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VOL. 116 issue 41
t apartMent fire

Monday, october 17, 2005

www.kAnsAn.cOm

Residents describe suspect
By Steve Lynn

slynn@kansan.com
Kansan staff writer

Coworkers, acquaintances and classmates describe Jason Allen Rose as either quiet, genuinely nice or creepy. Raúl Diaz, Los Angeles graduate student, said he lived on the third floor of Boardwalk Apartments and Rose lived on the first floor. He said he talked to Rose when he saw him outside a few times a week. “I want to see more evidence. I was surprised that he was taken by police,” Diaz said. “He was a shy guy, he kept to himself.” Diaz said he saw Rose with another man at Wal-Mart, 3300 Iowa St., after the fire the morning of Oct. 7. Diaz told Rose he was glad Rose was OK, but Rose didn’t say much and seemed calm and himself, he said. Diaz said Rose’s companion didn’t speak during the encounter. “I talked to Jason but this other guy was like a stone,” he said.

Rose was charged with three counts of first-degree felony murder and one count of aggravated arson in connection with the fire at the Boardwalk Apartments on Wednesday in the 500 block of Fireside Road. Two people are confirmed dead, one of them is Nicole Bingham, Wichita senior. Another man, Jose Gonzalez, 50, is missing and presumed dead. Rose previously lived in a group home, The Villages, 1149 E. 1200 Road, and recently moved to the Boardwalk Apartments. Robert Kidder, an employee at The Villages, refused to comment. Ginny Weatherman, Bucyrus senior and University Daily Kansan photographer, said she spoke with Rose three to four times per week for a month. Weatherman described Diaz as her best friend. She said Rosewould sit outside the building and smoke cigarettes when she and her dogs would visit Diaz at his apartment.
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Richard gwin/THe aSSOCIaTeD PReSS

Jason allen Rose, 20, of Lawrence, center, makes his first court appearance from the Douglas County Jail via video conference, Wednesday in Lawrence. He was charged Wednesday with three counts of first-degree murder and one count of aggravated arson.

Police charge suspect with murder
By John Jordan

jjordan@kansan.com
Kansan staff writer

Rose on Page 3a

Jason Allen Rose, who was charged with three counts of first-degree murder and one count of aggravated arson, will

appear in court again next Monday. Rose, 20-year-old Lawrence resident, made his first appearance in an orange jumpsuit Wednesday via closed circuit television from the Douglas County Jail.

The charges came less than one week after the Oct. 7 fire that destroyed the Boardwalk Apartments in the 500 block of Fireside Drive. The apartment fire killed Nicole Bingham, Wichita senior, and 33-year-old Yolanda Riddle, and may have killed 50-

year-old Jose Gonzalez. “It’s pretty rare that you get a decision this quickly on a case like this,” District Attorney Charles Branson said in a press conference Wednesday.
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sUsPeCT on Page 3a

t basketball

Renovated fieldhouse debuts new format, not-so-late night
Freshmen lead practice
By Miranda Lenning

mlenning@kansan.com
Kansan seniOr sPOrtswriter

Rylan Howe/KaNSaN

The new video scoreboard hangs above the court in Allen Fieldhouse. Other changes made to the fieldhouse include a new court, the new Jayhawk logo at center court, freshly painted seats and video boards above each entrance.

Improvements finally done; student response lukewarm
By ryan Schneider

rschneider@kansan.com
Kansan staff writer

The first basketball practice of the season Friday night gave a fresh start to the men’s and women’s teams and their aging homecourt. Construction crews spent Today’s weather

last week cleaning up the dust and debris from renovations to the interior of Allen Fieldhouse. The crews finished just in time for Late Night in the Phog, the traditional basketball season kick-off.
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RenoVaTIons on Page 2a

Everything about Late Night was new, from the format, to the players to Allen Fieldhouse. For the first time in the 21-year history of Late Night, the festivities started at 6:30 p.m. instead of about 9 p.m. A new NCAA rule that went into effect this year allows teams to start their scrimmages the evening before the first official day of practice. A new-look Allen Fieldhouse was nearly packed by 15,750 fans. It was the new video board and lighting system that received the most attention before the men’s players took the court. Fans watched as a video of Kansas players in the NBA blasted over the new board and got wild when a highlight video of KU basketball history played. “We needed something new, to be honest, to re-energize us after the way last season ended. Allen and the new recruiting class and the addition of Brandon, all those things have definitely pumped some adrenaline into us,” KU men’s basketball coach Bill Self said. Perhaps most of the newness, however, came when the current Jayhawks took the court about 8 p.m. Dressed in tuxedos and Adidas tennis shoes, the players formed a line and swayed to the Rock Chalk chant that sounded from a saxophone at center court. Next, the players formed three lines and performed a rhythmic sequence. “We needed something new to be honest with you,” Self said. The team then inducted its freshmen with a jump rope. As opposed to each class per-

Rylan Howe/KaNSaN

Freshman forward Julian Wright performs a step show with freshman guard Micah Downs and the men’s basketball team during Late Night in the Phog on Friday at Allen Fieldhouse. After the step show, the men’s basketball team scrimmaged for 20 minutes. Micah Downs led all scorers with 12 points. forming an individual skit, the team scrimmage statistics opted to perform team skits. “I think the thought was that we At Late Night on Friday, the Red Team defeated the Blue wanted to have one good one inteam 48-30. Freshman guard Micah Downs led all scorers stead of four average ones,” senior with 12 points. Sophomore guard Russell Robinson led guard Stephen Vinson said. all rebounders with six rebounds, five defensive and one The men’s festivities, which offensive. were broadcast live on ESPN2 and ESPNU, were highlighted by Blue Team Red Team a dunk contest and a 20-minute F Sasha Kaun F Darnell Jackson scrimmage. Dunks by freshmen F Julian Wright F C.J. Giles Julian Wright and Micah Downs F Christian Moody F Russell Robinson and sophomore Rodrick Stewart F Jeff Hawkins F Stephen Vinson were among the highlights. On one F Jeremy Case F Micah Downs play, Stewart put the ball between F Rodrick Stewart F Mario Chalmers his legs while he was in the air and F Brandon Rush F Matt Kleinmann then brought the ball back up over For complete coverage of the his head before slamming it home. Source: Kansas Athletics Department women’s team, check out 12A see PRaCTICe on Page 3a

84 54
Sunny
— weather.com Tomorrow Wednesday

In addition to classes, homework and jobs, some KU students are raising families as well. It takes time management and planning to succeed. Page 2a

Students juggle children and classes

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sunny

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The Kansas soccer team shut out Texas Tech before losing to Colorado in Boulder, Colo., this weekend. Kansas coach Ray Bechard said his team played well but “ran out of gas. Page 11a ”

Kansas loses momentum in second game

For the ninth-straight quarter, the Kansas offense failed to score a touchdown. Kansas lost to Oklahoma 19-3 Saturday at Arrowhead Stadium. Quarterback Brian Luke had three interceptions. Page 12a

Punchless

Index
Comics. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6A Classifieds. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7A Crossword. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6A Horoscopes. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6A Opinion. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5A Sports. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12A
All contents, unless stated otherwise, © 2005 The University Daily Kansan

2A The UniversiTy DAily KAnsAn

news
t Student Life

monDAy, ocTober 17, 2005

this week in

KU HISTORY Balancing obligations
oct. 17 - oct. 21
By KeLsey Hayes

Renovations
continued from page

editor@kansan.com
Kansan correspondent

For some, parenting as much a part of college as classwork
B y L ouis M ora

“He said, ‘You got

Oct. 17, 1944 In preparation for the 1944 presidential elections — a pivotal election because of World War II — members of the Democratic and Republican parties distributed fliers, stickers and political pamphlets en masse on campus. The 1944 candidates were Franklin Delano Roosevelt on the Democratic ticket and Thomas Dewey on the Republican ticket. Democrats circulated literature regarding the labor-friendly Political Action Committee and held a town rally Oct. 2. Senatorial candidate Thurman Hill and gubernatorial candidate Robert Lemon spoke at the rally. Republicans surveyed so-called Deweyites on campus and held voter registration drives. The University’s Socialist party also published copies of its magazine, The Informer, and made them available to students. The all-campus election was Nov. 3, 1944. Oct. 17, 1992 The Jayhawk football team overcame the largest deficit in school history when it defeated Iowa State 50-47. At one time, the University trailed the Cyclones by 26 points. Each team collected more than 500 yards on offense. Kansas coach Glen Mason said in a University Daily Kansan article that it was a tremendous victory for Kansas. “To come from behind like we did, there’s only one way to describe it. It’s because of T-E-A-M. Nothing else,” he said. Among the highlights of the game was quarterback Chip Hilleary surpassing 5,000 yards of career offense, the third player in Kansas football history to do so. Despite the victory, Kansas’ then second-ranked defense fell in the polls. Before surrendering yardage in excess of 500 to Iowa State, the defense had given up only 209.2 yards per game that season. Oct. 23, 1973 The Kansan profiled the 10 finalists for the HOPE Award (Honor for an Outstanding Progressive Education), an honor bestowed on faculty by members of the senior class each year. The last profile to be published detailed the career of mechanical engineering professor Edward McBride. McBride had been teaching at the University for 21 years at the time of his nomination. McBride’s classes were renowned for the discipline of the students taking them. When a HOPE committee member made plans to sit in on one McBride’s classes, the professor famously told him not to arrive Contributed photo late or he’d find the door locked. Students said McBride expected a lot out of them and had no tolerance for tardiness and late homework. Regarding the difficulty of his tests, McBride joked in his profile, “There are tests where the first question any student can answer. The second question, the good students can answer. The third question, only the teacher and God can answer and the fourth, only the teacher can answer.” McBride went on to win the HOPE award. F Source: Spencer Research Library. Edited by Katie Lohrenz

lmora@kansan.com
Kansan staff writer

Eric Hauber jumps out of bed as a loud noise wakes him up to get ready for school. The noise isn’t his alarm clock, it’s his newborn son, George. The Shawnee senior is one of several college students trying to balance the responsibilities of a family, school and work. “It’s stressful but it isn’t because it’s exciting,” Eric said. “I just take things day by day, hour by hour.” The new dad is still learning how to juggle working 30 hours a week and taking 15 credit hours at the University of Kansas. After spending a week in the hospital with his wife, Ashley, he’s still trying to make up for the week he missed. Finding time for school work can be difficult between changing diapers and playing with George, Eric said. Whenever the baby sleeps and Hauber makes it to the library he cracks his books and studies. Dayvid Prahl, Baldwin City senior, juggles teaching and a military career with his role as a father and husband. He is a student, algebra teacher, Air Force ROTC cadet, husband to Michelle

Prahl and father to 12-weekold Nora. One piece of advice concerning how to juggle those increased responsibilities came from his supervisor this summer, and he continues to remember his words. “He said, ‘You got to juggle them, but the trick is you got to know which balls are made of glass. Which ones are the ones you absolutely cannot drop.’” Dayvid said the most important thing to him is his family, and sometimes other responsibilities, such as writing a paper or studying for a test, suffer. The Prahls have been able to structure their work and class schedule so someone is with the baby all the time and each parent can spend time on school work. The arrival of a new daughter forced Dayvid to become more organized and more efficient in his time management. When Audrey Pool, Great Bend graduate student, learned she was having a baby she worried about what other people would think of her. She said she didn’t talk much about her son initially. Now she takes Simon, 2, to her classes and lets everyone know how proud she is of being a mother.

to juggle them, but the trick is you got to know which balls are made of glass. Which ones are the ones you absolutely cannot drop.”
Dayvid Prahl
Baldwin City senior

“I love my life. I love being called mommy because that’s who I am,” she said. For Eric, getting away from the stress of school work means going to work as a carpenter. He said working 30 hours a week and doing something that was “enjoyable” provided an opportunity to relax, as well as the opportunity to provide for his family. Eric said the financial responsibility of supporting a family as a college student could be difficult but is manageable with hard work. He said he paid attention to where money is spent so the bills get paid. Audrey said having a child worried her at first, but she has overcome that. For the Haubers, life slows down when the clock reads 7:00 and George goes to bed. That is, until the next time he cries. — Edited by Jonathan Kealing

Cat-o’-lantern

Accident leaves four dead, 11 injured
OSSEO, Wis. — A bus carrying high school students home from a band competition crashed into a tractor-trailer that had jackknifed on the interstate early Sunday, killing four adults and an 11-year-old girl, officials said. Twenty-nine others were injured, some seriously, troopers said. “It’s a terrific tragedy and loss to our school and community, ” said Chippewa Falls schools superintendent Mike Schoch. The semi had gone off the shoulder of Interstate 94 and jackknifed, and was blocking the westbound lane, Wisconsin State Patrol Capt. Douglas Notbohm said. “I don’t know how much opportunity there was for braking action, he said.The bus ” slammed into the overturned truck, but it didn’t roll or catch fire, patrol spokesman Brent Pickard said. It was the first of four buses carrying about 200 students and 40 adult chaperones, Schoch said. Four students and three adults remained hospitalized Sunday night.
— The Associated Press

nATion

Erin Pence/THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

This jack-o’-lantern in Sidney, Ohio, may be scary, but it doesn’t seem to bother a kitten who decided to take an afternoon nap inside it on Friday.

1a Late Night was the first opportunity for fans to see the renovations made during the summer and fall. The improvements included freshly painted bleachers, refurbished chair-back seats, new lighting and sound systems and renovated bathrooms. The most noticeable addition was the large video board hanging over center court. The four-panel board displayed the game score and a message board at the top, replay board in the center and another message board at the bottom. The Russell Stover Candies logo ran near the bottom, in recognition of the company’s owners, the Ward family, who funded the interior renovations to the fieldhouse. Chandler Hess, Lawrence junior, said he liked the new video board but wanted to see more graphics than just the Jayhawk logo. “I think the video board has a chance,” Hess said. “We’ll see as the season goes along if it was a good decision.” During Late Night, the video board showed video packages introducing the men’s and women’s basketball teams and shots of fans in the crowd throughout the night. A new hardwood court, with added cushioning, was installed last month to reduce player injuries. The design is the similar to the design used the last two seasons. The only difference is the Jayhawk at center court that features the new KU logo. As part of the renovation, the building received a detailed cleaning. Liz Roybal, Andover junior, said the building seemed cleaner and less dusty than in past years, but it doesn’t seem any different, despite its fresh look. “It still has a sense of tradition,” Roybal said, “but now it just has a more updated feel.” Jim Marchiony, associate athletics director, said the most important part of the renovation was maintaining the building’s atmosphere. He said the retro style of the new additions, including the lights, speakers and video board, added to the old-time feel of the 51-year-old building. Chris Schulte, Wichita resident, said he thought the atmosphere was maintained, even with the additions to the building. “The key is making it better for the players, but keeping the magic of Allen Fieldhouse intact,” Schulte said. “I think they pulled it off.” The bleachers and stairs in the three levels of the fieldhouse were painted crimson and blue. Schulte said he thought the improvements, such as the fresh paint, helped make the fieldhouse seem new. The Booth Family Hall of Athletics is still under construction on the east lawn of the fieldhouse. The new Hall of Athletics is expected to be completed in time for the first men’s basketball game against Idaho State on Nov. 18. — Edited by Katie Lohrenz

monday, october 17, 2005

Suspect
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news
Two-part harmony

the University daily Kansan 3a
corrections
F ednesday’sTheUniversityDailyKansan W containedanerror.Inthestory“Astoldby amonk, thenameofPaldenGyatsowas ” misspelledinthephotocaptionandeditor’s note. TheUniversityDailyKansan F Tuesday’s containedanerror.Inthestory“KUstudent amongmissing, thenameofJoseGonzalez ” wasmisspelled.

1a During the hearing, Judge Pro Tem Peggy Kittel set bail for Rose at $500,000. Branson recommended such a high bail amount to keep Rose from leaving town. Branson said at the press conference there was not enough information yet to know if his office would seek the death penalty. If Rose is convicted of all charges, he could face life in prison. Mark Bradford, interim chief of the LawrenceDouglas County Fire and Medical department, said at the press conference that interviews and information at the scene led to the arson investigation and the suspect. More than 600 contacts were made in the investigation. The third body has not yet been confirmed as Lawrence resident Jose Gonzalez. Bradford said it could take days or weeks for the body to be identified. Rose was charged with Gonzalez’s murder. The work between local agencies and state and federal agencies helped lead to a quick investigation and suspect, Bradford said. “You have a good sound solution, a good case,” Bradford said of the efficiency of the investigation. A memorial for Bingham will be held Tuesday at 6 p.m. at the Lawrence Free Methodist Church, 3001 Lawrence Ave. — Edited by Patrick Ross

on campUs
F rofessorVolodymyrDubovykofOdessaNaP tionalUniversityinOdessa,Ukraine,isdeliveringalecturecalled“BlackandCaspianSea Security:ThreatsVersusOpportunities”from 3:30to5p.m.todayinthePineRoomofthe KansasUnion.Thefreelectureissponsored bytheCenterforRussian,EastEuropeanand EurasianStudies. T F hedepartmentofFrenchandItalianisshowingtheFrenchfilm“NotontheLips”at7:30 p.m.WednesdayinWoodruffAuditoriumof theKansasUnionaspartoftheFrenchFilm Festival.Admissionis$2. F huckDofthehip-hopgroupPublicEnemy C willdeliveralecturecalled“Race,Rap,&Reality”at8p.m.WednesdayintheKansasUnion Ballroomaspartofstudent-runradiostation 90.7KJHK’s30thanniversarycelebration. Ticketsare$4forstudents,$6forthegeneral publicandcanbepurchasedattheSUAbox office,levelfouroftheKansasUnion.

Keith Myers/THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Rose

U.S. Sen. Pat Roberts, R-Kan., left, Rep. Dennis Moore, D-Kan., center, and Gov. Kathleen Sebelius sing Woody Guthrie’s “This land is your land” Thursday during a kickoff ceremony for the redevelopment of the Sunflower Army Ammunition Plant near DeSoto.

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1a Weatherman said her dog and Diaz’s dog would growl at Rose and didn’t seem to want her around. “He wore all black and there was something off about him. He kind of gave me the creeps,” she said. Heather Ryan, employee at Taco Bell, 1408 W. 23rd St., said she worked with Rose for two weeks; he had worked there four months. Rose drove Ryan home from work one night and they talked at her apartment, she said. “He was pretty much a loner,” Ryan said. “A couple people were surprised he talked that much to me.” Investigators interviewed workers at Taco Bell for three days last week, Ryan said. They asked Ryan whether Rose smoked cigarettes and if she thought he started the fire, she said. She said she thought he was innocent. Andrew McKee, Lawrence freshman, said he and Rose had the same study hall class for three years at Lawrence High School. Rose seemed like a genuinely nice person, though McKee did not know much about him, he said. McKee said he couldn’t remember a single time Rose was teased by classmates. “He was into auto technology and seemed industrious,” McKee said. “It was a complete shock when I found out. He seemed perfectly content.” — Samantha Samuel with KUJH-TV News contributed to this story. Edited by Patrick Ross.

Practice
continued from page

1a “I’ve seen him attempt that dunk about 200 times and I think that is only the third time he has made it,” Vinson said. “One for one is pretty good timing for him tonight.” On another dunk, Wright tossed the ball off the shot clock, perhaps a little too hard, but reached up and grabbed the ball with his hand and threw it down. It was another freshman, Downs, who had the most highlights in the scrimmage. Downs was the leading scorer, with 12 points. He was 2-for-2 from behind the three-point arc and 5-for-6 from the field. The Red team defeated the Blue team 4830. “I was excited all day thinking about it,” Downs said. “I was so nervous. It was so crazy with 16,000 people in there. It was by far the most

people I’ve ever played in front of.” Downs’ fellow freshmen also performed well in the scrimmage. Mario Chalmers was the second-leading scorer with nine points, going 4-for-8 from the field. Brandon Rush went 4-for6 for eight points. Both Rush and Chalmers wowed the crowd with some of the best passes of the night. “They can all pass,” Self said. “I think they share it well.” Only freshman Julian Wright struggled, mainly because of nerves, Self said. “Julian was in a hurry, the game was in fast forward for him but everyone else had pretty good composure,” Self said. “Julian still did well but you’ve got to let the game come to you.” Seeing how it was their first time playing in front of a large crowd, Self said he was impressed with the way the freshmen handled themselves. Chalmers had nine points

off 4-of-8 shooting for the winning team. Rush hit 4-of-6 shots and scored eight points and the team’s other freshman, Wright, was 1-of-6 shooting for two points with two assists. “I thought playing in front of the crowd for the first time, they played pretty well,” Self said. Of the veterans, sophomore forward C.J. Giles, who put on 25 pounds in the offseason, was impressive in the paint. He was also able to keep up with the quick pace of the game. He finished with seven points and six rebounds. Sophomore point guard Russell Robinson scored only one point but dished out seven assists, while Darnell Jackson added eight points. Stewart also added seven points. Senior Stephen Vinson, who was awarded a scholarship for this season, went 2-for-2 from three point range and 3-for-3 from the field, for a total of eight points. — Edited by Jonathan Kealing

state
TOPEKA—ShawneeCountycourtofficials havebeencrackingdownonpeoplewhodon’t showupforjuryduty. ThroughtheendofSeptember,morepeople summonedtoserveonajuryhadduckedtheir courtdatethanthenumberwhoanswered. Insomecases,lawyersalmostranoutof qualifiedjurors,whichwouldhaverequiredthe presidingjudgetosendsheriff’sdeputiesout intothecourthousehallsornearbyneighborhoodtograbpotentialreplacements. Consideringthatthecourtsystemhasmore jurytrialsthesedays_sofarthisyear,thecourt hasheld79jurytrialscomparedto67during thesameperiodlastyear_it’saproblemChief JudgeRichardAndersonisn’ttakinglightly. Andersonhasbegunsendingoutletters warningno-showsthattheycouldbeheldin contemptfornotreportingfordutyandbe forcedtopaya$100fineforeachdayofunexcusedabsence.
— The Associated Press

Topeka area officials crack down

4a The UniversiTy Daily Kansan

news

monDay, ocTober 17, 2005

No place like home

Thad Allton/THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Meinhardt Raabe, right, who played Munchkinland’s coroner in the 1939 MGM musical, “The Wizard of Oz,” talks about the film as two other former Munchkins, Mickey Carroll, left, and Karl Slover, look on at a news conference Friday on the stage of the Columbian Theatre in Wamego. A total of five Munchkins will participate this weekend in Wamego’s first Oztoberfest.

t courts

Prosecutors pursue capital charge in shooting death of police officer
The AssociATed Press Deputy Kurt Ford and wounding Hesston Police Det. Chris Eilert early on the morning of April 9, as they and other officers in an emergency response team stormed his home in answer to a domestic violence call. The officers said they went in after hearing Moore’s live-in girlfriend being beaten. “I started to hear gunfire, and immediately Kurt let out a groan, is the best way to put it,” Eilert testified during the hearing. “He fell flat on the floor. I continued in and immediately felt a burning in my right calf. I realized we were being shot at, and that I’d been shot.” Eilert was hit four times, one of the bullets nearly severing his left index finger. Alveda Sparks, Moore’s girlfriend, testified that during a standoff that led up to the shooting, Moore promised that there would be violence. “He said, ‘There’s going to be a bloodbath,’ and that I was going to die with him, and that it was my fault,” she said. Sparks escaped when Moore went into another room. On her way out of the house, she ran into the officers coming in — knocking aside the lead officer, who carried a bullet-resistant shield.

WICHITA — A Newton man accused of shooting a Harvey County sheriff’s deputy to death could get the death penalty if he is convicted. Prosecutors announced their decision to pursue a capital murder charge on Friday, at the close of a preliminary hearing for Gregory Moore. Sedgwick County District Judge David Kennedy bound Moore over for trial on the capital murder charge and four counts of attempted capital murder and set a trial date of Jan. 9. Moore is accused of killing

OPINION
WWW.KANSAN.COM
▼ WHEN IT RAINES IT POURS

MONDAY, OCTOBER 17, 2005

PAGE 5A

Don’t be a Halloweener: Get creative
It’s that time of year again. America’s greatest holiday is nearly upon us, a time for celebration, gatherings of loved ones, exchanges of gifts, food and cheer. Religious for some, fun for all, I’m referring, of course, to Halloween. While Halloween is great for many, many reasons, the feature that separates it from other festivities is the opportunity, for one glorious night, to be anything you want. It’s a release from reality for the shy and socially challenged, a catharsis from conformity, the American dream without the inevitable disappointment. Donning that carefully-crafted costume grants you a license for fun without strings, a get-out-of-embarrassment card for an evening of unbridled debauchery. Of course, all this is contingent on choosing the right costume. This will be the most important decision you make for the next year, and those photos will be around forever, so don’t take this lightly. Nothing can sink an otherwise-perfect Halloween faster than wearing a lame get-up. Humor is the most important factor when considering a potential costume. Your costume should immediately evoke shrieks of laughter

CHRIS RAINE
opinion@kansan.com

from on-lookers, kind of like real life, except on this special night, they’ll be laughing with you, marveling at your comedic genius. If your costume can’t conjure a chuckle from your fellow revelers, you’ve failed. Second to humor in costume choice is originality. This doesn’t necessarily mean your costume has to be an entirely original idea, but rather one that hasn’t been done too recently. Costumes are a form of fashion. You don’t want to be caught wearing last year’s styles. Ladies, many of you are undoubtedly planning on dressing as a sexy something. This is not discouraged, especially because many of you simply can’t help but look sexy. But instead of your generic sexy nurse, devil, kitty-cat, etc., try dressing as something that’s inherently un-sexy. For instance, perhaps this year you should dress as a sexy lunch lady, sexy parking ticket lady or a sexy tortoise. Speaking of tortoises, animal

costumes are always a good idea. Be it a chicken, gorilla, rhinoceros, whatever, dressing up as a giant silly-looking animal will be a can’t-miss costume. Group costumes are always great ideas, providing they meet the humor and originality criteria. Last year, for instance, eight friends and I posed as the Supreme Court and managed to win a costume contest. If that doesn’t sound funny, well, you had to be there. Incorporating animals into a group costume is an even better idea. Tell me you wouldn’t smile if you saw a flock of giant chickens running down Massachusetts street at one in the morning, or a swarm of giant bees shaking their stingers on the dance floor. Couple costumes are almost always annoying. If you must dress up as a couple, remember originality and humor. Dressing as Fred and Wilma is not funny. Dressing as a priest and an altar boy is funny. Costumes can be expensive, but the financially-challenged shouldn’t despair. There are many low-cost costume possibilities. For instance, you could go dressed as a certain feminine hygiene product. Just put on your best polo

Matthew Sevcik/KANSAN

shirt, pop the collar, and you can be rest assured that everyone will know exactly what you are. This costume can also be worn year round. Unfortunately there are many of you set on dressing up as pimps and hos, medical staff, rednecks, etc. You’re ruining Halloween. Do everyone a favor and stay at home.

I’m sure MTV will be running Laguna Beach reruns or something, so at least you’ll have entertainment, and the rest of us won’t have to be brought down by your incredible levels of lame. Halloween is only as fun as you make it, and it’s one of the few times in life where the effort is all that is necessary. This is your opportunity to be

whatever you want to be, and the only limit is your imagination. Grab your slippers, Cinderella, and get to work on that gown Halloween is almost here, and it won’t be back for another year. Let’s make it a night to remember. ✦ Raine is a Wichita senior in journalism and psychology.

▼ LETTER TO THE EDITOR

▼ LETTER TO THE EDITOR

Not just sticks and stone, Mencia University lucky to book Mencia
Comedian Carlos Mencia and KU student Kevin Hess are wrong. Words, like actions, can do violence to people. Consider Mencia’s choice of word to back up his assertion that words are inoffensive: “cunt.” Would people have agreed if he’d said “nigger” or “spick ?” I don’t think so, but his audience seemed to have no problem with a word that demeans women and their bodies. If Mencia and Hess truly think words like “cunt” are laughable, then I’ll assume they address women in their lives – family members, friends, teachers, co-workers – as “cunts,” to their faces, without fear of retribution. After all, in Mencia’s world, those who use language have no responsibility for what they say. Instead, people who “let the words hurt them” are to blame. Thankfully, we are in a university environment with other information sources. We don’t have to let Mencia insult our intelligence. Past history and current events illustrate that language is part of oppression, racism and sexism – and also part of opposing those forces. The bottom line is that Mencia uses shock value to make money. It’s no surprise that he rationalizes his act with “eitheror” thinking that is downright stupid. ✦ Ray Pence Casper, Wyo., graduate student in American studies. The performance of Mr. Carlos Mencia was very indicative of Hispanic Heritage and so were the other numerous events throughout Hispanic Heritage Month. This dedicated month gives everyone an opportunity to learn more about Hispanic culture and enjoy its famous Hispanics. Mr. Mencia is one of the few Hispanic entertainers in the nation and the University was fortunate to attract him to campus. Carlos realized that this was a special event to the University which is why he took questions after his performance. If I remember correctly, he said, “This is a place of higher learning.” He respected that because he was a former electrical engineering student. It is difficult for me to believe that his performance was “short-sighted” or “insulting.” On the contrary, he intended to make his performance exactly what it was advertised as: FUNNY! Some of his jokes were actually attempts to foresee what will happen in Iraq. His performance will stay with the hearts of audience members because he made them think about social issues. In summation, it is imperative that KU recognizes Mr. Mencia during Hispanic Heritage Month along with other cultural programs because it displays our diversity to the nation and the world. ✦ Evaristo “Joe” Ramirez is a Kanopolis, alumnus class of 2005.

▼ LETTER TO THE EDITOR

Alcohol worse than marijuana
First of all I would like to express my condolences to Lindsay Shelton for her father’s problem with pain killers. Addictions of any kind can destroy lives and families. My grandfather’s abuse cost him his life and hurt his wife and children emotionally. Just because people are willing to argue until they are blue in the face does not make the theory correct. When religious conservatives opposed Copernicus far out “round earth rotates around the sun theory” I am sure they too were willing to argue until they were blue in the face that the earth was flat. Being passionate does not save you from being wrong. A study done in 2002 by the U.S. National Household survey on drug abuse concluded “teenagers who tried hard drugs were predisposed to do so whether or not they tried marijuana.” It also made the point that ▼ TALK people generally used marijuana first simply because it was more available than harder drugs and an elimination of marijuana would not lead to elimination in harder drug use. The DEA’s own studies have concluded that more than 75 percent of people who use marijuana never go on to use an harder drugs. The problem in this story was not the fact that your dad used to smoke pot in high school. (If our parents told us the truth we’d find out many of them smoked pot, quit and then went on to lead successful lives free of any drugs) The problem seems to stem from his overuse of Xanax. In the article it says that you are supposed to only take it for the worst of times, but he took it for 20 years. This led to him using morphine and Oxycontin. I am not professional but it seems ▼ SUBMISSIONS
The Kansan welcomes letters to the editors and guest columns submitted by students, faculty and alumni. The Kansan reserves the right to edit, cut to length, or reject all submissions. For any questions, call Austin Caster at 864-4810 or e-mail opinion@kansan. com. General questions should be directed to the editor at editor@kansan.com.

Free
for

that his gateway was Xanax and not marijuana. The point that pot is harmless like alcohol is also untrue. Alcohol is not harmless. It resulted in 85,000 deaths in the United States, in 2000. Contrast that with the zero deaths caused by marijuana. Alcohol also causes bar fights, spousal abuse and other social ills. It is a rarity that someone high is in the mood to do anything other than eat microwavable burritos at 4 a.m. There is no reason to be tough on marijuana. The only reason people crack down on marijuana is a social stigma and the fact that people keep saying “gateway drug” until people accept it as truth. But saying something is true does not make it true. ✦ Conor McCartney is a Madison , Wis., sophomore in Pre-medicine.

All
✦ ✦ ✦ ✦

Did you know you could order a pizza directly to Watson library and just take it and run?

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On the way to K-State, there is a KU sign with a big purple penis on it. That is kind of messed up. I think KU should look for English speaking professors instead of English speaking tutors. My roommate just took a pill- water first then the pill, how do you take your’s Free for All? Water first, or pill first?

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Free for All Revolutions: www.kansan.com. Be there.
I want to say thanks, Free for All, I’m driving home with my brand new bunny. My friend, he laughs at the guys that get arrested on COPS, don’t you think that’s wrong Free for All? I’m in love with my roommate. Hey, just because we had a pickle fight last night does not mean you have to tell the whole school, dammit!

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There is nothing that gets me going like a test of the emergency alert system. And the stats for the night are: Found one homeless man in the Alpha-Chi dumpster, lost the senses of 40 sorority girls that were running around the parking lot screaming.

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You know, I just don’t know what you guys are talking about, I love the Olive Garden commercials. Is it just me, or does every Gina Ford article sound the same? Do you think Paris Hilton has ever eaten Ramen noodles? My dog is hung like a light switch. I’m so high I cant even remember the last time I was not high. Free for All, if I got to choose between my exgirlfriend letting me sleep with her again, or my ex-girlfriend getting hit by a bus, I would flip a coin.

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When the Cardinals win the World Series, I’m going to have the best orgasm of my life. All I know is that I’m drunk, and it took me 20 minutes to find the newspaper, so I better get in the Free for All.

TO US

Austin Caster, editor 864-4854 or acaster@kansan.com Jonathan Kealing, managing editor 864-4854 or jkealing@kansan.com Joshua Bickel, managing editor 864-4854 or jbickel@kansan.com Matthew Sevcik, opinion editor 864-4924 or msevcik@kansan.com Sarah Connelly, business manager 864-4014 or addirector@kansan.com John Morgan, sales director 864-4462 or addirector@kansan.com Malcolm Gibson, general manager, news adviser 864-7667 or mgibson@kansan.com Jennifer Weaver, sales and marketing adviser 864-7666 or jweaver@kansan.com

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I just called and I’m naked, and I’m listening to Madonna, the “Immaculate Collection.” Free for All loves the Thundercats, snarff, snarff Hi Free for All, just calling to let you know that I’m pretty sure my roommate peed in his pants, yup, they’re wet.

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Editorial board
Elis Ford, Yanting Wang, Joel Simone, Dan Hoyt, Anne Weltmer, Julie Parisi, Nathan McGinnis, Josh Goetting, Sara Garlick, Travis Brown, Julian Portillo, David Archer

Forget kegs for Katrina, we’ve got Rupes for Rita, bitch. There are five steak knives lodged in our wall, goodbye deposit! Therefore: heads should be called bus, and tails should just be called tails.

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6a The UniversiTy Daily Kansan
people t Friend or Faux?

enTerTainmenT

monDay, ocTober 17, 2005

Music legend returns to New Orleans home
NEW ORLEANS — Visiting his home for the first time since he was rescued from rising floodwaters in a boat, Fats Domino found his piano overturned among mud and debris and his house in ruins. Despite the destruction, the 77-year-old legendary musician found a few bright spots during last week’s tour, arranged by WWL-TV: a favorite shirt that survived unblemished and a bust that made it through the storm unbroken. Domino’s fate was not publicly known for several days after the Hurricane Katrinaspawned floods hit the lowlying neighborhood. He was rescued in a boat along with other family members from an upper-floor balcony.

t Lizard boy

Seth Bundy/KANSAN

Sam Hemphill/KANSAN

t squirreL

For these two kids, momma does preach
NEW YORK — Madonna says she’s the disciplinarian with 9-year-old Lourdes and 5-year-old Rocco. The former material girl told Newsweek that she doesn’t let her children watch TV or look at magazines. She says milk and ice cream are also off-limits. She’s also strict about laundry duties: If Lourdes leaves dirty clothes on the floor, “we take all of her clothes and put them in a bag, and she has to earn all of her clothes back by being tidy, ” Madonna said. “She wears the same outfit every day to school until she learns her lesson. ”
— The Associated Press
Max Kreutzer/KANSAN

Wes Benson/KANSAN

tThe MasKed adVenGers

t horoscopes The Stars Show the Kind of Day You’ll Have: 5-Dynamic; 4-Positive; 3-Average; 2-So-so; 1-Difficult
HAPPY BIRTHDAY for Monday, Oct. 17, 2005:A Lunar Eclipse on your birthday could herald substantial changes the following year. Do not fight change. Do not look at any situation as bad, but rather transitory. How this stellar event impacts you will depend on your chart. If you are a woman, you might have a mini identity crisis and take another look at your emotional life. If you are a man, there could be a change in the emotional caliber of your life. Some will say hello to new homes. Timing and indications of where you are heading are 1 month, 6 months and 18 months from today. If you are single, your status will probably change as you learn to value closeness on a new level. If you are attached, work with each other, allowing transformation. ARIES can challenge you. ARIES (March 21-April 19) HHH With an Eclipse in your sign this morning, your levels of energy could fluctuate dramatically. Don’t push yourself, as you could be accidentprone. Go into slow mode; do more mental work involving finances and your bills. Tonight: Revise your fall budget. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) HHHH You certainly hop out of bed on the wrong side this morning. Have you thought about getting back in bed and calling in, or at least making this a half-day? You will be all the happier if you move like a tortoise. The good news is, you end the day as a hare. Tonight: Whatever makes you happy. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) HHHH A change involving a friendship, meeting or goal happens quickly. You might ponder what has happened for quite a while. Take your time today, taking no strong actions. Your imagination finds solutions. Tonight: Take it easy. CANCER (June 21-July 22) HHH Be ready to swing or adjust to a different professional or community stance. Be gracious, knowing that ultimately everything happens for the better. Meetings add to your resourcefulness. Tonight: Brainstorm away. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) HHHH Information and news could rapidly change. Confirm what you hear with care, because your decisions and pending actions will be determined as a result. Others admire your resourcefulness blended with your leadership. Tonight: In charge, whether you want to be or not. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) HHH Someone close or key to your life could change his or her tune soon. Once more, take the high road and walk in others’ shoes. Explore new ways of thinking and handling issues. Talk to someone more knowledgeable than you. Tonight: Read between the lines. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) HHHH Others can upset your apple cart if you allow them to. On the other hand, you can swing with change and upset. Depend on a very important friend or associate. Together you can handle nearly anything. Tonight: Be a duo. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) HHH If you are exhausted, honor the drain in your energy. Let others run with the ball. You always feel as if you have to do everything. You don’t. Your friendly ways move others to see events through your eyes. Tonight: Flip through your messages first. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) HHHH You might expect changes with a romantic relationship, child or creative product -- perhaps not immediately, but soon. Look at this phase as a transformation. Concentrate on each task you do right now, and tension will ease. Tonight: In your favorite chair. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) HHH Handle a personal or domestic matter first thing this morning. You will need to come to some kind of conclusion. Once you clear out this situation, your creativity will flourish, no matter what you focus on. Tonight: Bring others together. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) HHH Take your car in for a checkup in the near future. Also, become a more cautious driver. Are you considering a home office or remodeling a room or two? Aquarius adores the different. Tonight: Return a long-distance call. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) HHH Handle your finances with kid gloves today and for the next several weeks. You will find that others have many suggestions as to how to invest your funds, or what to do with them. Claim your power; make your own choices. Tonight: Chat with a friend.

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MONDAY, OCTOBER 17, 2005
SWIMMING ▼ MLB

SPORTS
BY MIKE FITZPATRICK
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN 7A

Kansas wins eight of 11 events at Truman meet
The Kansas swimming and diving team defeated Truman State in a dual meet this weekend. The Jayhawks defeated the Bulldogs 127-78. Kansas swam in the dual meet after placing fourth at the Big 12 Relays, where it won eight of the 11 events. Freshman Molly Brammer finished first in the 1,000yard freestyle with a time of 10:19.38. Brammer, along with senior Gina Gnatzig, sophomore Terri Schramka and freshman Ashley Leidigh, won the 400-yard freestyle relay with a time of 3:32.08. Gnatzig also had a firstplace finish in the 200-yard freestyle with a time of 1:52.94. Freshman Shanna Bradbury won the 200-yard individual medley with a time of 2:07.92. Senior Lindsey Urbatchka, junior Jenny Short, freshman Danielle Herrmann and Schramka won the 400yard medley with a time of 3:53.74. The 500-yard freestyle was Schramka’s third victory for the day. She finished in 5:01.54. In the 200-yard butterfly, junior Emily Knopp finished first with a time of 2:08.45. Herrmann finished the final individual race of the day by completing the 200-yard breaststroke in 2:21.23, taking the top spot. Kansas’ next meet is Oct. 28 at 6 p.m. against Missouri in the Robinson Natatorium.
— Kansan staff report

Astros push Cards to brink
cusp of a lifelong dream. Now it’s the steaming-mad Cardinals who are in a serious jam. “Guess what? If we’re going to be a champion, we’ve got to come back,” shortstop David Eckstein said. “We might not be able to sleep tonight, but that’s normal.” Lidge stranded the potential tying run at third base to earn his third save of the series, Jason Lane homered and Willy Taveras made a saving catch on the center-field hill. Houston took advantage of a critical error by pitcher Jason Marquis — plus the ejections of St. Louis manager Tony La Russa and star Jim Edmonds by plate umpire Phil Cuzzi — to build a commanding 3-1 lead in the bestof-seven series. “This game, there’s some real great things about it and there’s some things that absolutely stink,” La Russa said, declining to talk specifically about the umpires. Any postseason ejection is rare, and the last time a team lost two members came in 1998 when Cleveland pitcher Dwight Gooden and manager Mike Hargrove were tossed. “I’m not trying to get thrown out of a playoff game. I don’t think I was adamant,” Edmonds said. “I said, I’m just trying to ask you why that ball’s a strike, and asked him to do a better job and he threw me out.” A security guard in front of the umpires’ room at Minute Maid park said they would not be available for comment. The Astros can close it out at home Monday night, with Andy Pettitte on the mound against Cardinals ace Chris Carpenter. Houston has come this far before — the Astros were one victory from the Fall Classic in 1980 and 2004, but are 0-4 overall with a chance to win the NLCS. “For us, it’s the best one out of three right now. It doesn’t get any easier,” manager Phil Garner said. “We’re in good position in terms of our pitching, our players and everything. But the job’s still got to get done.” St. Louis has quite an uphill climb if it wants to win its second consecutive pennant. The Cardinals must face Pettitte, Roy Oswalt and Roger Clemens in the next three games — if they can push it that far.

HOUSTON — First baseman Lance Berkman stretched as far as he could, squeezed the throw tight and hopped high in the air with glee. One more win and the Astros will have the whole city of Houston jumping for joy. Poised closer Brad Lidge pitched his way out of a major mess in the ninth inning, defensive replacement Eric Bruntlett started a game-ending double play and Houston scratched out a 2-1 victory over St. Louis on Sunday in Game 4 of the NLCS to move within one win of its first World Series. “I’m starting to believe,” said 39-year-old Craig Biggio, on the

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8a The UniversiTy Daily Kansan
t big 12 football

sporTs
t football
5. Texas A&M 6. Missouri

monDay, ocTober 17, 2005

Nebraska claims No. 3 KU loses
2. Texas Tech 3. Nebraska 4. Colorado 8. Oklahoma 9. Kansas State 10. Iowa State 11. Oklahoma State 12.Kansas

1. Texas

7. Baylor

despite Gordon
By Daniel Berk

dberk@kansan.com
KANSAN SENIOR SPORTS WRITER

Editor’s Note: The Kansan Big 12 Power Rankings are voted on by Ryan Colaianni and Daniel Berk, Kansas football writers, as well as Kellis Robinett, sports editor, and Eric Sorrentino, associate sports editor. Never before has narrowly defeating Baylor meant so much. In the past, Nebraska would have lost ground after escaping Waco, Texas, with a 23-14 victory. But combined with a Colorado loss to Texas, Nebraska moved up from fourth to third in this week’s power rankings poll. Baylor fell one spot with the loss, while Missouri has climbed into the top half with two consecutive conference victories.

The top of the rankings stayed the same for the third straight week. Texas humiliated Colorado 42-17 in a game that wasn’t even as close as the score indicated. The Longhorns’ in-state rivals put on quite a show themselves. The Texas Tech Red Raiders set all kinds of records with their 59-20 pummeling of the Kansas State Wildcats. Texas Tech quarterback Cody Hodges set a school record for passing yards in a game after going 44-for-65 for 643 yards and five touchdowns. Wide receiver Joel Filani also set a conference record for receiving yards in the game with 255. Next week’s top spot will depend entirely on what happens

in Austin, Texas, when the undefeated Red Raiders and undefeated Longhorns meet in what will probably decide who represents the Big 12 South in the conference title game. The bottom of the poll was just a repositioning of teams without a conference victory. Iowa State moved to 10th but only because it owns a legitimate Division I nonconference victory against Iowa. Oklahoma State and Kansas were a toss up. Both teams started 3-0 but have looked miserable in Big 12 play. The Jayhawks took the last spot because any team that scores six points in eight quarters of football deserves to be last.

Disappointment abounds
Extra Points:
Pre-game festivities included fireworks during the National Anthem and a KC-135 fly over. Cornerback Charles Gordon limped off the field as the game nearing its conclusion, however, Gordon said that it was muscle cramps. Reid had three tackles-for-loss. Those tackles moved him into first on the all time list 42. He passed Willie Pless’ record of 41, set in 1985. Kansas’ 97-yards of total offense was the first time the Jayhawks were held under 100 yards since 2001 when they had 67-yards against Texas.

Quotes:

“It is probably the most disappointing offensive performance that I have been around in a long long time in many ways,” Mangino said. “I’m ready to get in a fist fight with them but that goes back to pointing fingers and we can’t do that,” Reid said about his frustrations with the offense. “I guess they need to play with a little more heart,” Reid said of the offense.

Key Stats:

99 — Total offensive yards Kansas accumulated in the first quarter. 97 — Total offensive yards Kansas accumulated in the game, -2 yards over the last three quarters. 7 — Number of turnovers accumulated by Kansas and Oklahoma. 1 — Number of third down conversions for Kansas in 12 attempts. 4 — Number of turnovers from Luke, three interceptions and one fumble. 0.5 — Average number of yards per carry on the ground for Kansas.

Charles Gordon did all he could to try to secure a Kansas victory Saturday night against Oklahoma. The junior started the game at wide receiver, returned punts and also played cornerback. Gordon registered a number of big plays for the Jayhawks, including two interceptions and a long punt return, but his effort fell short and the Jayhawks lost 19-3. Gordon entered the game without an interception on the season, after registering an NCAAleading seven last year. Gordon’s first interception came in the third quarter on Oklahoma’s third play of the half. The Sooners were on their own 13-yard line trying to convert on a 3rd down and Gordon stepped in front of Sooner receiver Jejuan Rankins at the Oklahoma 25-yard line to pick off quarterback Rhett Bomar’s throw. The cornerback/wide receiver struck again one series later, after Kansas turned the ball back over to Oklahoma. The Sooners began to drive down the field, but after gaining 62 yards, Gordon came up with another interception, this time on Kansas’ 36-yard line. “Basically, I was just trying to read the hips of the receivers and break on the ball,” Gordon said. “I felt them stopping and just located the ball.” Gordon also made his presence known on offense. He saw the most snaps he has seen all season, and ended the game leading the Jayhawks with four receptions for 18 yards. Gordon said he knew before the game he would see more snaps on offense because the unit had been struggling coming into the game. “We knew they were going to play a lot of man coverage and they wanted to use me in there to try to create a spark on offense and make some plays,” Gordon said. Gordon last played this much on offense during the 2003 season. Gordon caught 57 passes for 769 yards in his freshman campaign. Gordon said there were a lot of differences between that offense and the 2005 version of the Jayhawk offense. In 2003, the Kansas offense averaged more than 420 yards per game, the best output in more than 50 years. During the Oklahoma game, Kansas managed just 97 yards of total offense.

Justin O’Neal/KANSAN

Senior quarterback Brian Luke looks downfield to pass during Saturday’s game at Arrowhead Stadium. Luke went 11 completions for 33 attempts, threw three interceptions and was sacked three times. The Jayhawks lost to the Sooners 19-3. “We’re just not executing the way we did when I started at wide receiver,” Gordon said. “We’re not taking care of the ball the way we did, and that’s a big difference.” Besides his two interceptions on defense and four receptions on offense, Gordon also had two punt returns with his long coming for 34 yards that set the Kansas offense up at the Sooner 31-yard line. Kansas senior quarterback Brian Luke connected with Gordon a play later for nine yards, but Kansas would miss a field goal attempt and turn the ball back over to Oklahoma. Gordon left the game with just more than a minute remaining because of cramps in his right leg. He said he wasn’t too exhausted, but could have hydrated himself better before the game to avoid the cramps. Kansas football coach Mark Mangino was not too concerned with Gordon leaving the game early. “I think he was real tired,” Mangino said. “We were working him pretty hard. I think he just needed to catch his wind a little bit.” — Edited by Patrick Ross

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Monday, october 17, 2005

Chavez
continued from page

sports
t volleyball
By Matt Wilson

the University daily Kansan 9a

12a

And make no mistake, that had to be difficult considering the start that Luke gave him. Two possessions, two interceptions, Sooners 10, Jayhawks 0. It didn’t get any easier. Oklahoma’s defense teed off on Luke, handing him a beating that would have made injury-prone former Kansas quarterback Bill Whittemore blush. Nevertheless, the Jayhawks couldn’t run the ball, which made passing too obvious. Not only did that let Mangino down, but yet again it let down one of the best defenses in the country. The best moment Saturday night came late in the game, when many fans were streaming for the exits. Despite battling exhaustion, the blue collar unit of throwbacks, led by Nick Reid, Kevin Kane and Banks Floodman — just to name a few — stuffed an Oklahoma running back yet again. The stop gave the offense another opportunity with a little more than a minute to get something going. As the defense walked off the field, the remaining fans gave

them the standing ovation it deserved. Perhaps the only positive to come from the game was the defense getting some respect on national television. But other than that, fans have been quick to jump all over Mangino, blaming him for the team’s offensive troubles. Funny how things change. Remember two years ago? Back then, everybody praised Mangino for an offense that put up points at will. The only problem was that the defense was giving up points at the same rate. Mangino was criticized for not being able to get both sides on the same page. Now the roles have reversed, but at some point the players — not the coach — have to be accountable. This season, which had so much promise, is now at a crossroads and could go either way now, for better or worse. It’s time for the offense players to earn their keep. They owe it to the fans, to themselves, to the defense and to Mangino. F Jimmy Chavez is a San Antonio senior in journalism. Luke finished 11-for-30 for 86 yards, with three interceptions and a fumble. “I’m definitely my biggest critic,” Luke said. “I definitely want to take some responsibility in our offensive performance but it is a team game.” — Edited by Jonathan Kealing

Kansas loses after hard game
mwilson@kansan.com
KANSAN STAFF WRITER

Luke
continued from page

12a

pass. The pass was Luke’s third interception of the game. The two teams combined for seven turnovers, but the offenses, specifically Kansas,’ were not able to capitalize on the mistakes.

The Kansas volleyball team dropped a three-game match to No. 7 Missouri on Saturday night in Columbia, Mo., for its third consecutive loss. The Jayhawks were plagued by errors all night. They finished the match with a lowly .085 attack percentage. The Tigers, on the other hand, efficiently ended a two-match losing streak. They hit .351 in the three games. Kansas returns to action at 7 p.m. on Wednesday night when it takes on Iowa State at the Horejsi Family Athletics Center. Kansas volleyball coach Ray Bechard said he was impressed with Missouri but thought his team hurt itself more than anything. “We just couldn’t make the adjustments we needed to make,” he said. “We were inconsistent, and you can’t afford to make as many mistakes as we did in this league.” With the victory, Missouri improved to 13-2 overall and 7-2 in conference play. Kansas dropped to 12-6 overall and 45 in the Big 12 Conference. The Tigers lead the Border Showdown 1.5-0 as well. The Tigers have held the trophy since they won the competition between the two schools last year. The match started off poorly for the Jayhawks. They fell behind 4-1 but rallied to tie the game and keep it close until the

halfway mark. A key 6-0 run gave momentum back to the Tigers en route to a 30-23 victory. They were aided by nine Jayhawk errors. Game two saw improvement from the Jayhawks, but it was not enough. Kansas hit .257, but Missouri countered with 15 kills and only three errors. The Tigers scored eight of the last nine points to win the game 30-21. Trailing early in the final game, the Tigers charged back with six straight points to regain control of the match. A sevenpoint run later in the frame put

plenty of distance between the two teams, and Missouri easily won 30-11. Junior middle blocker Nicole Wilson paced Missouri with 13 kills. Defensively, the Tigers were led by sophomore libero Tatum Ailes. Her 16 digs led all players. Kansas senior outside hitter Paula Caten finished the match with 14 kills and nine digs. Junior libero Jamie Mathewson added 12 digs for the Jayhawks. Nearly at the halfway point in the conference schedule, the Jayhawks are struggling to find a

solution to their recent woes. They have not won since junior outside hitter Jana Correa went down with a knee injury at the Kansas State game, but the three losses have all been against top 25 opponents. Bechard said fixing their problems was a matter of time. “We just need to find a good balance on offense and defense,” he said. “It’s a challenge with every team to find a good, consistent level of play throughout matches.” — Edited by Katie Lohrenz

Kansan file photo

Senior middle blocker Josi Lima goes up for a spike during a game against Nebraska Oct. 8 at the Horejsi Family Athletics Center. The Jayhawks traveled to Missouri on Saturday and lost against the seventh-ranked Tigers, dropping their record to 4-5 in the Big 12 Conference.

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Now.
kansan.com

10a the University Daily Kansan
t Cross Country

sports
t nFL

monDay, october 17, 2005

Jayhawks fly past competition at meet
By Antonio MendozA

Holmes plays ‘keep away’ with visiting Redskins
By doug tucker
the associated press

Kealing
continued from page

amendoza@kansan.com
Kansan sportswriter

A trip to Terre Haute, Ind., proved to be worth the time for the Kansas cross country teams. The Jayhawks took part in the NCAA Pre-Nationals hosted by Indiana State University. The men finished before six other top 25 ranked schools. They were ranked 28th going into the meet and defeated No. 11 Cal Poly, No. 17 Florida State, No. 18 Ohio State, No. 21 Indiana, No. 22 Dartmouth and No. 23 North Carolina State. “I thought it was a good performance,” coach Stanley Redwine said. “It was definitely a total team effort, and we’re pretty excited. Even though the race was deeper this year, we still fin-

ished fourth which was an improvement on our 22nd-place finish last year.” The Jayhawks were led by junior Benson Chesang. He finished the race fourth overall with a time of 24:05 in the 8K race. Sophomore Paul Hefferon was second for the Jayhawks, followed by sophomore Colby Wissel. There were a total of 33 teams in the men’s race. The only three teams to finish ahead of Kansas were Stanford, Brigham Young and Georgetown. The women’s team also finished fourth in its 6K race. Its field consisted of 13 teams. Michigan, Southern Illinois, and Minnesota were the three teams to finish ahead of Kansas. “I thought the women’s team

had a great showing today as well,” Redwine said. “It’s hard to compare times to courses, but in this case I think it’s applicable because we ran much better here today than we did last year. I thought it was a really good effort.” Sophomore Lisa Morrisey, finishing 11th overall, led the Jayhawks to a fourth place finish with a time of 22:26. “I think that we definitely had a better day this year than we did last year,” Morrisey said. “We worked so hard and it just kind of showed that we are at the level we are working at, now we just need to get it together for conference.” This was the last race before the Big 12 Championship in Waco, Texas, on Oct. 28. — Edited by Ty Beaver

KANSAS CITY, Mo. — Maybe age isn’t catching up with Priest Holmes as quickly as everyone thought. When it mattered most, the Washington Redskins couldn’t catch him at all. Nine days after his 32nd birthday, Holmes ran for a touchdown and caught five passes for 100 yards, including a winding, weaving 60-yard catch-and-run as Kansas City beat the Redskins 28-21 Sunday. Santana Moss caught 10 passes for 173 yards and two touchdowns for the Redskins (3-2), who lost their second in a row after a 3-0 start. The Chiefs (3-2) had a careergame from defensive end Jared Allen, who sacked Redskins quarterback Mark Brunell three times and recovered both fumbles he forced. After a dull first half ended

with the Redskins holding a 7-6 lead, the game exploded into a parade of long scoring plays. Moss had a 78-yard catch-andrun for Washington, Knight responded with an 80-yard fumble return and Holmes turned a short pass into a touchdown play for a 28-21 Chiefs lead early in the fourth quarter. The Chiefs took a 14-7 lead on their first possession of the second half on Holmes’ 6-yard touchdown run after he’d gone 21 yards on a short pass and officials tacked on another 14 yards for roughing the passer. The score tied at 21-21, the Chiefs had a first down on their own 40 when Green tossed the ball back to Holmes in the flat. He started left and then cut back against the grain. Tony Gonzalez threw the last block to spring him and he tiptoed into the corner of the end zone.

12a “I wanted to see what Stephen Vinson and Christian Moody were going to do because they’re goofy guys,” Mathews said. Vinson, in his fourth Late Night, said he thought the changes came because “there were some disappointing performances in the past, and we wanted to weed out the bad.” Though even he admitted the new format was left a different feel. And it wasn’t just strange for the players. It was strange for the fans as well. No longer can fans sit in expectation of the digital clock on the north wall of the fieldhouse rolling to “12:00”. Instead, fans wait for television to cut out. Or for the Marching Cobras to finish. Late Night started 21 years ago as a way for fans to build excitement for the season. While the practice continues and the players are showcased, some of the build up and history associated with the night has been lost. F Kealing is a Chesterfield, Mo., junior in journalism and political science. He is Kansan managing editor.

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MONDAY, OCTOBER 17, 2005
ATHLETICS CALENDAR
Today ✦ Women’s Golf at Arkansas, all day ✦ Men’s Golf at Stanford, all day, La Quinta, Calif. Tuesday ✦ Men’s Golf at Stanford, all day, La Quinta, Calif. ✦ Women’s Golf at Arkansas, all day, Fayetteville, Ark. Wednesday ✦ Volleyball vs. Iowa State, 7 p.m., Horejsi Family Athletics Center ✦ Tennis at ITA Central Regionals, all day, Salt Lake City, Utah Thursday ✦ Women’s Tennis at ITA Central Regionals, all day, Salt Lake City Friday ✦ Women’s Soccer vs. Colorado College, 3 p.m., Jayhawk Soccer Complex ✦ Women’s Tennis at ITA Central Regionals, all day, Salt Lake City

SPORTS
ap top 25
▼ SOCCER

THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN 11A

The Top 25 teams in The Associated Press college football poll, with first-place votes in parentheses, records through Oct. 15, total points based on 25 points for a first-place vote through one point for a 25th-place vote, and previous ranking: Record Pt Pvs 1. Southern Cal(57) 6-0 1,617 1 2. Texas (8) 6-0 1,566 2 3. Virginia Tech 6-0 1,495 3 4. Georgia 6-0 1,426 5 5. Alabama 6-0 1,306 6 6. Miami 5-1 1,279 7 7. LSU 4-1 1,201 10 8. UCLA 6-0 1,085 12 9. Notre Dame 4-2 1,020 9 10. Texas Tech 6-0 1,007 13 11. Florida St. 5-1 1,003 4 12. Penn St. 6-1 854 8 13. Boston College 6-1 809 14 14. Ohio St. 4-2 798 15 15. Oregon 6-1 665 20 16. Auburn 5-1 644 21 17. Tennessee 3-2 581 17 18. Florida 5-2 575 11 19. Wisconsin 6-1 549 23 20. West Virginia 6-1 379 _ 21. TCU 6-1 249 25 22. Michigan St. 4-2 223 16 23. Virginia 4-2 161 _ 24. Fresno St. 4-1 100 _ 25. California 5-2 89 18 Others receiving votes: Nebraska 107, Minnesota 49, Texas A&M 47, Virginia 44, Colorado 32, TCU 25, Fresno St. 14, Iowa St. 14, West Virginia 13, Iowa 11, Wyoming 11, Purdue 9, North Carolina 3, Southern Miss 2.

Kansas loses momentum
BY DREW DAVISON AND ALISSA BAUER

sports@kansan.com
KANSAN SPORTSWRITERS

LPGA

Wie disqualified after rules dispute
PALM DESERT, Calif. — Michelle Wie was expecting her first paycheck. She wound up in a rules dispute that got her disqualified Sunday from the Samsung World Championship for taking a bad drop.

It was a rude welcome less than two weeks after the 16-year-old phenom from Hawaii turned pro. Wie finished her round at 74 — she would have earned $53,126 — she was escorted by two rules officials to the par-5 seventh hole at Bighorn Golf Club to show them her drop from a desert bush the day before.

Nearly two hours later, she was disqualified for signing an incorrect scorecard. Because she dropped the ball closer to the hole — by 3 inches according to her, by about a foot according to the rules officials — she should have added two strokes to her third-round 71.
— The Associated Press

The Kansas soccer team ran out of steam after its first game this weekend. After shutting out Texas Tech 4-0 on Friday in Lubbock, Kansas lost to Colorado on Sunday in Boulder. Kansas lost the game 1-0 and moved to 8-6-2 on the season and 4-3-1 in play. “The latter part of the second half we ran out of gas a little bit in the altitude,” Kansas soccer coach Mark Francis said. Francis said the team had some good opportunities early in the game but was unable to finish off. Caroline Smith, senior forward, led the team with five shots on goal. Julie Hanley, freshman goalkeeper, made a career-high eight saves during the contest but lost her first game of the season as the starting goalkeeper. Colorado’s Lindsey Ralph scored the lone goal of the match off a rebound with 39 minutes remaining. Hanley made the initial save on Fran Munnelly’s shot but Ralph was able to punch it back in. Kansas had no trouble scoring against Texas Tech, though. The final 4-0 tally involved four different Jayhawk goal scorers and five assisters. Kansas was up 3-0 by the end of the first half before adding the fourth and final score in the 85th minute. “We scored four very good goals,” Francis said. “And we finished our chances extremely well.” Senior forward Caroline Smith tagged her seventh goal of the season to be the first to put Kansas on the board. Senior forward Nicole Braman touched it to Smith after a long pass from sophomore defender Afton Sauer. Both were awarded assists, the first of Sauer’s career. The Jayhawks continuously opened fire on Red Raider senior goalkeeper Megan Knauss, who, despite allowing

Senior forward Caroline Smith goes for a loose ball against Oklahoma State junior goalkeeper Jeanne Rankin at the Jayhawk Soccer Complex on Oct. 7. The Kansas soccer team lost 1-0 against Colorado on Sunday in Boulder, Colo. The loss drops the Jayhawks to 8-6-2 overall and 4-3-1 in the Big 12.
Kansan file photo

four goals, had a career-best 12 saves. Junior defender Holly Gault took her turn in the 34th minute. Gault put the evening’s second goal in from 20 yards out for her third of the season. Junior Lacey Novak and sophomore Emily Strinden, a pair of midfielders/forwards, each took an assist. With just over five minutes left in the first half, senior forward Kimberly Karfonta chipped in her first of the season, complete with a celebratory back-flip. Sauer was handed her second career assist not much more than 20 minutes after her first. Rounding out the scoring onslaught was midfielder Missy Geha. Goal num-

ber four on the evening was goal number three in the freshman’s career. Fellow freshman midfielder/forward Sara Rogers brought in her first career point with the assist. “The team played well,” Francis said. “A lot of people got into the game and contributed, which was good.” Kansas returns home for its next non-conference game against Colorado College on Friday at 3 p.m. “We’ve got to regroup and the last three games are at home,” Francis said. “The way the conference is looking we’ve still got a shot to finish very strong.” — Edited by Patrick Ross

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sports
monday, october 17, 2005
the third play of the game, KU senior quarterback Brian Luke was grabbed by the ankles and nearly sacked, but managed to get a pass off. D.J. Wolfe intercepted the pass and returned the interception 65 yards for a touchdown and a 7-0 Oklahoma lead. Luke threw another interception on Kansas’ next offensive play. That pick led to a 40-yard field goal and a 10-0 Oklahoma advantage. After playing three quarterbacks in the previous three games, Mangino stuck with Luke for the entire game. The new approach to quarterbacks did not improve the offense’s performance. The offense looked worse than it did during its performance a week ago against Kansas State. The offense gained 99 yards of total offense in the first quarter and lost two yards the remainder of the game and finished with 97 total yards. For the game the Jayhawks were 1-for-12 on third downs and accumulated six first downs, total. That kept the Kansas defense on the field for nearly 38 minutes. “To play a game that you think you should have won, it is just ripped out of you. There is definitely frustration there,” senior linebacker Kevin Kane said. Kane had 13 tackles including a sack. The fumble, as well as junior cornerback Charles Gordon’s two interceptions, did nothing to help the Jayhawk offense get moving. Despite the offense’s struggles, one play almost changed the course of the game. Sophomore tight end Derek Fine appeared to catch the ball at the Oklahoma two-yard line and put Kansas in a position to tie the score. The play, however, was reviewed and the initial call was overturned. The referees ruled that OU junior linebacker Rufus Alexander intercepted the
see

page 12a
t the column

Down on its Luke

Jimmy Chavez

By Ryan colaianni

rcolaianni@kansan.com
Kansan staff writer

KANSAS CITY, Mo. — Another week, another field goal. Kansas’ offense again negated a strong defensive performance, in a 19-3 loss to Oklahoma Saturday night at Arrowhead Stadium. The Kansas offense managed just 97 yards of total offense and made costly turnovers leading to Oklahoma points. “We didn’t do anything on offense,” Kansas coach Mark Mangino said. “It is probably the most disappointing offensive performance that I have been around in a long, long time.” Mangino said that blame for the offense’s struggles rested on his shoulders. “I have to get this offense going and I will find a way to do it,” Mangino said. “Call me an optimist or call me a fool, I still think we have capable kids on offense and we can get this together.” Members of the Kansas defense, who once again played well, appear to be growing frustrated with the lack of offensive production. Senior linebacker Nick Reid, who led the team with 15 tackles, was particularly upset after the game. “I’m ready to get in a fist fight with them, but that goes back to pointing fingers and we can’t do that,” Reid said of the offense. “I have nothing to say to them, they have got to figure it out for themselves, we are out there busting our butts, I guess they need to play with a little more heart.” The Kansas defense was outstanding against the run, holding Oklahoma to 96 yards on 49 carries and recovering an Adrian Peterson fumble. Oklahoma accumulated all the points it needed before its offense even snapped the football. On

Mangino should not be blamed
KANSAS CITY, Mo. — “Call me an optimist or call me a fool. But I still think we have capable players on offense,” — Mark Mangino It would be easy to blame Kansas football coach Mark Mangino for his offense’s ineptitude this season, which has now reached its crossroads. But it wouldn’t be fair. Too often we want to blame the head coach, but it’s time that the blame be taken off Mangino’s back. Instead, maybe fans should place the blame for Kansas’ offensive woes on the players — a novel concept when you think about it. The numbers speak louder than any words that could be said or written. 97 yards of total offense. 11 yards in the second half. Six points in eight quarters. Those kinds of numbers blare louder and more alarming than the Oklahoma band’s 128 renditions of “Boomer Sooner.” Funny how Mangino can’t seem to win. Granted, going through quarterbacks like a pitching rotation in baseball’s postseason doesn’t work — ever. That’s on him. Fans have clamored for him to settle on one quarterback, and this weekend he did. He finally chose senior Brian Luke and stuck with him throughout Saturday‘s 19-3 disheartening loss to Oklahoma at Arrowhead Stadium. Mangino said Luke was the horse he was going to ride and he held true to his words.
see

jchavez@kansan.com

Justin O’Neal/KANSAN

LUKe on pAge 9A

Kansas seniors Ronnie Amadi, cornerback, and Charlton Keith, defensive end, combine to break up a Rhett Bomar pass Saturday at Arrowhead Stadium. Amadi recovered one fumble and made two tackles in the 19-3 KU loss.

CHAVeZ on pAge 9A

t Words on paper

Late Night new but not exactly improved
Jonathan Kealing
jkealing@kansan.com

t Women’s basketball

Scrimmage reveals leaders
Michael PhilliPs

Along with the new scoreboard, new floor, repainted seats and repaired windows, the Kansas Athletics Department unveiled an entirely new format for Late Night in the Phog. And though it’s hard to deny the structural improvements to Allen Fieldhouse are great, the changes in Late Night format are anything but great. The thrill of Late Night has always been the expectation of the midnight scrimmage. Larry Brown created Late Night to provide fans and players an opportunity to start the season with excitement. In that first season, the fieldhouse was less than half full. Now, 21 years later, Late Night has become one of the highly anticipated events of the basketball season. Not only is it the first opportunity for many fans to see new recruits and new starters, it’s also a respite from what is often a grueling football season. And it’s free. This year, the NCAA changed its rules to allow practices to take place at any point during the day and the University adjusted its format accordingly. In addition to starting at 6:30 in the evening, the University took an opportunity to change the format it follows.

When Athletics Department officials announced the earlier time, they said they wanted more fans to have an opportunity to attend. It doesn’t seem like they were successful. Wednesday’s crowd of about 15,500 was the same as the year before. Sure, it seemed like there were more children and youngsters, but the place still didn’t fill up. Karen Carpenter, of Norton, made the five-hour trip to Late Night this year; however, she’s been doing it for years. She did bring her 86-year-old mother this year, but she wasn’t completely sold on the new time. “It was fun being here late at night, last year,” Carpenter said. Also changed this year were the skits. Instead of having skits from each class of players, the basketball teams performed skits as teams. The women’s team had a series of dances and the men’s team had two group skits, one of which featured the team “jumping in” with the freshmen, using a jump rope. It just wasn’t the same as skits have been in the past. Last year’s Late Night wouldn’t have been the same without the four seniors taking metaphorical control of the 1988 championship trophy. Sure, last season ended on a sour note, but Late Night certainly started it with a positive vibe. Brett Mathews, Olathe junior, was disappointed the individual class skits were cut.
see

mphillips@kansan.com
Kansan sportswriter

Rylan Howe/KANSAN

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Women’s basketball coach Bonnie Henrickson speaks to the crowd during Late Night in the Phog Friday night at Allen Fieldhouse. The women’s team scrimmaged for 10 minutes, with the Crimson team defeating the Blue team 17-8.

There were no jaw-dropping dunks from the Kansas women’s basketball team Friday night. Instead it showed off the high-intensity play that coach Bonnie Henrickson hopes will characterize this year’s squad. The team will be relying on two newcomers at the point guard position. Junior Shaquina Mosley was on the Blue team, while freshman Ivana Catic led the Red team to a 178 victory. Catic found a hot hand early in senior guard Kaylee Brown, who scored seven points in the 10-minute scrimmage. “She played really well the first half of last year and hit some big shots,” Henrickson said of Brown. “We’ll need that from her in her senior year.” Catic has already assumed the leadership duties that come with being point guard, barking out plays and directing traffic from the top of the arc. Henrickson said her leadership style was vocal but also respectful, a quality that is important for somebody playing the position. On the other side of the ball, Mosley showed the versatility that made her the national junior college player of the year last year. “Shaq doesn’t have to be at the point,” Henrickson said. “You can put her on the wing because she can penetrate and

make a play.” Noticeable on both ends of the court was the tight defense and hustle that characterized the team at the end of last year. The addition of six new players will give the Jayhawks more depth and allow them to play faster-paced games. Potential Recruits Five potential players attended Late Night on official recruiting visits. Henrickson has seven scholarships available next year, and has received three commitments thus far. This year’s team had six newcomers who participated in Late Night for the first time. “A lot of them made their official visit or came unofficially last year to Late Night,” Henrickson said. “Ivana Catic was so excited she could hardly breathe by the time the whole thing was done.” Song and Dance Half an hour before the scrimmage, the team made its entrance with a choir in the background singing “Ain’t no mountain high enough.” The team then performed a dance number to Earth, Wind and Fire’s “Let’s groove tonight.” Henrickson was introduced shortly afterward, and told the crowd her goal for the program. “We want a men’s and women’s basketball championship in the same year,” she said. — Edited by Patrick Ross