You are on page 1of 14

VOL. 115 ISSUE 144 WWW.KANSAN.

COM
MONDAY, MAY 2, 2005
THE STUDENT VOICE SINCE 1904.
Down on the farm
Check out kansan.com
to see a photo gallery
from
Friday
night’s
Annual
Farmer’s
Ball. The two winning
bands won studio time.
Sk8 or die
Lawrence skateboarders
can now buy their equip-
ment in town. Midwest
Skateboarding, 836 Iowa
St., is the only skate shop
in Lawrence. The shop
fills the void left when Let
It Ride closed less than a
year ago. PAGE 2A
Today’s weather
All contents, unless stated otherwise,
© 2005 The University Daily Kansan
Baseball team defeats Kansas State Wildcats
The Jayhawks bounced back from a 0-7 defeat in
Manhattan Friday night to win the series 2-1. A
Wildcat error gave Van Slyke a homerun. PAGE 1B
kansan
.com
exclusive
Classroom time cut for added game
Columnist Ryan Colaianni says the NCAA and uni-
versity presidents say one thing and do another. If
the groups want to add a 12th football game they
should revise the playoff system, he said. PAGE 1B
66 36
Tomorrow
Mostly sunny
Wednesday
Partly cloudy
59 31
Mostly sunny
—weather.com
74 45
▼ PROFILE
J.R. Giddens is ready for redemption
I yell and do all of that stuff and people are like ‘Oh he is
selfish’ But they weren’t saying that when I was making shots.
▼ CRIME
Mizzou
looks
into
scuffle
Officials from the University
of Missouri are investigating a
KU student’s complaint against
MU police chief Jack Watring.
The report claims that
Watring assaulted Chris
Kaufman, Denver senior, during
the March 9 men’s basketball
game at Missouri.
Rich Littrell, a witness in the
investigation, said Lisa
Wimmenauer, assistant director
of business services at MU,
interviewed him Thursday at the
University of Kansas.
Wimmenauer is the Missouri
official heading the investigation.
“They wanted to get our per-
spective on the things that hap-
pened,” said Littrell, Lee’s
Summit, Mo., junior.
During the interview,
Wimmenauer asked for the stu-
dents’ sides of the story and had
them demonstrate physically what
happened by acting it out, said
Chris Green, another witness.
“We drew diagrams so that
she could get an idea of the set-
ting and layout,” said Green, a
KU alumnus.
Green also brought the sign
that sparked the incident so that
Wimmenauer could physically
see it, he said.
In the complaint, Kaufman
accused Watring of assaulting
him after he refused to take
down the sign.
Written on the sign was a state-
ment that said Mizzou Arena was
“Allen Fieldhouse East.”
Kaufman said in a written
statement that Watring grabbed
him by the collar after Kaufman
tried to take the sign back.
Andrew Wymore, a KU alum-
nus, was ejected from the game
during the incident and then
arrested for trespassing after he
bought another ticket into the
game.
Mary Jo Banken, director of
the MU News Bureau, declined
comment about the situation
and said a statement would not
be released until the investiga-
tion is complete.
Wimmenauer could not be
reached for comment.
Wimmenauer had told Green
during the interview that she
had spoken with other witness-
es who gave the same version of
the story as he and his friends
had, Green said.
Wimmenauer told him that
more people had come forward
as witnesses after news spread
throughout Columbia, Mo.
“It’s 100 percent true,” Green
said. He said that Wimmenauer
told Green and his friends that
that there was no variation in
other witnesses’ accounts of the
incident.
Aside from punishment,
Watring should give us a public
apology, Green said.
“Not only to us,” he added.
“But to anyone wearing blue
that day.”
The University of Missouri
Police Department could not be
reached for comment yesterday.
— Edited by Jesse Truesdale
BY JOSHUA BICKEL
jbickel@kansan.com
KANSAN STAFF WRITER
Market supplies rarities
Saturday was the opening day
of the Lawrence Farmers’
Market. About 6 a.m. more than
30 local Kansas vendors lined
their pickup trucks and mini-
vans along half of the 1000
block of Vermont Street.
Mayor Boog Highberger rang
the opening bell at 6:30 a.m.
From flowers to meats to
cookies, the market attracted a
variety of customers that day.
The market was also turned
into a family event. Fathers
pushed and pulled their chil-
dren in strollers and little red
wagons. The majority of the of
customers have attended the
Farmers’ Market for years.
Matt Richard, 1999 School of
Law graduate, and his wife,
Jennifer, went to the market to
buy bison meat, which they
both tried for the first time at
last year’s market. Richard said
he couldn’t find the meat any-
where else in Lawrence.
Not only does he find bison
meat at the market, but he gets
to support the community and
the Kansas economy, he said.
Don Gibbs supplied the
Richards with the hard-to-find
meat. For the fifth straight year,
Gibbs has come from
Overbrook to sell bison meat
from the Lone Star Lake Bison
Ranch & Meat Sales.
He said the market offered
fresher products than supermar-
ket chains.
“You know where its coming
from,” he said. “It’s the stuff that
hasn’t been thawed out and
frozen and thawed out and
BY NATE KARLIN
nkarlin@kansan.com
KANSAN STAFF WRITER
Kansas Taylor,
Johnson County
Community
College sopho-
more, relaxes in
between cus-
tomers for his
Kansas’ Barbecue
Sauce stand and
his mother’s soap
stand at the
Farmers’ Market,
1000 block of
Vermont Street,
early Saturday
morning. He has
sold his sauce
there for three
years.
Rachel Seymour/KANSAN SEE MARKET ON PAGE 2A
▼ LAWRENCE
From freshman fame to sophomore slump,
Miranda Lenning ✦ Kansan senior sportswriter
resh off an offseason weight-lifting ses-
sion, J.R. Giddens has one thing on his
mind.
“Man, I am starving,” Giddens says.
The 6-foot-five 200-pound sophomore guard is
healthy for the first offseason of his college career,
and he intends to use every second of it to improve
his game. One of his summer goals: get stronger.
“Where do you all want to eat,” Giddens
demands impatiently. “I could eat anywhere, I’m
so hungry.”
As he always does, Giddens suggests McDonald’s.
He will not often turn down a double cheeseburger
and a milkshake. But on this Wednesday afternoon,
his dinner companions choose Subway.
On the way there, Giddens can’t stop talking
about the afternoon’s workout. Like they’ve done
almost every day since the conclusion of the sea-
son, Giddens and some of his teammates played
three-on-three after lifting weights.
He loves three-on-three. He likes the emptiness of
Allen Fieldhouse when it is just him and his team-
mates showcasing their athleticism and raw talent.
Giddens describes one play where he and
freshman guard Russell Robinson executed a per-
fect two-on-one play. Robinson beat a defender in
transition and threw an ally-oop pass to Giddens
on the opposite end.
Slam!
“We were out there running and playing fast,”
Giddens said. “We are going to be so fast next year.”
Although next year’s Jayhawks will look entirely
different than this year’s senior-led squad, Giddens
talks about the 2005-06 Jayhawks with excitement.
He could easily be the leader of that team. As a
junior on a team with 11 freshmen and sopho-
mores, Giddens knows there will be room for lead-
ership. He also knows he has to prove to his team-
mates that he is capable of that role. Leadership
has to be earned. This year’s group of seniors, for
example, spent three seasons training to be leaders.
But next year, there is not an inherent leader or
group of leaders. So Giddens wants to lead by
example.
Albert Johnson, athletics assistant at Texas
A&M, coached Giddens his sophomore and jun-
ior years in high school. Johnson was his coach at
John Marshall High School and coach of his AAU
team, Athletes First.
SEE GIDDENS ON PAGE 4A
Kit Leffler/KANSAN
Following a disappointing sophomore year, J.R. Giddens is taking a more serious approach to next season. This offseason is the first he has been healthy and able to work out, and
he plans on making the most of it by working out and concentrating on his outside shot.
news 2a the university daily kansan monday, may 2, 2005
MU officials are looking into an altercation between KU students and the MU police chief
at a March 9 basketball game. KU alumnus Chris Green said the chief owed him and his
friends a public apology. PAGE 1A
▼ insidenews
University of Missouri investigates banner tussle at game
Offseason gives Giddens opportunity to rebound
▼ insideOpinion
▼ insidesports
After a sophomore season filled with disap-
pointment and fan alienation, J.R. Giddens is
looking ahead to next year. In the offseason
he has plans to bulk up and work on his out-
side shot, hoping to take over a leadership
position for next year’s young team. PAGE 1A
Market opens to Lawrence early-risers
Families made an event of Lawrence’s Farmers’ Market opening day Saturday.
Customers came to buy products from flowers and produce to hard-to-find meat such
as bison meat. PAGE 1A
Skateboarding shop rides into Lawrence
When Let It Ride, Lawrence’s only skateboarding shop, closed last November, it left a
void for area skateboarders. Now that Dan Salazar has opened Midwest Skateboarding,
836 Iowa St., skateboarders don’t have to travel outside of Lawrence to buy their equip-
ment. PAGE 2A
Students use uppers to stay awake for finals
Caffeine, Red Bull and Adderall use become more common as finals approach. Some stu-
dents use these methods to stay awake longer hours to keep studying all through the
night. To help these late-night studiers, Watson and Anschutz libraries will have extend-
ed hours. PAGE 3A
KJHK’s battle royal
Lawrence bands got together for KJHK’s
Annual Farmer’s Ball at the Granada. Eight
bands competed in an elimination tourna-
ment for the first place prize of two days in a
recording studio. PAGE 8A
Column: Ward Churchill still not winning friends, but making enemies
The controversy around Ward Churchill hasn't died down in the pages of the Kansan.
Vince Myers says that Churchill used the cover of academic integrity and free speech
to pass off comments that are hallmarks of miseducation and incompetence. PAGE 7A
Column: Autonomy does not breed self-enlightenment
Through the sad story of a young David Bowie fan turned drug addict, Devin Sikes seeks to
explore the true nature of our destiny. The implication is that destiny is in our own hands and
that each individual is responsible for the choices and consequences that lie ahead. PAGE 7A
After a demoralizing 0-7 defeat against the Kansas State Wildcats in Manhattan on
Friday, the Jayhawks came back to win games Saturday and yesterday. PAGE 1B
Jayhawks clinch Big 12 series victory
ET CETERA The University Daily Kansan is the student newspaper of the University of Kansas. The first copy is paid through the stu-
dent activity fee. Additional copies of the Kansan are 25 cents. Subscriptions can be purchased at the Kansan business office, 119
Stauffer-Flint Hall, 1435 Jayhawk Blvd., Lawrence, KS 66045. The University Daily Kansan (ISSN 0746-4962) is published daily during the
school year except Saturday, Sunday, fall break, spring break and exams. Weekly during the summer session excluding holidays.
Periodical postage is paid in Lawrence, KS 66044. Annual subscriptions by mail are $120. Student subscriptions of $2.11 are paid through
the student activity fee. Postmaster: Send address changes to The University Daily Kansan, 119 Stauffer-Flint Hall, 1435 Jayhawk Blvd., Lawrence, KS 66045
TODAY
Pipe Dreams — mid-
night to 2 a.m.; Jazz
in the Morning — 6
a.m. to 9 a.m.;
Breakfast for
Beatlovers — 9 a.m.
to noon; News — 7
a.m., 8 a.m., 9 a.m., 6 p.m.; Sports
Talk — 6:15 p.m. to 7 p.m.;
Punditocracy — 9 p.m. to 10 p.m.
For more
news, turn
to KUJH-TV
on
Sunflower
Cablevision
Channel 31
in Lawrence. The student-produced
news airs at 5:30 p.m., 7:30 p.m.,
9:30 p.m. and 11:30 p.m. every
Monday through Friday.
Tell us your news
Contact Andrew Vaupel,
Donovan Atkinson, Misty
Huber, Amanda Kim Stairrett
or Marissa Stephenson at
864-4810 or
editor@kansan.com.
Kansan newsroom
111 Stauffer-Flint Hall
1435 Jayhawk Blvd.
Lawrence, KS 66045
(785) 864-4810
▼ MEDIA PARTNERS
Skateboard shop opening
‘a relief’ for local skaters
Zack Gould and other Lawrence
skateboarders don’t have to leave
town to buy skateboarding equipment
anymore.
Less than a year after Let It Ride,
Lawrence’s only skateboard shop,
closed, Dan Salazar rolled in with his
own, Midwest Skateboarding, at 836
Iowa St. For Gould, a skater for four
years, it’s a relief.
“It’s good to have someplace,” he
said as he applied grip to the top of a
sun-yellow colored board he recently
bought from Midwest Skateboarding.
“Not having a shop during the winter
brought our morale down.”
This is the second Midwest
Skateboarding location that Salazar
has opened. Two years ago he opened
one in Topeka. Although Salazar
wanted to open a shop in Lawrence,
he didn’t want to move in on what he
saw as Let It Ride’s turf.
“It was one of my favorite shops to
go to,” Salazar said. “You just don’t
move in. I know a lot of different peo-
ple wouldn’t care, but to me, you
respect them because they’ve been
here forever.”
For J.P. Redmon, Manhattan junior,
the move in was right on time.
“It was rough for a while,”
Redmon, a skater of 15 years, said.
“It’s always crappy when kids had to
order through mail order. We really
needed a shop, and he stepped in at
the right time.”
Salazar, 22, opened his first skate
shop in Garden City when he was 20
from money he saved from in what he
described as the “worst” job.
“I was in the shipping department
of a slaughterhouse, and I’m a vege-
tarian,” he said.
Salazar said he wouldn’t do as well
with a different kind of store.
“I like this because it’s kind of like
the people I roll with,” Salazar said.
“If I wasn’t doing this, I would be at
the skate park with the same people.”
He moved his original operation to
Topeka because he wanted to be clos-
er to Lawrence and because Topeka
has two skateboarding parks. Salazar
chose the Iowa street location
because rent is there is cheaper than
downtown and it’s proximity to the
Lawrence skate park at Centennial
Park, 600 Rockledge.
“I couldn’t even find a place that
was twice the amount here,” Salazar
said. “Plus we’re a pretty ‘core’ shop.”
Core shop meaning that Midwest
Skateboarding is more of a hardware
store for skateboarding, selling
wheels, boards and grips.
It’s a good location for younger
skaters who don’t have cars to have a
nearby skate shop to buy equipment
when their stuff breaks, Redmon said.
Another benefit of the location,
Salazar said he realized, was his next
door neighbor: Domino’s Pizza.
“I do find myself spending more
money on a pizza joint than I ever had
before,” he said.
— Edited by Azita Tafreshi
BY NEIL MULKA
nmulka@kansan.com
KANSAN STAFF WRITER
▼ BUSINESS
Rachel Seymour/KANSAN
Nick Haehl, Free State High School sophomore, helps his friend, Matt Callan,
Free State High School sophomore, pick out a board for his skateboard Thursday
afternoon at Midwest Skateboarding, 836 Iowa St. Haehl, who has been skating for
three years, heard about the Midwest Skateboarding after “Let It Ride,” a skate-
board shop previous located on 9th and New Hampshire streets, closed last
November.
Column: Presidents say one thing, do another
Ryan Colaianni is tired of the hypocrisy he sees from the NCAA and university presidents.
Last week, the two groups approved adding a 12th game to the playoff system, which
would cause student athletes to be out of the classroom more. PAGE 1B
Kansas shuts out Texas Tech
The Kansas softball team swept the Texas Tech Red Raiders in a two-game series this
weekend. Junior pitcher Serena Settlemier set a personal strikeout record with 14. Kansas
plays Missouri Wednesday at 4 p.m. PAGE 1B
You win some, you lose some
The Kansas rowing team achieved a record time Saturday in Austin. The bad news is, it
wasn’t good enough to win at the Big 12 Conference Championships. PAGE 2B
Men’s golf finishes sixth in Big 12 Championship
The men’s golf team missed fifth place by one stroke to Texas A&M this weekend in
Trinity, Texas. Oklahoma State won by nine strokes against Oklahoma. PAGE 2B
Tournament a tune up for waterski club
The KU waterski club competed in a tournament during the weekend. The cold weath-
er deterred some from partaking in the event, but teams had a good time and made the
most of the competition. PAGE 3B
Track and field splits in half to attend two weekend relays
Coach Stanley Redwine led one half of the team to Iowa while the other half went to
Philadelphia for the Penn Relays. The highlight of the Penn Relays was the third-place
victory in the 4x800 meter relay. PAGE 6B
frozen.”
Margaret Clark, owner of Clark Family Farm in
Baldwin, is also in her fifth year at the market.
She enjoys selling her pies and pasteurized chick-
ens at the market because it provides an opportu-
nity for interaction with customers that can’t be
found in a supermarket.
“The customer can actually see the producer
and a trust is built,” she said.
Elizabeth Kroeker, Topeka senior, woke up at 9
a.m. Saturday to buy baked goods and plants from
local gardeners.
“It’s nice to see people care about their product
and want to see you enjoy it,” Kroeker, who goes
to the market every other Saturday, said.
Michael Bates, who sells heirloom vegetables
and lamb meat, said the local residents were will-
ing to be a little adventurous with their produce.
Heirloom vegetables are open-pollinated varieties
of plants that have survived for years. Customers
don’t mind to experiment with something new,
such as his off-colored vegetables, rather than
simply going for the basic red tomatoes.
The market is open from 6:30 a.m. to 10:30 a.m.
on Saturdays and 4 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. on Tuesdays
and Thursdays. The market ends in November.
— Edited by Nikola Rowe
Market
CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1A
Leia Garrette,
2-year-old
Lawrence resi-
dent, plays
around the
fountain in
South Park,
1100 and 1200
blocks of
Massachusetts
Street, yester-
day afternoon
at Art in the
Park. Leia's
father, Scott
Garrette, said
she loves water. Stephanie Farley/KANSAN
Splish splash
news monday, may 2, 2005 the university daily kansan 3A
Uppers keep students studying all night
Final exams are two weeks
away, meaning Watson and
Anschutz libraries will stay open
later, and more students will use
alternative methods to stay
awake all hours of the night.
Syam Sidhardan, Dubai,
United Arab Emirates, junior,
said he used Adderall to stay up
late. He said he would study for
finals from 3:30 to 7:30 a.m dur-
ing his night shifts at Anschutz
Library. He said he took
Adderall two to three times a
week during finals week first
semester.
“If you have enough sleep
and you’re just taking it to con-
centrate, then it helps,”
Sidhardan said.
To stay up, Sidhardan said he
occasionally drank Red Bull
energy drinks as well.
“It just hypes me up and gives
me a rush so I don’t feel sleepy,”
he said.
David Holmes, professor of
psychology, said stimulants like
Red Bull could help under certain
circumstances but were counter-
productive most of the time.
“You may still be awake, but
you’re not processing the infor-
mation effectively,” Holmes
said. “It’s much better to spread
the studying out over time.”
Humaira Fareed, Lenexa soph-
omore, said she spent at least 40
hours studying for finals in
Anschutz Library last semester.
“I’ve seen people do every-
thing: caffeine pills, Red Bull or
Adderall,” Fareed said. “I just
do the coffee thing.”
Fareed said she preferred to
study at Anschutz Library
because her apartment provided
distractions to studying.
About a couple thousand stu-
dents visit Anschutz and Watson
libraries each day, said Bill Myers,
director of library development.
This spring is the sixth consec-
utive semester that Anschutz and
Watson libraries will provide free
beverages during finals week,
such as lemonade, to students
who study there, Myers said.
— Edited by Laura Francoviglia
BY ERIC SORRENTINO
esorrentino@kansan.com
KANSAN STAFF WRITER
▼ ACADEMICS
Library hours
Extended hours:
Monday through Thursday: 8
a.m. to midnight
Friday: 8 a.m. to 10 p.m.
Saturday: 9 a.m. to 10 p.m.
Sunday: 10 a.m. to midnight
Regular hours:
Monday through Thursday:
8 a.m. to midnight
Friday: 8 a.m. to 8 p.m.
Saturday: 10 a.m. to 8 p.m.
Sunday: 10 p.m. to midnight
Anschutz and Watson libraries have extended service hours
from April 29 through May 19 for final exams.
Source: University of Kansas libraries
ON THE RECORD
✦ A 52-year-old KU employee
reported to Lawrence police
$500 damage to her chain link
fence and $50 damage to her
flowers between 10 p.m. April
27 and 7:30 a.m. April 28 in the
2900 block of Moccasin Drive.
✦ A 42-year-old KU employee
reported to Lawrence police
18 DVDs and $175 cash
stolen between 7:30 a.m. and
4 p.m. April 27 from the 100
block of Michigan Street. The
DVDs are valued at $200.
✦ The KU Public Safety Office
cited a 19-year-old KU stu-
dent for possession of drug
paraphernalia and minor in
possession at 11:48 p.m. on
April 28 in the 1800 block of
Naismith Drive.
ON CAMPUS
✦ The Policy Research Institute
will sponsor a seminar on
“Global Development: The
Gender Challenge” by Elaine
Zuckerman of Gender Action
from noon-1 p.m. today at the
Paul Adams Lounge in the
Adams Alumni Center. Call
864-9120 for more information.
✦ The Peace Corps will hold an
informational meeting at 7
tonight in the Gallery Room at
the Lawrence Public Library,
707 Vermont St. Call 864-7679
for more information.
✦ The Center for Russian and
East European Studies will
sponsor a Brown Bag Lecture
on “Defeat in Victory: Poland at
the End of WWII” by Anna
Cienciala of the history depart-
ment at noon tomorrow at
Room 318 in Bailey Hall. Call
864-4236 for more information.
✦ The art history department
will sponsor the lecture
“Strum’s the Word: Manet’s
‘Spanish Guitarist’” by
Therese Dolan of Temple
University at 5 p.m. tomorrow
at Room 211 in the Spencer
Museum of Art. Call 864-4710
for more information.
Photo illustration by Rachel Seymour
When class work piles up and some students find themselves lacking the time for proper sleep, they turn to sugar, caffeine or other students’ prescription drugs, such as
Adderall or Concerta, to stay awake and finish studying.
Pre-Nursing Club Meeting
May 3, 2005 5:30pm
Watkins 1st Floor Conference Room
Anesthesia & Trauma Nurse Speaker
Johnson and Giddens have
remained close through the
years, and if no one else believes
Giddens can shoulder a team,
Johnson does.
Johnson watched Giddens
lead his high school team to a
state championship during his
senior year in high school.
“J.R can lead with his actions,
like playing hard, being unselfish,
making the extra pass, being there
for his teammates,” Johnson said.
That’s why Giddens has a list
of offseason goals that he wants
to achieve.
Along with getting stronger,
Giddens said he wanted to work
on his weaknesses, like putting
the ball on the floor and creating
his own shot.
“I really want to get better at
ball handling, attacking the bas-
kets,” Giddens said. “Obviously
I need to get better at attacking
the basket.”
Just like anywhere he goes,
people at Subway look at him
with recognition, but unlike
some of his other teammates,
fans don’t often approach
Giddens. Today two young boys
sit with an older man in a corner
booth. They stare with a look of
curiosity, as if wondering if that
is J.R. Giddens in line at
Subway. They don’t approach
him.
There is something intimidat-
ing about Giddens, an element
of secrecy. Kansas fans don’t
quite know him yet.
Losing favor
Giddens’ thefacebook.com
account is just an example of
what he endured this past season.
Dozens of “You suck” and
“Giddens you can’t hit a shot”
me s s a g e s
had to be
r e mo v e d
from his
m e s s a g e
board after
each log-
on.
After the
Bu c k n e l l
loss alone,
he received
hundreds of
n e g a t i v e
me s s a g e s
from fans,
he said.
One fan even name-called his
mother and his sister.
“I never thought a Kansas fan
would do that,” Giddens said.
“Maybe you expect that at the
next level, but not at Kansas.”
The bottom line is this: J.R.
Giddens didn’t make as many
shots this year as he did during
his freshman season, and he
took a great deal of criticism for
it.
Giddens averaged 11 points
and 3.6 rebounds per game his
freshman season. He shot 40
percent from three-point range.
He was named to the All-Big 12
freshman team.
There was talk of him jumping
to the NBA after just one year in
college. Giddens said he never
considered
l e a v i n g
after his
first year at
K a n s a s ,
but he did
get some
calls from
s c o u t s
telling him
he was
ready for
the jump.
“Scouts
watched a
lot of my
game on
TV and
stuff and saw that I had a good
freshman season. I could shoot
and I could run and jump,”
Giddens said. “They thought my
game was good for the league.”
After missing almost all of last
year’s offseason because of foot
surgery, Giddens entered his
sophomore season with high
expectations. He was named to
the Preseason All-Big 12
Conference honorable mention
team. Self said they were unrealis-
tic expectations for a 19-year-old
who missed all of the offseason.
“I was trying so hard, but it
was just a weird season from the
beginning,” Giddens said.
His points per game dropped
to 10.1, while his minutes
increased from 25 to 27. He
shot just 33 percent from
behind the arc this season. But
it was the number of three-point
shot attempts that initiated crit-
icism.
Against Nevada on Nov. 29,
he went just 3-8 from behind
the arc. He shot 3-10 against
South Carolina on Dec. 18. He
went two games without a
three-pointer against Texas
A&M and Kentucky on Jan. 5
and Jan. 9.
The criticism continued, and
Giddens was well aware of it.
“I feel like I play bad more
than anybody,” Giddens said.
“Imagine working hard your
whole life and your whole forte
wasn’t going well. Basketball
wasn’t going well for me.”
Giddens said midway
through the season, he got so
caught up in what he was doing
wrong that he forgot to enjoy
the game.
He turned to his teammates,
especially his best friend and
roommate Jeremy Case, sopho-
more guard. He worked closely
with Self to better his overall
game, beyond just shooting. He
called Johnson hundreds of times.
Johnson told him not to worry
about what he wasn’t doing;
instead focus on helping Kansas
win.
“It was one of those times that
every player goes through,”
Johnson said. “I told him to lis-
ten to coach Self and to focus on
the things he could control to get
his confidence back up.”
Kansas coach Bill Self knew
that Giddens had lost his confi-
dence, but he never gave up on
him. He knew Giddens was
caught up in the negative public-
ity surrounding his season.
“I’ve always thought he
thought too much,” Self said.
“He was worried about doing
things that people said he wasn’t
doing instead of doing things
that he needs to do, but it is not
intentional.”
Self worked with Giddens to
improve his rebounding, passing
and defense. His teammates
encouraged him to keep shoot-
ing.
“I had the greatest teammates,”
Giddens said. “They would say,
Giddens
J.R. Giddens 4a the university daily kansan monday, may 2, 2005
Kansan file photos
Above: J.R. Giddens fields ques-
tions from reporters after this sea-
son’s March 18 NCAA
Tournament loss to Bucknell.
Right: One of Gidden’s goals
next season is to put the ball
on the ground more like he did
during this game at Iowa State.
Kit Leffler/KANSAN
Next season, Giddens wants to be a leader by example on a team that will have 11 underclassmen. It’s a
role he has filled before, according to Albert Johnson, athletic assistant at Texas A&M, who watched
Giddens lead his high school team to a state championship his senior year.
CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1A
I feel like I play bad
more than any-
body. Imagine
working hard your
whole life and your
whole forte wasn’t
going well.
Basketball wasn’t
going well for me.
E
V
E
R
Y
T
H
IN
G
B
U
T
IC
E
BEDS • DESKS
CHEST OF DRAWERS
BOOK CASES
unclaimed freight & damaged merchandise • 936 Mass.
E
V
E
R
Y
T
H
IN
G
B
U
T
IC
E
BEDS • DESKS
CHEST OF DRAWERS
BOOK CASES
unclaimed freight & damaged merchandise • 936 Mass.
For Information Call: 785.864.2787
TDD: 785.864.2777

www.lied.ku.edu

The Lied Center
of Kansas
Universityof Kansas
785.864.2787
A FREE Concert at the
University of Kansas Edwards Campus
Regnier Hall Auditorium
Quartet Accorda
Friday, May 6 – 7:30 p.m.
Enjoy an intimate evening of wonderful classical music
with this first-class ensemble. The program will include
the Debussy
String Quartet.
Edwards Campus,
Regnier Hall Auditorium
12600 Quivira Rd.
Overland Park
2.5 miles south of I-435
off the Quivira Rd. exit
‘Keep shooting, J, the next one’s
falling, tonight is your night.’”
But the shots didn’t fall.
Giddens reached a low point
after the Jayhawks’ home game
against Iowa State, Kansas’ sec-
ond straight loss. He went 1-11
from behind the arc, and Kansas
fans booed him at the end of the
game.
“I felt horrible,” Giddens said.
“I didn’t even feel comfortable in
my own gym. I felt like people
cringed and were like ‘J.R. is
going to take a shot and he is
going to miss.’”
In the four games after the
Iowa State game, Giddens sank
only four three-point shots. He
didn’t feel like he was taking bad
shots; they just weren’t falling.
Johnson said he could see a
change in Giddens’ demeanor
just from watching him on televi-
sion. In high school, Johnson
used to make Giddens make
1,000 shots a day, part of the rea-
son he was such a confident
shooter.
“I could tell his mental focus
was off a bit when I talked to
him,” Johnson said. “A lot of
them just weren’t falling, but I
told him he just had to get his
confidence back.”
Giddens agreed.
“I was focusing so much on
making shots and people booing
me that I lost confidence in
myself,” Giddens said.
Anyone who has watched
Giddens on the basketball court
knows that he is not a player
who lacks confidence.
The man who tugs at the No.
15 on his jersey every time he
hits a three-point shot, throws
down a monster jam or assists a
play, is known for his energy on
the court. That energy, however,
can easily be misinterpreted for
cockiness, Giddens said.
“I yell and do all of that stuff
and people are like ‘Oh he is
selfish,’” he said. “But they
weren’t saying that when I was
making shots.”
Giddens said he tried to tone
down his emotions on the court
this season. Fans didn’t appreci-
ate the jersey tugging and chest
pounding from a player whose
shots were clanking off the rim.
“My first year here was so beau-
tiful,” Giddens said. “But the fans
went from liking me to hating me
real fast, even though I was out
there trying and giving my all.”
Johnson said Giddens’ on-
the-court personality matched
his persona off of it.
“That is how he is on the court
and off the court,” Johnson said.
“His antics may be misinterpreted
sometimes. He can come off
cocky, but really he is just glad to
be at Kansas. The basketball court
is almost like a stage for him to let
loose and show his emotions.”
For as much negativity as
Giddens received this past season,
he knows he is a better basketball
player, mentally and physically.
The shots may not have fallen,
but his rebounds, assists, blocks
and steals all increased, not to
mention his defense. By the end
of the season, Self was putting
Giddens on the opposing team’s
best offensive player.
“Coach Self made me a better
defensive player,” Giddens said.
“Overall, I was a better player, I
just didn’t make shots.”
At the end of the season, Self
told Giddens they couldn’t
change what happened this past
season. They do, however, con-
trol next year.
“He needs time to get in the
gym and work on ball handling
and passing and be a better bas-
ketball player, and not just shoot
the ball,” Self said.
Self isn’t shy about telling
Giddens what he needs to do.
They even have a name for their
relationship.
“We have
a no-bullshit
r e l a t i o n -
s h i p , ”
G i d d e n s
said. “If he
feels any-
thing he
needs to say
to me, he
can say it. If
I feel any-
thing, I can
walk into his
office and
do the same.”
Every day, Giddens is in the
weight room, lifting, trying to get
stronger. He practices with coach-
es on individual workouts. He
works on his footwork. He has
even made a deal with himself.
“Ninety percent of the shots I
take in practice or workouts are
going to be off the dribble,”
Giddens said. “I’m going to work
on my outside shot, but you can
bet J.R. Giddens is going to shoot
off the dribble more next year.”
If anything, Johnson said this
season would help Giddens
become stronger mentally.
“Yeah, his shooting percent
was down and that is what every-
one rests his lulls on,” Johnson
said “But overall, he improved
and he battled through it pretty
well for a 19-year-old kid.”
Looking ahead
Before the car can even pull
into the parking lot at Jayhawks
Towers, Giddens has consumed
the entire footlong meatball sub.
He hurries up to his fourth floor
apartment to catch the tip-off of
the NCAA National
Championship game.
Giddens is one of the few
Jayhawks watching the game. He
doesn’t, however, seem to enjoy it.
He sits in front of the televi-
sion like a distracted six year old
who has eaten too much sugar.
During commercials, Giddens
stands in the middle of the room
practicing his favorite basketball
moves with a volleyball.
“It’s less bouncy, better for
inside,” Giddens said.
His favorite move is one where
he goes between the legs twice,
palms the ball in one hand and
potentially blows by his defender.
“That is one you’ll be seeing a
lot of next year,” Giddens says.
The championship game is
intense, and Giddens appears irri-
tated that North Carolina holds
on to defeat Illinois and boasts the
National Championship trophy.
He turns off the TV before
CBS can play their annual
NCAA Tournament highlight
reel with “One Shining Moment”
playing in the background.
It’s not that Giddens was mad
that the coach who recruited
him won
the coveted
n a t i o n a l
c h a mp i -
onship tro-
p h y ,
a l t houg h
he admits
he never
received a
phone call
from Roy
Williams to
inform him
of his
depart ure
for North Carolina.
He said it was just so hard to
watch the tournament after the
way the Jayhawks went out.
Slowly, Giddens is getting
over the loss that he blames him-
self for. Like most of his team-
mates, Giddens broke down into
tears after Kansas’ 64-63 first-
round loss to Bucknell.
“A lot of it was my fault we
lost,” Giddens “I feel like I let
down the fans, my teammates
and my family.”
Several weeks after the loss,
Giddens sat down to watch the
McDonald’s All-American high
school game, a contest he com-
peted in two years ago.
Three Kansas recruits repre-
sented the Jayhawks in the
showcase: Micah Downs, Mario
Chalmers and Julian Wright.
Chalmers stole the show. He
scored 20 points and made five
assists. He put on a defensive
clinic, also collecting five steals
and four rebounds. In a 10-sec-
ond time span, Chalmers
drained a three-point shot, stole
the ensuing inbound pass and
knocked down another three.
“Oh man,” Giddens said.
“That kid can play.”
Thirty seconds later, his cell
phone rings. A loud voice can be
heard yelling on the other line.
It is Giddens’ pal C.J. Giles,
freshman forward.
“Did you see that, man?” Giles
says to Giddens on the phone.
Clearly, the returning Jayhawks
are excited about next year’s team.
They are going to be young, but
Self thinks they will be quicker,
allowing them to be more effec-
tive in the press and in transition.
“We’ll be so young and green
and we won’t know what we are
doing,” Self said. “But we will be
fast and athletic, and that is fun
to think about that.”
After the McDonald’s game is
finished, Giddens looked
relieved. The kind of relief a per-
son has when they realize their
luck is about to change.
“I just have to keep working
hard this offseason to make sure
that next year is better than this
one,” Giddens said.
He vows to be a more com-
plete player. A leader. A guy who
can go off the dribble, but is still
a threat from the outside. The
athlete who grabs an ally-oop
pass out of the air and slams it
down over a defender. The best
defensive player on the team.
Giddens wants to be all of
those. That is what drives J.R.
Giddens.
“People may say I am thinking
about the NBA and stuff,”
Giddens said. “But really I just
want to focus on being the best
leader and basketball player I
can be.”
Two weeks ago, after another
offseason work out, Giddens
walks slow and stiff.
“My legs hurt so bad from this
karate that we have been doing,”
Giddens said. “But we look
good in three-on-three. People
better watch out.”
Giddens will tough out his
tired legs. He opens the door
leading to the players lounge
next to the Kansas locker room.
“Is anyone hungry?” Giddens
asks his teammates.
— Edited by Neeley Spellmeier
J.R. Giddens monday, may 2, 2005 the university daily kansan 5A
Kit Leffler/KANSAN
Above: Kansas fans were critical of Giddens for most of the season.
He was received by boos after a loss at home to Iowa State. He said it
was difficult to not do well in his own gym.
Left: Giddens slashes through two defenders during the season-end-
ing loss to Bucknell in the NCAA Tournament.
Kansan file photo
People may say I
am thinking about
the NBA and stuff.
But really I just
want to focus on
being the best
leader and basket-
ball player I can be.
MILLIONS (PG)
4:30 7:00 9:30
OFF THE MAP (PG-13)
4:40 7:10 9:40
LIBERTY HALL
644 Mass
749-1912
www. l i ber t yhal l . net
FUNDRAISING
OPPORTUNITIES
Raise $$$ for
your Non-Profit
Organization.
Volunteer to work
concessions at
KU Athletic Events.
Call 864-7966 today to
schedule a date to raise
funds for your organization.
entertainment 6a the university daily kansan monday, may 2, 2005
Solutions to Friday’s puzzle
✦ Today’s Birthday. There’s way too
much to do this year, but the job is
quite familiar. The more you practice
the closer you’ll get to perfection, and
that pays quite well.
✦ Aries (March 21-April 19) Today is a 7.
Your friends have a lot of crazy ideas.
Nobody thinks they will work, except
you, of course. You’re famous for play-
ing outside the boundaries.
✦ Taurus (April 20-May 20) Today is a 5.
Showing respect is natural for you,
and profitable now, as well. A sugges-
tion sends you in a direction you
wouldn’t have thought of on your own.
✦ Gemini (May 21-June 21) Today is an
8. Allow yourself to be convinced to try
something you thought was impossi-
ble. Just because you don’t know how
it’s done, doesn't mean it isn’t.
✦ Cancer (June 22-July 22) Today is a 6.
The way you’re managing the money
is drawing attention to yourself. It’s a
good thing — people of importance
are favorably impressed.
✦ Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) Today is a 6.
Others don't seem eager to accept
your leadership; let them have it their
own way. Wait until they ask for your
opinion. They’ll come crawling back.
✦ Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Today is an 8.
Imagination takes the place of money,
strife and effort. If you also have a few
bucks to contribute, you’ll make the
job even easier.
✦ Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) Today is a 7.
Communication is a function of intent,
and today you can get your message
across. Don’t hold back.
✦ Scorpio (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) Today is a 7.
Coupons, rebates and sales are all part
of your budgeting plan. Some people
look on those things as extras. For
you, they’re basic and plentiful now.
✦ Sagittarius (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) Today is a
6. Follow your hunches as well as your
natural curiosity. They’re of equal
merit, even if you can’t explain either
one.
✦ Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) Today is a
7. Something you’ve kept stashed
away has greatly increased in value.
Cash it in, before the reverse becomes
the case.
✦ Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) Today is a 6.
Analyze your work procedures, with
the intention of making what you do
more fun. That would not be cheating.
✦ Pisces (Feb. 19-March 20) Today is a 6.
You’re being pushed to behave a little
more assertively. Some might think
you’re crazy. Your true love thinks
you’re creative.
▼ SQUIRREL
Wes Benson/KANSAN
▼ FRIEND OR FAUX?
Seth Bundy/KANSAN
▼ DAMAGED CIRCUS
Greg Griesenauer/KANSAN
▼ HOROSCOPES

We Have a Place to Fit Your Needs
Studios
1 Bedrooms
2 Bedrooms
3 & 4 Bedrooms
Larger Homes
We Have a Place to Fit Your Needs
Studios
1 Bedrooms
2 Bedrooms
3 & 4 Bedrooms
Larger Homes
EAGLE RIDGE
APARTMENTS
530 Eldridge Street
STONECREST
TOWNHOMES
1000 Monterey Way
· 1 & 2 BR Apartments
· Rents from $410
· SmaII Pets WeIcome
· Grocery/Restaurants/
Post Office Adjacent
· Furnished/Short-Term AvaiIabIe
· Microwaves/Dishwashers
· 2 & 3 BR Apts. & Twnhm.
· Rents from $550
· Washer/Dryer Hookups
· FirepIaces
· Adjacent to Perry Park
· KU Parking Pass (1 per apt)
· SmaII Pets WeIcome
Office: 530 EIdridge St., Suite L 1
Phone: 785-749-1102
E-maiI: ResourceManagment@sunfIower.com
As a young boy, Dennis
had always dreamed of being
an astronaut. His inspiration
first came when he heard
David Bowie’s “Life on
Mars,” although he never
admitted to his friends that
he only knew the words to
the chorus of the song. The
song evoked images of little
silver saucers, green men and ant farms devoid of
gravity.
Like any other Saturday, Dennis, now 30, lay
on the couch with a heroin needle sticking out of
one arm and the TV remote in the hand of the
other, wondering how it all went wrong.
Growing up in Jersey, Dennis’s childhood was
full of pleasant memories. Because he called the
Garden State home, albums and posters of the
Boss — Bruce Springsteen — were scattered
about his bedroom floor.
At age 10, Dennis searched the stores of
Newark to find those amazing jeans Bruce had
worn on the cover of the “Born in the USA”
album, but he could never find a pair that
grasped the essence that was Springsteen’s ass.
At age 15, every day Dennis would practice the
Bon Jovi riffs that lined the pages of the latest
Guitar World.
Yet those carefree days of leotards and hair-
spray seemed to disappear throughout time —
somewhere, between 15 and 20, Dennis recalled
that his life took a different turn.
Dennis tried to remember what it was that jolt-
ed his train off the track, as it were. He recalled
those who had been the most important to him
during his life: his family and friends.
Dennis’s parents, Hamilton and Carol, were as
odd a couple as you could find. It was rumored
that Hamilton was lost for five years in the early
‘70s while a roadie for Black Sabbath, whereas
Carol had won tickets to the local Black Sabbath
show under the impression that it was some sort
of church where everyone wore all-black outfits
to Sunday service.
Yet Dennis recognized his parents had always
offered their unconditional love and support,
and they were not the culprits
of his undoing.
During high school, Dennis’
best friend Eugene always
wore his favorite Motley Crüe
shirt and matching sweatpants
every Monday, Wednesday and
Friday to class.
The two had been good
friends and, in fact, Dennis
knew Eugene was not to blame because the two
shared an indescribable passion for the band
Journey.
The two had even tried to start a band, but
the local radio station said that Eugene sound-
ed too much like Steve Perry, and that type of
rock “wasn’t exactly ‘in’ anymore.”
Lying face down on the vomit-stained carpet,
Dennis thought perhaps it was love that, like the
drugs currently in his system, made him nauseous
and had derailed his life. Some of his failed rela-
tionships had been intense and emotional, while
others were debaucheries and were what he con-
sidered to be his sexual revolution.
Summoning to mind all the relationships that
had come and gone, Dennis laughed as memo-
ries of moments, high and low, had become
cherished treasures stowed in his mind. Then, in
that exact instant, an epiphany struck Dennis:
he had always been in control of his own des-
tiny.
Sitting up and staring at the boogers that
formed a mini Mt. Everest on the coffee table,
Dennis realized it was he, not some God or mys-
tical figure, that had been acting in the shell
known as his own body.
He realized it was not fate or predestination
guiding his every move; rather, it was he who was
responsible for his own actions: good and bad,
beautiful and ugly, significant and unimportant.
Crawling to the corner of the room on all fours,
Dennis proceeded to snort last week’s paycheck
up his nose, and he gracefully passed out with his
face against the wall.
✦Sikes is a Wichita senior in philosophy and Spanish.
University of Colorado pro-
fessor Ward Churchill and his
controversial essay, “Some
People Push Back: On the
Justice of Roosting Chickens,”
has met harsh criticism in the
past few months for proclaim-
ing that America was ultimate-
ly responsible for the attacks
on Sept. 11.
His supporters have screamed that no one is
willing to take Churchill's angry rant seriously.
So, in the spirit of fairness, I will try my best to do
so.
First, though, let me say that my reluctance to
take Churchill's essay seriously
stems from my confusion of
what, exactly, I should be taking
seriously.
Should I be taking his com-
parison of World Trade Center
victims to Nazis seriously?
Certainly even his staunchest
defenders must concede that
such an argument is more hot-
headed name-calling than real
argumentation.
Or maybe I should take seri-
ously his insistence that the
United States responded to the
Sept. 11 attacks by hanging its
“abundant supply of major war
criminals,” including George
H.W. Bush, Colin Powell, Bill
Clinton and Madeleine
Albright? Or his belief that the true personifica-
tion of evil is “that malignant toad known as
Madeleine Albright, squatting in her studio chair
like Jabba the Hutt”?
The problem is that Churchill's “scholarly”
indictment of American foreign policy lacks any
sort of scholarly protocol. He squandered the
opportunity to make a well-spoken argument that
U.S. policy was unfair toward Iraq and instead
resorted to name calling and Nazi comparisons.
His essay may as well have been co-authored by a
sixth grader.
Cutting through all the hateful rambling, the
major point of Churchill's essay is that America’s
sanctions against Iraq — imposed in 1990 after
Iraq invaded Kuwait — forced the Sept. 11
hijackers to attack the United States.
First of all, the sanctions were not unilateral, as
Churchill seems to believe, but were supported by
the United Nations as well.
Secondly, the hijackers had no connections to
Iraq. Most were Saudi nationals. The terrorist
group that orchestrated the attacks, Al Qaeda,
had no working relationship with Iraq or
Saddam Hussein, as many war dissenters have
pointed out. It is doubtful that the Sept. 11
attacks had anything to do with the sanctions
against Iraq.
As for the merit of the sanctions, different peo-
ple will give different opinions. Studies by the
United Nations and various
other groups conclude that
the sanctions, which were
necessary to keep Iraq from
rebuilding its military after
the Persian Gulf War, hurt
Iraqi civilians. But the apa-
thy of Saddam Hussein
toward that suffering has
also been documented.
In a 1998 New York Times article, Philip
Shenon noted that Hussein spent hundreds of
millions of dollars on new palaces rather than
improving living conditions for his people.
The United Nations realized that its sanctions
were harming the Iraqi people
as early as 1991, and, accord-
ing to Shenon, offered an oil-
for-food program to Iraq that
same year. Iraq rejected the
plan originally because it
wanted the sanctions com-
pletely removed or nothing at
all. In 1995, Hussein finally
accepted. Why? It might have
had something to do with the
$10 billion he illegally gar-
nered through the program in
its seven-year lifespan.
In the late 1990s, the
United States started to work
toward a “smart sanctions”
program for Iraq, in which
more food and medicine
would be given to Iraq, and
controls on weapon-related materials would be
tightened. Britain, Germany and France support-
ed the plan, but Iraq, backed by Russia on the
U.N. Security Council, refused. As former Iraqi
Vice President Taha Yassin Ramadan told CNN
in July 2001, “Any resolution that doesn’t clearly
mention the unconditional lifting of sanctions
will not be met favorably.”
Hussein sacrificed the well-being of his peo-
ple to guilt the United Nations into lifting the
sanctions on Iraq. Had the United Nations
budged, it would have sent the message that
the best way to fight sanctions was to starve
civilians.
Churchill's claim that the murder of thou-
sands of innocent people on Sept. 11 was jus-
tified by the United Nation’s sanctions is vile
and unwarranted.
While Churchill gives the benefit of every
doubt to Hussein, he readily labels the Sept. 11
victims “little Eichmanns,” in reference to one
of the lead Nazis in World War II. What the
essay lacks in logic it makes up for in radical-
ism.
Churchill's supporters should decide if hateful
rhetoric and radical anti-Americanism is some-
thing they really want to stand behind.
✦Myers is an Olathe freshman in political science.
So I just found a leftover roach on Wescoe Beach. Do I
smoke it?

Not only do Texas drivers suck, their liquor stores close
at 9. What a sissy state.

The leader of the free world is not important enough to
interrupt “The O.C.”

So my gynecologist called and left a
message that I need to call him
tomorrow to talk about my lab
results. I was wondering if I should
be nervous.

I just wanted to say that the
Farmer’s Ball finals were totally
rigged, and Chemical Ali should
have won.

Who’s gonna be next year’s
Farmer’s Ball winner? Hilary Duff?

I guess I know why roommate doesn’t like morning sex.
It’s because her breath smells like sewage.

This is Major Tom to ground control, I’m floating through
the air. And I think my spaceship knows which way to
go. Tell my wife I love her very much. She knows.
Wayne Stayskal/Knight Ridder/Tribune
▼ TALK TO US
Andrew Vaupel, editor
864-4810 or avaupel@kansan.com
Donovan Atkinson, Misty Huber, Amanda
Kim Stairrett and Marissa Stephenson
managing editors
864-4810 or editor@kansan.com
Steve Vockrodt
Laura Francoviglia
opinion editor
864-4924 or opinion@kansan.com
Ashleigh Dyck, business manager
864-4358 or advertising@kansan.com
Danielle Bose, retail sales manager
864-4358 or advertising@kansan.com
Malcolm Gibson, general manager
and news adviser
864-7667 or mgibson@kansan.com
Jennifer Weaver, sales
and marketing adviser
864-7666 or jweaver@kansan.com
Editorial Board Members
David Archer, Viva Bolova,
John Byerley, Chase Edgerton,
Wheaton Elkins, Paige Higgins,
Matt Hoge, John Jordan, Kyle Koch,
Doug Lang, Kevin McKernan, Mike
Mostaffa, Erica Prather,
Erick Schmidt, Devin Sikes, Gaby Souza,
Sarah Stacy and Anne Weltmer.
▼ SUBMISSIONS
The Kansan welcomes letters to the
editors and guest columns submitted
by students, faculty and alumni.
The Kansan reserves the right to edit,
cut to length, or reject all submissions.
For any questions, call Steve Vockrodt
or Laura Francoviglia at 864-4924 or e-
mail opinion@ kansan.com.
General questions should be directed
to the editor at editor@kansan.com.
Letter Guidelines
Maximum Length: 200 word limit
Include: Author’s name and telephone
number; class, hometown (student);
position (faculty member); phone num-
ber (will not be published)
Guest Column Guidelines
Maximum Length: 650 word limit
Include: Author’s name; class, home-
town (student); position (faculty mem-
ber); phone number (will not be pub-
lished)
Also: The Kansan will not print guest
columns that attack another columnist.
Submit to
Kansan newsroom
111 Stauffer-Flint Hall
1435 Jayhawk Blvd.
Lawrence, KS 66045
(785) 864-4810
opinion@kansan.com
Opinion
Opinion
WWW.KANSAN.COM PAGE 7A MONDAY, MAY 2, 2005
Churchill essay not based
on merit but radicalism
Autonomy does not always
imply self-enlightenment
▼ A RIGHT TURN
Free for All callers have 20 seconds to speak about
any topic they wish. Kansan editors reserve the right
to omit comments. Slanderous and obscene state-
ments will not be printed. Phone numbers of all
incoming calls are recorded.
For more comments, go to www.kansan.com.
Call 864-0500
Free
forAll
▼ STAYSKAL’S PERSPECTIVE
▼ FILOSOFO GALLEGO
▼ LETTER TO THE EDITOR
DEVIN SIKES
dsikes@kansan.com
VINCE MYERS
vmyers@kansan.com
‘Kansan’ misses point in article about
block funding for student organizations
Last Friday, the Kansan ran an article entitled
“Hard up for Money,” which painted a picture in
which many multicultural student organizations
were being denied block funding, a mechanism
in which “organizations receive an unfettered
amount of money” according to the article.
Block funding goes through the same rigorous
process as any other financial consideration
made by Student Senate. The difference is the
burden upon student groups, which is easily
twice as much; they are required to have a paid
treasurer and outline a two-year budget. The
table in the article that meant to illustrate the
“difference” between 1999 block and 2005 line-
item funding failed to point out that Asian-
American Student Union is receiving more
money via line-item than they did in block.
Many at this University fail to notice the inter-
nal burden of projecting every expenditure
groups intend to make over the course of the
next two years— which for small but growing
groups like the First Nations Student
Association means being trapped within their
previous projections, and not realizing more cur-
rent success. In closing, instead of addressing
the reality of funding and its guidelines, the arti-
cle that was run only instigates hard feelings
between multicultural organizations and
Student Senate.
Nolan T. Jones
Student Senate Communications Director
Pittsburg sophomore
Film
W
hile Churchill
gives the benefit
of every doubt to
Hussein, he readily
labels the Sept. 11 vis-
tims as “little
Eichmanns.” What the
essay lacks in logic
makes up for in radical-
ism.
news 8a the university daily kansan monday, may 2, 2005
CAMPUS
Panel to discuss illegal steroid use
Illegal steroid use has become a growing concern in profes-
sional sports such as track, baseball and football during the
last few years. From team discussions to federal investiga-
tions, doping is under scrutiny throughout athletics.
An expert panel of sportswriters and athletes is scheduled
to discuss illegal doping tomorrow night at the Robert J. Dole
Institute of Politics, located west of the Lied Center.
Bill James, baseball writer and statistician; John Hadl, for-
mer Kansas and NFL football player; and Bill Althaus, sports
journalist, are scheduled to discuss steroids and sports at 7:30
tomorrow night.
“This panel should be a great way to air out these issues in
our community, one of the most sophisticated sports towns in
the nation,” said Jonathan Earle, associate director of the
Dole Institute.
The event is free and open to the public. For more informa-
tion about the event contact the Dole Institute at 864-4900.
— Jason Shaad
‘West Wing’ writer to speak at Institute
The president is a Democrat.
At least that is what Eli Attie conditions himself to think.
Attie produces and writes for the NBC-TV show “The West
Wing,” in which actor Martin Sheen plays Democratic
President Bartlett.
Attie is scheduled to speak about the show and White
House culture at the Robert J. Dole Institute of Politics at 6:30
p.m. on Wednesday.
In addition to writing and producing parts of the show, Attie
has worked for former Vice President Al Gore, former
President Bill Clinton and Sen. Dick Gephardt (D-Missouri).
The Dole Institute will show a screening of a “The West
Wing” episode following Attie’s speech.
The event is free and open to the public, but reservations
are required for seating in the Dole Institute.
For reservations, call 864-4900 or e-mail
doleinstitute@ku.edu.
— Jason Shaad
Safety office investigating snake thefts
The KU Public Safety Office is investigating the theft of two
snakes from Lindley Hall.
Sometime between 8 p.m. April 24 and 11 a.m. April 26,
two Kenyan sand boa snakes were taken from Room 115-A,
according to a KU Public Safety Office report.
The snakes are about six inches long and are valued at
$120 total, according to the report.
The door to the room and the door to the building did not
appear to have been forced open, said Capt. Schuyler Bailey,
KU Public Safety Office.
Bailey said that no suspects have been identified.
Anyone with information is encouraged to call KU Crime
Stoppers at 864-8888.
—Joshua Bickel
Rachel Seymour/KANSAN
Josh Adams, Hi-Dive drummer, along with fellow band members, Scott Stone and Chris Shaw,
competes for studio time during the Annual Farmer's Ball final competition Saturday night at the Granada,
1020 Massachusetts St. The Band has been together since last year and heard about the competition on
KJHK. The event was open to everyone 18 years of age or older.
Rachel Seymour/KANSAN
Stacy D. Smith, also known as Reach,
Kansas City, Mo., artist, improvises with
his freestyle talent after malfunctions
occurred with the needed CD during
the Saturday night finals of the Annual
Farmer's Ball. Reach, with the help of
his friend, DJ Skeme, took first prize,
two days in a recording studio.
Rachel Seymour/KANSAN
Chris Shaw, bass guitarist for
the band Hi-Dive performs dur-
ing the Annual Farmer's Ball at
the Granada Saturday night. It
was the band's first time compet-
ing in the event.
Rachel Seymour/KANSAN
DJ Skeme starts up Stacy D.
Smith's performance Saturday
night at the Granada during the
Annual Farmer's Ball Competition.
Smith asked Skeme, a good
friend, to perform with him after
making it to the final night of the
competition. Their performance
took first place.
Stephanie Farley/KANSAN
Matt Rice, local Lawrence artist,
performs solo on the guitar and
harmonica at the Annual Farmer's
Ball final competition in the
Granada Saturday night. Rice took
second place and was rewarded
with one day in Neighborhood, a
local recording studio.
Local bands strum and
drum for studio time in
KJHK’s annual battle of
the bands, Farmer’s Ball
kansan.com
kansan.com
Thestudent newspaper of theUniversity of Kansas
Check out News!
CUT IT OUT!
Campus coupons
coming soon to a Kansan near you
PAGE 1B WWW.KANSAN.COM
The Kansas softball team
extended its winning streak to
eight, sweeping Texas Tech this
weekend. The Red Raiders did
not score a sin-
gle run as the
J a y h a w k s
defeated them
3-0 on
Saturday and
10-0 yesterday.
“We’re play-
ing confidently
and expecting
to win,” coach
Tracy Bunge
said.
She said the team’s confi-
dence had carried them down
the stretch.
“It’s the end of a long season
and the girls have a lot of tests
and papers due, so they’re a lit-
tle tired,” she said.
The two victories improved
Kansas’ record to 28-19 and 7-7
in Big 12 Conference play.
Destiny Frankenstein, junior
shortstop, said with all the
upsets going on in the confer-
ence, she thought Kansas was
right at the top of the mix.
The pitching staff allowed
three hits in each game in
Lubbock, Texas. Serena
Settlemier, junior pitcher, threw
her second consecutive shutout
on Saturday after holding North
Dakota State to no runs last
Thursday. She also set a career
high with 14 strikeouts.
Her previous mark was 10,
which she tied last Thursday.
Bunge said Settlemier felt good
physically. She said her curve
ball and screw ball were work-
ing effectively over the week-
end.
“Her screwball was moving
away from left handed hitters,
and she got them out swinging
at pitches away from the plate,”
Bunge said.
Kassie Humphreys, sopho-
more pitcher, and Christina Ross,
freshman pitcher, helped
Settlemier shut down the Red
Raiders on Saturday.
Frankenstein also made
Kansas softball history during the
weekend when she broke the sin-
gle-season home run record in the
sixth inning yesterday.
It was her 13th of the season,
and the solo shot gave the
Jayhawks a 4-0 lead. She broke
Leah Tabb’s previous mark of 12.
“It’s feels great. It’s a great
feeling to be part of Kansas his-
tory,” she said.
Kansas will take on No. 20
Missouri in the Border
Showdown Wednesday. The
2005 senior class will be hon-
ored before the game. First pitch
is scheduled for 4 p.m.
Kansas defeated Missouri
earlier this year in Columbia, 5-
3. The remaining three games
are against Big 12 opponents
which will determine postsea-
son positioning.
—Edited by Lori Bettes
The hypocrisy among the
NCAA and university presidents
continued last week as they
approved adding a 12th game
and allowing Division I-A teams
to count victories against I-AA
foes toward bowl games every
season.
This lengthens the season for
teams and made it easier for
them to qualify for bowl games.
While everyone in their right
mind knows that the NCAA
needs a playoff system, the uni-
versity presidents said they do
not want to lengthen the season,
keeping athletes out of the
classroom.
While the additional game
will occur during a team’s bye
week, it may mean that players
who are traveling to play the
additional game will miss class
time on Friday.
A playoff system would like-
ly take place in early January,
when students are on winter
break. Yet the NCAA decided to
add a game during the fall,
when athletes are in class.
Allowing victories against I-
AA teams each season makes it
easier for teams to qualify for
bowls, thus lengthening the sea-
son.
The changes contradict what
the university presidents have
said for years about a potential
playoff system.
While the decision to
increase the number of games to
12 is a good decision, the
NCAA could have left the num-
ber of games at 11.
Then it should have created a
four-team playoff format that
would have only added one
more game.
NCAA president Myles
Brand told The Associated Press
that a playoff system needs to be
looked at. So maybe the NCAA
will begin to take steps in the
right direction because it needs
to be done.
The BCS system is a joke.
Three teams last season finished
the season undefeated and with
legitimate claims for a national
title: University of Southern
California, Auburn and Utah.
There was a split national cham-
pion for the second year in a
row.
The Associated Press has
backed out of including its
poll rankings in the BCS for-
mula.
Everyone sees that the BCS
is a problem other than the
people who make the deci-
sions.
Why wouldn’t the presidents
agree with changing the bowl
system to a playoff format? An
eight-team playoff would be
optimal, but even a four-team
playoff would be an improve-
ment.
A costly yet humorous blun-
der by Kansas State leftfielder
Terry Blunt yesterday paved the
way for the Kansas baseball
team’s first Big 12 Conference
series victory.
Kansas (29-21, 6-11 Big 12)
relied on home runs to clinch
the series victory yesterday
afternoon, 6-4. Game three
served as a successful combina-
tion of an anemic offense in
Friday night’s 0-7 loss in
Manhattan and the 15-11 victo-
ry on Saturday after returning to
Lawrence.
Friday night’s game one
looked nothing like the final
two games of the series for
Kansas, which was held score-
less and managed only two hits
on the evening. It marked
Kansas’ first shutout in 27
games.
“That’s like the first time that
we’ve been dominated all year,”
coach Ritch Price said. “If we’d
pull out that first inning, it
might have been 0-0 in the sev-
enth the way both guys were
pitching.”
Junior right-hander Kodiak
Quick (8-5) took the loss for the
Jayhawks. After surrendering
five runs in the top of the first,
Quick settled down and lasted
until the eighth.
Junior right-hander Chase
Mitchell picked up the Wildcats
only victory on the weekend.
Mitchell threw a complete
game, two-hit shutout.
The series moved to
Lawrence for game two and the
Jayhawks went back to their
normal, hard-hitting ways that
were absent in game one.
Kansas tied the series at a game
apiece after the 15-11 victory
under the glow of the new
Hoglund Ballpark scoreboard,
which Van Slyke christened by
hitting it with his 10th homer of
the year.
Sports Sports
Shutouts strike spirit
Kansas sweeps Texas Tech;
Settlemier sets personal best
BY DREW DAVISON
ddavison@kansan.com
KANSAN SPORTSWRITER
▼ THE RANT
▼ SOFTBALL
▼ BASEBALL
Settlemier
Added game
cuts class time
for athletes
RYAN COLAIANNI
rcolaianni@kansan.com
Rachel Seymour/KANSAN
Rex Clark, Lawrence resident, and his son Zane, 8, pass by Strong
Hall on Jayhawk Boulevard during the Annual Hilltop Hustle 5K race
early Saturday morning. The Hilltop Hustle is a fundraiser for the
Hilltop Child Development Center on campus, which Zane started
going to at age 3. His brother Eli, 4, now attends the child center.
“We’ve always gone to Hilltop,” Rex Clark said. “It’s a great program,
and we want to support it.”
’Hawks declaw ’Cats
BY ALISSA BAUER
abauer@kansan.com
KANSAN SPORTSWRITER
Kansas turns Friday’s loss against Kansas State into series victory
Hilltop hustle
KANSAS STATE 4 : KANSAS 6
Kansas State (23-20) AB R H RBI
Terry Blunt, lf 5 2 2 1
Brandon Farr, c 2 0 0 0
Jared Goedert, 2b 3 0 0 0
Steve Murphy, rf 3 0 1 1
Joe Roundy, dh 3 0 0 0
Josh Dent, cf 4 1 0 0
Barrett Rice, 1b 4 1 1 2
Eric Eymann, ss 4 0 2 0
Eli Rumler, 3b 3 0 0 0
Cris Tapia, ph 1 0 0 0
Totals 32 4 6 4
✦ HR: Blunt, Rice
Kansas (29-21) AB R H RBI
Matt Baty, cf 4 0 1 1
Ritchie Price, ss 4 0 1 0
A.J. Van Slyke, lf 4 1 1 2
Gus Milner, rf 4 1 1 1
Sean Richardson, c 4 1 1 0
Andy Scholl, dh 3 1 2 1
John Allman, ph 1 0 0 0
Jared Schweitzer, 1b 3 0 1 0
Ryne Price, 2b 4 1 2 1
Erik Morrison, 3b 3 1 1 0
Totals 34 6 11 6
✦ HR: Van Slyke, Milner, Scholl
Score by inning R H E
Kansas State101 000 002 4 6 0
Kansas 002 210 01x 6 11 2
Win: Mike Zagurski (5-4)
Loss: Adam Cowart (6-3)
Save: Don Czyz (7)
Source: Kansas Athletics Department
KANSAS 3, TEXAS TECH 0
Kansas (27-19) AB R H RBI
Heather Stanley, rf 3 0 2 1
Jackie Vazquez, cf 4 0 1 0
Jessica Moppin, 2b 3 0 0 0
Destiny Frankenstein, ss 3 1 1 0
Serena Settlemier, p 3 1 1 2
Nettie Fierros, 3b 3 0 0 0
Elle Pottorf, c 3 0 2 0
Nicole Washburn, 1b 3 1 1 0
Ashley Frazer, lf 3 0 1 0
Totals 28 3 9 3
✦ HR: Settlemier
Texas Tech (23-23) AB R H RBI
Ashley Parker, cf 3 0 0 0
Natalie Enderlin, rf/dh 2 0 0 0
Jennifer Corkin, 1b 3 0 0 0
Kelly Rhyne, lf 3 0 0 0
Natalie Kula, 3b 2 0 2 0
Erin Crawford, p 2 0 0 0
Whitney Riley, ph 1 0 0 0
Jennifer Bowers, 2b 3 0 1 0
Lisa Lawler, c 3 0 0 0
Heather Parker, ss 1 0 0 0
Devin Zaragoza, dh/rf 1 0 0 0
Totals 24 0 3 0
✦ HR: None
Score by inning R H E
Kansas 001 200 0 3 9 0
Texas Tech 000 000 0 0 3 2
Win: Settlemier
Loss: Crawford
Save: None
Source: Kansas Athletics Department
KANSAS 10, TEXAS TECH 0
Kansas (28-19) AB R H RBI
Heather Stanley, rf 2 1 1 0
Cyndi Duran, lf 1 0 1 0
Jackie Vazquez, cf 3 1 0 0
Jessica Moppin, 2b 3 1 1 1
Destiny Frankenstein, ss 3 2 2 2
Serena Settlemier, dh/p 3 1 0 0
Nettie Fierros, 3b 4 3 2 4
Elle Pottorf, c 3 1 1 2
Nicole Washburn, 1b 3 0 0 0
Ashley Frazer, lf 2 0 0
Totals 28 10 8 9
✦ HR: Settlemier
Texas Tech (23-24) AB R H RBI
Ashley Parker, cf 3 0 0 0
Natalie Kula, 3b 3 0 0 0
Jennifer Corkin, 1b 2 0 0 0
Kelly Rhyne, lf 3 0 0 0
Brandy Moulin, dh 3 0 1 0
Jennifer Bowers, 2b 3 0 1 0
Natalie Enderlin, rf/dh 1 0 0 0
Whitney Riley, ph 1 0 0 0
Lisa Lawler, c 3 0 1 0
Heather Parker, ss 2 0 0 0
Totals 24 0 3 0
✦ HR: None
Score by inning R H E
Kansas 100 202 5 10 8 0
Texas Tech 000 000 0 0 3 1
Win: Kassie Humphreys
Loss: Julie Hauck
Save: None
Source: Kansas Athletics Department
T
he NCAA needs a
postseason
playoff system for
football, but it may
interfere with the
players’ class
schedule.
SEE COLAIANNI ON PAGE 3B
Rachel Seymour/KANSAN
Junior first baseman Jared Schweitzer swings into a hit as junior centerfielder Matt Baty waits on deck
during yesterday afternoon’s game against Kansas State University. Schweitzer went 2-for-4 and scored one
run in the 6-4 Jayhawk victory against the Wildcats.
SEE DECLAW ON PAGE 4B
MONDAY, MAY 2, 2005
Wednesday
✦Softball vs. Missouri, 4 p.m., Arrocha Ballpark
✦Baseball vs. Wichita State, 7 p.m., Wichita
Friday
✦Baseball vs. Texas, 6 p.m., Hoglund Ballpark
sports 2b the university daily kansan monday, may 2, 2005
Tell us your news
Contact Bill Cross or Jonathan Kealing at
864-4858 or sports@kansan.com.
Athletics calendar
MEN’S BASKETBALL
Award honors Simien for
completing college degree
Wayne Simien can now add another award to
his list of postseason accolades. The
Leavenworth native received the CLASS award
on Saturday night at the Westin Hotel in Kansas
City, Mo. The award, voted on by national media,
fans and coaches, stands for “Celebrating
Loyalty and Achievement for Staying in School.”
Television broadcaster Dick Enberg created the
award in 2001 to honor college athletes who
earn their college degrees. Simien said that
because this award honored his off-the-court
accomplishments, it was special.
“It’s the thing that sets this one apart from the
others,” Simien said. “Not only is it in Kansas
City, but the type of thing it honors: education
and staying in school.”
Kansas State senior forward Kendra Wecker
received the women’s award. Simien and Wecker
were the fist players from Kansas to be present-
ed with the award since it was created in 2001.
Kansas coach Bill Self was in attendance along
with senior guards Mike Lee and Aaron Miles.
Next week, Simien will work out with a slew of
NBA teams on the West Coast, he said.
— Miranda Lenning
Kansas beats record, not Texas
It was a record-breaking weekend
for the Kansas rowing team, as the
Jayhawks took second among three
teams at the Big 12 Conference
Championship in Austin, Texas.
The first varsity eight boat broke a
five-year-old Kansas record on
Saturday with a time of 6:31.5. Team
members were coxswain Crystal Reed
and rowers Erin Hennessey, Kris
Lazar, Jennifer Ebel, Kristy Hainer,
Jelayna Da Silva, Gillian Van Ruyven,
Alexis Boston and Rachel Chapman.
“In my 20 years of rowing, that is
the fastest eight I’ve ever had,”
coach Rob Catloth said.
Overall, Kansas accumulated 45
team points. Texas took first with 53
points and Kansas State took third
with 40 points.
“They raced really well today,”
Catloth said. “They were a little disap-
pointed in the final outcome because
they wanted to beat Texas, but I was
really proud of how they rowed.”
Kansas was first off the line and took
the lead for the first 1,000 meters. But
in the last 500 meters, Texas took the
lead and K-State wasn’t even in the pic-
ture, Hennessey said. The last time
Kansas and Texas raced, the
Longhorns won by 10 seconds. Texas
won by five seconds on Saturday.
“It was the best race I’ve had in
my four years at KU,”
Hennessey said. “I don’t
think they expected us
to be that ready and be
that competitive.”
The team had wanted
to set the school record
all season, Reed said.
“We definitely raced
our hearts out,” Reed
said. “It was the best
race we’ve had all year.
This helps us keep our spir-
its up.”
The Jayhawks were excited about
breaking the record, but still upset
about the loss to the Longhorns.
“Our goal was to beat Texas
today,” Hennessey said. “Breaking
the record was kind of like the icing
on the cake, but it doesn’t over-
shadow losing to Texas. It was a bit-
tersweet day. We just need to look at
the bigger picture and realize that we
have improved so much.”
A lot of this improvement comes
from the coaching staff, Reed said.
“Rob did a really good job prepar-
ing us for today, mentally,” she said.
“He really pumped us up to show
that we had the potential to beat
Texas. It’s really uplifting to see a
coach excited for his team, and Rob
was completely ecstatic that we
broke the record.”
The first varsity four and second
varsity eight boats also took second to
Texas. The Jayhawks took third in the
first novice four and first novice eight.
“We raced really well today,” Reed
said. “We’ve made a lot of progress
with our speed, which makes us more
confident. Knowing how fast we raced
today really put us in good standing
for training in the next two weeks.”
Kansas will compete in the NCAA
Central/Southern Regionals May
14-15 in Oak Ridge, Tenn., when the
team will have another opportunity
to race against Texas.
— Edited by Jesse Truesdale
BY KRISTEN JARBOE
kjarboe@kansan.com
KANSAN SPORTSWRITER
Rowing team’s best time still 5 seconds behind Longhorns
▼ ROWING
▼ MEN’S GOLF
Jayhawks finish tournament in sixth
The University of Kansas men’s
golf team didn’t have its way at the
Big 12 Championships this weekend
in Trinity, Texas.
Wh i s p e r i n g
Pines Golf Course
proved to be a diffi-
cult all weekend.
Its narrow fairways
and tall rough led
to no teams finish-
ing under par for
the tournament.
The Jayhawks
fired three consec-
utive rounds above
300 as a team, but managed to finish
the tournament alone in sixth place.
As a team, the Jayhawks shot a
three-round total of 910, 46-over-
par, and missed fifth place by one
stroke to Texas A&M. The Aggies
finished the tournament with a total
score of 909.
Oklahoma State proved that it
was the No. 1 team in the nation, as
the Cowboys captured their fourth
Big 12 title in school history.
Oklahoma State won the tourna-
ment by nine strokes over
Oklahoma, shooting a total score of
868, 4-over-par.
Oklahoma’s Anthony Kim won
the individual championship by six
strokes with a three-round total of
208, 8-under-par.
Kansas coach Ross Randall said
that he would classify his team’s play
as mediocre at best.
“If you hit bad shots on a difficult
golf course, you will pay for them,”
Randall said. “But we’ll regroup
from this just as we always do.”
The Jayhawks struggled the most
in the second round, tallying eight
double bogeys. They had 14 double
bogeys or worse for the tournament.
No Jayhawk golfer fired a round of
under-par golf all weekend.
The one bright spot for the
Jayhawks was the play of senior
Kevin Ward, who finished in a tie for
15th. While the rest of the team
struggled on Saturday and yesterday,
Ward improved.
He struggled in the opening
round, shooting a 7-over-par 79. On
Saturday Ward was on target, firing
an even round of 72. Yesterday he
kept his composure and made it into
the clubhouse with a round of 74.
“All weekend long I worked hard
on my swing and my putting,” Ward
said. “I came back strong from the
79. I knew I would shoot a low
round somewhere.”
Senior Andrew Price and sopho-
more Gary Woodland both finished
the tournament in a tie for 37th,
with total scores of 233. Sophomore
Tyler Docking and junior Luke
Trammell both finished in a tie for
39th with scores of 234.
Though Randall was disappointed
in his team’s play this weekend,
three of the five teams the Jayhawks
finished behind are ranked in the
top 25 by Golfweek, and Oklahoma
State is the top team in the nation.
The Jayhawks played well enough
in the regular season to earn a spot
in the NCAA Central Regionals.
The Jayhawks will have another
three weeks off to practice and pre-
pare. The team will then head to
South Bend, Ind., to compete in the
regionals on May 19-21.
Randall said he was pleased about
the berth.
“I think that this team has a
chance to play and compete in the
nationals,” Randall said. “We can be
a great team when we play like we’re
capable of.”
— Edited by Azita Tafreshi
BY TIM HALL
thall@kansan.com
KANSAN SPORTSWRITER
Ward
ULTIMATE FRISBEE
Kansas defeats North Texas,
Arkansas but falls to Texas
The Kansas men’s ultimate Frisbee club team,
the HorrorZontals, took second at regionals in
Dallas during the weekend.The team easily
defeated Texas State, Rice and Tulane on
Saturday, winning each game by 10 points or
more. The ‘Zontals beat Arkansas and North
Texas yesterday before falling to Texas, 15-10.
Texas, which took first, will advance to nation-
als, while Kansas’ season is done. Texas will rep-
resent the South region at nationals in Corvallis,
Ore., May 27-29. Other regional winners will rep-
resent the Atlantic Coast, Central, Great Lakes,
Metro East, New England and Northwest regions
at the championships, according to the Ultimate
Players Association.
Kansas was ranked 18th in last week’s com-
puterized UPA poll, while Texas was No. 10.
— Kansan staff report
Reed Catloth Hennessey
Valid at Lawrence store only. Specials not valid with other offers or discounts.
Limited delivery area, charges my apply. Customer responsible for all applicable taxes.
L
A
T
E
N
I
G
H
T
2233 Louisiana
865-5775
Mon–Wed. 11am–1am, Thurs.—Sat. 11am–3am, Sun. 11am–Midnight
KU Student Specials!
Large
Up-to-2-Topping
Pizza
$
6
99
No limit
A
fte
r 9
p
.m
. o
n
ly
L
A
T
E
N
I
G
H
T
3 Medium
Two-Topping Pizzas
$
15
99
ANY TIME!
ANY TIME!
M
e
d
iu
m
1
-T
o
p
p
in
g
P
izza
$
4
9
9
C
a
rry
o
u
t O
n
ly
Both offers good after 9p.m. only
kansan.com
The current bowl system
wouldn’t have to be changed.
Simply change the BCS bowls
to the playoff ones.
Teams would still be able to
qualify for postseason play even
if they were not included in the
BCS playoff bowls.
The television ratings for a
playoff system would be astro-
nomical, allowing the NCAA to
charge more for the television
rights to show the games.
That’s what the NCAA is
most interested in: money.
Claiming that it wants what is
best for the athletes is false.
The NCAA is a business,
driven by college football.
While men’s basketball may be
profitable, it is nothing close to
the money maker that big-time
Division I football programs
are.
Switching to a playoff system
would also increase the popu-
larity drastically.
While you are not going to
see office pools circulating
like those for the men’s bas-
ketball tournament, the casual
fan would certainly be
intrigued and watch the play-
offs even if his team is not
included.
If the system was a four-game
playoff, the first-round games
should be held in prime time on
back-to-back nights.
The ratings would be huge
and the championship game
could get ratings higher than
the men’s basketball champi-
onship.
The championship game
should be two weeks after the
first round of the playoffs.
This problem needs to be
solved quickly, or fans will like-
ly see more split national
champions and more uncer-
tainty as to who is the nation’s
top team.
✦Colaianni is a McLean, Va.,
sophomore in journalism
and political science.
It was the KU waterski club’s
spring tournament, and cars
filled with parents lined the
small lake. Happy dogs
splashed in the water and shook
themselves off on people while
a few guys threw horseshoes.
Some competitors changed
into wet suits and prepared to
ski, while others curled up on
the grass in blankets and
sleeping bags, and tried to
keep dry as the cold wind
whipped the water and blew in
their faces.
Caitlin Gillian, Chicago
freshman, shivered near the
shore with the members of the
Kansas team, 45 minutes after
she skied in the trick event.
“My nipples could cut glass
after I got out,” she said.
The cold weather wasn’t a
problem for the team and it fin-
ished in first place.
The family of Carin Olson,
Minneapolis, Minn., sopho-
more, who made the long drive
south to watch her ski, ran a
concession stand to benefit the
Kansas team.
On the water, a boat pulled
Rachael Hudson, Topeka junior,
toward the 5-foot jump near the
middle of the lake. She reached
the top of the jump and soared
through the air. As her skis hit
the water 35 feet later, she tried
to lean back but her body
lurched forward and crashed
into the cold water.
She wiped out again on her
second attempt, but landed her
final jump of 35 feet. It wasn’t
enough to place her in the top
five.
This tournament was a tune
up, said Amy Bing, KU
Waterski Team president. It
was an important one for the
five KU skiers who will com-
pete in the National Collegiate
All-Stars on May 21-22.
“It’s just a chance for every-
body to get together before All-
Stars and the summertime,”
Bing, Wichita junior, said. “And
we’re really good friends with
the other teams.”
Six teams competed in the
tournament: Kansas State, Iowa
State, Purdue, Emporia State,
Southwest Missouri State and
Missouri.
They came into town Friday
night in vans, cars and buses.
Blake Hines, Southwest
Missouri State sophomore,
decided not to ski because of
the cold. He said he enjoyed the
event anyway.
“It’s good to see the same
people every year,” he said. “It’s
fun to go to other people’s hous-
es. And then they come to your
house. It’s kind of a reciprocal
thing.”
Some of the visitors camped
west of town at Lonestar Lake,
while others spent the night at
the house where five of the KU
waterskiers live.
In past years the teams
camped at MoKan Lake, a few
miles east of Lawrence where
the KU team practices and the
tournament is held. Because
camping tore up the land, teams
spent the night elsewhere this
year, said Jason Lewis, Anthony
senior and one of the team’s
captains.
On Saturday people lounged
around, while others competed
in the slalom and trick events in
the morning and the jump in the
afternoon. Some parents drove
in to see their children ski.
Natalie Steutermann, Kansas
State sophomore, was eager to
show her skills off to her seven
family members, who had never
seen her ski before.
Steutermann fell on her first
two jumps but landed her third.
Her family congratulated her
after she finished.
She learned to jump a year
ago, and this was only the sec-
ond time she landed a jump in a
tournament.
After they competed, teams
went back to Lonestar Lake for
an award banquet, pizza, a bon-
fire and a DJ.
They wrapped up the tourna-
ment with wakeboarding and B-
team skiing yesterday.
— Edited by Jennifer Voldness
Teams compete despite chilly weather
BY FRANK TANKARD
ftankard@kansan.com
KANSAN SPORTSWRITER
SPORTS monday, may 2, 2005 the university daily kansan 3B
Rachel Seymour/KANSAN
Andy Nissen, sophomore transfer from Minnesota State, performs in the men’s slalom late Saturday morning at the waterski club’s tourna-
ment. Nissen took fifth in the men’s slalom and the Jayhawks finished first among the seven other competing universities.
The Kansas, Kansas State and
Missouri waterski club teams
competed during the weekend at
MoKan lake, east of Lawrence on
Kansas Highway 10.
Here’s how the teams and individ-
ual Jayhawks performed:
Overall (men’s and women’s
scores are combined):
Kansas 1st
Kansas State 2nd
Missouri 3rd
KANSAS WOMEN
Slalom:
✦ Amy Bing, 1st
✦ Megan LaCroix and Emily
Nelson, 3rd (tied)
Trick:
✦ Amy Bing, 1st
✦ Emily Nelson, 2nd
✦ Caitlin Gillian, 3rd
Jump:
✦ Amy Bing, 2nd
✦ Rachel Forshee, 3rd
Overall:
✦ Amy Bing 1st
✦ Emily Nelson, 3rd
KANSAS MEN
Trick:
✦ Bobby Hamilton, 3rd
Source: KU waterski club
▼ CLUBS
▼ COLLEGE FOOTBALL
Bowl eligibility easier
with new NCAA rule
Expect to see a Division I-AA
opponent on the Kansas foot-
ball schedule for the next couple
of seasons.
The NCAA approved a rule
last week that will allow
Division I-A teams to count one
victory against a I-AA school
each season for bowl considera-
tion.
The NCAA also chose to
lengthen the regular season by
one game, to 12, beginning in
2006.
The game will take place dur-
ing what is now bye week.
This is good news for the
Kansas football team, as it will
face Division I-AA Appalachian
State this fall.
Kansas had counted a victory
against Jacksonville State in
2003 for a trip to the Tangerine
Bowl, and under the previous
rule, it would not have been
able to count the Appalachian
State game toward bowl eligibil-
ity.
Chancellor Robert
Hemenway served as the chair-
man for the board of directors
who approved the rule change.
Now the Jayhawks will need
to go 6-5 to qualify for a bowl
rather than 7-4 under the 11-
game schedule in 2005.
Senior Associate Athletics
Director Larry Keating said he
planned to have a I-AA team on
the schedule in 2006 and 2007,
so the games could be played at
Memorial Stadium.
“We can play a I-AA team
every year, and that is what we
are going to do at least for the
next couple of years,” Keating
said.
Keating said in March that
Kansas planned on being able to
count a victory against a I-AA
team when they scheduled
Appalachian State. Kansas
thought then that the change
would be made.
The NCAA has not yet decid-
ed if a 6-6 record will qualify
teams for a bowl game when the
season goes to 12 games in
2006.
Keating said he did not think
that the NCAA would require a
7-5 record for teams to qualify
for bowls.
“There may be a difference
between BCS bowls and regular
bowls,” Keating said. “One of
the things they have to look at is
the bowl agreements that are in
place now stipulate that six wins
is all that is required.”
Keating also said that if a 7-5
record was needed for each
bowl that there might not be
enough teams that qualify for
bowls each season.
Kansas qualified for the
Tangerine Bowl with a 6-6
record in 2003.
— Edited by Laura
Francoviglia
BY RYAN COLAIANNI
rcolaianni@kansan.com
KANSAN SPORTSWRITER
Miles Kennedy/THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Edward Cox (2) outruns Bert Lancaster (1) and Wilford Scott (3) to win the mens' masters 75-plus 100-
meter dash at the 2005 Penn Relays, Saturday in Philadelphia.
It’s running men
Colaianni
CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1B
waterski tournament results
E
V
E
R
Y
T
H
IN
G
B
U
T
IC
E
BEDS • DESKS
CHEST OF DRAWERS
BOOK CASES
unclaimed freight & damaged merchandise • 936 Mass.
NewsNewsNewsNews
NewsNewsNewsNews
NewsNewsNewsNews
NewsNewsNewsNews
NewsNewsNewsNews
NewsNewsNewsNews
NewsNewsNewsNews
NewsNewsNewsNews
NewsNewsNewsNews
NewsNewsNewsNews
NewsNewsNewsNews
NewsNewsNewsNews
NewsNewsNewsNews
NewsNewsNewsNews
NewsNewsNewsNews
NewsNewsNewsNews
NewsNewsNewsNews
NewsNewsNewsNews
NewsNewsNewsNews
NewsNewsNewsNews
kansan.com
Now.
SPORTS 4b the university daily kansan monday, may 2, 2005
The Jayhawks scored in every
inning except the bottom of the
second in the victory. The teams
combined to put 22 hits on the
board.
Kansas once again found
itself behind early after Kansas
State scored twice in the top of
the first. The Jayhawks
answered back with five runs
in the bottom half of the
inning, and the hitting rally
was on.
Senior right-hander Andrew
Rebar (3-0) picked up the vic-
tory in relief. Rebar allowed
one run in 2/3 innings of
work.
Senior right-hander Eric
Rollins (2-3) took the loss for
the Wildcats.
Czyz picked up his sixth save
of the season on Saturday night.
“He was really special
tonight. It’s nice to see him
rebounding,” coach Price said.
“He’s a really tough young
man and he’s made phenome-
nal progress. He’s one of the
guys that I’m most proud of
his development in our pro-
gram.”
Freshman second baseman
Ryne Price led the way at the
plate for Kansas going 2-5 with
four RBIs. Those RBIs put him
at 34 on the season, a record for
a Kansas freshman.
Senior infielder Andy Scholl
and junior outfielders Gus
Milner and A.J. Van Slyke
homered against the Wildcats in
the series finale.
Van Slyke, who also homered
in game two on Saturday, hit his
team-leading 11th home run in
the series finale. In the bottom
of the third, with freshman third
baseman Erik Morrison on
base, Van Slyke drove a long fly
ball to left center field. At the
wall, Blunt went up for the
catch only to help the Jayhawks
by tipping the ball over the
fence with the webbing of his
glove. The home run tied the
game at two.
“It was pretty nice when it
hit his glove and bounced
over,” Van Slyke said. “But I
knew that I hit it high enough
and the wind was blowing
hard enough. I wasn’t sur-
prised.”
Junior first baseman Jared
Schweitzer tagged a base hit in
the bottom of the second to
move his conference hitting
streak to 18 games.
His streak ties for the
longest in the Big 12 this sea-
son. Nebraska shortstop Joe
Simokaitis also had an 18-
game streak earlier in the sea-
son.
“It’s nice to get it out of the
way in the first at bat and not
have to worry about it,”
Schweitzer said.
He also revealed his secret
strategy that he uses to keep the
hits coming.
“I think it’s the hair that does
it,” Schweitzer said. “That’s
why my hair is so long and I
look all dirty. As soon as I don’t
get a hit, I’ll cut it.”
After Kansas State (23-20,
7-14 Big 12) struck first, lead-
ing 2-0 into the third, Van
Slyke’s home run tied the
game in the bottom of the
third. The Jayhawks went
ahead in the fourth and never
looked back.
Despite the error, Blunt led
the Wildcat offense in the final
game of the series. He went 2-5
at the plate, drove in a run and
scored twice in the defeat.
Senior left-hander Mike
Zagurski (5-4) threw a solid
outing against the Wildcats,
lasting into the eighth inning.
He allowed two runs on five
hits, struck out seven and
walked four batters in 7.2
innings pitched.
“I told him before he went
out there that the key was to
not walk anybody and try to
put single digit runs on the
board, rather than crooked
numbers,” coach Price said.
“That was the best perform-
ance he’s had in the two years
he’s been here.”
After a couple of rough out-
ings, Zagurski was pleased with
the outcome yesterday.
“My last two starts have not
been very good,” Zagurski said.
“I could prevent the three-run
homer from happening by keep-
ing guys off base. I was fortu-
nate enough to do that.”
Junior closer Don Czyz
picked up his seventh save of
the season after relieving
Zagurski in the eighth, despite
giving up a two-run home run
to junior infielder Barrett Rice
in the top of the ninth.
Junior right-hander Adam
Cowart (6-3) took the loss for
Kansas State.
“I think that is about as
proud of our club as I’ve been
in my three years here,” coach
Price said. “You get it taken to
you pretty good on Friday
night and then bounce back
like we did this weekend. I’m
really proud of the pride and
character we showed this
weekend.”
— Edited by Austin Caster
Declaw
CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1B
KANSAS 0, KANSAS STATE 7
Kansas State (23-18) AB R H RBI
Terry Blunt, lf 5 0 2 0
Brandon Farr, c 5 1 2 1
Jared Goedert, 2b/1b 5 2 3 0
Steve Murphy, rf 3 1 1 1
Joe Roundy, dh 4 1 1 2
Josh Dent, cf 4 1 1 0
Chris Tapia, 1b 2 0 1 1
Eric Eymann, ss 3 0 1 1
Eli Rumler, 3b 4 1 0 0
Totals 35 7 12 6
✦ HR: None
Kansas (27-21) AB R H RBI
Matt Baty, cf 4 0 0 0
Ritchie Price, ss 3 0 0 0
A.J. Van Slyke, lf 3 0 1 0
Gus Milner, rf 4 0 0 0
Sean Richardson, c 3 0 0 0
Andy Scholl, 1b 3 0 1 0
Ryne Price, 2b 3 0 0 0
Travis Dunlap, dh 3 0 0 0
Erik Morrison, 3b 3 0 0 0
Totals 29 0 2 0
✦ HR: None
Score by inning R H E
Kansas State 500 000 11x 7 12 0
Kansas000 000 000 0 2 2
Win: Chase Mitchell (5-5)
Loss: Kodiak Quick (8-5)
Save: None
Source: Kansas Athletics Department
KANSAS 15, KANSAS STATE 11
Kansas State (23-19) AB R H RBI
Terry Blunt, lf 4 1 1 0
Josh Dent, cf 4 3 2 3
Jared Goedert, 2b 4 1 0 0
Steve Murphy, rf 3 1 1 2
Joe Roundy, dh 5 0 0 0
Barrett Rice, 3b 4 2 1 2
Cris Tapia, 1b 5 1 2 2
Eric Eymann, ss 5 1 1 0
David Baker, c 4 1 3 1
Totals 38 11 11 10
✦ HR: Dent, Rice, Tapia
Kansas (28-21) AB R H RBI
Matt Baty, cf 4 2 2 0
Ritchie Price, ss 3 2 1 1
A.J. Van Slyke, lf 4 2 1 4
Gus Milner, rf 5 0 0 0
Sean Richardson, c 3 3 1 0
Jared Schweitzer, 1b 2 2 1 2
John Allman, dh 2 2 1 1
Andy Scholl, ph 0 0 0 1
Ryne Price, 2b 5 1 2 4
Erik Morrison, 3b 4 1 2 1
Totals 32 15 11 14
✦ HR: Van Slyke, Schweitzer
Score by inning R H E
Kansas State 250 021 100 11 11 0
Kansas 502 221 21x 15 11 1
Win: Andrew Rebar (3-0)
Loss: Eric Rollins (2-3)
Save: Don Czyz (6)
Source: Kansas Athletics Department
“Ithink this is
about as proud of our
club as I’ve been in
my three years here.”
Ritch Price
Kansas coach
BOX SCORES
KANSANCLASSIFIEDS
PHONE 785.864.4358 FAX 785.864.5261 CLASSIFIEDS@KANSAN. COM
AUTO STUFF JOBS LOST & FOUND FOR RENT
ROOMMATE/
SUBLEASE SERVICES CHILD CARE TICKETS TRAVEL
Classified Policy: The Kansan will not knowingly accept any
advertisement for housing or employment that discriminates
against any person or group of persons based on race, sex,
age, color, creed, religion, sexual orientation, nationality or
disability. Further, the Kansan will not knowingly accept
advertising that is in violation of University of Kansas regula-
tion or law.
All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the
Federal Fair Housing Act of 1968 which makes it illegal to
advertise “any preference, limitation or discrimination based
on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or
national origin, or an intention, to make any such preference,
limitation or discrimination.”
Our readers are hereby informed that all jobs and housing
advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal oppor-
tunity basis.
JOBS JOBS JOBS JOBS STUFF
TICKETS
TRAFFIC-DUI’S-MIP’S
PERSONAL INJURY
Student legal matters/Residency issues
divorce, criminal & civil matters
The law offices of
DONALD G. STROLE
Donald G. Strole Sally G. Kelsey
16 East 13th 842-5116
Free Initial Consultation
For part-time package handlers at
FedEx Ground, it s like a paid work-
out. The work is demanding, but the
rewards are big. Come join our team,
get a weekly paycheck, tuition assis-
tance and break a sweat with the
nation s package-delivery leader.
Requirements include:
-18 years of age
-Work five consecutive days/week
-Ability to lift and carry 50-75 lbs.
-Load, unload and sort packages
-Work in hot and cold environments
Benefits Include:
-Scheduled raises every 90 days for the
first year
-Excellent advancement opportunities
-Tuition reimbursement
-No Weekends
-Equal Opportunity Employer
Come apply in person at:
8000 Cole Parkway
Shawnee, KS 66227
Call us at:
913-441-7569 or 913-441-7536
Shifts include:
DAY 2-6 p.m., TWI 6:30-10:30 p.m.,
NIT 11 p.m.-3a.m., SUN 3:30-7:30 a.m.
and Preload 1:30-7:30a.m.
Directions:
Take Hwy10 to Hwy 7 North. Follow
Hwy 7 to 83rd St and go west. Follow
83rd St. and make a right on Cole Pkwy.
Eye Exams Contact Lenses
Dr. Matt Lowenstein
and Associates
Therapeutic Optometrists Therapeutic Optometrists
841-2500 841-2500
Located Next to SUPER TARGET
Discount with Student Id
Storage units
available
No Security Deposit
2201 St. James Ct.
785-838-4764
)DVWTXDOLW\MHZHOU\UHSDLU
FXVWRPPDQXIDFWXULQJ
ZDWFKFORFNUHSDLU
0DVV
marksinc@swbell.net
Have experience working with
children?
Raintree Montessori School located on 14
acres with fishing pond and swimming
pools has the following openings begin-
ning June 1. Two late afternoon positions:
3-6 year-olds, 3:15-5:30 PM. 9 hours in
child-related courses and experience re-
quired. Positions continue in the fall.
$8.50/hr. Two full-time elementary sum-
mer camp counsel ors: Art Studi o or
Drama Workshop working with 6-12 year-
olds. Camp experience and training/expe-
ri ence i n art or drama requi red. Cal l
843.6800 or pick up application at
Raintree, 4601 Clinton Parkway.
Grand Stand Sportswear has an immedi-
ate opening for a PT/FT graphic artist ex-
perienced with free hand. Illustrator, and
Photoshop on the Mac. Must provide sam-
ple work and demonstrate artistic talent.
Screen printing knowledge a plus. Apply
i n person at 2124 Del aware St. Cal l
843-8888 with questions.
GET PAID FOR YOUR OPINIONS!
Earn $15-$125 and more per survey!
www.moneyforsurveys.com
2000 Oldsmobile Alero. Excellent cond,
power everything. Brand new tires, recent
tune-up. $4350. Leave message 312-7512
MIRACLE VIDEO
SPRING SALE
All adult movies
$12.98 & Up
1900 Haskell 785- 841-7504
COLLEGE STUDENTS
Great pay, flexible
schedules, sales/svc,
all ages 18+, conditions apply,
Call Now! Johnson Co. 913-722-0117
Wichita 316-267-2083
DOWNTOWN OFFICE ASSISTANT
Hiring PT office assistant for downtown
Lawrence business. $8/hr. 841-7274.
Get a head start with your summer em-
ployment and land a job that is flexible
with school when the summer is over.
Zarco 66 is now hiring sale associates. All
shi fts avai l abl e, fl exi bl e schedul i ng,
friendly co-workers, locally owned com-
pany. Apply at 900 Iowa Street.
SUMMER CAMPSTAFF
www. coloradomountainranch.com
1-800-267-9573
Help wanted for custom harvesting. Com-
bine operators and truck drivers. Guaran-
teed pay, good summer wages. Cal l
970-483-7490 evenings.
Camp Counselors - Gain valuable expe-
rience while having the summer of a life-
time! Counselors needed for all activities
apply online at www.pineforestcamp.com.
The perfect summer job! Women’s fitness
faci l i ty l ooki ng for qual i fi ed person to
teach kids fitness classes and work in on-
site childcare center. Experience with chil-
dren required. Hourly wage + salon dis-
count & free gym membership. Send re-
sumes to Body Bouti que attn Carri e
Forster 2330 Yale Rd., Lawrence , KS
66049. For more information call 749-2424
The DOUGLAS COUNTY CONSERVA-
TION DISTRICT is accepting applications
for a full-time entry-level WATER QUALI-
TY/BUFFER COORDINATOR. The Coor-
dinator implements state water quality pro-
grams, promotes establishment of conver-
sation practices, and develops education
programs. Will require some time spent
outdoors, which may include rough ter-
rain. Requires background experience in
conservation or agriculture. College de-
gree preferred. Beginning pay $10 per
hour. Benefits include health insurance,
vacation, and sick leave. For application
and complete job description call (785)-
843-4260 x 3. Applications will be ac-
cepted through May 4, 2005.
Nanny needed
Fall semester for two children. Tues.-
/Thurs. 7am-6pm, Mon. 11 am - 6 pm
One or all days, possibility of split days.
Must have transportation. Please contact
Cathy at 838-4244.
TACO BELL
SHIFTS/CREW
Now taking applications
for full time shift leaders and
crew members.
Insurance, vacation, 401K.
Apply in person.
1408 West 23rd Street.
1220 West 6th Street.
Lawrence, KS
E O E
500! Police Impounds! Hondas, Chevys,
Toyotas, etc. From $500!
Cars/ trucks/SUVs/Jeeps.
For listings 800-426-9668 x 4565
PLAY SPORTS! HAVE FUN! SAVE
MONEY! Sports camp i n Mai ne.
Coaches needed: Tenni s, Basketbal l ,
Baseball, Water-sports, Ropes Course,
Golf, Archery, and more. Work Outdoors
and Have a Great Summer! Call Free:
(888) 844-8080 or Apply:
www. campcedar.com.
Open house
Wednesday and Friday
from 4:00 to 6:00 pm
at Hanover Place... 209/213 Hanover
and Kentucky Place...1314 Kentucky
Graduating Seniors. Celebrate and en-
tertai n your graduati on weekend i n a
unique and elegant setting. Located 4
blocks from campus. Historic Williams
house offers an 1861 home, 9 acres of
perennial gardens, and limestone ruins.
Exceptional on-site catering. Call for an
apt 843-8530.
Shipping position open. $8.00 per
hour. 20 hours per week. Choose your
own hours. Must have own transportation.
Mileage reimbursed. Involves some heavy
lifting. Must be committed and depend-
able. Send letter and/or resume w/3 refer-
ences to: EEI, P.O. Box 1304, Lawrence,
KS 66044. EOE/AA.
College Grads!
Apply with the Midwest’s leading
placement firm for career opportunities.
No fees!
Premier Personnel
www.premierks.com
785-273-9944
$5,000 + That’s what you could earn this
summer. Hel p needed i n new energy
drink launch. Call 888-212-7373.
Need help getting A’s in class? Certi-
fied teacher available for various courses.
If interested call Alan at 785-843-8180.
BAR TENDING!
$300/day potential. No experience nec.
Training Provided.800-965-6520 ext.108
Looking for somebody to create a
web page. Pay negotiable.
Call Jim at 749-5997
Mass Street Pinups is looking for
beautiful amateur models 18-23 for pinup
and glamour photography - no nudity
required. Excellent pay + incentives.
From sporty, athletic girls to curvy, natural
beauties-we encourage you to call us!
785-856-0780
Mystery
Shoppers
Needed for work at local stores
No exp req’d/Training prov’d
Up to $19 per hour
Immed openings FT/PT
Call 1-888-898-4124
Make Money and Have Fun!
Athletic/creative counselors/coaches
needed; sports, water, art; apply online
www.summercampemployment.com;
carolyn@summercampemployment.com
1-800-443-6428
Student Summer Help Wanted. General
field work growing flowers, turf and veg-
etables at K-State Research and Exten-
sion Center west of Olathe in Johnson
County. Must have own transportation to
si te 31525 W. 135th Street, Ol athe.
8.00/hr/ 40hrs/wk. Cal l Terry at
913-856-2335 ext. 102 or 816-806-3734.
Summer Jobs
Positions open NOW!
Data Entry - Clerical - Receptionist
Warehouse - Production
Key Staffing
2815 SW Wanamaker
Topeka, KS 66614
785-272-9999
Childcare provider needed in our home
Basehor, KS. Call 913-728-2370.
AUTO
JOBS
SERVICES
STUFF
Kansan Classifieds
864-4358
classifieds@kansan.com
KANSANCLASSIFIEDS
PHONE 785.864.4358 FAX 785.864.5261 CLASSIFIEDS@KANSAN. COM
AUTO STUFF JOBS LOST & FOUND FOR RENT
ROOMMATE/
SUBLEASE SERVICES CHILD CARE TICKETS TRAVEL
KANSANCLASSIFIEDS
In a Class of its Own.
Don’t forget the
20% student discount
when placing a
classified.
With proof of KUID
“The Ultimate in Luxury Living”
• ONE MONTHFREE RENT!!!
• Luxury 1,2,3 BR apts.
• Full size washer and dryer
• 24 hour fitness room
• Computer Center
• Pool with sundeck
1/4 mile west on Wakarusa
5000 Clinton Parkway
www.pinnaclewoodsapartments.com
785-865-5454
1 & 2 BRs
Large Unique Floorplans
W/D, Pool & Hot Tub &
Fitness Center
700 Comet Lane
832-8805
Now Accepting Short Term Leases
• Large 3&4 BR, 2 full bath
• Large fully applianced
• Dishwasher & microwave in kitchen
• Gas heat & hot water
• Central heat & air
• Off street parking
• Fully furnished @ no cost
• 24 hr. emergency maintenance
• Washer & Dryer
• Modern decor
Show Units Open daily
No appointments needed.
Office Hours Mon-Fri 9am-5pm
Regents
Court
19th & Mass
749-0445
regents@mastercraftcorp.com
Now Leasing
for fall
Luxury apts
1, 2 & 3 BRs
DVD library & free
continental breakfast
2001 W. 6 St.
841-8468
www.tuckawaymgmt.com
Tuckaway
at
Briarwood
Pool & Fitness
Washer/Dryer
Alarm System
Fully Equipped Kitchen
Fireplace
(at Tuckaway/Harper)
Built in TV
(at Tuckaway)
Tuckaway has two pools,
hot tubs, basketball court,
fitness center and gated entrance
2600 w 6th Street
Call 838-3377
Harper Square
Apartments
2201 Harper Street
Hutton Farms
Kasold and Peterson
Brand New!
Gated residential homes for lease
From 1 Bedrooms with
garage up to single family homes
Clubhouse, fitness, swimming pool,
walking trail, car wash, plus more!
841-3339
Bring this in with your application and receive
$300. off deposit. Offer expires 5/13/05
1-2-3 Bed
$99 Deposit
Call for Specials
843-4040
4500 Overland Dr.
thefoxrun.com
Fem. wanted to share cute 3 BR house.
Avai l . for summer or l onger. Cl ose to
downtown. $285/mo.+ 1/3 util. 312-9458
1 & 2 BR some w/ wood floors, free util.,
free W/D use, near KU, $345-560 mo.
841-3633 anytime.
Female art student seeks female room-
mate, 1/2 hour commute to KU, house on
3/4 acre, art studio, garage, view, deck,
fi repl ace, $425/mo. + 1/2 uti l . Approx
$650/mo. total. 913-721-9964
2 BR, 1 BA, lrg. 444 California. On bus
route, W/D, CA, pets ok, $600. 550-7325.
Garage?
2 BR town home w/ garage
W/D Hookups
Hanover- 1400 block Kentucky
www.midwestpm.com
MPM- 841-4935
Attn sen. and grad students. Real nice,
quiet [3 BR,3 BA}, [2 BR, 1 BA] Close to
KU. Lots of windows, hardwood floors. No
pets/smoking. 331-5209 or 749-2919
Female roommate wanted to share a
brand new 2 story home, 4 BR 41/2 BA.
$400/mo. + util. Must like dogs. Located in
Hutton Farms at Peterson and Kasold.
Call 913-231-8860 or 913-209-9206.
4 BR, 3 BA, W/D, Dishwasher, Central
Ai r, near downtown, cats okay.
$1500/mo. 545 Tennessee. 785-842-8473
3 BR, 2 BA house, all appl, full bsmt, 1
car garage. CA, gas heat. New carpet &
paint. New siding, lg yard. $151,500. Avail
ASAP1832 W 22nd. 636-561-4077.
Near KU; Studio and 1 BR apts. Rm. or of-
fice apt. in private home. Possible ex-
change for misc. labor. Call 841-6254
Great Westside Location!
950 Monterey Way
1 & 2 bed, 1 ba, laundry on site
fully equip kit $410 & $500
Midwest Property Mgmt 841-4935
Large floorplan for the $$$$$
Bradford Square
Central Location- $199 Sec. Dep.
1,2,3 BR’s
MPM- 841-4935
Best Value! California Apts. 501 Califor-
nia Studios, 1,2, & 3 BRs. From $415.
Avail. Now & Aug.1. 841-4935
Heatherwood Apts. Large 1, 2 & 3 BR
apts. Pool , carports, 2 BA, water pd.
$450-$595. $99 deposit. 842-7644
3 BR, 2 BA, on bus rte., DW, W/D, newly
remodeled, $720/mo. water included, $50
electric paid per mo. 816-289-3502
Location! Location!
901 Illinois
2 BR/ 1 Bath
W/D Hookups
Starting at $535
MPM- 841-4935
2 BR apt in ren. older house 14th &
Conn. Walk to KU/dwntwn, AVAIL
AUG. wd flrs, AC, D/W, WD hookups,
cats ok, $599 call Jim & Lois
841-1074
Midpoint of Campus and Downtown
Kentucky Place- 1300 block of Kentucky
2, 3, and 4 BR’s avail.
Lots of closet space
Call for Specials
MPM- 841-4935
Female Roommate wanted for 3 BR apt.
$280 /mo. plus 1/3 util. Lease from 8/05
-7/06. Call for details. (785)-760-0223.
KU students looking for fem. roommates
to share 5BR, 3BA house on New Hamp-
shi re. $300/mo. +uti l . Cal l Leanne @
785-218-4751
Looking for 2 female Roommates for 2003
town home. No pets, no smoking. Located
5-10 min from campus. Avail. Aug. $350 +
1/3 utilities. Call 785-550-5855.
Sublease for June and July. 1 Large BR
apt., hardwood floors, free cable & some
uti l . $420mo.+ el ectri ci ty. 1215 Ten-
nessee. Call Suzie 312-4803.
Summer sublease 1 room avail. in 2 BR
apt, 6th & Iowa, spacious, W/D, pets ok,
$330/mo. + util. 785-218-6192
SUMMER SUBLEASE: 4 BR, 2 BA only
1 other roommate. $320/mo + electric.
Can move in May 18th. Call 316-640-6784.
Roommate Needed ASAP for really spa-
cious and nice 2BR apt. Get your own
designated parking spot. $300 mo & no
util. Call Chrissie at 913-634-8116.
Great studio apt, $425/mo, no deposit, all
util paid. Perfect condition. Avail May 16
unti l Aug. Lease i s extendabl e. Trai l
Ridge apts contact Danielle 816-699-3337.
1, 2, 3 & 4 BR apts. & town homes
Now Leasing for Summer & Fall
walk-in closets, patio/balcony swimming
pool, KU bus route.
Visit www.holiday-apts.com
Or call 785-843-0011 to view
2 BR / 2 BATH
With Washer Dryer
Starting at $675
Newer property- central location
Country Club
www.midwestpm.com
MPM- 841-4935
EDDINGHAM APARTMENTS
VALUE AND LOCATION!
Now leasing for fall...
24th and Naismith
841-5444
QUAILCREEK APARTMENTS
WESTSIDE...GREATFLOOR PLANS!
2111 Kasold
842-4300
Enjoy a panoramic view of Lawrence from
your well maintained, spacious, 3 bed-
room, 2 bath condo. Rent is only $825.00
with water and trash paid. Featuring a
fully equipped kitchen, washer/dryer, on
the KU bus route, or enj oy a short 5
minute walk to class or downtown. For a
showi ng cal l 842-6264 or 865-8741
evenings & weekends.
Cute 1041 Conn. 2+ BR $685/mo. No
Pets. Avail 8/1. 1300 Connecticut Nice 3
BR, 2 BA $975/mo. No Pets. Avail. 6/1.
Call 841-2544 or 841-4935
Excellent locations 1341 Ohio & 1104
Tenn. 2 BR, CA, D/W, W/D hook-ups.
$500 & $480 Aug. 1. No pets. 842-4242
1 BR apt. Cable, WD included, 2 bal-
conies, stones throw to KU. $499. Sub-
lease until July 31st. Call 785-838-3377 &
ask about Hawker B6.
Summer sublease 2 BR, 2 BA, 5 min.
walk to campus, quiet, no pets, W/D. Call
Erica (785) 550-5572.
Summer Sublease Apt in Legends. Pri-
vate bath in bedroom, parking & util. Incl.
pool & clubhouse. Call (847)275-7556.
Walk to Campus! 1712 Ohio. 3 & 4 BR
Apts. Avai l . Aug. 1. Mi dwest Property
Mgmt. 841-4935
Sunflower Apts. Large 1& 2 BR apts.
Free cable. $395-$435. $99 deposit. Pets
okay 842-7644.
The Roanoke Apts.
W. 41st. Place and Roanoke Rd.KC, MO.
1-2 Bdrms. Near KU Med. Ctr.
Off-street parking.816-756-1789
Washer/Dryer provided
Great Location- 6th and Michigan
1,2,3 BR starting at $450
$199 Security Deposit
Woodward Apts
www.midwestpm.com
MPM-841-4935
785-760-0963
785-841-4935
2 BR, 2 BA avail July 10, ‘05 through Aug
1, ‘06. CA, W/D, 2 car garage, on bus
route. No smoking, no pets. Nice Prairie
Meadow location. $800, call 785-842-0001
3 bed, 2 ba, 2 car gar
2 living areas, large kit
w/d hook, walk out bsmt
2505 Rawhide Ln $975
Midwest Property Mgmt 841-4935
Studio apt on bus route. $390/mo.
508 Wisconsin. Avail Aug 1.
218-8254 or 218-3788
Remodeled! Eastview Apts. 1025 Miss.
Studio, 1 &2 BRs. Avail. Aug. 1. Midwest
Property Mgmt. 841-4935
Great Location!!
3 bed, 1.5 ba, 1 car gar
w/d hook, 2 level, deck and patio
3005-3007 University Dr.
Located in quiet area!! $775
Midwest Property Mgmt 841-4935
Space & quiet. Private BR in spacious
house shared with 2 male KU students.
$475/month includes utilities & Internet.
785-832-1270
Garber
Property
Management
Now leasing for June/Aug.
2-3 bdrm townhomes at the
following locations:
*Bainbridge Circle
(1190 sq. ft to 1540 sq. ft)
*Brighton Circle
(1200 sq. ft to 1650 sq. ft)
*Adam Avenue (1700 sq. ft)
Providing
*Equipped kitchens
*W/D hk-ups
*Window coverings
*Garages w/openers
*Ceramic tile
*Fireplaces
*Lawn care provided
*NO PETS
841-4785
3 BR, al l appl i ances, i n W. Lawrence
$995 to $1095 starting Aug. 1. Well Main-
tained. Great Locations. 749-4010.
4 BR, 2 BA, 2 story house
W/D hkups, 2 car gar, fenced yard
4808 W 25th St. $1100
Max of 3 unrelated persons!
841-4935 Ask for Wendy
1 BR apt. in renovated older house.
AVAIL AUG. New 90% efficient gas
furnace, wd flrs, window AC, DW,
lrge kit, small BR, off-street parking.
9th & Miss. right near laundry mat.
$450. Cats ok. Call Jim and Lois
841-1074.
Awesome location 922 Tennessee St.
3 BR 2 full BA . W/D hookups available
Aug. 1st. No pets. 785-393-1138.
4 BR, 2 BA duplexes. Avail. August 1st.
All Appliances incl. W/D. On bus route.
$850/mo. 1811 W. 4th. Call 766-9823
1112 New Jersey Large 3 BR,
1.5 BAhouse. $1000/ mo. No pets
841-4935 ask for Wendy
Male Christian Roommate wanted for 3
BR apt. W/D, DW. $260/mo. + 1/3 util.
Avail 06/01. Call 913-669-0854.
Work in K.C.- School in Lawrence?
Turtle Rock Condos- 2100 Haskell
2 BR starting at $550
Washer/Dryer hookups
MPM- 841-4935
West Side Bargain
1, 2 BR - 1 bath
Bus Route
Great kitchens/floorplans
Jacksonville- $199 Sec. Dep.
MPM- 841-4935
Apt. room for rent, private bath. Off 6th
street. $322/ month + 1/2 Utilities. Avail-
able Graduation - End of July. Call Molly
913 302 6989
WOW!
3 BR 2 1/2 BA$820
4 BR 2 BA$920
Unbelievable space for your money.
Taking deposits now.
Sunrise Village 841-8400
660 Gateway Ct.
2 bed, 2 ba, 2 car gar
fenced yard, w/d hook
large eat in kitch, pets ok
2112 Pikes Peak $725
Midwest Property Mgmt 841-4935
AVAIL AUG. small 2 BR apt in older
house, 14th & Conn. Walk to KU, Dil-
lons, & downtown, private porch
with swing, small storage area, off-
street parking. $485 call Jim & Lois
841-1074
Apartments, Houses, and Duplexes
for rent. Best prices and service in
town. 842-7644 www.gagemgmt.com
BEST DEAL!
Nice, quiet, well kept 2 BR apart-
ment. Appliances, CA, low bills and
more! No pets, no smoking.
$405/mo. 841-6868
College Hill Condos
927 Emery Rd.
3 bed, 2 ba, w/d provided
1050 sq ft, fully equip kitch
$775-800 B101, B303
Midwest Property Mgmt 760-1415
Briarstone Apts.
1+2 BR. apts. for June or Aug. Great
nei ghborhood near campus at 1000
Emery Rd. 1 BR- $505 or $515 with W/D
hookups. 2 BR- $635 with W/D hookups.
Balcony or patio, ceiling fan, mini-blinds,
DW, microwave, walk-in closets. No pets.
785-749-7744 or 785-760-4788
Leasing Aug. 331-7821
2 BR, on KU bus rte. $550
2 BR + den, on KU bus rte. $595
3 large BR, W/D, garage, FP, $975
2 BR NOW/ Aug., W/D, westside $675+
Avail Aug, small 1 BR basement apt
in newly renovated older house.
14th & Vermont. DW, AC, cats ok.
Brand new 90% efficient furnace.
$350/mo. Call Jim and Lois 841-1074.
Parkway Gardens
3 bed, 2 ba w/ 1 car gar
w/d hook, private patio
Located in Quiet setting
Max of 3 people $875-$975
Midwest Property Mgmt 766-4852
Charming 1 BR apts in Victorian
house very close to campus & down-
town. Util paid. Call 913-441-4169.
2 bed, 2 ba, 1 car gar
w/d hook, bsmt, deck
4729 Moundridge Ct $800
Midwest Property Mgmt 841-4935
Affordable College Rates!
2 BR 1 & 1/2 BA
3 floor plans starting at $510
Taking deposits now.
Sunrise Place 841-8400
9th & Michigan
TOWN HOMES APARTMENTS
FOR RENT
HOMES
APARTMENTS
APARTMENTS
TOWN HOMES
APARTMENTS
HOMES
ROOMMATE/
SUBLEASE
Classifieds monday, May 2, 2005 the university daily kansan 5B
sports 6B the university daily kansan monday, may 2, 2005
Team splits for Penn Relays
If two of the most elite relay
meets in the country land on the
same weekend, what do you do?
Go to both.
That’s what the Kansas track
and field team did this weekend.
Coach Stanley Redwine led half
of the team into Des Moines,
Iowa, for the Drake Relays. Amy
Linnen, senior pole vaulter,
Benson Chesang, junior distance
runner, and Sheldon Battle, jun-
ior thrower, led the other half
into Philadelphia for the Penn
Relays.
The Penn relays, in its 111-
year history, brings in talent
from high schools, universities
and Olympic training facilities
worldwide. The Jayhawks
proved worthy opponents with
three first-place finishes.
Battle won the men’s shot put
with the mark of 65 feet, .912
inches. His victory updated his
current No. 1 ranking in the Big
12 Conference.
“I felt good. I knew there were
a lot of good guys here, and I’ve
been executing well,” Battle said.
Amy Linnen took home
another victory as she won the
women’s pole vault. The senior
vaulted 13 feet,10 inches, setting
a new Penn Relays record. She
vaulted five inches higher than
the second place finisher,
Arkansas’ Stacy Manuel.
Benson Chesang won the
men’s 5,000-meter run. He also
won the men’s invitational mile
last weekend at the Kansas
Relays. In his first trip to the
Penn Relays, and his first effort of
the season in the 5,000-meter
race, Chesang finished in the
time of 13:57.42. His time vaulted
him to third place in the Big 12.
The highlight of the meet,
Redwine said, was the men’s
4x800 meter relay. Mike Rost,
Cameron Schwehr, Brandon
Hodges and Joshy Madathil fin-
ished third behind Big 12 rivals
Kansas State and Missouri.
The best 4x800 team couldn’t
compete because of the split,
Redwine said, but the four’s per-
formances were their best.
“Mike Rost ran a personal
best and set the team up for suc-
cess. Joshy Mandathil ran a
solid leg,” Redwine said. “We’re
definitely excited.”
Rost ran the first leg of the
relay team. The Wichita sopho-
more ran 1:52.8, his best time in
the 800-meter run. In his first trip
to the Drake Relays, Rost said he
was pushed by the excitement.
— Edited by Nikola Rowe
BY PATRICK SHEHAN
pshehan@kansan.com
KANSAN SPORTSWRITER
Juggle, juggle, toil and trouble
▼ TRACK AND FIELD
Stephanie Farley/KANSAN
Bradley Barger, Lawrence graduate student, practices juggling techniques Saturday afternoon on Wescoe Beach. Barger is a member of the
KU Juggling Club. He’s been juggling for about 10 years. Anyone interested in joining can e-mail the club at juggle@ku.edu.
RESTAURANTS
BEST MEXICAN: EL MEZCAL
BEST CHINESE: JADE GARDEN
BEST BREAKFAST: FIRST WATCH
BEST BURGERS: JEFFERSON’S
BEST SUBS: YELLO SUB
BEST ITALIAN: PAISANO’S
BEST STEAKHOUSE: HEREFORD HOUSE
BEST VEGETARIAN: ZEN ZERO
BEST PIZZA: PAPA KENO’S
BEST FRENCH FRIES: McDONALD’S
BEST WINGS: BUFFALO WILD WINGS
BEST BUFFET: JADE MONGOLIAN
BEST ICE CREAM: SYLAS & MADDY’S
BEST CUSTARD: SHERIDAN’S
BEST COFFEE HOUSE: STARBUCKS
BEST ATMOSPHERE: FREE STATE BREWERY
BEST DELIVERY SERVICE: JIMMY JOHN’S
BEST BAKERY: WHEATFIELDS
BEST POST-PARTY FOOD: THE WHEEL
BEST CUSTOMER SERVICE: FREE STATE BREWERY
BEST DATE RESTAURANT: PAISANO’S
BEST KC RESTAURANT: CHEESECAKE FACTORY
BEST LOCAL RESTAURANT: FREE STATE BREWERY
BEST OVERALL RESTAURANT: FREE STATE BREWERY
BEAUTY SERVICES
BEST WORKOUT FACILITY: STUDENT REC CENTER
BEST HAIR SALON: Z COSMETOLOGY
BEST BARBER: DOWNTOWN BARBERSHOP
BEST MASSAGE: Z COSMETOLOGY
BEST WAXING: Z COSMETOLOGY
BEST TANNING SALON: MANGO TAN
BEST NAIL PLACE: Z COSMETOLOGY
BEST TATTOO SHOP: BIG DADDY CADILLACS
RETAILERS
BEST CAR WASH: ROCK CHALK
BEST GROCERY STORE: HY-VEE
BEST GAS STATION: BP AMOCO
BEST CAR SERVICES: JIFFY LUBE
BEST COPY CENTER: FEDEX KINKOS
BEST BANK: COMMERCE BANK
BEST EYE DOCTOR: DR. KEVIN LENAHAN
BEST LAWYER: LEGAL SERVICES FOR STUDENTS
BEST FLOWER SHOP: FLOWERAMA
BEST LAUNDROMAT: COLLEGE LAUNDRY
BEST GOLF COURSE: ALVAMAR
BEST DRY CLEANERS: SCOTCH
BEST MOVIE RENTAL: BLOCKBUSTER
BEST LIQUOR STORE: CORK & BARREL
BEST MUSIC STORE: LOVE GARDEN
BEST SHOE STORE: ARENSBERG’S
BEST MEN’S CLOTHING: ABERCROMBIE & FITCH
BEST WOMEN’S CLOTHING: BRITCHES
BEST SPORTING GOODS: FRANCIS SPORTING GOODS
BEST BIKE SHOP: SUNFLOWER OUTDOOR & BIKE
BEST JEWELRY STORE: GOLDMAKERS
BEST DEPARTMENT STORE: WEAVER’S
BEST ELECTRONICS: BEST BUY
BEST FURNITURE STORE: BLUE HERON
BEST PET STORE: PET WORLD
BEST CELL PHONE CARRIER: CINGULAR
BEST PLACE TO SELL CD’S: HASTINGS
BEST PLACE TO SELL OLD CLOTHES: ARIZONA TRADING COMPANY
UNIVERSITY RELATED
BEST PLACE TO STUDY: ANSCHUTZ LIBRARY
BEST BOOKSTORE: JAYHAWK BOOKSTORE
BEST RESIDENCE HALL: OLIVER HALL
BEST SCHOLARSHIP HALL: K.K. AMINI
BEST BUILDING ON CAMPUS: BUDIG HALL
BEST FRATERNITY: PI KAPPA PHI
BEST SORORITY: DELTA GAMMA
BEST STUDENT ORGANIZATION: STUDENT SENATE
BROUGHT TO YOU BY:
BARS
BEST SPORTS BAR: JEFFERSON’S
BEST DRINK SPECIALS: LOUISE’S DOWNTOWN
BEST MARTINIS: THE HAWK
BEST MARGARITAS: EL MEZCAL
BEST WELLS: THE HAWK
BEST BEER SELECTION: OLD CHICAGO
BEST DANCE CLUB: THE HAWK
BEST BILLIARDS: THE POOL ROOM
BEST BARTENDERS: THE HAWK
BEST TO MEET GIRLS/GUYS: THE HAWK
BEST ATMOSPHERE: THE WHEEL
BEST TO WATCH KU BASKETBALL: THE YACHT CLUB
BEST STRIP CLUB: ALLSTARS
BEST LIVE MUSIC: JAZZHAUS
BEST OVERALL BAR: THE WHEEL
HOUSING
BEST APARTMENT COMPLEX: THE LEGENDS
BEST TOWNHOMES: LORIMAR
BEST LANDLORD: SERINA HEARN
BEST NEIGHBORHOOD: OREAD NEIGHBORHOOD
(STUDENT GHETTO)
The student voice since 1904
CONGRATULATIONS TO
THIS YEAR’S WINNERS!