Women’s golf team took

first place at Sunflower
Invitational for the second
year in a row.
8A
At McCollum Hall, international
students come together, meet
new people and adjust to life in
the United States.
The student vOice since 1904
1B
wednesday, october 4, 2006
www.kansan.com
Vol. 117 Issue 35
PAGE 1A
all contents, unless stated otherwise,
©2006The university Daily kansan
classifieds. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5B
crossword. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4B
Horoscopes. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4B
opinion. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7a
sports. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1B
sudoku. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4B
index
72 55
Partly cloudy
Mostly cloudy
— weather.com
Thursday
today
weather
Mostly cloudy
82 62
Friday
73 53
By dAvid linhArdt
Textbook prices have increased
at twice the national rate of infla-
tion over the last 10 years, accord-
ing to a study released at the end
of the summer by the Government
Accountability Office.
Prices overall have inflated at
an average rate of 3 percent each
year since 1987, but textbook prices
jumped at least 6 percent in the
same time frame.
The study, “College Textbooks:
Enhanced Offerings Appear to Drive
Recent Price Increases,” stated that
students at a four-year university
would spend more than 26 percent
of their money on books and sup-
plies this year.
Rep. David Wu (D-Ore.) com-
missioned the study with several
other Representatives earlier this
year because it was the top con-
stituent complaint about education.
The textbook industry is a “classic
broken market,” Wu said in a press
release.
“Every year that the cost of text-
books doubles compared to the
overall average of prices is another
year students experience an even
greater barrier to a college degree,”
Wu said in the statement.
The study found that freshmen
in 2003-04 paid an average of $898
per year for textbooks. That means
students pay more than $28 per
week for books — and some books
may only be used a few times during
the semester.
Linsie Eriksen, Aurora, Colo.,
junior, said she spent about $500
this semester for her books, which
is more than the national average.
Eriksen is majoring in English and
many of her classes require multiple
books.
“This semester was awful,”
Eriksen said. “The cheapest book I
got cost $20.”
Eriksen is getting frustrated as
she spends more money on books
each semester and her student loans
pile up.
“It’s just not necessary,” Eriksen
said. “Books don’t cost that much
to make, so they shouldn’t cost that
much to buy.”
New college textbooks can be
marked up 23 percent or more
before a student purchases them.
Used textbooks, which are gen-
erally in far greater demand, are
marked up as much as 33 percent
of their market value, according to
Though physical injuries have begun to heal for those
who survived, most of the lost mementos and
possessions will never be replaced. For the survivors,
the only option is to try to rebuild and remember.
tryIng to SUrvIve
Part 2: Survivors struggle to get back on their feet
boardwalk
remembered
onLIne
Go online to
kansan.com to view
all the parts of the
series and to leave
your comments.
Part 3: tHUrsday
The family of Jose
Gonzalez, one of
three to die in the
fre, has had a year
to grieve.
Part 4: FrIday
structural
problems that
doomed Boardwalk
are common to
local apartments
one can at a time
Ryan McGeeney/KANSAN
Megan Renz, St. Louis junior, helps build the Gamma Phi Beta sorority and Sigma Chi fraternity’s replica of the
Campanile, the University of Kansas’ World War II memorial. The project was part of the Can-struction competi-
tion, a Homecoming activity in front of Wescoe Hall.
» caMPUs
University resubscribes
to plagiarism detector
» FInances
Textbook prices rise
faster than infation
see study on page 5a
By AnnA FAltErmEiEr
One year ago, Eli Greenbaum awoke to smoke
and sounds of explosions. He thought he was
going to die.
Greenbaum, then a Ph.D. student, jumped
out the window of his third-story Boardwalk
apartment toward the asphalt parking lot below.
Two policemen held a beach towel to soften his
fall; it didn’t help much, but it was all they had
at the time.
His girlfriend, Dawn Davis, had jumped min-
utes before him. “They just tried to catch her as
she hit the pavement,” Greenbaum remembers.
Almost a hundred people lived in the
Boardwalk Apartment Complex building that
burned down. And though three residents died
in the Oct. 7, 2005, fire, the vast majority of
residents lived.
The year since finds many residents struggling
to regain their health and put back the pieces of
their lives.
When Davis jumped, she broke her back, pel-
vis, tailbone and wrist, but survived.
Greenbaum was afraid that if his girlfriend
didn’t get out before him, she wouldn’t make it
out.
“She had a Chihuahua and was looking every-
where for her dog and breathing in all kinds of
smoke,” he said.
She was so disoriented from smoke inhalation
that he made her stick her head out the window
to breathe.
“I think if I wouldn’t have been there she
would have died,” Greenbaum said. “If someone
was going to die, I wanted it to be me.”
Davis’ Chihuahua didn’t survive.
Davis suffers from post-traumatic stress dis-
order and was unable to be interviewed. Though
she still has nightmares, Greenbaum said she’s
doing better physically.
Greenbaum didn’t escape injury. When he
jumped out the window, the bones in both of his
heels snapped in half. He was wheelchair-bound
until February.
A year later, Greenbaum can walk about five
minutes before his feet swell up. After a few
hours, the pain is so bad that he has to get off
his feet altogether. He also wears special pressure
stockings every day or his feet swell up.
But his condition is improving.
“I just walked all over Chicago this weekend,”
he said. “It hurt, but I did it.”
Greenbaum is trying to move past the fire, and
he’s doing it while studying geckos. He earned a
doctorate in ecology and evolutionary biology in
By dArlA sliPkE
The University of Kansas
renewed its subscription to turni-
tin.com, a service that detects pla-
giarism.
The subscription expired
Tuesday, but the University signed
up for a two-year subscription,
which would start immediately.
Lynn Bretz, director of University
communications, said the transi-
tion should be “seamless.”
The decision for renewal came
after the University considered a
variety of other options and after
concerns about cost and papers
going into the database were
resolved, Bretz said.
Four years ago, the University
paid $6,000 for turnitin.com. Last
year, the University paid $14,000
for the service. The University con-
sidered not renewing its subscrip-
tion because of the price increases.
Bretz said the University was
pleased with the cost of the service,
but said she could not disclose the
price until the contract was pro-
cessed.
Some students expressed con-
cerns about their papers going into
the database of turnitin.com, which
holds tens of thousands of papers.
Some worried that the company
would use their papers as exam-
ples. Bretz said students and faculty
would be able to remove papers
from the database. She said the
University would set up a system
with the Writing Center to allow
students access to retrieve their
papers.
The University initially sub-
scribed to turnitin.com when 22
percent of 1,250 randomly selected
students admitted to plagiarizing.
In the same survey, 50 percent of
students said it was easy for them
to get away with academic mis-
conduct.
Students have mixed reac-
tions about turnitin.com. Stefani
Rahardja, De Soto freshman, said
turnitin.com was a useful tool. She
said the University should keep
using it.
Latchit Patel, Leavenworth
junior, said if there was no way to
get caught he would be tempted to
plagiarize.
Jessica Mulvaney, Leavenworth
sophomore, said the service was
pointless. She said students who
didn’t plagiarize could get in trou-
ble if what they wrote was similar
to what appeared on a Web site.
Faculty members are pleased
with the renewal. David Dewar,
assistant director of the Humanities
and Western Civilization depart-
ment, said he used the program
when he had reason for suspicion.
He had caught students plagiariz-
ing before, but not with the turni-
tin.com program.
“I think it’s a good idea,” Dewar
said. “Anything that can be done to
curtail plagiarism is a good thing.”
kansan staf writer darla slipke
can be contacted at dslipke@
kansan.com. kansan correspon-
dent dustin dye contributed to
this story.
— Edited by Brett Bolton
Despite recent price increases, student privacy concerns,
University renews turnitin.com subscription for two years
see survivor on page 5a
INSIDE
students speak out
KU students take action
to help those sufering
in Darfur
4A
gLoBaL
Update
N. Korea
threatens
nuclear
test
4A
spoRts
tRaCKeR
Charges
fled in
NASCAR
attack
2B
NEWS 2A
wednesday, october 4, 2006
quote of the day
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et cetera
on the record
on campus
media partners
contact us
fact of the day
The University Daily Kansan
is the student newspaper of
the University of Kansas. The
first copy is paid through the
student activity fee. Additional
copies of the Kansan are 25
cents. Subscriptions can be pur-
chased at the Kansan business
office, 119 Stauffer-Flint Hall,
1435 Jayhawk Blvd., Lawrence,
KS 66045.
The University Daily Kansan
(ISSN 0746-4962) is published
daily during the school year
except Saturday, Sunday, fall
break, spring break and exams.
Weekly during the summer
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Periodical postage is paid in
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KS 66045
KJHK is the student
voice in radio. Each
day there is news,
music, sports, talk
shows and other
content made for
students, by stu-
dents. Whether it’s
rock n’ roll or reggae, sports or spe-
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For more
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turn to
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Lawrence, KS 66045
(785) 864-4810
“It isn’t the mountains ahead
to climb that wear you out; it’s
the pebble in your shoe.”
—Muhammad Ali
Left and right shoes were
frst introduced to America
in 1800 by William Young of
Philadelphia. Though he is com-
monly credited with inventing
separate shoes for each foot,
they likely existed in Europe
before this time. BONUS FACT:
Women were slower to adopt
the new “left” and “right” shoes
than men.
Source: footwearhistory.com
Want to know what people are
talking about? Here’s a list of
Tuesday’s most e-mailed stories
from Kansan.com.
1. Boathouse construction faces
obstacles
2. NASCAR driver loves college
basketball
3. Insurance dispute marks
Boardwalk fre anniversary
4. Friend remembers hit-and-
run victim as group ‘dad’
5. Kansas players struggle
through second week of boot
camp
A 21-year-old KU student re-
ported criminal damage to a car
parked near Mississippi street.
The incident occurred between
Oct. 1 and Oct. 2, and damage
was estimated at $280.
The University Career Center
will be host to a workshop, Dy-
namic Interviewing Skills, today
from 3:30 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. in
room 149 at the Burge Union.
The University Career Center
will be host to the Volunteer
Fair tomorrow from 11 a.m. to
3 p.m. on the fourth foor of the
Kansas Union.
Ryan McGeeney/KANSAN
Christine Sandburg, Paola junior, fnds solitude in the fourth foor stacks of Watson Library Tuesday morning. “It’s nicer to have sunlight than to just
sit in some room,”said Sandburg.
Who’s
Who
KU
at
Elon Sharton-Bierig
Industrial Design
student
Couple accidentally gives
away $2,000 with shirt
CROSS LANES, W.Va. — Ruth
Ferrell learned a valuable lesson
when she donated one of her
husband’s shirts to Goodwill:
Always check the pockets.
Ferrell said she never liked
the red-and-black checkered
fannel shirt, which her hus-
band Walter received as a gift.
So she decided to donate it to
Goodwill on Sunday along with
other clothing.
But she had forgotten that
Walter Ferrell had stashed
$2,000 — the couple’s sav-
ings for a trip to Europe — in a
pocket in the shirt.
“He said in the beginning
that we needed to put it in the
bank. But I said, ‘Let’s just hide
it somewhere,’” Ruth Ferrell said
Monday. “He told me where
some time ago, but I hadn’t
thought more about it.”
When her husband asked
her about the missing shirt,
Ferrell realized that she had
given away more than a piece
of detested clothing.
The panicked couple called
Goodwill on Monday morning
and Goodwill worker Marilyn
Williams found the cash. Ferrell
said the couple gave Williams
a $100 reward, which she was
reluctant to take.
“I know I’ll start checking the
pockets now,” Ferrell said.
odd news
The KU Public Safety Ofce
arrested two 19-year-old Wichita
men for allegedly stealing thou-
sands of dollars of electronics
from Oliver Hall last weekend.
Cameron Hardrick and Michael
Deallie remained in Douglas
County jail Tuesday on four counts
of aggravated burglary and theft
and were expected to be formally
charged later that afternoon.
Schuyler Bailey, KU Public
Safety Ofce spokesman, said a
key witness led to the arrests.
The witness saw two men who
looked suspicious in Oliver early
Sunday morning. The witness saw
the same two men last night, and
Bailey said the witness identifed
the two men during the Public
Safety Ofce’s investigation.
Someone sneaked into several
Oliver Hall rooms early Sunday
morning and stole several iPods
and laptop computers while the
room occupants slept. The Public
Safety ofce issued a crime alert
Monday afternoon and appre-
hended the two suspects shortly
afterward.
—David Linhardt
The Lawrence Public Transit sys-
tem will ofer free rides on the “T,”
Oct. 5., in an efort to encourage
the use of public transportation
across the city.
The free bus rides are part of
a national public transit initiative
known as “Communities in Motion
Day.”The initiative is an efort to
promote the benefts of public
transportation.
The event is being sponsored by
the American Public Transportation
Association.
— Mark Vierthaler
An article in Tuesday’s
The University Daily Kansan
needs clarifcation. The article
“Graduate students no longer
have vote” should have said the
provost has reinterpreted the
policy that allows graduates
students’ input on the hiring of
faculty.
clarifcation
KU makes two arrests
for Oliver Hall thefts
Light at the end of the stacks
lawrence
Lawrence bus system
gives free rides Oct. 5
Elon Sharton-Bierig, Deerfield,
Ill., junior, has two passions in
his life: drawing and Dance Dance
Revolution, or DDR.
Sharton-Bierig is an indus-
trial design major, but plans on
changing to illustration. He says
that drawing is his calling. It is
not unusual for Sharton-Bierig to
spend entire nights doing noth-
ing but drawing. Even though he
has four studio classes, which take
about 24 hours a week, Sharton-
Bierig usually spends three to six
hours just drawing for fun.
Sharton-Bierig said that draw-
ing offers limitless possibilities.
“Drawing has so much varia-
tion,” Sharton-Bierig said.
Along with drawing, Sharton-
Bierig also plays DDR. He plays
the game for fun, but also says that
the game was good exercise and
improved coordination. Sharton-
Bierig enjoyed the game so much
that he took the class that was
offered last semester, and he now
teaches a section of the class.
“At the end of the semester,
I asked the teacher if a student
could teach the class. I got an e-
mail at the beginning of this year
saying that I was going to teach,”
Sharton-Bierig said.
The best part of teaching the
game that he loves is that he can
improve along with the class.
Sharton-Bierig said DDR was a
different kind of video game, and
it also gave him a challenge, so he
could always improve.
— Edited by Brett Bolton
detail: André Masson, Rimbaud, early-mid 1900s,
color lithograph, screen print, 1971.0088
7
PM
, O
C
TO
B
ER 5
Spencer Museum of Art Auditorium
1301 Mississippi St., Lawrence, 785.864.4710
A reception will follow in the Central Court.
Caws, who earned her doctorate in French
from KU in 1962, is an accomplished scholar
in 20th-century avant-garde literature and art.
The lecture is presented in conjunction with Art into Art:
Inspired Responses, and is co-sponsored by the Spencer
Museum of Art and the Hall Center for the Humanities
M
A
R
Y
A
N
N
C
A
W
S
Distinguished Professor of English, French & Comparative
Literature, The Graduate Center, City University of New York
“L
O
O
KI N
G
A
N
EW
:
S
U
R
R
E A
L I S M
T
O
D
AY”
LAWRENCE
AUTOMOTIVE
DIAGNOSTICS
INC.
Domes t i c
& For ei g n
Compl et e
Car Car e
“We StandBehind
Our Work, and
WE CARE!”
842-8665
2858 Four Wheel Dr.
campus
news
3A
wednesday, october 4, 2006
By Mark vierthaler
David Corliss is the Lawrence city manager
after being formally hired Friday morning at
City Hall.
Corliss has worked for the city of Lawrence
since 1990 in varying capacities, most recently
as director of legal services and interim city
manager.
Recently, Corliss sat down with The
University Daily Kansan to answer some con-
cerns that students have voiced over the past
several months.
Q: The city of Lawrence
Transit System and KU
On Wheels have been dis-
cussing merging the two
bus systems. The main
student concerns are cost
and control of the system.
How will you address stu-
dents’ concerns on this
matter?
A: Those are both impor-
tant issues we can resolve
through good-faith discussions with stu-
dent transportation leaders. It appears to be
efficient to create additional transportation
options. We have to look at the opportunity
to merge. We can combine the benefits of a
strong KU system and a growing city system. I
think we can make a better system for both the
University community and the community of
Lawrence as a whole.
Q: The noise ordinance in Lawrence has
met with active resistance from students who
claim it’s unfair to punish students for occa-
sionally making noise. The city currently
meets with offenders on an individual basis
to discuss issues. Do you feel the current law
is serving its purpose, or is there room for
improvement?
A: We’re always open to improving any of
our laws. However, it’s important to recognize
that we expect good, neighborly conduct from
all citizens, students and visitors. Usually,
when the police department tells people there
have been noise complaints, most respond
respectfully. It’s not just a student problem.
There are some who just don’t recognize their
responsibility to be good neighbors.
Q: With recent problems with house fires
in Lawrence, will you address any building
codes in the city that may prevent fires in
older apartments and homes that students
may live in?
A: We currently have very aggressive fire
code requirements in congregational living.
Working smoke detectors are required in every
type of dwelling from multiple-family to single
family residences. What’s important is we have
to look to add ways to get the message out to
home and apartment dwellers concerning the
importance of fire safety.
Q: There has been an increasing amount
of disagreement on the direction downtown
Lawrence is heading. Those with non-alcohol
serving businesses feel the increase in bars and
drinking establishments is hurting business.
How will you address their concerns and the
students’ desire for nightlife?
A: I think we already do that now. The fact
is that downtown Lawrence already has a num-
ber of different faces. Downtown responds to a
multitude of demands. During the day, it’s the
center for commerce. In the evening, the area
offers dining and entertainment. At night, it
serves for a different area of entertainment.
I don’t think one of these events is going to
change the aspects of what downtown is.
Q: With rising tuition costs and the cost
of living in Lawrence above the state average,
how will you encourage jobs that would fit
student schedules?
A: Economic development and the creation
of quality jobs has to be a continued area of
emphasis. The city clearly has to make sure
there are great job opportunities for students.
We understand there are traditional students
who only go to school and then there are those
who go to school full time and have to work to
support themselves through school. We want
to make sure there is employment for all the
different individuals.
Q: How important is the relationship
between the University and the city?
A: It’s difficult to overestimate the impor-
tance of KU. It’s very important to the city’s
identity and its economic health. A strong
and vibrant KU helps Lawrence. On the
same token, a strong and vibrant Lawrence is
extremely important for KU. The city needs to
be an attraction for students and faculty and
staff. It also needs to be an attraction for those
visiting. KU thrives as Lawrence thrives.
Q: After the recent hit and run accident on
Kentucky Street, what steps will you take to
make the campus area and residential neigh-
borhoods safer for pedestrians?
A: We’ve got to continue to look at these
neighborhoods to see if there are ways to
improve pedestrian safety. However, it can’t
be based off of one accident, as unfortunate
as that may be. It may not just be pedestrian
safety we have to look at either. There needs to
be some way for continual vigilance in alcohol
awareness. Of course, I’m not being specific,
I’m speaking overall.
kansan staf writer Mark vierthaler can be
contacted at mvierthaler@kansan.com.
— Edited by Mindy Ricketts
By Ben sMith
A recent research study conducted
by a KU doctoral student might lead
to earlier detection and possibly a
better understanding of what causes
autism in young children.
Christa Anderson, graduate
research assistant in the Bureau of
Child Research, with the aid of John
Colombo, professor of psychology,
completed a two-year preliminary
study to measure the pupillary
response of children with autism.
Colombo said that researchers
across the country had been try-
ing for years to discover a means of
determining whether a child was
afflicted with autism spectrum dis-
order.
“Autism is diagnosed variably,
generally, in many cases, when a
child fails to develop language,”
Colombo said.
Anderson, whom Colombo cred-
its with the conception of the study,
said that this research was only the
beginning of what she viewed as a
career-long investigation.
“Our primary goal is to deter-
mine a method of early detection
of autism in the stages of infancy
or even prenatally,” Anderson said.
“And the study has implicated differ-
ent neurological systems.”
Anderson and Colombo used
eye-tracking equipment to measure
constriction or dilation in the pupils
of three groups of children who were
shown various images on a computer
screen.
Colombo said that the study mea-
sured different indications of reac-
tion, trying to measure visual atten-
tion markers in the child subjects.
Anderson said that if researchers
could find a way to detect autism
earlier, scientists might be able to
pin-point the stage of development
in which the problem occurred and
then prevent it.
kansan staf writer Ben smith can
be contacted at bsmith@kansan.
com.
— Edited by Brett Bolton
City manager answers to student concerns
» Lawrence
Corliss gives his thoughts on noise ordinances, nightlife and jobs for students
» HeaLTH
Student helps
professor fnd
autism’s cause
Corliss
By anna FalterMeier
HIV testing at Watkins Memorial
Health Center could be as routine as
checking your blood pressure soon.
Patricia Denning, Watkins chief
of staff, said Watkins would make the
test part of a regular doctor’s visits
after the Centers for Disease Control
and Prevention revised its recom-
mendations for testing last month.
The goal is to make HIV testing a
routine part of medical care.
The CDC estimates about 250,000
people in the United States have
HIV and don’t know it.
Denning said that in the past,
Watkins had to talk to patients about
their risk factors, assess those risks,
council them about the test, and have
the student sign a consent form. She
said sometimes students would defer
the HIV test because the test’s prepa-
rations took so much time.
With the new test regulations,
Denning said patients wouldn’t have
to go through the counseling or sign
a consent form.
“When you come to the doctor
for your routine check for your thy-
roid test that you get every year, I can
say, ‘Hey, would you like to get an
HIV test with that?’ ” Denning said.
She said a goal of the new plan
was that patients would no longer
feel stigmatized that their physician
had asked them to get an HIV test
because everyone would be asked.
“We’re not doing it because we
necessarily think you’re at risk for
it,” she said. “We’re doing it because
everybody needs to be tested.”
Susan Iversen, Watkins laborato-
ry supervisor, said between 460 and
470 students had blood tests for HIV
at Watkins each year. Results are
available a few days after the test.
Kristin Brumm, executive direc-
tor at the Douglas County AIDS
Project, said she thought the new
recommendations were a positive
step.
“It can take up to 10 years for
people to develop noticeable symp-
toms of HIV,” Brumm said.
Douglas County AIDS Project
plans to offer free HIV testing with-
in the month. The project offered
free, confidential testing in the past,
but couldn’t offer the testing recent-
ly because of staff changes. Brumm
said the employees were training
new staff on how to provide the
testing. The staff gave 324 tests in
2005.
kansan staf writer anna Falter-
meier can be contacted at afalter-
meier@kansan.com.
— Edited by Jacky Carter
Watkins revises policy to ofer HIV testing during routine visits
» HeaLTH
Volunteers are greatly needed and appreciated! While
you are assisting KU students you can also study and
do homework! Pick up forms in room 410 in the Kansas
Union! If you have any questions regarding the service
or about volunteering, please email Safety@ku.edu
Have you ever felt unsafe walking alone
at night on campus? Wish someone
could walk with you? Jaywalk can help!
What is JayWalk?
Where is JayWalk?
When is the service available?
Who walks with me?
JayWalk is a service available to all students
who want a JayWalk volunteer to WALK
them to their residence hall or car, or to
wait with them for the Night Campus
Express Bus or SafeRide.
The JayWalk station and volunteers
are located inside Anschutz Library.
JayWalk runs Sunday through Thursday
from 8pm to midnight .
One male and one female will escort
you to a specific location.
WANT TO VOLUNTEER FOR JayWalk?
Call us at: 864-3222
JayWalk is giving away an IPOD
Nano! Every time you use our
service or volunteer with JayWalk,
you get your name in the drawing,
which will be in December!
NONTRADITIONAL STUDENT SERVICES
AND THE
NONTRADITIONAL STUDENT FOUNDATION
INVITE YOU TO
NEWS 4A
WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 4, 2006
BY ERIN CASTANEDA
One day of fasting isn’t much
compared to years of starvation.
But a KU club will make the most
of it on Thursday, when its members
will fast to raise awareness about
genocide in the Darfur region of
Sudan.
Thursday starts the group Fighting
Ignorance of Global Humanitarian
Threats’ weeklong donation drive.
Members of the club will collect
donations on Wescoe Beach during
the week, which ends Oct. 11. The
money will go to Doctors Without
Borders, an independent organiza-
tion that delivers emergency aid, to
help provide food and medical care
for refugees at camps in Darfur and
Chad. Group members will also fast
all day Thursday.
Amanda Applegate, Wichita
sophomore and vice president of
FIGHT, said she thought people
were detached from these conflicts
in other countries. She said an event
like the donation drive helps people
understand that 400,000 have died.
“When you see a number that
big, people may pay more attention,”
she said. “The next time they see
something about it on TV or see
something in a newspaper, they will
pay attention.”
“Half the cast of ‘West Wing’ is
doing it,” she said. “It’s a pretty big
deal in activism. We’re standing up
and saying something is wrong and
we need to be doing something about
it.”
Applegate explained that students
would fast from any luxury item, not
necessarily food.
“We’re giving something up to
remember that people have given
their lives to unnecessary conflict,”
she said.
Mark Skoglund, Olathe sopho-
more and FIGHT president, refer-
enced a quote from the movie “Hotel
Rwanda.”
“People are going to look at this
genocide and then go back to their
dinner,” he said. “That’s the mindset
we want to avoid.”
He said he wanted people to take
action and go to the next level by
spreading awareness. He said this
could be done by taking part in a
campaign such as FIGHT’s, calling
senators or telling others about the
conflict.
“When awareness translates to
other awareness, that’s another step,”
he said.
The fast is inspired by the nation-
al program DarfurFast, a national
campaign and joint effort between
STAND: Student Anti-Genocide
Coalition and the Save Darfur
Coalition. The event coincides with
the holy month of Ramadan.
According to the organization
Save Darfur, the three-year-old con-
flict in Darfur has claimed 400,000
lives and forced 2 million to flee from
their homes. The organization’s Web
site also stated that 3.5 million people
there were reliant on international
aid for survival.
Skoglund said people participat-
ing have three chances to donate.
The club will be on Wescoe Beach on
Thursday and Friday from 10 a.m.
to 2 p.m. and at Mass St. Deli, 719
Massachusetts St., at 7:30 Thursday
night.
Kansan staf writer Erin Castaneda
can be contacted at ecastaneda@
kansan.com.
—Edited by Natalie Johnson
» ACTIVISM
Fasting, shirts help fght war
KU club plans activities to raise awareness about Sudan’s genocide
BY DANNY LUPPINO
Hans Tregear sat in class last week,
having seen more news on the ongo-
ing conflict in Darfur, and wondered
what he could do to help.
That’s when the Wichita sopho-
more got the idea of selling T-shirts
to raise awareness and money. The
sale begins this week.
“I have had a lot of people ask
me what Darfur is, and it kind of
bothered me to see that — with
all the media and technology today,
not everyone is aware of a genocide
going on right now,” Tregear said.
The Darfur conflict began in
February 2003. The conflict centers
between Janjaweed, an Arab mili-
tia group, and tribal ethnic groups.
Most accounts estimate the number
of deaths to be 400,000, with more
than 2 million displaced. The United
Nations’ official report in January
2005 did not find it to be a genocide,
but many, including foreign affairs
experts and American politicians,
say the killing has genocidal intent.
Tregear hopes the shirts, the
back of which say “Give Life, Give
Freedom, Give Peace, Save Darfur,”
will help more students become
aware. The shirts cost $10 and will
be distributed Oct. 9.
Tregear’s plan is for every student
who purchased a shirt to wear it Oct.
10. He has invited the International
Medical Corps, a nonprofit organi-
zation that provides health care and
training to those displaced by the
conflict, to come to campus that day
to accept the donation. IMC has not
Proceeds from ‘Save Darfur’ T-shirts to fund emergency aid eforts
yet confirmed an appearance.
Ron Francisco, professor of politi-
cal science, called the Darfur conflict
a tragic genocide with no end in
sight.
He said that no one wanted to go
and stop it, because of the tremen-
dous fatal risks. “It’s like all genocides,
which are tragic because nobody has
an incentive to stop it,” he said.
Francisco said that the idea of
spreading the message to students was
a good one, but that monetary dona-
tions would have a minimal effect.
“I think everyone should be aware
that there is active killing going on,
and yet I don’t know what anybody
can do,” Francisco said.
Still, Tregear said he thought the
effort would spread the mindset nec-
essary to overcome a conflict like
Darfur.
“It’s all about helping one another,”
Tregear said.
Students can place T-shirt orders
at the front desks of Naismith, Lewis,
and McCollum halls. Students can
pick up the shirts at the same place
they bought them on Oct. 9.
Kansan staf writer Danny Luppi-
no can be contacted at dluppino@
kansan.com.
—Edited by Natalie Johnson
LEE KEATH
ASSOCIATED PRESS
BAGHDAD, Iraq — A suicide
bomber unleashed a blast in a
Baghdad fish market Tuesday and
two Shiite families were found slain
north of the capital as violence
across Iraq claimed at least 52 lives.
The U.S. military, meanwhile,
announced the deaths of nine sol-
diers and two Marines in what has
been a deadly period for American
forces in Iraq. The announcement
brought to at least 15 the number of
servicemembers killed in fighting
since Saturday.
Four of the soldiers were killed
in Baghdad on Monday in separate
small-arms fire attacks, the mili-
tary said. Another four were killed
the same day in a roadside bomb
attack on their patrol northwest of
Baghdad. The ninth died Sunday
when his vehicle was struck by a
roadside bomb west of the capital.
Sunni politicians expressed wor-
ries over a new government plan
to stop sectarian violence. The
plan, announced a day earlier by
Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki,
won some praise in parliament
Tuesday, but Shiite and Sunni lead-
ers delayed potentially contentious
talks to work out its details.
The four-point plan calls for cre-
ating neighborhood Shiite-Sunni
committees to monitor efforts
against sectarian violence. The aim
is to overcome the deep mistrust
between Sunnis and Shiites.
Many Sunnis remain skepti-
cal that Shiite leaders will allow
BY BO-MI LIM
ASSOCIATE PRESS
SEOUL, South Korea — North
Korea triggered global alarm on
Tuesday by saying it will conduct
a nuclear test, a key step in the
manufacture of atomic bombs that
it views as a deterrent against any
U.S. attack. But the North also said
it was committed to nuclear disar-
mament, suggesting a willingness
to negotiate.
The contradictory statement fits
a North Korean pattern of ratch-
eting up tension on the Korean
Peninsula, a Cold War-era flash-
point, in an attempt to win conces-
sions such as economic aid. The
strategy has had mixed results
in recent years as the totalitarian
regime sinks deeper into isolation
and poverty, with China serving as
its lifeline for food and fuel.
Secretary of State Condoleezza
Rice called the announcement “a
very provocative act” and urged
Asian nations to rethink their rela-
tionships with North Korea.
The North’s announcement came
as the standoff deepened over Iran’s
nuclear program, with senior U.N.
diplomats saying six world powers
would begin negotiations Friday in
London on possibly imposing sanc-
tions against Tehran for refusing to
suspend uranium enrichment.
It was the first time the North
had publicly announced its intent to
conduct a nuclear test. Previously, it
had warned that it might conduct a
test, depending on U.S. actions.
“The U.S. extreme threat of a
nuclear war and sanctions and pres-
sure compel the DPRK to conduct
a nuclear test, an essential process
for bolstering nuclear deterrent, as
a self-defense measure in response,”
said a statement by the North’s
Foreign Ministry and carried by
the North’s official Korean Central
News Agency. DPRK stands for
Democratic People’s Republic of
Korea, the North’s official name.
Yet it said it wanted to “settle
hostile relations” between the North
and the United States, and that it
“will do its utmost to realize the
denuclearization of the peninsula.”
Many North Korea watchers
believe the country’s dictator, Kim
Jong Il, knows that all-out confron-
tation with the United States would
lead to his destruction. Even if Kim
seeks negotiations, though, the risk
of a miscalculation that spirals out
of control cannot be ruled out.
The North Korean statement
did not say when a nuclear test
might occur, but the prospect drew
rebukes from Japan, South Korea,
and the United States. The allies,
along with China and Russia, had
participated in the stalled six-party
talks aimed at getting the North to
give up its nuclear ambitions.
The announcement was not a big
surprise to many observers of North
Korea because U.S. intelligence
reports previously had indicated
that Pyongyang might be preparing
a nuclear test. Many experts believe
the North has enough radioactive
material to build at least a half-
dozen or more nuclear weapons.
“They are an active proliferator,”
said Defense Secretary Donald H.
Rumsfeld. “And were they to test
and were they then to proliferate
those technologies, we’d be living
with a proliferator and obviously
we’d be living in a somewhat differ-
ent world.”
Rumsfeld, in Managua,
Nicaragua, for meetings with
Central and South American for-
eign ministers, declined to say
whether Pyongyang’s announce-
ment had triggered any changes in
the U.S. alert status.
During a visit to Cairo, Egypt,
Rice said the United States would
have to assess its options if the
North carries out the test, without
detailing what those options were.
She stressed, however, that a North
Korean test was an issue “for the
neighborhood” and not just for the
United States.
“It would be a very provocative
act,” Rice said. “A North Korean
nuclear test ... would create a
qualitatively different situation on
the Korean peninsula,” Rice said.
“I think that you would see that
a number of states in the region
would need to reassess where they
are now with North Korea.”
The remarks appeared direct-
ed primarily at China and South
Korea.
» WORLD
North Korea to do nuclear test
» WORLD
Plan aims to stop Iraqi violence
security forces to crack down more
strongly on Shiite militias blamed
for killing Sunnis — including some
linked to parties in the government.
“I haven’t seen any real desire in
the other side. There are militias
supported by the government,” said
Sunni lawmaker Khalaf al-Alayan.
U.S. Ambassador Zalmay
Khalilzad said that under the plan,
parties that have militias have agreed
to take “responsibility for what their
groups or people under them are
doing, ... committing themselves to
ending the sectarian violence.”
Still, “there are forces that are not
under their control,” Khalilzad said
in an interview with National Public
Radio. “But if they implement what
they’ve agreed to, there should be a
significant decrease in the level of
violence in Baghdad.”
Another lawmaker, Izzat
Shabandar, from the secular Iraqi
Bloc, cautioned “we have to be real-
istic.”
“Those who signed this blessed
agreement have to confess, at least
to themselves, they are the basis of
the problem and they are part of it,”
he said.
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NEWS
5A
WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 4, 2006






































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Homecoming
Medallion
Hunt 2006
You’ve made it this far, give yourselves a hand. Find clue
number three as you take your _______ and catch a _______.
TODAY’S CLUE:
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ʻ
ʻ
ʻ
MONDAYʼS CLUE:
“From the beginning, I’ve always had pep.
To find the next clue, be careful where you step.”
(Tuesdayʼs Hint) (Tuesdayʼs Hint)
TUESDAYʼS CLUE:
Follow the daily clues in this week’s papers to find a special
KU Medallion on campus. The winner will receive
$25 to the KU Union or 75 Homecoming points!
“We hope this clue isn’t too tall, and you figure
it out before it drives you up the ________.” (Monday hint)
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SURVIVOR (CONTINUED FROM 1A)
BY KIM LYNCH
Becca Phipps only carries a tablet
computer to her Medical Center
classes.
Phipps, Lawrence first-year med-
ical center student, likes the fact
that she doesn’t have to carry books
around and all of the features on
her tablet computer. Phipps is one
of the 182 first-year medical center
students who was required to buy a
tablet computer for her classes.
Allen Rawitch, vice chancellor
for academic affairs and dean of
graduate studies, said this year, for
the first time, all first-year medical
students were required to have the
same tablet computer, for which
they paid a fee that included pack-
ets of software and some preloaded
textbooks.
The idea is to minimize print-
ed material and paperwork. Class
notes and podcasts for a majority of
lectures are available online as well,
he said.
James Fishback, associate profes-
sor of pathology and curriculum
director of basic sciences for the
first two years, said students paid
a technical fee of $2,500 for the
Hewlett-Packard tablet PC, which
they got to keep. He said about 75
percent of the books were provided
electronically.
He said the school paid about
$100,000 on electronic texts, but
that it was a first-year implementa-
tion deal only.
He said he thought the KU
Medical Center was one of the first
medical schools to go all electronic
with textbooks. The student fee did
not include textbooks because the
Medical Center promised to pay
for books for the 182 first-year stu-
dents.
Phipps said at first she was upset
that she had to pay for another com-
puter because she already had one,
but now she loves her computer and
the programs on it.
She said getting used to the tech-
nology was a challenge when she
first started classes. She said she
had also taken out insurance on
her computer because theft was not
covered by the warranty.
Fishback said a few technological
glitches had occurred with the com-
puters but that there were several
measures in place in case students
had issues. There are computers
on loan from the library. Also an
external hard drive comes with the
tablet, and students have to back up
their files every day.
Ali Wait, Seblit second-year
medical student, said she didn’t
envy the first-year students because
they were having to experience all
the glitches as the new curriculum
got worked out.
Wait said it was more difficult to
read long documents on the com-
puter rather than in print.
She said that almost all of the
second-year students had laptops
and that at least half of those were
tablets so there wasn’t a stark con-
trast.
Kansan staf writer Kim Lynch can
be contacted at klynch@kansan.
com.
—Edited by Brett Bolton
Med students go entirely digital
» KUMC
STUDY (CONTINUED FROM 1A)
the report.
One major factor contrib-
uting to price increases is the
CDs or supplemental booklets
packaged with new textbooks.
Publishers told the Government
Accountability Office that they
invested heavily to develop those
supplements in response to
instructors’ requests.
In addition, publishers told
the office that the number of
revised editions has increased
over the years, but that it cur-
rently remained stable. When an
instructor requires the newest
edition of a textbook for a class,
students are forced to buy the
new, more expensive book rather
than older, used editions.
Patricia Schroeder, presi-
dent and CEO of the American
Association of Publishers, wrote
a letter to the Government
Accountability Office to criticize
the report.
The report uses “inaccurate
and misleading data,” Schroeder
wrote, and its tone suggests bias
against new textbook purchases.
“We believe that this report is
being rushed to completion due
to deadline pressures,” Schroeder
wrote. She urged the office to
create a “more balanced and rep-
resentative report” that took into
account the AAP’s own efforts
to get textbooks into students’
hands even if they can’t afford full
prices.
Kansan staf writer David Lin-
hardt can be contacted at dlin-
hardt@kansan.com.
— Edited by Mindy Ricketts
January. Now he’s working with an
expert on geckos at Villanova, using
DNA sequences to research how all
gecko species are related.
In November, he’ll travel to South
Africa to conduct research. He also
plans on taking an expedition to
Congo next summer that will involve
a lot of physical activity.
“It will require a lot of walking and
physical exertion,” he said optimisti-
cally. “I’m trying to work out and do
all I can to get ready for that.”
Aside from physical injuries,
Greenbaum lost all his belongings,
Greenbaum, however, had renter’s
insurance, as did Brady DeSanti, who
also lived in Boardwalk.
DeSanti has had renter’s insur-
ance since he moved to Kansas in
2003. The Omaha doctoral student
lived on the first floor of the building
that burnt down. His apartment was
destroyed by the fire.
“Luckily I hadn’t been asleep very
long that night,” DeSanti said. “I can
be known as a deep sleeper, and in
this case there just wasn’t much time
to get out.”
DeSanti awoke to screams and the
sound of glass breaking. He thought
it might be a break-in or domes-
tic dispute. “The last thing on my
mind was a fire,” he said. Then he
smelled smoke and saw “pulsating
red.” That’s when he fled.
After crossing the street, he real-
ized that he hadn’t shut his front
door. He said he thought about how
much easier that would let the fire
spread.
It didn’t make a difference.
“You replace stuff, you deal with
the insurance company, but all in all
that’s miniscule compared to a lot of
other people,” DeSanti said.
Some things are gone forever,
some possessions have been replaced
and others are still waiting.
DeSanti lost many family photos
he’d kept in his apartment. Those are
gone forever.
“There are always those things
you’re not going to get back, no mat-
ter how much insurance you have,”
he said.
He’s replaced most things that can
be replaced, except some martial arts
equipment, books and clothes.
DeSanti has a new apartment and
is working to earn his Ph.D. in his-
tory. He credits his colleagues and
other students in a religious method-
ology course for all their help.
“They just went overboard with
their hospitality to help me out,” he
said.
People from his religious method-
ology class bought him a gift card to
Target for “a substantial amount.” His
colleagues in the history department
had a get together where everyone
brought him things like gift cards
and new dishes.
As for Greenbaum, he’s gotten
back on his feet, literally. He hopes to
have a permanent job in a museum
or zoological institution and to keep
doing more fieldwork. Next summer,
he’ll take on Congo.
Kansan staf writer Anna Falter-
meier can be contacted at afalter-
meier@kansan.com.
— Edited by Jacky Carter
BY MARK SCOLFORO
ASSOCIATED PRESS
QUARRYVILLE, Pa. — The
gunman who killed five girls in
an Amish schoolroom confided
to his wife during the siege that
he molested two relatives 20 years
ago when he was boy, and was
tormented by dreams of doing it
again, authorities said Tuesday.
Investigators also said that
Charles Carl Roberts IV, 32, plot-
ted his takeover of the school for
nearly a week and that the items he
brought — including flexible plas-
tic ties, eyebolts and lubricating
jelly — suggest he may have been
planning to sexually assault the
Amish girls before police closed
in.
Roberts shot himself in the head
when police arrived.
The death toll rose to six Tuesday
— including the gunman — when
two girls died of their wounds.
During the standoff, Roberts
told his wife in a cell phone call that
he molested two female relatives
when they were 3 to 5 years old,
State Police Commissioner Jeffrey
B. Miller said. Roberts would have
been around 11 or 12 at the time.
Police could not immediately
confirm Roberts’ claim that he
molested two relatives.
Roberts had planned the attack
for nearly a week, buying plastic
ties from a hardware store on Sept.
26 and other items less than an
hour before entering the school,
Miller said.
» CRIME
Shooter molested relatives
KU Medical Center requires first-year students to buy tablet PCs for books
EDUCATION
Atchison superintendent
resigns after DUI accident
ATCHISON — The superinten-
dent of Atchison public schools,
who was arrested for driving under
the infuence of alcohol after he
was involved in an accident, has
resigned.
Richard E. Branstrator, 68, was
arrested Sept. 16 after allegedly
losing control of his car and hitting
two mailboxes and a tree, police
said. Branstrator was given a sobri-
ety test and had a blood-alcohol
level of .148, nearly twice the legal
limit.
“I feel it is appropriate at this
time to ofer my resignation as
superintendent of USD 409,” Brans-
trator said in his written resigna-
tion Monday. “It is important that
I focus on and address the issues
that led me to this decision.”
Assistant Superintendent
Corbin Witt will serve as superin-
tendent for the remainder of the
school year. School of cials plan to
begin interviewing candidates in
January.
Branstrator is scheduled to ap-
pear in court Oct. 19.
NEWS 6A
wednesday, october 4, 2006
By Jared duncan
One of the business’ that suf-
fered the most damage from the
March microburst was Pendleton’s
Country Market, 1446 E. 1850 Rd.
Though the damage was severe,
owner John Pendleton still man-
ages to look on the bright side.
“This kind of damage gives us
an opportunity to make changes
we wouldn’t have made,” Pendleton
said.
Pendleton recalls the morning
of the storm as if it were just
another day.
“I was putting away tractor
equipment, just in case it rained,”
he said. “Then, next thing I know,
I see this wall of dirt coming
across the field.”
Pendleton then went into the
market and dove under a desk,
seeking shelter.
After the storm had passed,
Pendleton was left with acres of
rubble where much of his farm
used to stand.
Damage included two demol-
ished 60-foot silos, a green house
destroyed by debris, a grain bin
and a 30-by-50 farm shop that
were both blown away and a 50-
by-130 roof carried away by the
storm.
Six months after the storm,
John and his wife Karen are still
cleaning up and rebuilding the
80-acre farm. But with only half
of the $150,000 damage covered
by insurance, the family has a long
way to go.
“The clean up is costing more
than we have,” Karen Pendleton
said. “No one ever comes out ahead
when insurance is involved.”
To help with the astounding
amount of clean up, the commu-
nity quickly came to the aid of
Pendleton’s. Around 300 friends,
neighbors and community service
groups showed up the day after the
storm to aid in the cleaning.
“We had neighbor ladies cook-
ing casseroles and kids dragging
nail magnets around,” Pendleton
said.
The market was able to open on
schedule on April 1.
Some volunteers kept coming
out to the farm until every piece
was picked up.
“The clean up took at least a
month,” said Matt Kirby, a friend
who helped with the clean up. “But
it was a gift to go over and help.
They’re good people.”
Kirby recalls driving miles away
from the farm two weeks after the
storm and still picking up sheet
metal.
“The right thing for us to do is
to go over and help these people,
and I’m glad we did,” Kirby said.
In addition, Kirby’s musical
group, The Alfred Packer Memorial
Band, will be performing at the
Barnstorm Benefit, a fundraiser
on Oct. 15 at the Pendleton’s farm
to raise money for repairs.
“They’re really good people and
have done a lot for the communi-
ty,” Maria Anthony, benefit orga-
nizer, said. “A lot of people came
out to help clean up, so hopefully
they’ll come out again and have
some fun while helping out.”
The Pendletons have taken
their own steps in making up for
the damage, as well. People can
rent a portion of the farm for par-
ties, including a large party deck.
Prices range from $100 to $1,000
and can include a bonfire, tent set-
ups and hayrides.
The Butterfly Bio-Villa is anoth-
er new venture the Pendletons hope
will draw customers. Measuring
20 feet by 100 feet, the Bio-Villa
cost $5,000 to put together. Those
who pay $2 to get in can observe
and learn more about butterflies in
an enclosed environment.
“We needed an attraction to
replace what was blown away,”
Pendleton said.
On the wall inside of Pendleton’s,
a sign encourages customers to
visit Davenport’s Winery just a few
miles away. Much like Pendleton’s,
the winery saw a lot of damage
that halted business for a brief
period.
“It put us behind in all our
work,” owner Greg Shipe said. “We
got behind in the crops.”
Unlike Pendleton’s, though,
Davenport’s damage amounted to
$12,000 and was completely cov-
ered by insurance.
With the benefit, Pendleton
hopes his business can fully recov-
er, but said that he didn’t know
what lies ahead.
“With this type of damage, we
can look at the operation very
critically and see if this business
has a future,” he said. “Fortunately,
I think it does.”
Kansan correspondent Jared
duncan can be contacted at edi-
tor@kansan.com.
— Edited by Mindy Ricketts
» Business
Local country market
uses microburst damage
as excuse for upgrading
» haBitat for humanity
Family prepares for new home
By danae deshazer
For three years, Mindy Mies, a
34-year-old Lawrence resident who
is visually impaired, has lived in a
duplex that’s so small she doesn’t
have room for a seeing-eye dog.
Mies has to trust in herself when she
takes care of her three-year-old twin
sons in their two-bedroom duplex.
“When we moved, I gave up my
dog. I gave up my freedom,” Mies
said.
But in February, Habitat for
Humanity approved the Mies
family for a new home. Comfort
Neighborhood, the new Lawrence
Habitat project, is coming to life.
Volunteers have started building
two sponsored homes. But with the
rising cost of materials and sup-
plies to build a house, Habitat for
Humanity is having more trouble
finding sponsors to finance the
costs.
“After Hurricane Katrina, the cost
of building materials has increased
so much that it now takes $60,000 to
build a home,” said Ginger Ratzlaff,
chair of fund development for
Lawrence Habitat.
In 2004, the cost to build a Habitat
house was $40,000. By July 2005, the
cost was $50,000 and it increased to
$60,000 this year. Because building
a home is more expensive, families
are taking longer to find sponsors.
Habitat will spend $385,000 to build
the projected seven houses, and
$540,000 to complete the neighbor-
hood.
Since purchasing the four-acre
site in 2004, developers have spent
$520,500 preparing the 16-house
neighborhood. Originally, construc-
tion for the first house was supposed
to start in Spring 2006, but prepara-
tions took longer than expected.
By August, the neighborhood was
finally ready for development.
Aug. 19 marked the first nail-
driving ceremony for the Comfort
Neighborhood. Volunteers started
construction on the second house
on Sept. 16. Habitat needs to com-
plete seven houses by June 30, 2007,
and finish the remaining nine by
Summer 2008.
Habitat will also spend more
time building the Comfort
Neighborhood homes than other
houses. These houses are not being
“blitz-built,” which means that from
the first nail-driving to the finishing
touches, volunteers build the house
within about seven days. These
houses will take 12 to 14 weeks each
to complete, Ratzlaff said.
Mark Brooks, construction
manager for Lawrence Habitat for
Humanity, said that he does his job
because of the amazing people that
he encounters every day. Brooks is
in charge of design and construc-
tion for the Comfort Neighborhood
builds. Each house has the same
design, with three bedrooms, one
large bathroom, kitchen, dining
area and living room. The homes
are about 1100 sq. feet. Although
the homes don’t have garages,
Brooks designed sheds for storage
space. All sheds are 10 feet by 12
feet, which is the largest size of a
building that does not need a build-
ing permit.
Volunteers start working at 9
a.m. on Tuesdays, Thursdays and
Saturdays. Anywhere from six to
35 people help out. Brooks also
hires professionals, such as electri-
cians, plumbers and cement layers,
to make sure everything is perfect.
Families also contribute to their
home. Each family member must
donate 225 hours to Habitat for
Humanity, including 150 hours on
his own house. Mies will do most
of her hours in the Habitat office
because of her visual impairment.
“This shows that Habitat is a
continual process. We are all help-
ing out each other,” Brooks said.
Mary Gordon of the Lawrence
Noon Lions Club, an organization
that provides care for the visually
impaired, is Mies’ mentor. The pair
have been together ever since Mies’
eyes were removed as a toddler. The
Lawrence Lions Club is helping to
sponsor the Mies’ new home. All
58 clubs in the Northeast Kansas
district are raising $13,500. Lions
International will match $11,500 of
donations. Habitat will double its
efforts as well, Gordon said.
“Mindy is like a daughter to me.
We want to help her in any way we
can,” Gordon said.
Mies hopes that construction
will start in January. “We are just
so crowded. The older the boys get,
the bigger they get. We really need
room to stretch out,” Mies said. “If
we get this new house, I’ll be able to
have a dog again. I want ownership
and a sense of community.”
Kansan correspondent danae
deshazer can be contacted at
editor@kansan.com.
— Edited by Jacky Carter
opinion
Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion,
or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech,
or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble,
and to petition the government for a redress of grievances.
jorgensen: When somebody cheats on you, only
one thing flashes across your mind: revenge. Here are
few different routes you can take to gratify your fury.
See kansan.com for more opinions and Free for All comments
wednesday, october 4, 2006
www.kansan.com
opinion PAGE 7A
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editoriaL board
Jonathan Kealing, Erick R. Schmidt, Gabriella Souza, Frank
Tankard, Dave Ruigh, Steve Lynn, McKay Stangler and Louis
Mora
If a Kansas Board of Regents
proposal passes, future KU stu-
dents could be required to spend
a semester in China, Italy, Ghana
or Mexico.
In a state that continues to
increase tuition rates, the board
now wants to force students to
study abroad, with students likely
paying the bill. The study abroad
program at the University is first
class, but no student should be
forced to participate in it.
The goal of this proposal is
to provide students with global
awareness and help them gain a
better understanding of a differ-
ent environment. But the regents
should look at the number of
students who are already study-
ing abroad before considering
this proposal.
Nearly a quarter of KU stu-
dents study abroad, which puts
it just outside the top 10 among
public research universities in
study abroad participation. A
diverse foreign student popula-
tion along with a high number of
students studying abroad dem-
onstrates a strong international
representation at the University.
Also, where will the money
come from? Financial aid is pos-
sible, but supplying enough for
every student is far-fetched.
Every student should be
encouraged to study abroad, but
none should be pushed. If the
Board of Regents wants to help
students attain a global perspec-
tive without mandating every
student to study abroad, the
University has set the blueprint.

Louis Mora for the editorial
board
I am writing this in response to
a serious problem we have at the
University of Kansas: drunken driv-
ing.
One person every 31 minutes
died in a drunk driving collision
in 2004, according to alcoholalert.
com. I may just be naïve, but I don’t
understand why lives must be taken
in a situation that could be easily
avoided.
There are many ways to avoid
driving drunk. First, a call can
always be made to SafeRide. Its
number is 864-7233 and this ser-
vice is completely free of charge.
If SafeRide doesn’t appeal to you,
maybe a taxi service would be bet-
ter. Midwest Transportation has
cheap rates. Its phone number is
865-2872.
If neither of those options inter-
ests you, simply take turns with
your friends. I would happily be the
sober driver one night and have the
comfort of knowing that the people
that matter most, my friends, are
safe.
When a drunk driving incident
occurs, it affects many more people
than just those in the realm of the
accident. Family, friends, insurance
agencies, police support, teachers
and a community can all be affect-
ed. Accidents do not have to be fatal
to truly hurt.
This year I am a senior at the
University of Kansas. I can not
even count the nights of partying I
have been able to enjoy these past
years — the good times have been
immeasurable. Yet I also can’t count
the number of times I’ve opened
the Kansan on a Monday morning
to see a student killed by a reck-
less drunk driver. Even today, as I
write this on a Tuesday morning, in
the “On the Record” section of the
paper, out of four reports, two of
them were alcohol related, one deal-
ing with an impaired driver.
So I am asking those who are
reading this to step up and take
responsibility. Enjoy the party. Live
up your time here at the University
of Kansas. But before you take
that last sip of whatever beverage
of choice you are enjoying on a
Saturday night, put your keys away
and use your brain instead.
Becca Goldberg
Plano, Texas, senior
At its October meeting,
the Lawrence Traffic Safety
Commission (TSC) voted unani-
mously to recommend that the
Lawrence City Commission reject
a request to change the ordinance
banning skateboarding on the
University campus.
No one came to speak in favor of
the change, but representatives of
the Provost’s office and KU Public
Safety argued for keeping the ban
in place. It appeared to me, as a
member of the TSC, that support-
ers of a change are uncertain about
the role of the TSC, the relation-
ship between city ordinances and
University policies — and most
important, haven’t engaged the KU
administration or the rest of the
University community in discussion
about the skateboard policy.
The issue is not necessarily dead.
The recommendation of the TSC is
just that: a recommendation. City
commissioners are free to accept or
ignore our advice when the propos-
al comes before them, probably at a
meeting later this month. However,
they are likely to have the same con-
cerns we had.
First, the request was simply to
“revise” the city ordinance. How?
Examples of policies at other uni-
versities were given to the TSC, but
they are not identical. The purpose
of a revision would be to allow
“safe” riding while continuing to
ban activity that threatens others or
damages property.
Finding the proper balance will
require work and a lot of discussion
between proponents of change and
the non-skateboarding community.
The KU facilities maintenance and
Public Safety departments clearly
see skateboards on campus only
as a problem. To convince them
to broaden their view, responsible
riders will need to meet with them
— and provide clear evidence that a
change will work.
Which brings up a second
point: Traffic regulations on the
KU campus are determined by the
University. They are enacted into
the city code only so that violations
can be prosecuted through the city’s
Municipal Court. Before the TSC or
the city would approve a change in
the skateboarding ordinance there
needs to be agreement within KU
on the wording of any new policy.
The issue isn’t dead for another
reason. At the TSC meeting, the KU
representatives indicated their con-
cern about unsafe and destructive
skateboarding on West Campus,
which is not covered under the
current ordinance. It is likely that
the University administration will
soon propose a different revision: to
expand the ban to cover all areas of
the campus. Skateboard advocates
could use this as an opportunity to
broaden the discussion.

Robert Hagen
Research Associate, Kansas Bio-
logical Survey
Courtesy faculty member, Depart-
ment of Ecology & Evolutionary
Biology
The “Our View” on Tuesday con-
tained one important misconcep-
tion that should be clarified.
The writer states, “In what other
arena can a business sell a product
at an enormous markup, buy back
the product at a minimal cost, and
then sell the product back to the
same target consumer at a huge
profit? The apparent collusion
between the oligopolist publish-
ers....” I read this as placing the
blame entirely on the publishers.
Bookstores, not publishers,
markup the cost of the book
(33.3%), buy it back, and then resell
it. Again, it is the bookstore, not the
publisher. Thus, for the book I have
written, the bookstore buys it from
the publisher for $64 and sells it to
the student for $80. Of that $64 sale
to the bookstore, the three authors,
who spent two years of their lives in
working on the edition, split $10.24
on the sale of each new book. The
bookstore, which contributed noth-
ing to the production of the book,
received $16 per book.
Additional information: For this
particular book, the bookstore will
buy it back at $40 and then resell it
at $60 for a cool $20 profit. That’s a
larger profit than they get for new
books! No wonder they push used
books on students!
What does the author receive on
the sale of a used book? $0.00. What
does the publisher receive? $0.00.
The profit is made by the bookstore;
the author and publisher receive
nothing for their years worth of
effort and the financial investment.
All that said, though, it is rea-
sonable for the bookstore to earn
something; they do have salaries,
utilities, rent, etc. to pay. I just ques-
tion them making more than the
authors. That’s my clearly biased
and self-serving view.
Stephen Shawl
Professor of physics and astrono-
my
Co-author of “Discovering Astron-
omy”
Free for All callers have 20 seconds
to speak about any topic they wish.
Kansan editors reserve the right to
omit comments. Slanderous and ob-
scene statements will not be printed.
Phone numbers of all incoming calls
are recorded.
my parents just yelled at me
because i just told them how i
broke my thumb at the bar the
other night.
n
did anybody notice the new
fag on top of Fraser Hall has the
new ku logo patched on it? it
looks like crap.
n
Hey Yello sub, do you think
you could actually get your trash
in your dumpster instead of our
driveway?
n
i will slap whoever keeps calling
about spangles commercials.
n
ku can’t even beat nebraska.
better luck next year.
n
if Hash is for free love and they
don’t love the kid bashing them,
that doesn’t make them very good
at free love, does it?
n
i can’t believe dennis moore
voted for the torture bill. i hope he
never gets reelected again.
FREE FOR ALL
call 864-0500
» OUR VIEW
Revenge is a dish best served
piping hot, and nothing causes the
heat to rise like getting cheated on.
Those who have endured a cheating
partner know the sadness — and
the fury — that comes with it.
What do you do when you get
cheated on? Do you break up with
the person? Do you let it blow over?
Do you pour sugar into the cheater’s
gas tank?
If your partner cheats on you,
if nothing else, break up with the
person. It is inexcusable and nearly
unforgivable. If you don’t break up
with a cheater, then you deserve the
anguish you’ll get when it happens
again.
If you cheat on me, not only am I
breaking up with you, but I’m poop-
ing in your shampoo.
The “shampoop” revenge tactic is
one of many you can use to get back
at the person who just tore your
heart out. Revenge isn’t for every-
body, but it’s for a lot of people.
Here are some revenge tactics for
those not willing to let a cheater get
off easy.
That’s not bird poop: The only
thing more embarrassing than
cleaning poop out of your hair is
cleaning poop off your windshield.
During the night while the cheat-
er sleeps, take a squat over their
windshield and drag it across. If
you have the talent and hip mobil-
ity to write while squatting, might I
recommend writing, “This is what
your breath smells like.”
Fly farm: I wish I could take
credit for this next one. An old
friend told me she did this once,
and it is genius and long lasting.
If you really want to stick it to
someone that stuck it to someone
else, pour milk on the floorboards
of that person’s car on a hot sum-
mer day. Science will take care of
the rest. After a couple days of set-
tling, maggots and a bad cottage
cheese smell will be riding shotgun
for months.
The only thing I might change
in this recipe is to use some form of
meat. I’m thinking little smokies.
Logically, by using little smok-
ies, rather than attracting flies,
you would be attracting bears, or
possibly Bigfoot. It is common that
knowledge that Bigfoot is crazy for
little smokies.
There are few things more terri-
fying for a cheater, or anyone, than
finding Bigfoot tearing through
your car, sniffing out little smokies.
The only thing worse might be
finding Rosie O’Donnell rummag-
ing through your car. It is common
knowledge that Rosie O’Donnell
also is crazy for little smokies.
Death by Facebook: With the
recent globalization of facebook.com,
there is ample room for spreading
word about a cheater. With many
groups reaching the hundreds of
thousands in members, each and
every group has that potential.
The group, “My girlfriend will
have a threesome with me if this
group reaches 100,000” hit that very
goal in a matter of days.
Imagine how much popularity
the group, “I will have closure over
my boyfriend cheating on me when
this groups reaches infinity,” will
have.
As a side note, the group, “Make
this group reach 100,000/Chuck
Norris/‘We’re going streaking!’/My
girlfriend cheated on me/I watch
The View,” should pick up steam
instantly, because there is some-
thing in there for everybody.
The Nip/Tuck: One of my worst
fears is getting drugged, waking up
in a bathtub full of ice, and then not
having both my kidneys. My fear
inspired this next tactic, which I
have not been able to pull off.
If your girlfriend or boyfriend
cheats on you, you could have the
cheater’s body surgically attached
to a horse’s. Because, let’s face it, no
one wants to date a centaur.
Granted, this one is a little
tougher to pull off. You might be
able to use Photoshop to superim-
pose the cheater’s body on a horse’s,
and then hack on to the person’s
Facebook account and make it the
profile picture. That’s almost as bad
as actually being a centaur.
Cheating is no joke, people, and
you shouldn’t let it slide. Break up
with the cheater, and if you feel it
necessary, let the person feel your
wrath through a little revenge. At
least give the cheater the “sham-
poop.”
Jorgensen is a Baldwin City senior
in journalism.
By ERiC JoRGEnSEn
kansan cOlUmnIst
opinion@kansan.com
» GUEst cOmmEntaRY
» lEttER tO tHE EDItOR
» lEttER tO tHE EDItOR
» cOmmEntaRY
Study abroad mandate unrealistic
Skateboard advocates have time
to fght if they can get organized
Be responsible when you drink
How to make ‘shampoop’ and other dishes of revenge
Blame bookstores
for over-the-top
textbook prices
grant snider/KAnsAn
KULTURE 8A
WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 4, 2006
.
who
.
what
.
when
.
why
› Adjusting to life
away from their
home counties
› During the begin-
ning of their college
careers
› To make friends
and experience
American culture
ELIZABETH SCHUBAUER
On most weeknights, a group of interna-
tional students gather at the second-floor
lobby of McCollum Hall.
The students, mostly from Saudi
Arabia and India, have found that living
in McCollum has given them a chance to
interact with and adjust to a culture differ-
ent from their own.
“The lobby is a good place to meet
new people,” Vivek Bhandari, Kathmandu,
Nepal, freshman said. “We play table ten-
nis, pool and sometimes even do our
homework.”
Atul Koshley, Raipur, India, sophomore,
admits that he didn’t know where Kansas
was before he became a freshman here.
He wanted to get out of India, and the
University was the least expensive option
that had a good engineering program.
Koshley and the other students plan to
stay at the University until they earn their
degrees, which means that they’re in for a
more long-term adjustment than students
doing only semester- or year-long study
abroad programs here.
When the students contrast Lawrence to
their hometowns, they often use words like
“quiet,” “calm” and “friendly.”
“There are so many people. It’s huge,”
Koshley said of India.
The students enjoy living here, though.
“(There are) lots of nice people I can get
along with,” Mohammed AlMarri, Al Jabail,
Saudi Arabia, freshman, said. “They don’t
make me feel alone.”
A transition period is common among
all of the University’s new students, but
there are a few additional changes that
affect international students.
For example, international students
have more difficulties adjusting to the food
offered on campus. The food at Mrs. E’s is
not what most international students are
used to eating.
Sheryl Kidwell, assistant director of KU
Residential Dining, said that menu items
are revised every summer and more diverse
cuisine was gradually being added.
The Muslim students also struggle with
the times that Mrs. E’s is open. Every year,
Muslims celebrate the holiday Ramadan by
fasting from sunrise to sunset for 30 days.
“You feel hungry, feel thirsty so you
remember the poor people,” Talal Alsahli,
Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, freshman, said.
During the holiday, one isn’t supposed
to eat until 7:15 p.m., Alsahli said. Mrs.
E’s 7:30 p.m. closing time makes it diffi-
cult to eat a substantial meal there during
Ramadan. AlMarri fasted at the University
last year and said that by planning ahead
he was able to follow the restrictions of the
holiday.
Kidwell said that KU Dining works to
accommodate international students in
need of special meal arrangements.
“In the past we have posted signs ask-
ing those students who will be observing
the Ramadan holiday to sign up so we can
have to-go meals made up for them to take
to their rooms,” Kidwell said in an e-mail
interview.
She also said that the late-night hours
that accompany the meal equivalency
option have helped solve the problem in
recent years.
The international students at McCollum
may have a more pronounced culture shock
than traditional students, but in many ways
they are hanging out in the lobby looking
to make new friends just like most other
students.
—Edited by Mindy Ricketts
Chris Neal/KANSAN
Vivek Bhandari, Nepal freshman, serves during a friendly game of table tennis with fellowinternational students Tuesday evening at McCollumHall. Bhandari and other international
students come fromall parts of the world, adding diversity and perspective to the student population.
Foreign students adjust to culture clash
› International stu-
dents live in Mc-
Collum Hall
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sports
The NASCAR Chase format
narrows down competitors,
leaving fans guessing who
will win the championship.
6B 6B
the Kansas volleyball team will attempt
to snap its three-game losing
streak at Missouri tonight.
Wednesday, october 4, 2006
www.kansan.com
sports
PAGE 1b
by Josh LAndAu
The University of Kansas
women’s golf team placed first in
the Marilynn Smith Sunflower
Invitational on Tuesday at Alvamar
Country Club.
The victory marks the second
time in a row that the Jayhawks
have won the tournament when
they hosted it.
“We did well overall,” coach Erin
O’Neil said. “We were kind of shaky
here and there, but we didn’t give
up. I’m proud of them.”
The Jayhawks had a final round
score of 917 and a 14-stroke lead
over The University of Notre Dame.
Notre Dame moved past Arkansas-
Little Rock into second place. The
Jayhawks also improved on their
score from the last time they hosted
the tournament, when they posted a
score of 946 in 2004.
A large fan base was present for
the team. Several golf carts followed
players from hole to hole.
“It always helps to have a big
crowd to support us,” Amanda
Costner, Claremore, Okla., senior,
said.
After leading the first two rounds,
Costner fell to fifth place after the
third round with an overall score
of 227. Swirling winds were again
present on the second day and only
one golfer during the three rounds
was able to post a score under par.
“Everyone’s scores were up,”
O’Neil said. “It was a tough day on
a tough golf course.”
Emily Powers, Quincy, Ill., fresh-
man, led the Jayhawks in the final
round, posting an even par on the
course. She attributes her success to
her chipping.
“My chipping was never that
good until I got here and we worked
on it,” Powers said. “I made a lot of
up-and-downs today.”
Powers finished fourth in the
tournament with an overall score
of 225. Top honors went to Anita
Ojeda of Arkansas — Little Rock
with an overall score of 221.
The victory provided a boost of
confidence for the team members.
They hope to take it and apply it to
future tournaments.
“This is a huge point for us
to build on,” Annie Giangrosso,
Overland Park junior, said. “We
can take this to New Mexico or,
more importantly, Auburn.”
» football
Quarterback injuries not new to Mangino
Hosting tournament lucky charm for golfers
by RyAn schnEidER
Luck is something that has cer-
tainly eluded Mark Mangino and
his quarterbacks.
In Mangino’s five seasons, inju-
ries have riddled his starting quar-
terbacks. Kansas has yet to have a
quarterback start a full season in
the Mangino era. That trend con-
tinued again this season.
Freshman Kerry Meier has
missed his last two starts after suf-
fering an injury against Toledo.
Mangino isn’t sure if his quar-
terbacks are cursed, or if it’s his
bad luck.
“You won’t catch me playing lotto
tickets anytime soon,” Mangino
joked.
It’s probably a good idea.
Mangino is convinced he wouldn’t
have good luck with them anyway.
“When’s it’s zero, I’ll hit it,” he
said.
His luck with quarterbacks at
Kansas has certainly been baffling.
Mangino has gone through nearly
10 starting quarterbacks, with more
than half missing time because of
injury. Each of his five seasons has
featured at least two different start-
ers.
“Certainly all of us have a lit-
tle bit of frustration, but we have
to stand for what we believe in.”
Mangino said. “Our focus here has
always been that any player on the
field that gets hurt, we get the next
guy ready and ready to go.”
The trend started during
Mangino’s first season when Bill
Whittemore was injured. He suf-
fered injuries during both of his
seasons at Kansas. Whittemore’s
injury during his senior season
forced Mangino to strip Adam
Barmann’s redshirt. Barmann went
on to start two more games in
2003.
Kansas’ bad luck with quarter-
backs continued the next season
when Barmann suffered an injury
against Iowa State. Jason Swanson,
one of last season’s many quar-
terbacks, was injured during the
regular season finale against Iowa
State, but recovered in time to play
in the Fort Worth Bowl.
As for his current injured quar-
terback, Mangino said there’s a
chance that Meier will play “rela-
tively soon.”
“There’s no question that we’ll
see him again this season,” he said.
All that’s preventing Meier from
playing this weekend against Texas
A&M is clearance from the team’s
medical staff and Mangino. He
practiced again on Sunday, but is
still unable to make all the throws
needed in the offense.
Meier is currently listed as
“day-to-day” and Mangino has no
timetable for a decision about this
week’s starter.
KANsAN FILE pHoto
AdamBarmann prepares to pass the ball during a game Sept. 23 against South Florida State.
Barmann continued to start for Kerry Meier while he recovers froman arminjury.
» Women’s Golf » serenity noW
Quarterback shows
his improving skills
Coach’s five seasons have showcased at least two starters each year
I never thought I’d say this: Start
Adam Barmann.
That’s right, I said it, and I’ll say
it again. Start Adam Barmann, and
do it for as long as this guy is capa-
ble of playing like he has seven out
of the last eight quarters of football
for the Kansas Jayhawks.
I was petrified two weeks ago
when faced with the reality that
Barmann was going to start against
South Florida. The last thing I
remembered from Barmann was
that nightmarish outing against
Kansas State in Manhattan.
Remember that 12-3 shoot-out?
The Anti-Nick Reid — he was
doing No. 7 no justice — was three
for eight that day for a whopping
17 yards. That was 17 yards against
a mediocre Kansas State team in
Manhattan: a tough place to play if
you’re used to modern civilization.
But then Barmann, the alleged
successor to Bill Whittemore, who
has failed miserably ever since
his alleged breakout game against
Texas A & M in College Station
four years ago as a true fresh-
man, saves the day against South
Florida? And after a putrid first
quarter, leads Kansas back against
Nebraska — in Lincoln? Who is
this man, boys and girls? And what
has he done with the happy-feet,
wobbly-throwing, confidence-
lacking and baseball-cap-wear-
ing-because-he’s-content-being-a-
backup Adam Barmann we came
to bemoan and dislike? He’s gone,
and this new Adam Barmann, this
— let me get this two-intercep-
tion, first-quarter out-of-the-way-
and-throw-for-405-yards and-two-
touchdowns-the-next-three-quar-
ters — Barmann is now leading
the way.
So what do you say about his
turnovers?
While the fumbles and inter-
ceptions do hurt, there should
only be two interceptions because
the last pick Barmann threw in
the Nebraska game should have
never happened. The “sure-hand-
ed” Derek Fine dropped his first
of two easy touchdown passes
that the aforementioned quarter-
back put right on the numbers.
As a quick side note: once you
drop two (two!) touchdown pass-
es that would change the entire
complexion of a game, you lose
the distinction of being ‘sure-
handed.’ Where’s Marc Jones? But
I digress...
It’s amazing what Kansas foot-
ball fans are seeing right now when
it comes to the Kansas offense,
because folks around here haven’t
seen that kind of offense since,
well, the Kansas City Chiefs of the
past five years. Seriously, Mangino’s
offenses have been so bad that
Nick Reid threatened to beat up
every member of the offense last
year, and as bad as they were,
he probably could’ve done it by
himself – taking them all on at the
same time. Granted, no one on the
defense has threatened to beat up
any members of the offense this
year — although I hear Paul Como
and Kerry Meier have hair issues.
The offense and defense are actu-
ally helping each other.
The reason this offense is click-
ing is because of Adam Barmann,
the quarterback we love to hate.
He’s finally playing like the quar-
terback Mark Mangino envisioned
when he brought this gangly-look-
ing kid from West Platte, Mo.,
to Lawrence four years ago. He’s
played two great games in a row
and his confidence is sky-high after
what he did in Lincoln. His team’s
behind him, the fans are behind
him; let the kid ride this thing out
for as long as he can, because who
knows, he may ride this thing to
Kansas City in December.
— Edited by Brett Bolton
» biG 12 conference
Daily Nebraskan comic sparks discussion, criticism
by c.J. MooRE
After an Omaha television sta-
tion ran a news story about an
editorial cartoon that appeared in
Monday’s Daily Nebraskan, the
Nebraska school newspaper, the
paper received an abundance of let-
ters to the editor and comments on
its Web site.
The cartoon angered fans of both
Nebraska and Kansas.
Jenna Johnson, the editor of the
Daily Nebraskan, said the paper
was running eight to 10 letters to
the editor in today’s newspaper. But
before people jump to a quick judg-
ment of the cartoon, Johnson said
it’s important that they understand
the context.
Johnson said that the cartoon
was meant to be critical of both
Kansas and Nebraska fans.
She said that a number of Kansas
fans showed up to the game in
“our coach can eat your coach” T-
shirts. During the game when Eric
Washington was injured in the third
quarter, Nebraska fans started to do
the wave around the stadium.
“I think people who misunder-
stand it are people who weren’t at
the game or do not know the con-
text of the cartoon,” Johnson said.
Vanessa pearson/KANsAN
Meghan Gockel, Dallas freshman, swings during the frst day of the Marilynn Smith Sunfower
Invitational on Monday at Alvamar Country Club. Sixteen teams attended the two-day tournament.
Kansas won the tournament by 14 strokes; Notre-Dame came in second. Gockel tied for 26th place.
The team’s next tournament will be Oct. 16 at Price’s NMSU Collegiate Invitational in Las Cruces, N.M.
sEE Schneider oN pAGE 3B
sEE MoorE oN pAGE 3B
sEE landau oN pAGE 3B
by fREd A. dAvis iii
kansan columnist
fdavis@kansan.com
Players of the Week
Each week, coach mark mangino and his staf select players of the
game from the past weekend’s game. the selections come from
ofense, defense and special teams. they are announced on tuesday
afternoon. this week’s winners were:
ofense:
Dexton Fields
defense:
James mcclinton
special Teams:
scott Webb
webb mcclinton Fields
Brent Meier/The Daily Nebraskan
sports 2B
wednesday, october 4, 2006
By Evan HEngEl
Other than “we’re sorry, your call
can not be completed as dialed,”
there is no phrase in the English lan-
guage more aggravating than “run-
ning back by committee.”
Fantasy owners have been tor-
tured by coaches who change run-
ning backs more often than John
Madden changes networks, with
coach Mike Shanahan being the lead
offender. Owners of Joseph Addai,
Dominic Rhodes, Reggie Bush,
Deuce McAllister, DeShaun Foster,
DeAngelo Williams, Laurence
Maroney and Corey Dillon have
experienced the pain first-hand so
far this year.
While I can’t solve all your run-
ning back problems, I’m here to say
that one problem has solved itself.
Laurence Maroney, while still in the
backup role, has officially joined the
“Starting Club.” This is the elusive
brotherhood of NFL running backs
that you can start every week with-
out fear.
It’s actually easier to date Lindsay
Lohan than it is to join the Starting
Club. Maroney picked up 125 yards
on just 15 carries and reached the
end zone twice. What may be more
important is that Corey Dillon, ahead
of him on the depth chart, sputtered
in a goal-line situation several times
until finally stumbling in on fourth
down. With Maroney averaging 15
carries a game and rising, along with
his goal-line duties, he’s established
himself as a solid fantasy option.
Who to add:
1) LenDale White, running back,
Tennessee Titans. If you watched
him play as a USC Trojan, you might
remember him as a brash, cocky
running back with an attitude prob-
lem. Well, he’s the same guy, but for-
tunately he also has the same talent.
If he can steal enough carries from
Chris Brown and Travis Henry, I
like his chances to be the new Eddie
George to Tennessee fans.
2) Leon Washington, running
back, New York Jets. I might not
pick him up just yet, but keep an
eye on the running back situation
in New York. Cedric Houston and
Leon Washington will both be jock-
eying for more carries as fellow run-
ning back Kevan Barlow is averaging
under three yards per carry. Barlow
will get all the short yardage oppor-
tunities, as he had two more touch-
downs on Sunday, but giving the ball
to Barlow is a lot like head-butting
somebody, in both cases you must be
close to the target to be effective.
Who to drop:
1) Maurice Morris, running
back, Seattle Seahawks. His debut
as Seattle’s starting running back in
place of the injured Shaun Alexander
was more disappointing than the
season three finale of Entourage. He
picked up just 35 yards, and with
Seattle’s bye in week five, Morris may
not get another start his year.
2) Cincinnati defense. Perhaps
losing Odell Thurman for the year
was more important than anyone
thought, as the Bengals defense was
rocked for 38 points by the Patriots
on Sunday. They’ll probably rebound
later in the year, but they have a bye
this week, so if possible, I’d recom-
mend picking up San Francisco’s
defense. If you’re not sure why, it’s
because they play Oakland. I hate to
keep picking on the Raiders, but it’s
just so much fun.
Evan Hengel is an Overland Park
senior in fnance.
—Edited by Brett Bolton
TODAY
nVolleyball at Missouri, 6:30 p.m., Columbia, Mo.
FRIDAY
nWomen’s swimming, Intrasquad, 4 p.m., Robinson Center
nSoccer vs. Texas, 4 p.m., Jayhawk Soccer Complex
nWomen’s tennis, Indiana Tournament, all day, Bloomington, Ind.
SATURDAY
nFootball vs. Texas A&M, 11 a.m., Memorial Stadium
Player to watch: Sophomore defensive end
Russell Brorsen made the move from ofense to
defense, a move that is beginning to pay divi-
dends for the Jayhawks. Brorsen had a breakout
game against Nebraska and looks to carry that
momentum into the Jayhawks’ Homecoming
game against the Aggies.
nVolleyball at Oklahoma, 7 p.m., Norman, Okla.
nSoftball, Big Red Fall Classic, 2:30 and 4:45 p.m.,
Lincoln, Neb.
nTennis, Indiana Tournament, all day, Blooming-
ton, Ind.
SUNDAY
nSoccer vs. Texas A&M, 1 p.m., Jayhawk Soccer Complex
nMen’s golf, Windon Memorial Classic, TBA, Skokie Country Club, Glen-
coe, Ill.
nSoftball, Big Red Fall Classic, 10 a.m. and 2:30 p.m., Lincoln, Neb.
nTennis, Indiana Tournament, all day, Bloomington, Ind.
» FanTaSy FooTball
Bill Kostroun/Associated Press
Indianapolis Colts defensive back Jason David, left, beats NewYork Jets running back LeonWashington to the ball as he recovers a fumble on the
last play of the game during NFL football Sunday at Giants Stadiumin East Rutherford, N.J. The Colts beat the Jets 31-28.
athletics calendar
» naScar
Brorsen
The 2006 KU women’s basketball
television schedule was released
Tuesday. Out of the Jayhawks’ 31
regular-season matchups, 24 of
them will be televised.
Fox Sports will air two home
games: Jan. 6 against Baylor and
Feb. 18 against Kansas State. Col-
lege Sports Network has the rights
to the other two national broad-
casts: Jan. 3 against Baylor and Jan.
31 against Texas Tech.
Three games will receive re-
gional Fox Sports Net coverage. The
remaining seventeen games will
be shown locally on the Sunfower
channel and Metro Sports.
The frst exhibition game is Nov.
1 against Fort Hays State, and will
be shown on Sunfower.
Case Keefer
Two men at Speedway
charged afer attack
Television schedule released
aSSOCIaTED PRESS
KANSAS CITY, Kan. — Two
men accused of trying to rob the
Kansas Speedway amid a hail
of bullets were charged Tuesday
with trying to kill an off-duty
Kansas City, Kan., police detec-
tive and rob her.
Wyandotte County District
Attorney Jerome A. Gorman
charged Frederick Douglas and
Nolden Garner with attempted
capital murder in the attack
Sunday on Detective Susan
Brown.
Brown, a 25-year veteran, was
working security at the track for
a NASCAR race.
Authorities said in court doc-
uments that the two men fired
several shots at Brown, even after
she had fallen to the ground, and
took her handgun.
Gorman also charged the men
with aggravated battery because
a track employee suffered minor
wounds from either being shot
or being hit with bullet frag-
ments.
Evan Hengel’s
Fantasy Football Wednesday WOmEn’S BaSkETBall
Football Notes
Washington update:
Senior linebacker Eric Washington, who
suffered a concussion and temporary paralysis
after a hit in the Nebraska game, returned to
Lawrence on Monday morning. Mangino said
that Washington was suffering from weakness
in his left leg, which doctors have said is not
unusual. Washington will visit a doctor who
specializes in head and neck sports injuries for
further evaluation. Mangino said Sunday night
that there’s a chance Washington may play
again this season.
Nebraska decision:
Mangino said Tuesday that he has no regrets
about not attempting the two-point conversion
near the end of regulation in Saturday’s loss to
Nebraska. A successful two-point conversion
would have given Kansas a one-point lead with
less than 45 seconds to play.
“Nobody considered going for two,” he
said.
Kansas kicked the extra-point, which sent
the game into overtime.
Kansan senior sportswriter Ryan Schneider
can be contacted at rschneider@kansan.com.
— Edited by Jacky Carter
Ford Bray, Kansas City, Kan. junior, was at
the game and said he was surprised that the
Nebraska fans started a wave while Washington
was hurt on the field. He said it was a wave out
of boredom.
“I was impressed with how polite they were
so that kind of surprised me,” Bray said. “This
is a misrepresentation of the fan base as a
whole.”
Some fans, like Morgan Henzlik, Atlanta
junior, have interpreted the cartoon as making
fun of KU coach Mark Mangino’s weight rather
than as a criticism of the fan bases.
“It seems like a cheap shot – an easy thing
to go after,” Henzlik said. “OK, our coach is fat,
that’s not the first time we’ve heard that.”
Before publication, Johnson said the
Nebraskan editors made sure that Washington
was not going to be severely injured. Johnson
said if Washington had been paralyzed, the
cartoon would not have run. Once they found
out Washington was going to be OK, the edi-
tors decided to run the cartoon.
“This is an editorial cartoon that our edito-
rial cartoonist did just like an opinion column,”
Johnson said. “This is his opinion, his view on
the football game.”
Kansan staf writer C.J. Moore can be con-
tacted at cjmoore@kansan.com.
— Edited by Erin Wiley
This was the first tournament of the season
in which the Jayhawks went into the final
round with the lead and they performed well
under pressure.
“There were a lot of good teams out here,”
O’Neil said. “We kept the lead in the final
round and it was a great experience for us.”
O’Neil is hoping the experience of winning
will transfer to other tournaments, something
the team needs.
“Now we can go into tournaments knowing
we can win them,” Costner said.
The Jayhawks will compete in Price’s New
Mexico State University Collegiate Invitational
Oct. 16 to 18 in Las Cruces, N.M.
Kansan sportswriter Josh Landau can be con-
tacted at jlandau@kansan.com.
—Editedby Mindy Ricketts
sports
3b
wednesday, october 4, 2006
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schneider (continued from 1B)
Final Team Scores
Team Score
Kansas, U. of 917
notre dame, U. of 931
arkansas-Little rock 934
Missouri, U. of 936
north texas, U. of 936
Illinois state Univ. 940
Kansas state Univ. 942
Iowa state Univ. 944
wisconsin, U. of 950
wichita state Univ. 971
evansville, Univ. of 978
Indiana state Univ. 986
UMKc 1006
drake University 1009
creighton University 1011
southern Mississippi 1018
landau (continued from 1B)
moore (continued from 1B)
Final Top-20 golfers
Name School Score
anita ojeda ar-L. rock 221
stephanie wavro Missouri 222
sara wikstrom ar-L. rock 224
emily Powers Kansas 225
amanda costner Kansas 227
Katie elliott wisconsin 229
Lisa Maunu notre dame 229
annie Giangrosso Kansas 230
Karly Pinder Iowa state 231
christi athas Iowa state 232
Hilary anderson IL st. 232
Maggie noel n. texas 232
Lauren cheves n. texas 233
Michelle regan Kansas st. 234
Maddie augustsson Missouri 234
Pennape Pulsawath Iowa state 234
Halli Jo richards n. texas 234
Hailey Mireles Kansas st. 234
noriko nakazaki notre dame 235
tifany Hockensmith IL st. 235
Julia Potter Missouri 235
Jane Lee notre dame 235
britt Knutson IL st. 235
Helene robert Kansas st. 235
Source: KU Athletics
Texas Tech’s throwing
motivates Missouri
By TROy SCHULTE
THE ASSOCiATEd PRESS
COLUMBIA, Mo. — Missouri’s cornerbacks
are aware of Texas Tech’s reputation for throw-
ing the football. And for a group that says it has
yet to be challenged this year, that’s part of the
excitement.
The 23rd-ranked Tigers (5-0, 1-0 Big 12)
travel to Lubbock, Texas, Saturday to play Texas
Tech, a team whose 347.6 passing yards a game
leads the Big 12 Conference. The Red Raiders
(4-1, 1-0) rank third in the country in passing,
while their 432.8 yards per game rank third in
the conference in total offense.
“It’s exciting because it’s a good football
team and they throw the ball all over the place,”
Missouri cornerbacks coach Cornell Ford said.
“So I would think any corner, they are pretty
excited to play against a passing team like
this.”
Starter Darnell Terrell said Missouri’s defen-
sive line and linebackers have played so well
that the secondary hasn’t really been tested yet.
But he knows that will change this week.
“It’s a great challenge,” he said. “This team
doesn’t run the ball a lot; they put the ball in the
air a lot. This is probably going to be a true test
for the secondary.”
Through its first five games, Missouri has
given up an average of 143.2 passing yards
per game. But that was before Domonique
Johnson injured an ACL in his right knee
during Saturday’s 28-13 win over Colorado.
Missouri Coach Gary Pinkel said Johnson
would need surgery and probably wouldn’t play
again this season.
“Those usually take about four to five
months,” Pinkel said after practice Tuesday.
Ford said he had a stable of young corners
who were ready to step in for Johnson. The
sophomore from Texas City, Texas, lost his
starting spot against Ohio on Sept. 23 for disci-
plinary reasons, and Ricks played so well in his
place that he also started against Colorado.
True freshman Del Howard also will be
expected to play quite a bit against Texas Tech.
Previously listed as Terrell’s backup, Howard
will now help Ricks shore up the side that was
vacated by Johnson. Junior college transfer Paul
Simpson is listed behind Terrell.
Pinkel said playing young cornerbacks early
in the season helped them prepare for the Red
Raiders.
“That’s why you get backup players ready to
play, and we’re lucky to have a Del Howard that
is a freshman that can actually play and do a
good job,” Pinkel said. “Certainly, he’ll be tested
this week.”
Texas Tech quarterback Graham Harrell
averages over 300 yards passing per game, and
Robert Johnson and Joel Filani rank first and
second in the Big 12 in catches per game.
But Terrell said he isn’t worried about the
young corners. Through five games, Ricks’ 11
tackles are tied with Johnson for the most by
any of Missouri’s corners, and Howard’s two
interceptions are the only two by a corner.
Terrell and Ricks, who are roommates, already
have started late-night film sessions.
“I think they are going to be up for the chal-
lenge,” Terrell said. “They know this is a team
that is going to put the ball up in the air. I think
we’re going to be prepared for this team.”
» big 12 FooTball
1
2
3
marlins replaces manag-
er with third-base coach
MIAMI, Fl. - Once the runner-
up to Joe Girardi for the job of managing
the Florida Marlins, Fredi Gonzalez became
his successor Tuesday.
The Marlins fred Girardi, and fve hours
later announced that he’ll be replaced
by Gonzalez, third-base coach for the
Atlanta Braves the past four years. Girardi’s
departure after only one season had been
expected after his rift with owner Jefrey
Loria boiled over in an on-feld confronta-
tion two months ago.
Gonzalez, 42, interviewed with the Mar-
lins a year ago after Jack McKeon resigned.
Instead they hired Girardi, but his relation-
ship with Loria and general manager Larry
Beinfest soon became strained.
Gonzalez was born in Cuba and raised in
Miami, becoming the frst manager in the
Marlins’ organization when they hired him
to run their frst minor league team in Erie,
Pa., in 1992. Beginning in 1999, he coached
third base for 2 1/2 years under Marlins
manager John Boles.
-Associated Press
Titans’ tackle gets record
fve-game suspension
NASHVILLE, Tenn. - Tennessee
Titans defensive tackle Albert Haynes-
worth was given a fve-game suspension
— the longest for on-feld behavior in NFL
history — for stomping on Dallas Cowboys
center Andre Gurode’s head and kicking
him in the face Sunday.
The NFL said that Haynesworth was
suspended for fagrant unnecessary rough-
ness. The suspension, which is without pay,
is efective immediately. Haynesworth will
be eligible to return Nov. 19 for the Titans’
game at Philadelphia.
-Associated Press
Prosecutor: newspa-
per report on steroids
wrong
SAN FRANCISCO, Calif.
— The federal prosecutor overseeing an
investigation of steroids in baseball said
a newspaper report that fve players, in-
cluding Roger Clemens, had used illegal
performance-enhancing drugs contained
“signifcant inaccuracies.”
Citing sealed court flings, the Los An-
geles Times reported that former pitcher
Jason Grimsley had named Clemens, his
Houston Astros teammate Andy Pettitte,
and Baltimore Orioles Miguel Tejada,
Brian Roberts and Jay Gibbons. The
story frst appeared on the
Times’ Web site on Satur-
day and quickly was seized
on by print and broadcast
media outlets.
San Francisco U.S. At-
torney Kevin Ryan issued
the statement saying the
reports were inaccurate.
A spokesman for Ryan
declined to elaborate.
-Associated Press
entertainment 4B
WEDNEsDay, octobEr 4, 2006
» horoscopE
» parENthEsEs
Chris Dickinson
Eric Dobbins
BRIAN HOLLAND
10 is the easiest day, 0 the most chal-
lenging.
Aries (March 21-April 19)
Today is a 7
It’s good to work with another
person who has diferent qualities.
This time, you need somebody
who’s good at schmoozing, which
you’re not.
TAurus (April 20-May 20)
Today is a 7
Of course you care what others
think, but you can’t let them stop
you from doing what you have
already decided really needs to be
done. And be efcient about it.
GeMini (May 21-June 21)
Today is an 8
Keep moving, and keep yourself
headed in the right direction. Your
natural agility is very useful now.

CAnCer (June 22-July 22)
Today is a 6
Be fexible. Things don’t turn out
exactly as you’ve planned. Some
developments, however, are better
than you hoped. It all balances out.

Leo (July 23-Aug. 22)
Today is a 7
You have a good idea of what you’d
like to achieve. Now get down to
the real numbers and make it hap-
pen.

VirGo (Aug. 23-sept. 22)
Today is a7
You’re getting some interesting sug-
gestions but some of them won’t
work. Listen and take notes but do
more research before you decide.

LibrA (sept. 23-oct. 22)
Today is an 8
A new idea still needs some work.
Don’t go public with it until you’ve
found all the problems. That’ll take
a few days.
sCorpio (oct. 23-nov. 21
Today is a 7
A word here, a gesture there
— make sure they get the mes-
sage. If you don’t show disapproval,
they’ll spend all your money.

sAGiTTArius (nov. 22-Dec. 21)
Today is a 6
Changes in the routine cause
disruptions that make simple tasks
take longer. There’s an increased risk
of accidents, too. Take care during
renovation.
CApriCorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19)
Today is a 6
You’re smart and getting smarter
every day. Danger still lurks ahead.
Use it to your advantage.

AquArius (Jan. 20-Feb. 18)
Today is a 7
The money is pouring in. Don’t try
to catch it in a sieve. The danger of
spillage is very high, so hold onto
every drop.

pisCes (Feb. 19-March 20)
Today is a 7
Let people know what you want.
They’ll be happy to lend you a hand.
Don’t get sidetracked into talking
about other things. Stay on track.
» squirrEl
Wesley Benson
Greg Griesenauer
» DaMaGED circus
»yEah totally
644 Mass
749-1912 /,%(57 /,%(57 /,%(57 /,%(57 /,%(57< +$// < +$// < +$// < +$// < +$//
WHO KILLED THE ELECTRIC CAR (PG)
NO SHOWS
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4:40 7:10 9:40
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Ad Rep: Chris Pumpelly
Information Services
Contact: Sarah Kanning (kanning@ku.edu, 864-0467)
Bill to: Allison Lopez, Information Services, 223 Strong hall
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KANSANCLASSIFIEDS
PHONE 785.864.4358 FAX 785.864.5261 CLASSIFIEDS@KANSAN. COM
AUTO STUFF JOBS LOST & FOUND FOR RENT
ROOMMATE/
SUBLEASE SERVICES CHILD CARE TICKETS TRAVEL
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BARTENDING. UPTO $300/DAY. NO
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PROVIDED. 800-965-6520 EXT108
ACCOUNT SERVICE REPSneeded to
start full-time, on choice of either mid-Nov
date or late Dec date, at Security Benefit,
Topeka, KS. All degree programs welcome
for this entry-level career opp. After com-
prehensive training, ASR’s provide infor-
mation and service (no selling or solicita-
tion) relating to financial products.
Competitive salary and benefits package
for this opportunity in our dynamic technol-
ogy-based business, se2.
Apply via our online application at
www.securitybenefit.com. or phone
785.438.3732. EOE.
*CALLCENTER*
No sales, collections or customer service
Weekly paycheck. Apply now for shifts
M-F day or evening. Even if you've never
done call center work you can do this job!
It's easy to do and we'll train you so CALL
US 913-384-9494 www.vipresearch.net
$5,842 FREE cash grants. Never Repay!
FREE grant money FOr School, Housing,
Business, Real Estate. For listings
1-800-509-6956 extension 860.
In-home babysitter needed to help mother
during the day with 2 children, ages 2 yrs.
and 8 mos. Experience only. MWF 7 am-1
pm. Contact: david.c.fleischer@gmail.com
Mystery Shoppers
Earn up to $150 per day
Exp not Required. Undercover shoppers
needed to Judge Retail and Dining Estab-
lishments. Call 800-722-4791
Leasing Consultant needed part-time for
busy apartment communities. Excellent
people skills required. MWF 12-5 or M-F
1-5 pm. Apply in person at West Hills
Apartments,1012 Emery Rd.
Spring Break 2007
20th Anniversary w/ SunSplash
Free Trip on 12 before Nov. 1, Free Meals
& Parties, Group Discounts on 6+
1800-426-7710 www.sunsplashtours.com
KU Students SAFE RIDE is now
hiring Saferide Drivers for the Fall
Semester! Must have a good driving
record. Apply in person at 841 Pennsylva-
nia or call to schedule an interview
#785-842-0544.
Lawrence Helpers Inc. seeks companions
for delightful elderly clients. Full time and
part time with flexible hours and excellent
pay for honest, personable employee.
Call Julie 331-5850.
COOLCOLLEGEJOBS.COM
Paid Survey Takers Needed in Lawrence.
100% FREE to Join! Click on Surveys
BUSINESS INTERNSHIP! College Pro is a
student development company. We coach,
train and teach students how to manage a
business while in school. Resume builder,
valuable skills, competitive money.
www.iamcollegepro.com to apply.
$3500-$5000 PAID. EGG DONORS
+Expenses. N/smoking, Ages 19-29.
SAT>1100/ACT>24/GPA>3.0
reply to: info@eggdonorcenter.com
ROOMMATE/SUBLEASE
FOR RENT
FOR RENT
3 BD, 2 BAall appliances included. 2000
mobile home. $ 21,000 OBO.
Call 785-764-1561
1987 Cadillac Coupe Deville $750 OBO
Call 913-706-3136
Subleaser needed for spring semester.
Swanky furnished apt @ 14th and Ten-
nessee. Hardwood floors, new bathroom,
$287.50/mo + utilities. Student studying
abroad, must sublease. 651-402-9985.
Tuckaway Management.1, 2 3 Bdms for
Dec/Jan. Short-term lease available.
838-3377 or 841-3339.
www.tuckawaymgmt.com
Female roommate needed immed. for
house. $400/mo. + cable, no util.
Located 1 block from 6th St. Hy-Vee
Call 785-252-7566
SUNFLOWER APTS.
CA, security system, laundry. 1 & 2 BRs.
Large 2BRs for 1BR price of $395/mo
Deposit $99. Call 785-842-7644.
Trinity Family Learning Center, AChristian
Child Care Provider Seeks Teachers &
Assistants. FT/PTavailable.
913-724-4441
Room for rent. 3 BR/3 BAduplex. Close to
campus. Cable, wireless internet, garage
spot. $350/Mo + utl call Kelsey @
913-205-8133
Female roommate wanted. 1 BR available
in 3 BR apartment at Parkway Commons
3601 Clinton Pkwy. Non-smoker, no pets.
$413/mo. Utilities included. Call Alissa
262-672-5506 or Bridget 785-766-7461.
Party Personnel is hiring banquet
servers. $9.25/hr. Kansas City. Call Gary
at 913-963-2457 or print off application
online at www.partypersonnelkc.com.
FOR SALE: 1996 Jeep Cherokee Sport
4x4. H.O. engine, ac, am-fm-cd, 112,000
miles. Very clean and always well cared for.
$3,950 Firm. Call 785-547-7448 today!
PTand FTteaching positions for children
available. Small class size, great environ-
ment. Shawnee, Kansas 913-268-8991
Seasonal: Lenexa mail order co. Cust. Ser-
vice & Warehouse. FT/PT. Day/Eve. $7-
$9/hr. Job line: 913-438-3995, x 126
We pay up to $75 per survey.
www.GetPaidToThink.com
Party Personnel is hiring banquet
servers. $9.25/hr. Kansas City. Call Gary
at 913-963-2457 or print off application
online at www.partypersonnelkc.com.
Only $700/mo for 4 BR, 2 bath apartment
on 4th St. by Iowa. CA, DW, W/D. Available
now. 785-550-2109.
Remodeled 2 BR and 3 BRincludes W/D,
DW, new carpet, new tile, fireplace, back
patio, $650-$750. 785-841-7849
1998 Mercury Sable, V6, $2600 OBO
great condition, inside and out.
Call Daniel 785-979-2066
2005 Honda Rebel. 250cc's. Orange. 65
miles per gallon. Great starter bike!
$2800. Call 785-383-7548
Are you tired of living in the dorms or
Greek houses? If so, move into this luxury
4BR, 2-1/2 bath duplex w/ fireplace & 2
car garage. Quality appliances-refrig,
stove, microwave, DW, & washer/dryer.
408 Trent Court. Great NW location on
cul-de-sac, only $1,095 plus deposit.
Small pets negotiable with deposit. 1st
month rent free if you call now
785-979-0806.
20 gallon aquarium-$75, 55 gallon aquar-
ium-$200, 135 gallon aquarium-$700 obo,
6" true gold piranha-$60, 7" black piranha-
$100, 2" Cariba piranha-$35, call
913-683-1843
Lost: in/around Memorial Stad. 9/23, men's
Swiss Army "Seaplane" watch body (no
band). Reward. 913.486.8958.
1 BR, 1 BAvery near KU campus.
$500/mo + util. Ready by Sept. 23.
ejstrumpet@yahoo.com or 505-850-5946.
Foosball table for sale! Great condition,
electronic scoreboard. Great for parties!
$150. Call 785-236-974
Lawrence Property Management
www.lawrencepm.com. 785-832-8728 or
785-331-5360. 2 BRs Available now!
www.ubski.com
1-800-754-9453
Breck, Vail,
Beaver Creek,
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& Keystone
#1 College Ski & Board Week
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5 Resorts for the
Price of 1
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179
from only
plus tax
1-800-SKI-WILD
Gumby's Pizza now hiring delivery drivers
and all positions. Start today, cash paid
daily 1445 W. 23rd Call 785-841-5000
Maceli's seeks part-time dishwasher,
servers, and bartenders. To apply, call
Karlyn at 331-2096, ext. 106.
Earn $800-$3200 a month to drive brand
new cars with ads placed on them.
www.AdCarKey.com.
Don's Steak House hiring servers and bar-
tenders. Apply in person at 2176 E. 23rd.
843-1110.
Googols of Learning Child Development
Center is looking for an Assistant Teacher
M-F 3-6. Candidates must have;
*Ayear of experience in a licensed child
care center OR
*Have academic credit in Applied
Behavioral Science with experience in a
licensed child care center. OR
*An Assoc. Degree in Child Development
Qualified Candidates call 785-856-6002 or
send resumes to:
4931 W. 6th St. Suite 118
Lawrence, KS 66049
4000 w.6th
(Hyvee Shopping Center)
Call 785-mango (856-2646)
walk-ins welcome!
4 tans $15
level l beds only
expires l0-3l-06
(must present coupon)
TVOTIJOF GSFTI BJS DPPMXBUFS NBOHPT
+EEPYOUR
SUMMERTAN
See yourself getting a head start on the holidays by joining the team at the Target Distribution Center in Topeka, KS.
We're adding Full-time and Seasonal Warehouse Worker positions to get ready for the holiday rush, and if you love
the thrill of working in a fast-paced environment, this is the place to be.
Full-time and Seasonal Warehouse Workers
• Receive and unload cartons and/or pallets from trailers
• Move pallets through the warehouse
• Check and maintain carton count accuracy within the warehouse
Apply in person:
• Target Distribution Center, 1100 SW 57 St, Topeka, KS
Target is an equal employment opportunity employer and is a drug-free workplace.
See Yourself Here For The Holidays
©
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We’re looking for:
• Ability to operate all power equipment safely
• Ability to lift up to 47 lbs and occasionally up to 60 lbs
• Requires successful completion of the Physical Abilities Test
See the rewards:
• Competitive pay
• Comprehensive benefits
• Target discount
KANSANCLASSIFIEDS
In a Class of its Own.
Classifieds Policy: The Kansan will not knowingly accept any advertisement for
housingor employment that discriminates against any personor groupof persons based
on race, sex, age, color, creed, religion, sexual orientation, nationality or disability. Fur-
ther, theKansan will not knowinglyaccept advertisingthat is inviolationof Universityof
Kansas regulationor law.
All real estate advertisinginthis newspaper is subject tothe Federal Fair HousingAct
of 1968whichmakes it illegal toadvertise “any preference, limitationor discrimination
based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an
intention, to make any suchpreference, limitationor discrimination.”
Our readers are hereby informed that all jobs and housing advertised inthis newspa-
per are available onanequal opportunity basis.
Classifieds
5B
Wednesday, OctOber 4, 2006
SPORTS 6B
WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 4, 2006
BY JEFF DETERS
NASCAR driver Tony Stewart’s
victory Sunday at the Kansas
Speedway had no effect on his goal
of winning the 2006 NASCAR cham-
pionship.
“If you’re not in the Chase, the
only thing you can do is win races,”
Stewart said.
The Chase is NASCAR’s version of
a playoff system: a 10-race sprint for
the championship. For three years,
the Chase format has made a big
impact on the NASCAR Nextel Cup
Series.
The first 26 races determine which
drivers are eligible for the Chase: the
top 10 drivers with the most points,
and any drivers within 400 points of
the leader. The drivers’ point totals are
then adjusted for the final 10 races.
Before the Chase went into effect,
some of NASCAR’s top drivers, like
Jeff Gordon, would accumulate so
many points that they would cruise
to the championship long before
season’s end. NASCAR thought this
diminished the suspense and excite-
ment, causing fan interest to wane.
The Chase has sparked fan inter-
est and driver techniques in terms
of strategy and momentum, which
four-time NASCAR champion Jeff
Gordon knows all about.
“I think it is extremely important
that you carry momentum into the
Chase,” Gordon said. “You want to
peak while you are in the Chase.”
Gordon finished third in each of
his last two Chase races but finished
a disappointing 39th on Sunday.
One driver who is not in this
year’s Chase is Emporia native Clint
Bowyer. He thought the Chase had
been a great addition to NASCAR.
“I think the Busch Series needs
a Chase,” Boywer said. “I think the
Truck series needs a Chase. I think
at the point of the season where it’s
starting to get a little stale, it adds
a lot more excitement and gets the
fans back into it.”
Dale Earnhardt Jr., one of the most
popular drivers in NASCAR, fin-
ished 10th on Sunday and is seventh
in the Chase standings. Earnhardt is
thankful to be in the hunt this year.
“It’s exciting obviously to be in the
mix and to be one of the names in
the hat,” he said. “So we’re trying to
take advantage of it.”
Kansan sportswriter Jef Deters
can be contacted at jdeters@kan-
san.com.
—Edited by Shanxi Upsdell
BY DREW DAVISON
Tonight’s match at Missouri will
be a tough challenge for the Kansas
volleyball team to snap out of its
three-match losing streak.
The Tigers are undefeated at
home this season and are ranked
No. 17 in the country.
“Obviously, they’re going to be
heavy favorites,” Kansas coach Ray
Bechard said. “We’ve got to start
having success, and we have to find
a way to win on the road.”
Missouri (11-4, 5-1 Big 12
Conference) has defeated Kansas
(8-7, 1-5) in Columbia, Mo., the
past five years. The Tigers have also
won the last four meetings against
the Jayhawks.
Even with everything in
Missouri’s favor, Kansas will have
an opportunity for its first confer-
ence road victory tonight.
“I got to say this, even though
we’re disappointed, they come
back and practice hard everyday,”
Bechard said. “We’re going to do all
we can do to get this thing headed
in the right direction.”
Missouri swept then No. 5 Texas
on Sept. 23 during the team’s cur-
rent five-game winning streak.
With the victory, Missouri climbed
to No. 2 in the Big 12 standings.
“They knew at some point in
time, they could be really strong,”
Bechard said. “They went through
some growing pains in nonconfer-
ence, but have recovered extremely
well.”
Missouri outside hitter Jessica
Vander Kooi leads the team in
kills with 4.40 per game. She also
earned Big 12 Player of the Week
on Sept. 25.
Bechard said the Jayhawks have
made costly errors, which kept
them out of the win column.
“We literally, at times, stop our-
selves from being the team we want
to be,” he said.
Kansas right side hitter Emily
Brown had a good feeling about
tonight’s game after being swept by
Iowa State on Saturday.
“It’s coming (tonight), for sure.
It’ll be a good win for us,” she said.
The match, set for 6:30 p.m., is
the first event in the 2006-07 Kansas
vs. Missouri Border Showdown.
Kansas defeated Missouri to win
last year’s Border Showdown 23-
17.
Kansas will next play at No. 25
Oklahoma on Saturday.
Kansan sportswriter Drew Davi-
son can be contacted at ddavi-
son@kansan.com.
—EditedbyErinWiley
Jayhawks play old rival
» VOLLEYBALL » NASCAR
2006-07 Border Showdown starts tonight in Columbia
Orlin Wagner/Associated Press
Jimmie Johnson (48) makes a pit stop with four laps to go in the Banquet 400 on Saturday at Kansas Speedway in Kansas City, Kan. Johnson was
penalized for speeding in pit rowwhile getting back into the race. He fnished 14th.
Chase format drives fan interest
Kansan fle photo
Kansas hasn’t won in the Big 12; it has losses against Colorado, Texas Tech and Iowa State. Fresh-
man Brittany Williams and her teammates will try to start a winning streak at Missouri.
TRUCKLOAD SALE
Prices Good October 4 thru October 10, 2006
“Come On In,
You Be The Judge!”
OPEN
24 HOURS
EVERYDAY!
THURSDAY SPECIAL
BANANAS
19
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DOUBLE PUNCH
OCT. 5, 6 & 7
4 $1000 Winners Remaining
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29 $100 Winners Remaining
Today’s
Homecoming
Events:
Stop by Wescoe Beach to
sign a Good Luck banner for
the football team!
Tomorrow’s
Homecoming
Events:
View Chalk & Rock Entrys on Wescoe Beach!
PEP-RALLY in Visitor Center Parking Lot 6m!
www.homecoming.ku.edu