeymoon
phase is temporary, and being aware that
you may be ignoring warning signs may
help to make fewer mistakes.
Getting too comfortable, and
playing the blame game
As the honeymoon stage passes,
couples start showing their real sides
and getting too comfortable, starting
“sweatpants syndrome” and not being as
attentive to partners as before, resulting in
accusations that the partner has changed.
Vickie Hull, marriage and family therapist
with a private practice on 1201 Wakarusa
Dr., has seen couples who became disap-
pointed with each other afer dating for a
while. “I have worked with young mar-
ried couples who have divorced only afer
a couple years of marriage, because ‘It
just wasn’t fun anymore’,” Hull says. “Tat
is tragic, because all relationships have
this initial feel-good phase, but then the
relationship naturally matures, and real
life does set in.”
Kathy Garner,* a senior from Overland
Park, says long-term relationships may
fall apart when a couple gets too comfort-
able with each other. “My ex started to
vegetate and play video games, got fat and
quit his hygiene upkeep, as well as going
to classes. He got pretty disgusting and I
couldn’t stand it,” Garner says.
Hull says in this case, Garner’s ex-boy-
friend was showing his true self, rather
than having changed as a person. Before,
he was using Prince Charming as a short-
term persona to attract and interest her,
but he couldn’t keep that persona up any
longer. “Even if she could convince him
to put the prince suit back on, it wouldn’t
ft forever. Tink how hard it is to change
yourself and then realize it will be even
harder to change someone else, especially
if they don’t want that change.”
It is common to think a partner has
changed than to realize that the person
you possibly fell for in the beginning was
not 100 percent real to begin with, and it
can also be a mistake to take each other
for granted and stop making an efort to
impress each other.
feature
12
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photo illustrations by ashliegh lee
sometimes it takes making multiple mistakes with different people before finding “the one.”
Four Horsemen of a
Relationship
John Gottman, a marriage
researcher and co-founder
of The Gottman Relationship
Institute, came up with four
characteristics of a couple that
can predict a relationship end-
ing. “Horsemen” refer to the four
evils that will come at the end
of the world in the Bible. Anne
Owen, psychologist in Lawrence,
explains the four horsemen.
1. Criticism- “It’s like saying ‘You
never take me anywhere,’ rather
than saying ‘I would really like it
if you would take me out to din-
ner.’”
2. Contempt- “This includes sar-
casm, eye-rolling, making insults,
and other things intently trying to
hurt the other person.”
3. Defensiveness- “It’s like when
someone says ‘You never spend
time with me,’ and the other
person gets defensive and says,
‘What do you mean? It’s you
who doesn’t spend time with
me!’ It’s an opportunity to fx the
problem, but the issues don’t get
resolved.”
4. Stonewalling- “It’s when
someone is just like ‘talk to the
hand, I’m not listening anymore.’
The person shuts down and just
utterly derails any kind of com-
munication, and conveys disre-
spectful attitude.
feature
Not maintaining individuality
Being in a relationship may come with
another common mistake: neglecting
friends by having the partner become
their only go-to person.
Julia Schafermeyer, licensed profes-
sional counselor in Lawrence at 1012
Massachusetts St., ofen sees someone go-
ing through a break up and having a hard
time as an independent person. While
dating, the person has cut of friends
and spent time and shared thoughts with
mainly the signifcant other. Tat per-
son loses one’s identity, and everything
about the person has become more of the
identity as a couple. Afer breaking up,
“they have the story about really need-
ing the other person and feeling really
empty without them,” Schafermeyer says.
“Te mistake is having lost their sense of
identity.”
Being on different pages (or
circles)
Anne Owen, psychologist at 5200 Bob
Billings Parkway, says to think of a rela-
tionship as an archery target. If the person
is acting near the bulls-eye, the person
is being very intimate and feels like their
partner is the most important person.
Te further away from the bulls-eye, the
lower the level of intimacy and the fewer
shared goals. “You want to be in the same
ring (of the circle) that the other person
expects. If not, it can be painful and sort
of disconnect the couple.” Owen says.
Christina Weiss, a senior from Los
Angeles, thought her three-year relation-
ship was dull, and thought her boyfriend
was more like a brother, but she was not
breaking up yet because she didn’t know
if it was just a phase. When her boyfriend
realized how she felt, he became afraid
of losing her and became possessive,
and told her he wanted to marry her. He
pressured her to express the same desire,
and even had his parents talk to her about
a wedding date. “It was too soon, and I
wasn’t ready. I realized that we weren’t
right for each other. I didn’t feel that way
so strongly until he brought marriage up
though,” Weiss says.
Acting outside the ring of the circle that
you are being presented with can result
in either being too demanding, or too
apathetic to the partner, which can wear
both partners down.

( The Break-Up phase )

Being afraid to suffer
Lawrence therapist Vickie Hull says
trying to convince yourself and your
partner to hang on to a dead relationship
is common, even by begging, pleading, or
threatening. “None of these are attractive
or worth it. If you have to coerce someone
to stay, do you really want to know that is
why they are staying? Te risk of dating is
that you might break up. Tis is reality,”
Hull says.
Irene Smith was in a four-year rela-
tionship, and she remembers that afer
breaking up with her boyfriend, she kept
thinking about the good memories with
him and thought being together again
would make her happy. Her ex felt the
same way, and they did get back together.
But shortly afer, they broke up again.
“Usually, unless it was just some break
up over a stupid, petty fght, couples that
break up once over a serious problem will
likely to break up again with that exact
same problem,” Smith says.
In order to move on, you have to sufer,
even though it may seem more comfort-
able to go back to the in-a-relationship-
phase you are used to being in.
Not taking enough time to heal
Afer breaking up with her boyfriend
for good, Smith had hard time dealing
with the sudden feeling of “emptiness.”
13
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12
She had been in the relationship for so
long, it took her a while to get used to
being single. “It was hard to deal with,
at that time not knowing when I would
completely heal,” Smith says. “So I dated
guys who were being nice to me. I wasn’t
even into them that much, but I liked the
attention and the sense of security that
someone likes me.”
Hull suggests taking time to refect
on what worked and what didn’t work so
that you will have a better idea of what
will make for a better next relationship.
To help with this phase, it is important
for the person initiating the breakup to
let the partner know why the relationship
wasn’t working.
( The Moral )
So afer that ‘What’s up?’ text, you and
the crush may go out on a date, see each
other few more times, but not end up as a
couple. Or you two may become ofcial.
But then again, you might also break up.
Who knows? Even if you meet “the one,”
your relationship will still be unpredict-
able and require efort. Professor Dailey
has been married since he was 21 years
old, and he says he and his wife constantly
negotiate to manage diferences that are
inevitable in relationships.
“College students are always asking
me, ‘How do you know he’s (or she’s) the
right one?’” Dailey says. “You can’t pos-
sibly know that on some fnal terms. So
then the question becomes, how willing
are you to take a risk that this might be
the right person?”
Taking a risk means going through
the phases and possibly making mistakes
such as these common ones. We may even
not realize some mistakes before it’s too
late. But in reality, “Tat’s what dating is
all about,” Dailey says. “Otherwise it’s ro-
mance novels from Dillon’s, or Hy-Vee.”
*name has been changed
photo illustrations by ashliegh lee it’s not hard to find yourself on a different page than your
partner.
14
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Everything changed for Patrick Riley
and Alaina Moore when they set out on a
seven-month sailboat adventure along the
Atlantic coast. Refecting on their trip, the
married couple wrote some songs upon
returning to Colorado. Reputable indie
label Fat Possum took notice afer some
of their mp3s picked up Internet buzz,
and the band released a handful of EPs
and 7-inch singles in mid-2010. Fat Pos-
sum eventually released the group’s debut
album “Cape Dory” in January 2011.
Tennis’ sophomore efort “Young and
Old” was released (also by Fat Possum)
last month on Valentine’s Day. Te album
was produced by Black Keys drummer
Patrick Carney — Black Keys had a string
of releases on Fat Possum between 2003
entertainment
// Alex TreTbAr
Album review
Tennis—"Young and Old"
The denver husbAnd-wife duo’s second Album
Topped kjhk's pre-spring breAk chArTs
black keys drummer patrick carney produced Tennis’ latest release “Young and old.” singer/keyboardist
Alaina moore is featured here on the album artwork.
and 2006. “Cape Dory” is a dreamy,
oceanic collection of straightforward pop
songs with lo-f dirt and old-school girl-
group aesthetics. Te new record shoots
for a bluesy, more rock ‘n’ roll edge, which
is where Carney comes in.
Riley and Moore recruited drummer
James Barone for support on their frst
tour (which included a February 2011
stop at Te Jackpot) afer releasing “Cape
Dory.” Tennis is currently on tour, but
won’t be stopping in Lawrence this time.
Te group is taking a break afer hitting
the South by Southwest music festival in
Austin, Texas earlier this month, but they
head out in April for eleven more shows
from Vancouver to Tucson.
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Wizard rock guide
For a genre built around a children’s book series, Wizard Rock has
produced a diverse range of groups. Of course they are united by a
few common traits, including a love of Harry Potter and an ability to
turn easily over-looked details into catchy songs.
DRacO anD tHe MalFOys
Draco and the Malfoys take on the persona of Harry’s childhood
nemesis, Draco Malfoy. expect lots of insults about poor people and
orphans, and a surprising amount of bluegrass.
tOP sOngs: My Dad is Rich, Potions yesterday, a gift for lucius,
MinistRy OF Magic
this trio takes its name from the government agency that rules over
Potter’s wizarding world, but their songs are better for dancing than
bureaucracy. assuming the clubs you frequent aren’t full of muggles.
tOP sOngs: House song, accio love, gryffindor Rally cry
tHe PaRselMOutHs
this female duo, which sounds like a mix between lisa loeb and
t.a.t.u, produced three albums in a year before calling it quits in
2009. it’s a far cry from what the name suggests—parselmouths are
people that can talk to snakes in their native hisses.
tOP sOngs: What Kind of name is Hermione, the Day i Met a
snake, Voldemort Fangirl
tHe ReMus luPins
named for Harry Potter’s favorite teacher who also happens to be a
werewolf, the Remus lupins produce cheerful indie-pop with classic
rock influences.
tOP sOngs: lovely lily, at Hogwarts, Marauders Worst Memory
Other Wizard rOck acts: the Moaning Myrtles, the Butterbeer
experience, the Mudbloods, Justin Finch-Fletchley and the sugar
Quills, the Whomping Willows, the Misuse of Muggle artifacts Of-
fice, tom Riddle and Friends
15
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entertainment
Harry Potter Rocks
The boy who lived lives on thanks to a local wizard rocker. //kelsey cipolla
contributed photo
contributed photo
Ever wonder what happened to Harry Potter afer he defeated Voldemort? He became a rock
star, trading in his wand for a guitar and fighting to keep music fun. He also owns an art gallery.
Ok, fine. Even as a super fan, I’m willing to admit Harry Potter is a fictional character, but Paul
DeGeorge, the very real owner of Wonder Fair, the downtown Lawrence art gallery and store, is
keeping his name and spirit alive and rocking with his band, Harry and the Potters.
Te band formed in 2002 as a joke between Harry Potter aficionados and brothers Paul and
Joe DeGeorge. Te duo had always appreciated concept bands and thought the idea of playing
punk rock to kids in libraries was the perfect blend of subversion and fun.
With voices that sound like indie-rock darling Connor Oberst and lyrics that put a hilarious
spin on scenes and characters from the iconic books, they quickly became more successful than
they had imagined.
Teir fan base was built-in, thanks to the series’ devoted fan following, Paul DeGeorge says.
Lovers of the books came out to see the band play at libraries, bookstores, Potter-themed events
and more traditional concert venues across the country.
Tey were at the forefront of what is now known as “Wizard Rock,” an entire genre of music
based of of the world of Harry Potter.
“I think that it’s amazing the Harry Potter series is able to inspire people to make a subgenre
of music, and even a whole sub-culture,” says Kim Barrientos, a junior from Kansas City, Kan.,
and a big fan of Harry Potter. “It shows how powerful and meaningful a story can be for readers
of all ages.”
Giselle Anatol, an associate English professor at the University who teaches the book in her
children’s literature class and edited a book of scholarly essays about the series, says that she has
found current college students to be the most dedicated fans. Many of us grew up with Harry
and company, waiting in bookstores and movie theaters until midnight to buy the newest book
or watch the latest movie.
Joe and Paul were only 15 and 23 when they started the band, but a lot has changed over the
past decade. Tey independently released seven albums, including a Christmas album, and went
on several tours. A few years ago, Paul settled down in Lawrence, where he owns Wonder Fair
with his fiancee, a doctoral student at the University.
Summer Bradshaw, a Wonder Fair staf member and a senior from Olathe, was working on
making fiers for the show when I stopped in to ask her what it’s like to have a boss that moon-
lights as Harry Potter.
“It’s a fun time,” Summer says. “It’s a big part of his life, and I think they’re pretty rad.”
Paul’s fondness for the series even makes remembering the ofce WiFi password easier, since
it’s the name of one of the Potter world’s most beloved characters.
Te brothers DeGeorge will play at Wonder Fair tonight, Tursday, March 29 at 7 p.m. as part
of their current Midwest tour, which proves there’s life for Harry and the Potters even afer the
end of Harry Potter.
“What we were finding was there are still a lot of new people coming to Harry Potter, parents
bringing their kids into that world,” says Paul. “If anything, I think we can fill a gap now that
there aren’t any books or movies. Tere are still people out there who love Harry Potter and want
to celebrate that.”
left: the band’s second album, “Voldemort can’t stop the rock!” was released in 2004. the deGeorge brothers
worked on it in their parent’s shead before taking off to tour the country. right: harry and the potters’ self-titled
debut album featured some of the Wizard rock’s most recognizable songs, including “save Ginny Weasley.”
Joe and paul deGeorge, brothers from massachusetts, take on the character of harry potter during their shows.
16
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entertainment
Casey Donahew is pure Texas. He was
born in Burleson, Texas, graduated from UT
in Arlington, and is now the frontman for the
popular country-rock music group, Casey
Donahew Band. When he’s not on stage, he’s
outside, ofen playing golf with the band’s bass
player, Steve Stone. Although he’s sold out in
Fort Worth at Billy Bob’s Texas, “the largest
honkey-tonk in the world,” he still enjoys stop-
ping in Lawrence to play shows at the
When and hoW did you knoW you
Wanted to be a performer?
I started writing in high school but really
sucked at playing guitar. In college, my room-
mate played guitar and my grandpa had given
me an old one, so I taught myself how to play.
I started playing out at bars in Fort Worth
[Texas] and it really went from there.
Where did you go to college? When
did you graduate and What did you
study?
Texas A&M, but I got asked to leave for a
lack of attending classes. So I went to UT in
Arlington and got a degree in fnance in about
2001, I think. I was just always mindful of
money, I guess. I fgured it would be some-
thing I would excel at and keep my interest.
What Was the Worst job you ever had?
Why?
I was a 9th grade algebra teacher. I was
scared all the time. It was not for me.
What’s your favorite song right noW?
I still love “Much To Young to Feel Tis
Damn Old” by Garth Brooks.
hoW Would you personally describe
your music?
Oh, you know, I like to call it “Texas music.”
I grew up watching Pat Green and he would
always say “Texas music,” so that’s what I
always go with. It’s rock and roll country.
All through life, something happens all the
time that motivates every song. I try to come
up with a good hook and work from that. It
comes from everyday life.
What do you love about your career?
I just love performing. I love being on
stage and having music as an outlet to express
myself. I really love the band and the crew and
the guys we travel with. We spend a lot of time
together and there’s good camaraderie; they’re
a second family.
What challenges do you face in this
business?
Trying to stay creative with my music and
trying to grow as an artist. I try to write better
songs and play an instrument better. And
there’s always missing your family and being
away from home; that’s the tough part.
are you Watching march madness at
all?
[Laughing] I might get in a lot of trouble in
Kansas. I don’t follow it a lot. I could tell you
a lot more about the Dallas Cowboys or Texas
Rangers.
Q&a:
Casey Donahew's Country Roots //rachel schultz
the casey donahew band is a country music sensation that
released its fourth album, “double Wide dream,” in fall of
2011. the band has been to lawrence quite a few times and
will return april 5th for a show at the granada at 8:30 p.m.
The Granada will turn honky tonk when these country-rockers come to town.
Granada, as he will April 5 at 8:30 p.m.
17
03
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campus & town
1. Love Garden has only occupied its current location at 822 Massachusetts St. for the
last two years. Te move, inspired by difering levels of landlord enthusiasm, ended the
store’s 20-year stint at its old location above Te Toy Store.
2. Love Garden intentionally keeps a large selection of bargain albums in store.
Tough they bear a smaller proft margin than the more upscale inventory, the store
wants to foster musical interest across all tax brackets.
3. Two cats, Sam and Mickey Roy, grace the foor of the shop, greeting customers. In
the 22-year history of the store, there have been a total of seven fuzzy companions.
Ten Things About...
Love Garden Sounds //john garfield
4. Talib Kweli provides the lone autograph gracing the walls of the new storefront.
Te old location had an entire wall of signatures.
5. Te walls of Love Garden are adorned with the works of various local artists.
Tough the art for sale is rotated, certain pieces are there to stay, being either contribu-
tions or because the management thought they were just too good to let go.
6. Love Garden holds live shows in its store every once in a while, but makes a con-
scious efort to distinguish itself from a venue. It does this by pitching the shows as
events, consistently coinciding with album release parties, art shows, fundraisers and
other events.
7. Te current location was once a pawnshop. In the back of the store, there is even a
hatch, which was allegedly used to test-fre weapons into the ground.
8. Also in the back of the store is an old manual elevator, showing the age of the
building and connecting the basement and attic to the main foor.
9. Te landlord of the current location actually “wooed” Love Garden to the location,
being considerably more “community-oriented” than the previous landlord.
10. Te giant neon Johnny Cash sign hanging over the entryway came from a junk
shop in Topeka. It was discovered by a third party who called the store, knowing it
would be perfect, and suggested it to the business.
photo credit goes here
18
03
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campus & town
Girl: Do you need an Advil?
Guy: No, it’s just a freaking boo boo.
Girl: Maybe I’ll stay in tonight and pick out my outft and de-bloat for tomorrow.
professor: What’s an example of a lie?
student: I did not have sexual relations with that woman.
Girl: You are fne. My mom rode a rollercoaster when she was pregnant with me.
Guy: Would you ever wanna be a swinger with me?
Girl: Heck no!
Guy: Not even a gentleman’s threesome? Two girls and one guy?
professor: Ok, I’ll name a body organ and then you say what is associated with it. Liver.
student: Alcoholism!
Girl: The weather outside is making me want to pee.
Guy: Look at that creamy texture.
Girl: That’s what she said.
Guy: You can always tell a good pressman by how many fngers he has.
Guy: If you say a word over and over again it starts to sound meaningless.
Girl: Penis penis penis penis penis.
Guy: Please don’t make that word sound meaningless.
wescoe wit //kelsea eckenroth
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19
03
29
12
Founded to populate new territory with
anti-slavery advocates, Lawrence experienced
more than its share of growing pains becom-
ing the town it is today. Horse-drawn carriag-
es, a half dozen wars, the Depression, protests
and prohibition are but a few memories of the
city, and Mass Street saw it all.
Tough it may be difcult for students to
imagine these things happening on the same
plots of land that they eat, drink, shop and
dance on, there are businesses in Lawrence
operating today that are living relics of those
times.

The eldridge hoTel
Te Free-State Hotel was built in 1856 at
the cost of $20,000. Te hotel had 50 rooms,
along with stables and outhouses specifcally
purposed to accommodate emigrants to the
free state, quickly gaining a reputation as a
symbol for abolitionist sentiments.
Not long afer its inception, the hotel, along
with the abolitionist publications the Herald of
Freedom and the Kansas Free-State drew the
ire of the Douglas County grand jury, Sherif
Samuel Jones and an angry mob determined
to shut them all down by force.
Afer surviving cannon blasts and deto-
nated kegs of gunpowder, the actual newspa-
per from the recently-destroyed anti-slavery
publications was used as kindling to burn the
hotel down.
Later that same year, the hotel would rise
campus & town
hiSTorY “eN MASS”: Lawrence Rising
Today’s epicenter of student recreation, Massachusetts Street, is a long way from the frontier iden-
tity that forged it, a vague and distant dream of that time. //john gaRfieLd
again, one story taller under the ownership of
the Eldridge family that occupied the building
during its destruction.
It was less than a decade, though, before
tensions surrounding slavery would bring the
symbol of freedom to its knees once again
with Quantrill’s raid in 1863.
Tough the hotel had been declared a
sanctuary by the Provost Marshal of Kansas,
and Quantrill himself had even declared that
the guests should not be harmed, disgruntled
border skirmishers killed all but one guest,
who survived by playing dead.
Despite the city’s best eforts, Lawrence only
raised enough funds to rebuild one foor and
had to sell the icon. Tough it rose again to
three stories, the hotel eventually foundered
and was lef in disrepair.
Te year 1925 marked the development of
the motif the hotel is known for today. Tough
the surge of motels in the 1960s would close it
again, it would eventually be reopened in 1985
with $3 million in donations to stand at fve
stories tall — one for each time it shut down.

WeAver’S depArTMeNT STore
In 1857, Lathrop Bullene moved to Law-
rence and started a department store with his
stepbrother. Tough they would eventually
split and become competitors, Bullene stayed
in the business of selling groceries, glass,
shovels and tailoring services as he moved to
several locations up and down Mass Street.
Te store even survived Quantrill’s raid in
1863, with whispers abound that Bullene’s wife
had fed the raiders in turn for protection. De-
spite this stroke of luck, the department store
would continue a long Lawrence tradition of
burning to the ground only a decade later.
In 1883, Bullene hired Arthur D. Weaver,
and within two short years, Weaver had both
married into the family and inherited the store
in the wake of Bullene’s newly developed bron-
chial condition.
Weaver’s son would eventually inherit
the business in 1915, and in 1929 buy out
their largest competitors, the Innes Store,
and acquire the location they occupy today.
Exploring other ventures, Weaver gradually
transferred the store to Larry S. Flannery,
whose son Joseph operates the store today.

liberTY hAll
When the the Herald of Freedom was
burned down in 1856, a new building would
rise in its place. At its base a butchery, the
two-story building held up a small theater that
would come to be known as “Liberty Hall,” a
nod to Abraham Lincoln’s referral to Lawrence
as the “cradle of Liberty.”
Tat name would, however, be short-lived
as the building was sold in 1882 to J.D. Bow-
ersock, becoming his namesake opera house.
In keeping with the tumultuous times and
fre-prone architecture, the Bowersock Opera
House burnt down in 1911, taking with it the
newspaper that would become the Lawrence
Journal-World.
Rebuilt in 1912 as “fre proof,” the reno-
vated venue gradually incorporated mov-
ies throughout the 1920s until Bowerson’s
death in 1923, when it became the Dickinson
Teater. By the time it became the Jayhawker
Teater in 1940, it showed mostly movies.
Following the Jayhawker’s closure in 1956,
the venue would be reopened as several night
clubs and theaters throughout the 60’s, 70’s
and 80’s until it was eventually purchased and
restored in 1986 as Liberty Hall once again by
David and Susan Millstein and Rob Fitzgerald.
Te venue now shows independent movies
as well as live shows in its two theaters.

The lAWreNce JourNAl-World
Te Lawrence Journal World’s location
represents a long and storied history of news-
papers in Lawrence. Tough ofcially created
in 1911, the Journal World as it is known
today exists as a consolidation of the Lawrence
Journal and the Lawrence World.
Created in 1892, the Lawrence World was
owned by Wilford Collins Simons who worked
as a newspaper editor in Lawrence from 1891
until his death in 1952. Tough Simons ac-
quired the Journal in 1905, it was not until the
1911 fre that also destroyed the Bowersock
opera house that the two papers were merged.
contRibuted photo
northbound view of the 900 block of massachussetts street during the early 20th century.
20
03
29
12
21
03
29
12
play
Last year, Adam Smith, a senior
majoring in atmospheric science, went on
four storm chases. Smith goes on a storm
chase about every other week from March
through May with a group of about eight
students and a professor from KU.
Our day starts at the mock lab in
Lindley Hall. Te group decides where to
storm chase that day and we leave for our
destination around 8 a.m. We drive and
adjust where we go based on the weather
activity. Car windshields have cracked
before, so we take a car that belongs to
someone who isn’t
afraid of getting
some hail damage.
Te equipment we
have is limited. We
take our laptops and
listen to local radio
stations.
Te scariest storm
I experienced was
campus & town
What it’s like to...
chase a storm
Do this:
custom cupcakes
In pursuit of one of nature’s most powerful forces.
These tasty treats go much further than plain vanilla and sprinkles.
//kelsea eckenroth
//rachel cheon
in Iowa last April. We drove about 95
mph down an Iowa state highway try-
ing to catch up to the storm. When we
came up on a hill, there was a tornado
on the ground. It was too far south and
we couldn’t get to it, so we drove along
side it. I always hope to see a tornado, but
it rarely happens. When I do witness a
tornado, the feeling is incredible because
I’m witnessing a natural monster.
We ended up camping in a feld in
a smaller city because we heard on the
local radio that there was another storm
coming. Te storm started rotating and
putting down a funnel. It was very weak,
but we felt it lif up our jackets and felt the
rush of air. It was scary because we knew
what we were doing, but the local radio
didn’t know the storm was actually in the
city. Te storm never actually dropped a
tornado, but it was ready to. Te class-
room is great for learning about storms,
but until you are out there watching what
is happening, it’s hard to get a sense of
what really goes on.

photo by adam smith
contributed photo
Amy Sanders, senior from Overland Park,
planned to have friends over for drinks and
cake before going out bar hopping for her 21st
birthday. But when she realized over 20 people
were coming, she thought cupcakes would be
better than cutting a cake into 20 super-thin
slices. So she ordered two dozen cupcakes of
diferent sizes, favors and designs. “It put the
party of to a great, happy start,” Sanders says.
Like Sanders, you can custom design fun
cupcakes and enjoy these fufy, sweet cakes.
Tere are two places to get cupcakes custom
designed in Lawrence; Cupcake Construction
Company (727 Massachusetts St.) and Billy
Vanilly Cupcakes (914 Massachusetts St.). At
Cupcake Construction Company, you can
choose four aspects of the design and favor
of the cupcake, and the staf will assemble the
cupcakes for you. First, you choose the foun-
dation, which is the cake favor, and second,
you choose the interior, which is the flling.
Tird, you choose the topping, which includes
mini Oreos or strawberry drizzle. Lastly, you
choose the icing, which includes cofee, chai,
and mint favors. Each custom-designed
cupcake costs $2.75, and mini cupcakes cost a
dollar each.
At Billy Vanilly, there are freshly-baked
pre-made cupcakes available, but customers
can still customize and decorate them by add-
ing edible decorations to the cupcakes, such
as fowers, hearts, graduation caps or animals.
Unlike Cupcake Construction Company, you
pre-order at least two days in advance to get
cupcakes customized. Gluten-free favors are
available on Fridays, sugar-free favors are
available on Saturdays, and fat-free “skinny
cakes” are available on Sundays. Cupcakes
come in three sizes: Big kid (jumbo) for $3.50
each, baby (standard) for $2.50 each, and
preemie (mini) for a dollar each.
Lucy Brown, a senior from Seattle, likes to
give custom-designed cupcakes as gif for her
friends, whether it’s a single cupcake for a sad
friend or a box of cupcakes for a special occa-
sion. She says going out for custom-designed
cupcakes always puts her in good mood.
“Tey are sof and sweet,” Brown says. “ It’s
like few bites of heaven.”
photo by ayako sawaguchi
adam smith
the iowa storm right before a funnel cloud developed.
billy Vanilly cupcakes topped with oreos and peanut butter cups.
22
03
29
12
play
Sweet laSSi ingredientS:
2 cups curd
1 tablespoon sugar
¼ tablespoon cardamom
2 drops vanilla extract
People in India drink lassi to cool down
from the Indian heat afer long hours of work,
Bhargavi Krishnan Arvind says. Tere are
two types of lassi, she says, one sweet and one
salty.
When I frst heard lassi was made from
yogurt or curd, I thought it might have a
smoothie-like consistency. It is actually more
akin to frothy milk. Te drink is flling and
has an almost carbonated taste from the live
and active milk culture, an ingredient in
the curd. Arvind, a graduate student from
Chennai, India, says the salty version is more
diluted than the sweet version and is ofen
drunk afer a heavy lunch.
Te northwest Indian state of Punjab is
famous for its lassi, Greeshma Umapathi
Santosh says. Santosh, a graduate student
If you have a milk allergy, a dietary
restriction or you’re just not a fan of cow’s
milk, there are plenty of milk alternatives
available in grocery stores. However, what
I wanted to know is how they taste on
cereal or, more importantly, in macaroni and
cheese.
Soymilk: Haley Gilchrist stopped drink-
ing dairy milk three years ago in an attempt
to minimize her use of animal byproducts.
Gilchrist, a freshman from Wichita, says
she primarily drinks unsweetened soymilk.
Soymilk is a bit sweeter than cow’s milk and
has a slight beany afertaste. Gilchrist says
sweetened soymilk is also good, but may be
too sweet for cooking.
CoConut: Tis is not just the juice from the
center of the coconut, but from coconut meat
as well as the juice. Because of this it’s thicker
and sweeter than soymilk. I would not put
this in my mac and cheese, or in my cup for
that matter. However, it makes a sweet milk
mustache.
riCe: Rice milk is thinner than other
milks, but comes the closet of all to the taste
and smell of dairy milk. It is mildly sweet-
ened and would be great in cooking or on a
bowl of cereal. I liked the oat taste so much
I was ready to cast of dairy milk for good,
until I saw the percentage of carbohydrates:
Rice milk has 8 percent carbohydrates
compared to the 4 percent in whole organic
dairy milk.
almond: Mica Mendez says unsweetened
almond milk has a bitter afertaste, like
drinking liquid almonds. Mendez, a sopho-
more from Lawrence,
says the bitterness is less
noticeable in cooking.
Sweetened almond milk
is very similar in taste
and texture to coconut
milk. Mendez describes it
as melted ice cream.
If you’re cook-
ing, rice milk, unsweet-
ened almond milk or
unsweetened soymilk
will do the trick, even
in macaroni and cheese.
Rice milk is also a satisfy-
ing alternative to cereal.
Taken straight, none of
the alternatives have the
buttery sweet taste of
dairy milk.
from Bangalore, India, gave me a Punjab
recipe for sweet lassi. You can buy the curd
at the Mediterranean Market, at Bob Billings
Parkway and Kasold Drive, or you can make it
from scratch.
At the Mediterranean Market, two cups
cost $2 and saved me the eight to 12 hours
Santosh says it takes to make homemade
curd. Check the ingredients for pectin and
gelatin when buying curd at the store, she
says. Tese ingredients will not give you the
authentic lassi taste. Te Dana brand sold at
the Mediterranean Market does not contain
either of them.
For sweet lassi, add the curd, sugar,
cardamom and 2 drops of vanilla extract to a
large bowl. You can also use powdered sugar
or honey as a sugar alternative. Next, whisk
the mixture until it becomes frothy. Finally,
pour the mixture into a cup with a half cup of
crushed ice.
You can also fnd lassi at India Palace, 129
E. 10th St., and Curry in a Hurry, 1111 Mas-
sachusetts St.
drink this: drink this:
a traditional drink of india. Four options for the lactose intolerant.
Lassi Milk alternatives
//Sara Sneath //Sara Sneath
photo by Sara Sneath
photo by Sara Sneath
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23
03
29
12
Speak
I was 17, a senior in high school, and
my brother Brad was 15. While I went out
with friends and was involved in clubs
and activities at school, Brad preferred to
listen to music in his room or go hunting
with his dog. We’d always gotten along,
but never really had a relationship. Start-
ing that September though, things began
to change.
When my parents asked to have a
family meeting, I knew what was coming.
To me, it was obvious things hadn’t been
going well between them. A few months
earlier they’d started fghting about every-
thing — money, intimacy, bills, you name
it. Every fght took place in the living
room, which happened to be right outside
my bedroom door. So what my dad said
next came as no surprise to me.
“Here’s the deal guys. We’re getting a
divorce.” I looked at my younger brother,
who was sitting across the room. His face
dropped in complete confusion.
Brad rode with me to school every day
since we lived seven miles out of town,
GrowinG ToGeTher How my relationsHip witH my
brotHer went from just siblings, to best friends // BriTTney haynes
and he couldn’t drive. On the way to
school in the mornings, we would talk,
mostly about my parents. I did my best
to answer his questions, but his face still
told me he was upset. I felt like I had to
be there for him, because all we had was
each other.
I went of to college the following fall,
and we would talk periodically on the
phone or on Facebook. When I came
home for the summer, we both returned
to our summer jobs of lifeguarding at our
hometown pool. We were out on rota-
tion at the same time, so we also had our
breaks together. Tat summer I felt that
my brother began to see me as more of a
friend than just his older sister. We went
to Warped Tour together, made frequent
Sonic and ice cream runs and went to
the movies. He asked me when was the
right time to ask a girl out and talked to
me about how I knew I was in love. He
asked my opinion on classes he wanted
to take his junior year and even started
discussing the possibility of majoring in
elementary school education in college.
We began to discover the things we had
in common: a love for alternative rock,
sweet potato fries and children. Afer that
summer, I fnally began to feel a connec-
tion to my brother and I found leaving
home to go back up to school a little
harder than the year before.
During my second year of college,
my mother moved closer to her job in
Sedgwick, and my brother moved with
her, 50 miles away from my hometown of
Sterling. Brad switched high schools for
his senior year. He was excited to move to
Sedgwick and get a fresh start. Brad had
been playing football since he was in the
ffh grade. He wasn’t getting much play-
ing time, so he really looked forward to
football season at a new high school.
He ft right in. He had friends over at
the house constantly and he went from
getting Cs and Ds, to As and Bs. I began
to get phone calls from him afer every
football game to tell me how his team
did. I could tell how happy he was just
from hearing how optimistic he sounded.
On his 18th birthday, he had his open-
ing game, which they won. I was able to
go home for his senior night game later
in the season, and it was one of the best
football games I’ve ever been to. Brad
played the entire game and had several
key tackles and blocks. Afer the game, I
ran onto the feld to see him. He wrapped
me up in a hug as I told him how proud
of him I was.
My brother had never been up to visit
me at college by himself so this past No-
vember, he came up and spent a weekend
with me. It was one of the best weekends
we’ve had together. We went ice-skating,
hung out at my boyfriend’s fraternity, and
went out together that night. He got to ex-
perience college life as I experience it.
Towards the end of winter break as I
was shopping with a family friend, I got a
call from my mom.
“You got a second?” she asked.
“Yeah, sure.” I replied.
“Well, your brother just signed with
the Army.”
I felt my heart drop in my chest.
“What?”
“He decided to do the Army Reserves.
He had been talking to a recruit about
it for awhile, and afer discussing it with
your dad and me, he decided to do it.”
A million things were running through
my head. “What is the Army Reserves?
Is he going to be deployed? Why did he
decide to do this instead of school? Is he
not going to college anymore?” I asked
my mom every question I could think of,
and although I tried to not cry, I felt the
tears start to fall.
She explained to me what the Army
Reserves is. Brad will go to boot camp
and then training for whatever he wants
his specialty to be. He’ll be gone for a
year and a half before he’s able to attend
college. Te Army Reserve will pay for
his college as long as he does his monthly
commitment, which is one weekend a
month, the entire time he’s in school.
Afer I understood things a little better,
I asked my mom to hand the phone to my
brother.
“You didn’t think to talk to me before
you made a decision like this?” I asked.
“Sis, I’m sorry I didn’t tell you before,
but this is my decision. And this way, I’ll
get to go to KU, just like you.”
I slowly began to realize that my
brother was a man. He wasn’t my little
brother sitting in my front seat on the way
to high school. He didn’t need my advice.
He’d grown up and was able to make deci-
sions for himself, and this was obviously
what he thought was the best choice.
“You know I love you, right?” I said.
“I know that.”
“Ten know that I’ll stand by you and
support you no matter what. Tis is the
right decision for you.”
Afer Brad graduates in May, he’ll leave
for boot camp in September. He also
recently found out that afer his training,
he’ll be deployed to Afghanistan for two
years. I won’t get to spend the summer
with him because I’ll be abroad for an
internship. I’m upset that I won’t get to
spend the summer with him, and I’ll
be the frst to admit I’m terrifed at the
thought of him being deployed and in
Afghanistan. But despite that he won’t
be just be a phone call away anymore, I
couldn’t be prouder of him and the man
that he’s become.
Brittney haynes with her younger brother Brad. conTriBuTed phoTo
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