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wednesday, june 17, 2009 www.kansan.com volume 120, issue 153


mip case on
judge judy
Student travels to L.A. for flming. page 5
summer dog
days continue
Don Gardner
leads
two-a-day
workouts
despite
battling
cancer.
page 15
frederick
remembered
Students mourn former athletics director. page 3
kansas hosts
ironman 70.3
for second time
Students join more than 2,000 athletes
from around the world in triathlon.
PAGE 12
ryan mcgeeney/kansan
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WEATHER
Wednesday, June 17
96 75
Thursday, June 18
95 75
Friday, June 19

Saturday, June 20
Sunday, June 21
Monday, June 22
Tuesday, June 23
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NEWS 2
wednesday, june 17, 2009
QUOTE OF THE DAY
Im half machine. Im a
monster.
Buster Bluth, Arrested Development
FACT OF THE DAY
Amy Poehler, who is married
to Will Arnett in real life, also
plays his wife on the show.

Funtrivia.com
ET CETERA
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INDEX
News. .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . P.3
Entertainment . . . . . . . . P.10
Opinion . . . . . . . . . . . . . P.11
Classifeds . . . . . . . . . . . P.17
Sports . . . . . . . . . . . . . P.20
Potter Lake was built in 1911
in order to combat major fres
on campus. Swimming and
diving contests were held
there until the water quality
was deemed too poor and
swimming was banned in
1924.
DAILY KU INFO
@
Check Kansan.com all sum-
mer to keep up on campus and
Lawrence news. The print edi-
tion of The Kansan comes out
every Wednesday.
NEWS NEAR & FAR
INTERNaTIoNal
1. Chinese woman not
punished for stabbing
BEIJING A Chinese woman
who became a folk hero after fatally
stabbing a Communist Party ofcial
to fend of his demands for sex was
freed by a court Tuesday.
Deng Yujiao, 21, was accused of
stabbing the ofcial with a knife
and injuring his colleague when
the two inebriated men cornered
her one night last month at her
workplace. Her popularity refects
widespread anger in China over
abuse of power by communist of-
fcials and the security forces.
The court ruled that Deng should
be spared punishment because the
injury resulted from excessive force
used in self-defense and that she
had limited criminal responsibility
because she was manic-depressive.
2. Women imprisoned for
illegal entry into country
SEOUL, South Korea North
Koreas state-run news agency
says that two American journalists
sentenced last week to 12 years of
labor admitted they crossed into
the country illegally.
The Korean Central News Agency
said in a detailed report Tuesday
that Laura Ling and Euna Lee of
Current TV were arrested after
crossing the Tumen River.
The report said the women ad-
mitted and accepted the sentences
handed down by North Koreas top
court on June 8.
3. German prime minister
assumes missing are dead
BERLIN German Foreign
Minister Frank-Walter Steinmeier
said two German women who went
missing in Yemen are presumed to
have been killed.
It was the frst ofcial confrma-
tion from Germany of reports from
Yemen that two of three mutilated
bodies found Monday were Ger-
man women.
Steinmeier says a team of Ger-
man experts was sent Tuesday to
Yemen to assist with the identifca-
tion of the bodies.
But he said, We must unfortu-
nately assume that the two German
women who were missing are
among the dead.
He said fve Germans remain
missing despite conficting reports
and speculation that they might
have been killed.
Steinmeier said, We will do
everything in our powers to return
the Germans still missing in Yemen
back home.
Mostly sunny
NaTIoNal
4. Attorneys explain bail
increase for Tiller case
WICHITA Prosecutors are tak-
ing possible threats made by the
man accused of killing abortion pro-
vider George Tiller seriously. Thats
why the bond for Scott Roeder
was raised to $20 million from $5
million.
A transcript released Tuesday of
an impromptu telephone call last
week between attorneys and the
judge in the case makes public for
the frst time why his bond was
increased.
In raising the bond, Judge Warren
Wilbert cited comments Roeder
has made to the news media since
his arrest about other possible anti-
abortion events.
In a docket hearing Tuesday,
Roeders preliminary hearing was
continued until June 30.
5. Coworker surrenders
after parking lot murders
WOODBRIDGE, Va. A co-
worker suspected in the Monday
morning shootings of a bus driver
and another man in the employee
lot of a northern Virginia bus sta-
tion surrendered later in the day,
authorities said.
Police said the suspect, Glen Ki-
nard Wade, and one of the victims,
bus driver Darnell McPherson, had
a fght before shooting broke out
about 11 a.m. at the Potomac and
Rapphannock Transportation Com-
mission.
McPherson, 32, of Dale City and
William Anderson Jr., 34, of Wood-
bridge were killed. Both McPherson
and the suspect were commission
employees, while Anderson was an
outside contractor.
Wade, a 40-year-old from Wood-
bridge, turned himself in to Prince
William County Police Monday. He
was charged with murder and is
being held without bond.
6. Trooper faces criticism for
pulling over ambulance
OKLAHOMA CITY Bothered
that an ambulance driver failed to
yield to him as he raced to provide
backup on a call and angered
further when he thought the driver
fipped him an obscene gesture
state Trooper Daniel Martin decided
to stop the ambulance and give the
driver a piece of his mind.
What Martin didnt know then,
his lawyer said Monday, was that
there was a patient in the back of
the ambulance.
Martins attorney said the law
allowed an ofcer to pull over an
ambulance if its emergency lights
and sirens arent running, as was the
case in this incident.
Associated Press
Mostly cloudy
86 65
AM clouds/ PM sun
91 70
Sunny
Sunny
92 72
90 70
Partly cloudy
91 68
Sunny
ON THE RECORD
On Monday, June 11, the KU Pub-
lic Safety Ofce reported the theft of
11 bicycles and a micro scooter from
a storage lot at the KU Department
of Student Housing Maintenance
Shop. The estimated value of the
items was listed at $3,300.
On Thursday, June 13, the KU
Ofce of Public Safety reported a
robbery near Sprague Apartments
at 1400 Lilac Lane. Two men ap-
proached a sandwich shop delivery
driver and took $204 through physi-
cal force.
wednesday, june 17, 2009 news 3
Lawrence
Frederick remembered by community, students
BY DYLAN SANDS
dsands@kansan.com
Tose remembering Robert Fred-
erick, known as Freddy, Doctor Bob,
Coach Bob and other endearing
nicknames, do so with reverence.
Te former athletics director died
Friday night afer sufering injuries
from a bicycle accident in Lawrence
Tursday. He was 69.
From the time he frst came to the
University in 1958 until his death,
Frederick had a deep connection
with the University. He graduated in
1962 with a Bachelor of Science in
chemistry and then obtained both
a Master of Education in 1964 and
his Doctor of Education in 1984 at
the University. He returned in 1981
and served as the executive director
of the Williams Educational Fund
until 1985. In 1987 he became the
athletics director, a position he held
until 2001. Afer
resigning as ath-
letics director,
Frederick began
teaching at the
University as an
assistant profes-
sor and lecturer
in sports man-
agement.
For many, Frederick was known
as the man who brought Roy Wil-
liams to the University. But Pat War-
ren, who served as assistant athletics
director under him, said Frederick
had many other accomplishments.
Tere are things that are difcult
to capture from just looking at his
resume, Warren said. His decision
to hire Roy, those are things that are
more visible. He did what he be-
lieved was right, even if it wasnt the
most popular thing to do.
Warren said that Frederick was
instrumental in providing opportu-
nities for female athletes.
He added womens soccer and
womens rowing. Hundreds of wom-
en since those sports were added
have competed, Warren said. Its
the result of his decision to do what
he thought was right. He provided
opportunities for women.
Warren also said that during their
time together in the athletics depart-
ment, Frederick pushed through
several improvements to campus
facilities. According to the athletics
Web site, Frederick oversaw more
than $50 million in upgrades to the
campus with a $35 million renova-
tion of Memorial Stadium and Allen
Fieldhouse.
Jerry Nossaman, Lawrence resi-
dent and long-time friend of Freder-
ick, said Frederick was frmly dedi-
cated to doing what he thought was
right for the University.
Nossamans wife, Sandee, said she
was also close to Frederick.
One of the things I certainly re-
spect the most about him is his work
with women being a part of athletics,
Sandee said. He worked very hard
for that. He was an individual who
enjoyed and could
talk with women as
well as he did men.
He really believed
in equality. I, as a
woman, respected
him for that.
Sandee said
Frederick had a
habit of writing
personal notes to
his friends about
shared memories. Sandee said these
notes were always from the heart.
Peter Luckey, senior pastor at
Plymouth Congregational Church
in Lawrence, said Frederick was a
treasured member of his congrega-
tion. Like Sandeee, he also remem-
bered receiving personal gifs from
Frederick.
One thing thats been moving for
me is a year ago he gave me a poem
called A Life that Matters. It now
hangs in my ofce. Its all about what
matters at the end of the day, our
character and what we stand for, not
how much money we
make, Luckey said. He
had an amazing level of
energy and passion. Im
sure many people have
letters from Bob that
they saved like I have.
Its a huge loss to this
community.
Keyarash Jahanian,
2007 graduate, took
Fredericks sports law
and sports marketing classes and
said Frederick did everything with
passion.
Te coolest thing about taking a
class with him is that he had all these
fantastic stories, Jahanian said. It
was easier to follow what he was
teaching because he had experience
see frederick on page 4
Frederick
He was the most car-
ing individual Ive ever
been associated with.
Bernie Kish
Professor
Former athletics
director killed in
bicycle accident
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4 wednesday, june 17, 2009
in applying the principles we were
learning.
Jahanian said Fredericks person-
ality made him a great teacher.
He really wanted to make sure
everyone succeeded. He pulled me
aside afer my last class period with
him and asked me about my goals,
Jahanian said. He wanted to make
sure I had the right connections so
I could move forward. Tat really set
him apart in how he was ingrained in
students life.
Sarah Tompson, 2008 graduate,
said Frederick was willing to extend
his help even afer she graduated.
As I was in the process of looking
for jobs he was constantly e-mailing
me contacts and checking on my
progress, Tompson said. Tis
man was the athletics director for 14
years. He was more than well enough
of to leave KU afer his time was up.
However, he came back to do what he
loved best educate young adults. I
am so very fortunate to have known
what I believe was an earth angel.
Bernie Kish taught sports facilities
and management class with Freder-
ick and said he felt blessed to have
worked with him.
He was the most caring individ-
ual Ive ever been associated with,
Kish said. He cared deeply for the
little people that did things that are
not usually gloried. Te people who
maintained the buildings, he cared
about them as much as he did about
famous coaches or chancellors.
Nossaman said he was unaware
of Fredericks involvement in many
organizations until afer his death.
An obituary provided by Fredericks
family listed organizations he was
involved with, including Kansas Spe-
cial Olympics Advisory Board, Big
Brothers, Big Sisters Advisory Board,
the Sunfower State Games, Board
of Directors and was also Kansas
spokesperson for Bicycle Helmet
Safety, Kansas Safe Kids Coalition
and Character Counts Sports.
He did a lot of things that a lot of
people didnt know, Nossaman said.
He never tooted his own horn. He
didnt talk about the things he did, he
would just do them.
A memorial service for Frederick
will be held at 1 p.m. Wednesday, at
the Lied Center on West Campus.
Edited by David Ugarte
frederick (continued from 3)
Politics
BY ALI AKBAR DAREINI
Associated Press
TEHRAN, Iran Thousands
of pro-reform protesters marched
Tuesday in a second straight day of
street demonstrations in the Iranian
capital, defying both their leader
and the government after the cleri-
cal regime said it would recount
some disputed ballots from the
presidential election.
Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali
Khamenei called on Iranians to
unite behind the cleric-led ruling
system despite the rival demonstra-
tions and street clashes, state televi-
sion reported, and he said represen-
tatives of all four candidates should
be present for any limited recount
of disputed ballots.
In the elections, voters had dif-
ferent tendencies, but they equally
believe in the ruling system and
support the Islamic Republic,
Khamenei said.
Supporters of reformist candi-
date Mir Hossein Mousavi marched
about the same time as a state-
organized rally where thousands of
people waving flags and pictures of
Irans supreme leader.
Khamenei said Monday the gov-
ernment would conduct an inves-
tigation into the election. This was
followed by a rally of hundreds of
thousands of people that presented
one of the greatest challenges to
Irans government since the 1979
Islamic Revolution.
iranian reformists fght for recount
ASSOciATed PreSS
in this image issued by the government run Iranian Students News Agency, thousands of people
attend a state-organized rally in a square in central Tehran, Iran. Thousands of people waving Ira-
nian fags and pictures of the supreme leader massed Tuesday at a rally organized by Irans clerical
regime but the government barred foreign media from covering the rally.
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wednesday, june 17, 2009
news
5
courts
Student, bar owner take MIP case to Judge Judy
BY DYLAN SANDS
dsands@kansan.com
For most students, an MIP means
a long road of fines, court appear-
ances and tarnished records. But for
Charles Miller, it meant a paid vaca-
tion to Los Angeles.
Miller, Overland Park senior,
was taped in a trial on Judge Judys
show in which Biggs BBQ restaurant
owner Doug Holiday sued him for
the money he was fined for serving
Miller alcohol when he was a minor.
Both Miller and Holiday signed
agreements saying they would not
reveal the outcome of the episode,
which has not yet aired.
The controversy began March 28,
2008 when Miller and his friends
watched a Kansas basketball game
at Biggs BBQ, located at 2429 Iowa
Street. Millers and Holidays accounts
of the night differ. Miller said he was
never asked to present an ID after
ordering a beer. Holiday said Miller
presented a fake ID before being
served alcohol.
I wasnt carded, and we just start-
ed drinking, Miller said.
Miller said he and his friends had
several drinks throughout the night
and became intoxicated.
The two did not dispute what hap-
pened next. A Lawrence Police offi-
cer entered the restaurant and began
checking the IDs of patrons drinking
alcohol. Miller presented an ID that
belonged to someone else.
There was no resemblance; the
ID was of a redhead and Im blond,
Miller said. He didnt believe it at
all.
That night, Miller was cited for
the fraudulent use of an ID and
possession of alcohol. The Lawrence
Municipal Court eventually lessened
the charges to a public consumption
charge and fined Miller $452.
Holiday was notified that he would
be fined $500 for serving alcohol to a
minor. Holiday said being asked to
pay more than Miller had to pay did
not seem fair to him.
Ryan McGeeney/KANSAN
Doug Holiday, owner of Biggs BBQ, recently appeared in an episode of Judge Judy, a televised courtroom arbitration program, to settle a dispute
with Charles Miller, a student who was charged with a minor in possession in Holidays restaurant March 28, 2008. In addition to fning Miller $452, the
Lawrence Municipal Court fned Holiday $500 for serving alcohol to a minor. Holiday fled a suit against Miller to recoup the $500, but agreed to drop the
suit when a producer from Judge Judy contacted him and asked him to appear on the show with Miller.
See id oN pAGe 6
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KUPedia LVQFEJB!HNBJMDPN
KUpedia is a student's guide te |iIe at KU in the Ierm eI a wiki. Like Wikipedia, anyene can edit er add te
KUpedia. 1he en|y diIIerence is that KUpedia is a|| abeut KU.
Prisen a|| CCSBD!LVFEV
Prisen a|| C|ub is an erganizatien that a||ews students te exercise in a Iun and epen envirenment. Prisen a|| is a
0edge-ba|| |ike game inve|ving twe teams, each en ene side eI the specihed ceurt, that ever the ceurse eI the game
peried try te put a|| eI the eppesing team's p|ayers inside "prisen".
|ayhawk Metersperts NJMMFSDK!LVFEV
|ayhawk Metersperts aims te educate students en the interactien eI design and preductien (specihca||y autemetive) whi|e
rewarding the team with Iun recreatiena| racing.
xperimenta| a||een 5eciety XIPFWFS!LVFEV
xperimenta| a||een 5eciety's purpese is te a||ew a|| students te participate in high a|titude
ba||een system experiments.
fer mere eppertunities te get inve|ved, check eut the
Iu|| |ist eI registered erganizatiens at www.si|c.ku.edu
news
6 wednesday, june 17, 2009
In my eyes, hes the one who per-
petrated the crime and he was drag-
ging me down with him, Holiday
said.
Holiday said his lawyer suggested
that he sue Miller in small claims
court to force Miller to pay the fine.
Soon after Holiday filed the suit,
producers from the Judge Mathis
program approached him and asked
if he would bring his case to the
show.
My attorney joked that I should
hold out for Judge Judy, Holiday
said. Then, sure enough, a producer
from her show called me up.
Holiday said he agreed to drop the
lawsuit and appear on Judge Judy
after the producers told him Miller
would also be willing to appear.
Miller said that after weighing his
options, he found no reason not to
appear on the show.
I agreed to go to Judge Judy
because she offered to pay the
expenses, whatever the outcome. I
got a free trip to L.A., I got a hotel
and they paid me.
Miller said the producers offered
to pay airfare and expenses for his
girlfriend to accompany him as well.
Miller said he and his girlfriend had
time to go to the beach and tour the
city over Memorial Day weekend.
Because he decided to sue me, I
got to go to L.A, Miller said.
Holiday said he was also compen-
sated for airfare, but his wifes airfare
was not covered by
the show. He said
he and his wife were
able to spend some
time enjoying the
city as well.
Gary Rosen,
spokesperson for
the show, said all
defendants appear-
ing on the program
were compensated
for travel arrange-
ments if they were from out town
and were paid a very small amount
for appearing.
Holiday said his experience on the
show was mostly positive despite at
first feeling anxious and intimidated.
He said Judge Judy lived up to his
expectations from viewing other epi-
sodes, using her trademark sarcasm
and witticisms. Because the episode
has not yet aired, he said, he was
unable to discuss details of the show,
including the outcome.
Miller said he felt the experience
had a theatrical element to it.
The whole experience was kind
of fake, he said. They were telling
me to show more emotion. Its a TV
show; its not court. They plan it
around getting ratings.
Holiday said that
in light of the experi-
ence, he planned to
urge the Lawrence City
Commission to change
the citys policies on
fining restaurant and
bar owners for serving
minors.
All Ive wanted to
do is call attention to
this serious problem,
Holiday said. People ask me why I
didnt just pay the $500. Im a small
business owner and thats a lot of
money.
Lawrence Mayor Robert Chestnut
said the city commissioners would
take time to address the issue on
future agendas.
We will be reviewing the fines
and structure of the MIP and what
violators have to pay versus the folks
at the establishment, Chestnut said.
Its a big issue all around town.
Chestnut said that several fake
IDs were passable to the naked eye
and that it had become increasingly
difficult for restaurant and bar own-
ers to tell the difference. He said he
hoped to find a balance that would
make underage people think twice
about drinking.
Holiday said that he was glad the
issue was gaining attention and that
he would work to make city policies
fair for business owners.
Theres no way we can change
Kansas law, Holiday said. But you
can add laws that make people think
twice about using fake IDs.
Miller said that he did not think
the lawsuit was justified and that the
Judge Judy case would not resolve
the issue.
If he wanted to make his state-
ment to the court, he went about
it the wrong way. You should make
a statement to the court and not
weasel around it, but Id like to thank
him for the free trip to California.
Miller and Holiday said they were
waiting for a call to see when their
episode would air.
Edited by Adam Schoof
ID (continued from 5)
Because he decided
to sue me, I got to go
to L.A.
Charles miller
Overland Park senior
ASSOCIATED PRESS
STURGIS, Ky. The body of
an 8-year-old boy was found with
his head pinned in a church eleva-
tor authorities said Monday.
No foul play is suspected in
the death Saturday of Zachary
Waddell The churchs pastor, the
Rev. Nate Harper, found the boys
body in the doorway at the lower
level of the shaft authorities said.
Harper told the newspaper
that the discovery was the worst
thing hes ever experienced.
Theres a family that needs
prayer, Harper told the AP on
Monday afternoon. Theyve suf-
fered a great tragedy.
NatioNal
Boys body
found afer
elevator
accident
(&5
*/70-7&%
Ab|eBawks
BCMFIBXLT!HNBJMDPN
Ab|e Bawks is the eIhcia| erganizatien en campus Ier students with disabi|ities and a|| Iu||y ab|e peep|e whe suppert disabi|ity as part eI
diversity. 1egether as A||ies, peep|e with disabi|ities and peep|e Iu||y ab|ed werk tegether te bring awareness eI
disabi|ities issues and te premete a envirenment epen te a|| kind eI diIIerent abi|ities creating eppertunities te a||.
ueers & A||ies 2BOE"!LVFEV
ueers & A||ies is KU's eIhcia||y recegnized student greup Ier these whe identiIy as |esbian, bisexua|, gay, er
transgender, and Ier these in the straight cemmunity whe suppert them as a||ies. fer mere than yy years, &A has been the hub Ier
queer educatien, suppert, cemmunity, and activism at KU.
nvirens
FOWJSPOT!LVFEV
nvirens is a KU student erganizatien which premetes awareness eI envirenmenta| preb|ems and issues. 1hreugh distributien eI inIermaiten,
educatien, and activism, nvirens enceurges seund envirenmenta| practices within the university and the cemmunity eI Lawrence.
KU merging Creen ui|ders XXXLVFHCPSH
1he KU Chapter eI the natiena| erganizatien merging Creen ui|ders, students at the University eI Kansas
dedicated te the deve|epment eI the green bui|ding mevement.
fer mere eppertunities te get inve|ved, check eut the
Iu|| |ist eI registered erganizatiens at www.si|c.ku.edu
EntErtainmEnt
7 wednesday, june 17, 2009
After purposely burning her
familys house down at the end
of season three, Nancy Botwin,
the pot-dealing suburban widow,
played efortlessly and acutely by
Mary-Louise Parker, takes her fam-
ily to the California/Mexico border
where they take up residence with
her father-in-law, played by the re-
nowned Albert Brooks. Marijuana
is still Nancys preferred source
of income, but when she gets
involved, both professionally and
personally, with the quadruple-
dealing mayor of Tijuana, business
expands. Nancys brother-in-law,
Andy, and disgraced former CPA
and pothead, Doug, played by
Kevin Nealon, form their own il-
legal business. In one scene, Doug
says, Andy, I smuggled her here. I
think that merits some cockamole
on her face-a-dilla.Yes, the humor
is still there. Nancys two sons
have found their own happiness.
And Cecilia? Oh, shes still
Cecilia. Season four is a much
welcomed revitalization to the
series. It feels brand new, almost
as if this was the frst season. The
decision by series creator Jenji
Kohan to move the show to the
Mexican border brings greener
and deadlier storylines that would
have seemed silly in the Botwins
former town of Agrestic. And it
feels good to have a Showtime
series that cares to include special
features on its DVD.
Justin Hilley
DVD: Weeds
Review
TV: Wipeout
Review
New episodes of your favorite
shows are usually hard to come
by in the summer. ABC challenges
that with a new season of last
years hit, Wipeout.
The premise is simple: 24 con-
testants compete to win $50,000.
Whats not so simple is the famous
Wipeout course. First the 24 con-
testants compete in the qualifying
round in which they go through an
obstacle course suspended over
water that makes it nearly impos-
sible to not fall in.
The contestants with the top 12
times move on to the next round,
where eventually they are reduced
to four. The fnal four compete in
what is called the Wipeout Zone.
In the Wipeout Zoneall four
contestants compete on a gigantic
obstacle course and the contestant
with the fastest time wins.
Whats great about this show is
simple: Its entertaining seeing
people make fools of themselves.
The most famous part of the show
is the Big Ballswhere contestants
have to move across four gigantic
infatable balls. Its rare to see a
contestant make it across all four.
What also makes the show fun is
SportsCenter host John Anderson
and former Talk Soup host John
Hensons cheesy but funny com-
mentary as the contestants try and
usually fail at navigating through
the obstacle course unscathed.
Its plain and simple, people get-
ting hurt is pure comedy.
JasonBaker
F
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KU eung 0emecrats onJrewtku.eJu
KU eung 0emecrats pursues the ideas eI |iberty, justice, and Ireedem Ier a|| regard|ess eI race, re|igien, er sex. We wi|| pursue these
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tance eI KU students and te eIIer them eppertunities te beceme mere active in the 0emecratic party.
KU federa|ist 5eciety Joxter.joscngmoil.ccm
1he KU Law federa|ist 5eciety is a greup eI censervative, |ibertarian, and mederate students cemmitted te preserving the mainstays eI eur Iree
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entertainment 8 wednesday, june 17, 2009
review
Shakespeares play King Lear
is known as one of his greatest
works and is also a grim and serious
tragedy. Fool, by Christopher Moore,
takes the famous old play and
makes a hilarious, raunchy tale from
it. I always had trouble following the
dialogue in Shakespeares Lear, but
Fool makes it easy to enjoy a classic
tragedy-made-comedy.
The King Lear story is retold from
the perspective of the kings fool,
an iconic character who usually has
some signifcance in Shakespeares
works. This fool, named Pocket, is
a clever, dirty-minded jester who
fearlessly teases and insults the royal
fgures from the original play.
The book includes real quotes and
excerpts from the original play, but
pokes fun at some of Shakespeares
overt drama as well as the plays set-
ting. Outside of references to Lear,
situational humor and funny social
commentary ft into the dialogue.
Anyone can pick up this book and
start laughing in the frst pages, but
someone who has read King Lear
will be able to appreciate the more
subtle, satirical references to the play
that ft smoothly in the story.
DavidUgarte
Book: Motormanby David Ohle
It took me three tries to get
through David Ohles Motorman.
The book was simply too disgust-
ing to take in wholly the frst time.
Ohle dives into the swamps of
your brain and dredges up strange
demons for your consideration.
Motorman was frst published
by Knopf in 1972 and has become
a cult novel. Ohle, professor of
English at the University, is a quiet
hippie who at one point recorded
the dreams of William S. Bur-
roughs.
The novel is dreamlike itself;
chapters are out of order and you
never know precisely where you
are. The world is just as disorient-
ing. The government has manufac-
tured several moons and created
a race of zombie-like jellyheads.
Believing he has killed two jel-
lyheads, Moldenke holes up in
a room to hide. He is a nervous
wreck and he worries his replace-
ment animal hearts will fail. It only
gets weirder from there.
This is not a novel for the
faint-hearted. Dont give it to your
grandmother. This novel is acid
that will corrode the outer layer of
your subconscious so you can see
whats inside.
AdamSchoof
review
Book: Fool by
Christopher Moore
0L1
lk0LLB
LIectiens Cemmissien
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ler mere eppertunities te get inveIved, check
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Aries (March 21-April 19)
Today is an 8
Confusion is likely, so if it happens,
dont recoil in horror. Its nothing
to be afraid of, really. It just means
there are more options than you
realized. Simply choose and keep on
choosing, until you get it right.
TAurus (April 20-May 20)
Today is a 5
Schedule a romantic interlude for
later on tonight. Youll have a busy
and somewhat stressful day. Plan
something for later thats soothing.
Comfort food defnitely recom-
mended. A wee bit o rum is op-
tional.
GeMini (May 21-June 21)
Today is an 8
A clerical job may seem menial, but
its actually very important. You can
do it quickly, where somebody else
is confused. Help this person out
cheerfully and youll make another
lifelong friend.
CAnCer (June 22-July 22)
Today is a 5
Dont argue with a person who only
wants to be obeyed. There will be a
better time for you to ofer sugges-
tions. It might work if you can make
this person think it was his or her
own idea. Its risky; take care.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22)
Today is an 8
Any way you can get out of town
with a few of your favorite friends?
If not, could you manage a foreign
restaurant for lunch? It might sound
funny, but conditions indicate those
activities will bring you luck. Besides,
theyll be fun.
VirGo (Aug. 23-sept. 22)
Today is a 5
Your wise fnancial management is
attracting attention. If youre work-
ing with other peoples money, this
is natural. They seek your advice
and they lean on you, maybe more
than youd really like. You do have
a natural talent, though. And you
work at it.
LibrA (sept. 23-oct. 22)
Today is a 9
Let your partner carry the load for a
while, and even do the driving. Youll
be more comfortable tagging along
on this trip. If you have someone
nearby who wants to make the deci-
sions, allow him or her to do that.
Itll be fne.
sCorpio (oct. 23-nov. 21)
Today is a 5
The jobs not easy, and youre not
going to make as much as you
thought. Be very careful with your
spending; itll make a big diference.
You dont need a lot of stuf to make
yourself look good. Do that with
your attitude.
sAGiTTArius (nov. 22-Dec. 21)
Today is an 8
A partnership agreement made
now should turn out well. Trust your
intuition in this one; it should be
right on target. Relax and enjoy the
rest of the day. Youve accomplished
something already.
CApriCorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19)
Today is a 5
Make your home more comfortable;
itll make a big diference. Put all
those pizza boxes into recycle, with
the plastic cups in the other bag.
You might even make a couple of
bucks on the soft drink bottles and
beer cans.
AquArius (Jan. 20-Feb. 18)
Today is a 9
Youre getting motivated, even pas-
sionate. The material youre studying
leads to a brand new world. Have
you found the cure for some exotic
disease? If not, why not? No, really, it
could be something that big. Keep
at it.
pisCes (Feb. 19-March 20)
Today is a 5
Fussing around your place is your
best entertainment option. Put just
enough money into your project to
get yourself going again. Youre very
creative but sometimes even you
need a little boost.
entertainment
skeTChbook by Drew sTeArns
horosCopes
@
Check for
answers to
puzzles on
kansan.com
6-16-09
9 wednesday, june 17, 2009
1
@
Check for
answers to
puzzles on
Kansan.com
Movies
ASSOCIATED PRESS
SPRINGFIELD, Mo.
Brad Pitt and his siblings
have given $1 million to
help a Missouri hospital
open a new pediatric cancer
center that will be named
for their mother.
Pitt and his siblings fam-
ilies, Doug and Lisa Pitt and
Rob and Julie Neal, gave the
money to St. Johns Hospital
in Springfield, Mo., on
Saturday in honor of their
mothers passion for chil-
drens issues.
The hospital is open-
ing the Jane Pitt Pediatric
Cancer Center this summer
in the town where Pitt and
his siblings grew up. The
donation will pay to hire
the only pediatric oncolo-
gist and hematologist in the
southwest Missouri region.
The new center will make
St. Johns one of six affili-
ates of St. Judes Childrens
Research in Memphis, Tenn.,
meaning the center will be
able to participate in St. Judes
clinic research trials.
Pitts give to childrens hospital
Brad and family
donate money
to cancer center
in hometown
ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this Dec. 8, 2008 fle photo, from left, Brad Pitts father, William Pitt,
Angelina Jolie, Brad Pitts mother, Jane Pitt, and Brad Pitt arrive at the
premiere of The Curious Case of Benjamin Buttonin Los Angeles.
6-17-09
entertainment
10 wednesday, june 17, 2009
Opinion
THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN
wednesday, june 17, 2009 www.kansan.com PaGe 11
United States First Amendment
Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of
religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging
the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people
peaceably to assemble, and to petition the Government for a
redress of grievances.
THE IRISH ExpERIENcE:
THE pRIcE OF SmOKINg
cOmINg wEDNESDAY
To contribute to Free for
All, visit Kansan.com or
call (785) 864-0500.
n n n
Does spending your summer
beating your best Zelda times count
as nerdy?
n n n
I shot a gun for the frst time today. It
was glorious.
n n n
Salsa shark. Were gonna need a
bigger boat.
n n n
I want a puppy!
n n n
How do I ask a girl out for dinner
platonically?
n n n
How do I ask a girl out for dinner
non-platonically?
n n n
I think Ive ofcially become a
grammar Nazi.
n n n
My mom just asked me if I thought
Bill OReilly was hot...
n n n
Sat alone all night with no calls or
texts or Facebook notifcations. I
love my life.
n n n
Do people from Kansas realize that
there are 49 other states?
n n n
Thank god somebody killed that
song.
n n n
Im being Zeus for the night!
n n n
Jesse Trimble, editor
864-4810 or jtrimble@kansan.com
Amanda Thompson, campus editor
864-4924 or athompson@kansan.com
Todd Brown, business manager
864-4358 or toddb@kansan.com
Cassie Gerken, sales manager
864-4358 or cgerken@kansa.com
MalcolmGibson, general manager and news adviser
864-7667 or mgibson@kansan.com
Jon Schlitt, sales and marketing adviser
864-7666 or jschlitt@kansan.com
T
his Sunday is a day many of
us celebrate our fathers.
Whether its just a call,
sending a card or spending the
day with them, its a day reserved
for all children, young and old, to
remember the greatest men in their
lives.
Tis will be my 11th year with-
out my father. My dad died when I
was 12 afer having cancer for two
years and his death has afected
almost every aspect of my life.
I was a selfsh child, since I am
the only one, and when my mom
told me we wouldnt be taking the
family vacation to Disney World,
when I was 10, I was devastated.
Shed told me daddy was sick and
wed have to go once he got better.
We eventually took the trip
afer my father had gone through
multiple surgeries, rounds of
chemotherapy and radiation. Hed
lost weight and had bouts of anger.
I still have the photos of the vaca-
tion, dad and I with smiles on our
faces, his throat looking like raw
hamburger meat and although you
cant see it in photos, the port used
for the chemo, which was implant-
ed in his chest.
I remember everything. As pain-
ful as it is, I make myself remem-
ber, so Ill never forget. I remember
the nights sitting up in strange
hospital waiting rooms waiting
for whatever news was to come.
I remember the times I had to
watch my own father, the strongest
person I knew, fall to his knees in
pain while vomiting up blood and
gripping the toilet bowl until his
knuckles were white. I remember
watching him cry for the frst and
only time in my life afer co-work-
ers had collected money for his
treatments.
And I will always remember the
day I was told he was gone forever.
Te days following his death were
a whirlwind. Picking out his casket
and headstone with my mom and
placing family photos in his suit
jacket before he was lowered into
the ground.
Tose arent the only things I re-
member about my father, though.
I remember his smile, especially
afer Id caught a bass. I remember
his cowboy boots and the way he
smelled of Stetson and old leather.
I remember his encouragement
and how he pushed me, even when
I was just a kid.
No matter who you are, or how
you feel about your dad, spend
time with him this Sunday. Because
youll never know how great of a
man he actually is until hes gone.
contact us
EdiTorS NoTE
This Fathers Day, spend time with the most important man in your life
By jesse trimBle
jtrimble@kansan.com
LETTEr GuidELiNES
Send letters to opinion@kansan.com
Write LETTEr To THE EdiTor in the
e-mail subject line.
Length: 300 words
The submission should include the
authors name, grade and hometown.
Find our full letter to the editor
policy online at kansan.com/letters.
how to submit a LetteR to the editoR
CoMMENTAry
Reporter abroad misinterprets Irish charm
By KAylA reGAN
kregan@kansan.com
*Editors Note: Regan, who was
previously the living arrangements
reporter, is currently living in Ireland
and will be sharing her experiences
abroad in a weekly column that will
focus on everything from culture dif-
ferences to study abroad to work. She
will be interning for an LGBT publi-
cation in Ireland later in the summer
and will periodically check in with
Te Kansan about her experiences.
M
y parents and I traveled
around Ireland before I
had to report to Dublin
for my study abroad program this
month. We were in Kinsale, a small
artsy town, on my mothers birth-
day and celebrated with a few too
many drinks at dinner, followed by
more at a pub.
A nice elderly couple sat next to
us at the pub, and afer I told them
I was a journalism student, the
woman replied, Well youve got a
face for T.V.
Te reaction that went through
my head was something like Hell
yeah, someone thinks Im pretty!
She fueled my vanity more with
comments such as With your wit,
youll do great! and before we lef,
she called to me to come closer.
Tis is so European! I thought,
sure that she was going to kiss my
cheek.
I got in position and touched
my cheek to hers. She pulled away
very quickly and told me good luck.
As we walked back to the hotel my
dad teased, You tried to kiss an old
woman!
Did not! I yelled back.
I totally did, and the worst part
was that I realized I wasnt the
worldly traveler I likened myself to
be.
From June 5 to August 3 I will be
living in Dublin, experiencing life
abroad. Ill be checking back in with
Te Kansan and letting you know
what I learned about the culture, as
well as our own.
Mark Twain wrote Travel is fa-
tal to prejudice, bigotry, and nar-
row-mindedness, and many of our
people need it sorely on these ac-
counts.
With Twains words in mind,
I think some travel is just what I
need.
Edited by Justin Hilley
news 12 wednesday, june 17, 2009 wednesday, june 17, 2009 news 13
BY KRISTEN LISZEWSKI
kliszewski@kansan.com
At 20 years old, John McGreevy com-
pleted his 17th triathlon Sunday morn-
ing. McGreevy, Wichita junior, swam
1.2 miles, biked 56 miles and ran 13.1
miles at the Ironman 70.3 Kansas triath-
lon at Clinton State Park.
The triathlon had 2,000 particpants,
including2008worldchampionChrissie
Wellington from the U.K. who won the
womens title with a time of 04:14:52,
and professional triathlete Luke Bell
from Australia who won the mens title
with a time of 03:49:35.
McGreevy finished the Ironman 70.3
Series, which is half the distance of the
full Ironman, with an overall time of
05:12:41. He said he was pleased with
his performance that day because he
surpassed his time from last years tri-
athlon by 35 minutes.
McGreevy said triathlons had been
a part of his familys life since he was
a young boy. He followed in his older
sisters footsteps and participated in his
first IronKids Wichita competition, a
2.3 mile event for his age group, when
he was seven years old. He participated
in IronKids every year until he turned
13, when he completed a 10.2 mile tri-
athlon. McGreevey said he stayed active
in high school by running track and
swimming. He also competed in local
triathlons, sometimes three in a single
summer.
I feel lucky to have stumbled on tri-
athlons when I was younger, McGreevy
said. Ive been running and swimming
competitively since I was six, so it comes
naturally.
McGreevy competed in his first
Ironman 70.3 in 2008, which was the
first Ironman event to be held in Kansas.
He said he planned to continue partici-
pating, especially if the Ironman 70. 3
kept returning to Kansas.
As long as it continues to drawa large
number of people, theres no reason why
it shouldnt be here, McGreevy said.
A wide variety of age groups were
represented at this years race. Callum
Shayer, St. Louis, 17, was the youngest
athlete to compete in this years event
and Don Hart, Edmond, Okla., 75, was
the oldest.
McGreevy competed against two
other University students.
Ryan Saxton, McLouth junior, said
his participation in a recent marathon
sparked the idea to combine his running
with other types of races.
Ive never been too competitive,
Saxton said. I just really enjoy running
mainly.
Doug Zimmerman, Kansas City,
Kan., senior, said his main goal was just
to finish the race because he had never
competed in anything at that distance
before.
The swim and the bike turned out
to be easier than what I had expected,
Zimmerman said. The real pain didnt
really set in until about five minutes
after I had finished. Then all of sudden
my body started really feeling the effects
of that whole morning.
Even though hes still an amateur,
McGreevy said he hoped to accomplish
the full Ironman in Louisville, Ky. in
August.
The full Ironman will be more like a
rite of passage rather than a race for me,
McGreevy said. I have goals for myself,
but I just want to accomplish finishing.
Editedby JustinHilley
Students
complete
ironman
For one KU junior, the race meant competing in his 17th triathlon
Jason Baker/KANSAN
John McGreevy, Wichita junior, is greeted by friends after completing Sundays Ironman triathlon, a 70.3 mile race at Clinton Lake. The event drewmore
than 2,000 athletes fromaround the world.
Ryan McGeeney/KANSAN
Hundreds of triathletes begin making their way out of the swim-to-bike
transition area at the triathlon. The use of individual timing chips allowed
participants to start the event in stages.
Ryan McGeeney/KANSAN
Connie Rhodes of Lawrence cheers on her daughter, Katie, as she transi-
tions between the cycling and running legs of the triathlon.
Ryan McGeeney/KANSAN
Above: After exiting Clinton Lake and jogging to the bicycle transition area, Doug Zimmerman, Kansas City senior, pauses to place contact lenses in his eyes
before stripping out of his wetsuit and mounting his bicycle for the second phase of the 70.3 mile race. Right: Australian triathlete Luke Bell applauds the
crowd and event staf as he nears the fnish line at Sundays Ironman triathalon at Clinton Lake. Bell won the event, completing the 70.3 mile race in less than
three hours and 50 minutes.
Ryan McGeeney/KANSAN
A triathlete waves to a fellowcompetitor as a group of men prepare to begin the frst leg of the triathlon. Participants swam1.2 miles before biking 56 miles
and running 13.1 miles.
StudentS timeS
in the ironman
70.3 KanSaS
John McGreevy: (5:12:41)
Doug Zimmerman: (5:38:43)
Ryan Saxton: (7:34:21)
Illustration by Drew Stearns
1
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wednesday, june 17, 2009
news
15
Cancer survivor supervises 400 person workout twice daily
BY STEPH SCHNEIDER
sschneider@kansan.com
Thursday night started like most at
Don Red Dog Gardners Dog Days
workout. Standing on the field next to
Robinson Gym, Gardner greeted the
participants for about an hour before
the stretching began. He then grabbed
his microphone and told people of all
ages to get into their spots. All right,
here we go! Gardner said.
Don Gardner, 70, discovered he
had cancer at the end of February, yet
he continues to instruct the Dog Days
workouts at 6 a.m. and 6 p.m.
Gardners cancer is in remission
after undergoing his final radiation
treatment about a week ago.
Although there are tests and more
appointments to come, Gardner said
he is happy his radiation is finished.
I wore a sport coat and tie to my
last radiation, Gardner said.
After his last treatment, Gardner
expressed concern to Klish, his physi-
cian, about what would happen if the
radiation did not work. Klish assured
him that it would.
Everyone thinks, This cant hap-
pen to me, Gardner said. And then
it does.
Modest about all the attention,
Gardner said he appreciated the cards
and affection he received.
Liz Beisner, Lawrence senior and
Dog Days participant, said the mood
at Dog Days became somber when
word got out about Gardners cancer.
It was discouraging for the group,
said Beisner. Hes the glue that holds
everyone together.
Gardners wife, Beverly, said it was
hard at times to always be upbeat
and cheerful with their Dog Days
extended family.
But, its important to stay posi-
tive, Beverly said.
For five years, Adam Petz, 17,
Lawrence, has attended the workouts
because of Gardners dedication and
effort.
We all really appreciate it, Petz
said. I come because of Red Dog.
Since his diagnosis, Gardner has
only missed two Dog Days work-
outs. Gardner said the workouts were
addicting, so it was hard to miss one.
Getting up isnt the hard part,
Gardner said. I am a busy guy and
I enjoy it.
Gardners schedule typically con-
sists of going to the 6 a.m. workout,
then having coffee with Dog Days
participants, followed by going to a
doctors appointment around 8 a.m.
Remaining optimistic about the
situation, Gardner focused on the
hospital food.
The cook at the hospital is great,
Gardner said. I go there even when
I dont need to be there because of
the food.
Gardner said the hardest part of
treatment was being tired and los-
ing his strength. He also said he had
memory problems.
Gardner tries to greet almost every
person who attends Dog Days, around
400 to 500 people each session. But
one day, Gardner said he couldnt
remember a womans name he had
known for years.
Id like to blame it on radiation,
but its just old age now, Gardner
said.
Gardner said he used to participate
in a run up 14th street but now he has
designated himself as the yeller and
coordinates stretches and cheers of
encouragement.
Gardners support has made an
impression on the participants.
He really has built a community
out of Dog Days, Beisner said. He is
irreplaceable.
Edited by AdamSchoof
EXERCISE
Ryan McGeeney/KANSAN
Don Gardner, also known as Red Dog, cheers on participants at a Dog Days workout in early June.
The community exercise program, which Gardner initiated 26 years ago, takes participants through
a series of calisthenic exercises before a short run at 6 a.m. and 6 p.m. Monday through Friday each
week.
@
For a photo gallery of Red
Dogs Dog Days, check out
Kansan.com.
around the corner from Brothers
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1
news 16
wednesday, june 17, 2009
medicine
Six-step program works to cure depression
BY KRISTEN LISZEWSKI
kliszewski@kansan.com
In his book, Te Depression Cure,
published June 1, Stephen Ilardi, asso-
ciate professor of clinical psychology,
said the most efective way to cure de-
pression was to make just a few simple
changes to daily lifestyles and habits.
Ilardi used Terapeutic Lifestyle
Change, or TLC, a research program
on depression conducted by him
and his colleagues at the University,
to write the book. TLC combines six
primitive lifestyle elements ex-
ercise, omega 3 fatty acids, sunlight
exposure, anti-rumination strategies,
social support and sleep hygiene to
help heal victims of depression.
I noticed across the globe that de-
pression rates are higher in urbanized
places, about one-in-four now, Ilardi
said. So I thought, Whats diferent
about the way were living now?
Ilardi used historical evidence from
published studies on the detection of
diseases in large populations to show
the diferences in todays lifestyles and
those a century ago. He also com-
pared modern society to cultures
that refect a simpler way of life. For
example, the American Amish have
depression rates much lower than the
larger American
population.
Ilardi also used
evidence from
the Kaluli people
of New Guinea,
a population
of about 2,000,
where anthro-
pologist Edward
Schiefelin found only a small amount
of depression symptoms in one per-
son. Tese studies ultimately showed
Ilardi that modern societys lack of the
primitive lifestyle elements have ush-
ered in a vulnerability to depression.
Ilardi said people were willing to
take the TLC approach because the six
elements were all part of the world we
were originally designed for.
Our environment has mutated
and so we need to be very clever about
how to bring these elements back in
the 21st century, Ilardi said.
One of the main focuses in Te
Depression Cure is how to bring
these elements back into modern-day
life. Ilardi suggested a prescriptive
dose for each element. For example,
he recommended people get at least
30 minutes of bright light exposure
each day. He said the TLC program
was designed to re-focus peoples
natural habits away from the high-
stress, sleep-deprived lifestyles they
lead today.
Ilardis research can also be found
in the classroom.
Danielle Hagen, Hillsboro senior,
said Ilardi was one of the most en-
gaging professors she had had. She
said Ilardi incorporated the TLC pro-
gram into a class discussion one day,
describing omega-3 supplements,
which promote better health. Hagen
said Ilardis research showed that the
vitamins were benefcial, so she began
using them.
He was so intense and excited
about it that he convinced me to start
taking the vitamins. Now my whole
family does, Hagen said.
Editedby JustinHilley
Ilardi
entertainment
Letterman makes
apology for joke
BY FRAZIER MOORE
Associated Press
NEW YORK David Letterman
said his joke about Alaska Gov.
Sarah Palins daughter was a lousy
joke, no matter how you cut it, and
hes sorry.
On Mondays edition of Late
Show, Letterman explained that the
risque joke thought by some to have
targeted Palins underage daughter,
Willow, was actually referring to
18-year-old daughter Bristol. The
name of the daughter wasnt men-
tioned in the joke, which was part
of Lettermans monologue on last
Mondays show.
It was a coarse joke, a bad
joke, Letterman told viewers. But
I never thought it was (about) any-
body other than the older daughter,
and before the show, I checked to
make sure, in fact, that she is of
legal age, 18.
Even so, the ongoing outcry, led
by Palin and her husband, Todd,
has centered on Letterman intend-
ing to make a joke about the Palins
14-year-old daughter having sex
with a Yankees baseball player.
On Mondays show, Letterman
said, Im wondering, Well, what
can I do to help people understand
that I would never make a joke like
this? Ive never made jokes like this,
as long as weve been on the air, 30
long years.
If thats the misconception that
the joke was aimed at a 14-year-old
he understands why people are
upset, he said. I would be upset
myself.
He apologized to both daughters,
and also to the Governor and her
family and everybody else who was
outraged by the joke, he said as
the studio audience applauded. Im
sorry about it, and Ill try to do bet-
ter in the future.
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JOBS
KANSANCLASSIFIEDS
785-864-4358 HAWKCHALK.COM CLASSIFIEDS@KANSAN.COM
housing
for sale
announcements
jobs
textbooks
SALE
KU ID GETS MAKEOVER, MEETS VISUAL STANDARDS WEEKLY SUMMER EDITION WEDNESDAY, JUNE 11, 2008
VOLUME 118 ISSUE 149
The audience cheers for Cake during their performance in the Revival Tent on Friday night at the Wakarusa Music and Camping Festival. Cake was originally scheduled to play on the main stage, but had to switch performance times and stages with Galactic
when a ight was delayed.
W
akarusa W
rap-up
SOCCER TEAM PLAYS EXHIBITION GAMES IN BRAZIL
SAFETY
OFFICE
RIDES
WITH NEW SEGWAYS
Summer Kansan
Every Wednesday
WEEKLY SUMMER EDITION WEDNESDAY, JULY 23, 2008
VOLUME 118 ISSUE 155
P. 13
Student looks for his
biological parents,
nds himself
Finished football
complex boasts
amenities that rival
most ve-star hotels
Former KU athlete
qualies for 2008
Olympics with lengthy
javelin throw Tyshawn Taylor, a native of New Jersey, is one of seven newcomers to the Kansas basketball team. Taylor and his six cohorts moved to Lawrence this
summer in preparation for the upcoming season. Read more about Taylor and his teammates on p. 18.
Keeping it fresh
Kansas basketball welcomes
seven new faces to campus
P. 26
P. 22
Some people live for the
WEEKENDS
We live for
WEDNESDAYS
1
Sunrise Place
Spacious, Remodeled homes
View plans, pricing,
and amenities @
sunriseapartments.com
or call 841-8400
g
Apartments and Townhomes
Sunrise Village
2, 3, & 4 Bedroom
Models Available
PAID INTERNET
off deposit
2 & 3 Bedroom $750-$820
Apartments & Townhomes
24-Hour Maintenance
Pet Friendly in some
buildings,
Fitness Center and
2 Pools!
www.meadowbrookapartments.net
2 & 3 BR
Apartments &
Townhomes
available for
Summer & August
Floor plans and photos on
our website:
Set up a tour today!
Only $265 per person! Fully equipped
3BR 2BA, W/D, pool, volleyball. Act fast,
this wont last! Please Call 843-6446.
Studio 14th and Ohio avail Aug., newly re-
modeled, A/C, hardwood oors. $315/mo.
plus util., Please call 550-8499
4 4-Day Country Stampede Passes.
Cheaper to buy from me than full price!
June 25th-28th. Call or email me if inter-
ested. Email: vberroth@yahoo.com Cell:-
785-845-3785 www.hawkchalk.com/3667
BARTENDING. UP TO $300/DAY. NO
EXPERIENCE NECESSARY. TRAINING
PROVIDED. 800-965-6520 EXT 108
Professional Resume and Interview Prep
Conducted by Experienced Recruiters
Affordable for any Student. 913-439-1984
michael@strategicrcruitinginc.com
1125 Tennessee 3BR & 4BR. Tons of
space! Includes W/D. Make Offer.
Please Call 841-4935
1BR avail in 5BR, 2BA house w/base-
ment. Available August 1st. $275/mo. Call
Jay at 785-979-1648
2 2BRs in a 4-plex for rent starting Aug.
1st., W/D, $525/mo, 928 Alabama. Close
to KU stadium. Great for college kids! Call
Edie at Silver Clipper 842-1822 for details.
Teachers aide needed for varied hours
M-F starting as soon as June 29th.
Please apply at Childrens Learning
Center at 205 N. Michigan or email
clc5@sunower.com
FREE FOOD
Sat. 7/20,11AM-6PM Pool Party & Open
House. South Pointe 2310 West 26th.
Call 843-6446
FOR SALE
HOUSING
JOBS
KANSANCLASSIFIEDS
785-864-4358 HAWKCHALK.COM CLASSIFIEDS@KANSAN.COM
housing
for sale
announcements
jobs
textbooks
SALE
KU ID GETS MAKEOVER, MEETS VISUAL STANDARDS WEEKLY SUMMER EDITION WEDNESDAY, JUNE 11, 2008
VOLUME 118 ISSUE 149
The audience cheers for Cake during their performance in the Revival Tent on Friday night at the Wakarusa Music and Camping Festival. Cake was originally scheduled to play on the main stage, but had to switch performance times and stages with Galactic
when a ight was delayed.
W
akarusa W
rap-up
SOCCER TEAM PLAYS EXHIBITION GAMES IN BRAZIL
SAFETY
OFFICE
RIDES
WITH NEW SEGWAYS
Summer Kansan
Every Wednesday
WEEKLY SUMMER EDITION WEDNESDAY, JULY 23, 2008
VOLUME 118 ISSUE 155
P. 13
Student looks for his
biological parents,
nds himself
Finished football
complex boasts
amenities that rival
most ve-star hotels
Former KU athlete
qualies for 2008
Olympics with lengthy
javelin throw Tyshawn Taylor, a native of New Jersey, is one of seven newcomers to the Kansas basketball team. Taylor and his six cohorts moved to Lawrence this
summer in preparation for the upcoming season. Read more about Taylor and his teammates on p. 18.
Keeping it fresh
Kansas basketball welcomes
seven new faces to campus
P. 26
P. 22
Some people live for the
WEEKENDS
We live for
WEDNESDAYS
r 24/7

7353412345

ir curr
conrsiors [ro+
sn[[ort or
i corcrrs

www.hqcc.|awrence.|s.us
1
news 18
wednesday, june 17, 2009
BY KRISTEN LISZEWSKI
kliszewski@kansan.com
Alumnus Shannon Skoglund de-
cided to come to the University afer
attending Project Discovery, an en-
gineering camp for high school girls
organized by the School of Engineer-
ing.
Skoglund, who majored in com-
puter science engineering, said the
camp, which is taking place again this
week, helped her fnd a passion for
engineering. It also helped her recog-
nize the importance of peer support
as a girl interested in the science feld.
As a young girl, if you like science
and math, youre going to hide it just
to ft in, Skoglund said. A lot of these
girls dont have friends who are inter-
ested like they are in those subjects.
Florence Boldridge, director of di-
versity and womens programs at the
school, organized Project Discovery.
Te camp ofers two sessions in the
summer, the frst of which began
June 15. Boldridge said the week-long
camp not only ofered girls hands-on
experience in math and science sub-
jects, but also gave girls the accep-
tance and friendships of peers who
shared the same interests.
Boldridge said one of the goals of
Project Discovery was to encourage
young women to follow their passion
for science and continue their educa-
tion in engineering. Skoglund attend-
ed the camp three consecutive years,
which helped her make the decision
to come to the University.
Project Discovery made me more
familiar with the University, Sko-
glund said. Afer three years of camp
there, I didnt really want to go any-
where else.
According to a Bureau of Labor
Statistics survey from 2007, women
make up only 11 percent of engineers
in the U.S.
In an efort to increase the percent-
age, the Society of Women Engineers,
a national organization, ofers a va-
riety of engineering related events
similar to Project Discovery, where
girls can meet women engineers, par-
ticipate in activities with them and ask
questions. According to its Web site,
the organizations mission is to estab-
lish engineering as a highly desirable
career for women through training
and development programs, network-
ing, scholarships and outreach.
Boldridge, who has worked at the
University for 25 years, said she had
seen the positive efects of outreach
programs. Over the past three years
Project Discovery has recruited 20 of
its participants to the school.
Kyli Christopher, Lee Summit se-
nior, is a mechanical engineering stu-
dent working with Boldridge on Proj-
ect Discovery. Christopher helped
Boldridge make the fnal preparations
for session one of the camp, in which
20 high school girls take part in ex-
periments and lectures, furthering
their knowledge toward becoming
engineers.
Some plan to major in chemical
and mechanical engineering, like
Christopher, who said she hoped to
use her engineering degree in health
and medical advancement.
If you really love math and sci-
ence, theres really no reason why you
shouldnt go into engineering, Chris-
topher said.
Editedby DavidUgarte
Campus
Engineering camp builds girls interest in science
Ryan McGeeney/KANSAN
John Gibbons, Lawrence doctoral student, explains elements of HTML programming design to
a small group of high school girls from around the country during Project Discovery, a week-long sum-
mer camp that provides high school girls the chance to explore possible careers in engineering.
LawrenCe
Lawrence T joins Google application
BY HaNNaH DECLERK
hdeclerk@kansan.com
The Lawrence Transit System
is now part of an application by
Google that Robert Nugent, public
transit administrator for the T, said
could help increase the number of
student riders. The T has been a
part of the Google Transit applica-
tion for less than six months and
is the first transportation system in
the state of Kansas to join.
The application, Google Transit
Trip Planner, plans trips for public
transportation users by taking into
account bus schedules and estimat-
ing the time and distance of the
trip.
Once in the application, riders
enter an origin and destination and
receive three options for planning a
trip with the T system.
The application allows riders to
adjust the time frame of their trip
so that it will work around their
schedule. It also shows riders the
difference in cost between taking
public transportation and driving to
the selected location.
Nugent said he thought this was
a great way to get people from one
place to another.
Students should look at the trav-
el patterns of the T, Nugent said. It
is not just on campus, but also from
one side of town to another. And it
is free with a new KUID.
Kaitlyn Kash, Dallas senior, was
without a car last semester. She
said she relied on her friends and
walked to and from place to place.
Kash said if had been aware of the
application, she would have been a
frequent user.
I was aware of the elections last
year about the joining of public
transportation, but thats about it.
Kash said. I never really heard any-
thing about the T after that, and did
not know much about it. If I would
know what I know now, I would
have used it a lot more, Kash said.
In addition to KU campus routes,
Nugent said the T had routes that
went from one side of the city to
the other.
Lauren Haskin, Kansas City, Kan.,
senior, said she sometimes used the
T around town.
I was not aware of this applica-
tion, Haskin said. Normally the
routes are posted in the booths,
but now I can just get on my phone
and look it up myself. It is pretty
convenient.
According to the Lawrence
Transit System Web site, the applica-
tion does not re-route riders around
construction in Lawrence.
Edited by Jason Baker
THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN
Sports
TRAcK SEASoN ENDS
IN DISAppoINTmENT
Track members fall short at outdoor championships. pAGE 21
wednesday, june 17, 2009 www.kansan.com PaGe 19
baseball
BY HANNAH DECLERK
hdeclerk@kansan.com
Five Kansas baseball players were
ofered contracts by Major League
Teams. Four players were picked
in the 2009 Major League Baseball
First-Year Player Draf last week,
and one signed a free agent contract
Monday.
Te draf aired its frst round
Tuesday the 9th, with the opening
three rounds of picks. Rounds 4-30
took place Wednesday and the fnal
rounds, 31-50, were on Tursday.
Seven Jayhawks, who have complet-
ed at least three years at the Univer-
sity, were eligible for the draf.
Mike Cummings, assistant me-
dia relations director for the Kansas
team, said the draf was a waiting
process, where many of the partici-
pants waited at home with friends
and family for the recruiters to call.
Junior shortstop David Naro-
dowski was the frst drafed from the
team. Te Arizona Diamondbacks
picked Narodowski in the 15th
round, making
him the Univer-
sitys highest draf
pick since 2006.
I was just watch-
ing the draf track-
er online when I
got the phone call,
Narodowski said.
Te Diamond-
backs told me that
I was going to be in the next round
and to get ready for it. It has been
craziness ever since.
Narodowski signed a professional
contract with the Arizona Diamond-
backs Monday.
Narodowski said he was also
excited for his friend and team-
mate Shaefer Hall, who was picked
Wednesday by the New York Yan-
kees.
I was very excited when I heard
the news about Hall, Narodowski
said. He pitched very well for our
team. He had a really great year.
Junior lef-handed pitcher Shaef-
fer Hall was the second player to be
drafed from the team.
I got the call from the New York
Yankees and I thought to myself,
Me being drafed the excitement
doesnt get old, Hall
said. I would not have
ever have gotten this
opportunity if it wasnt
for the Kansas Baseball
team, especially my
coach.
Hall decided two
days afer being drafed
to sign a professional
contract with the Yan-
kees and forgo his senior year at
KU.
Buck Afenir signed a free agent
contract with the New York Yankees
Monday afer not being drafed last
week. He is now the second Kansas
baseball player to have a profession-
al contract with the Yankees.
Other drafed players included
senior right-handed pitcher Paul J.
Smyth, who was drafed by the Oak-
land Athletics, and junior outfelder
Brian Heere, who was drafed by the
Boston Red Sox. Tey have yet to
announce a contract with the Major
League Teams.
Edited by Kristen Liszewski
BY JESSE RANGEL
jrangel@kansan.com
The return of center Cole Aldrich
and guard Sherron Collins may have
Kansas fans planning a return to
the national championship game,
but Kansas coach Bill Self still has
growing pains factored in for next
season.
We know theres a big step you
have to take to win a champion-
ship, Self said in a Wednesday Big
12 media teleconference. Were
going to get some knocks put on our
head. Hopefully its not with a lot of
losses.
With this, Self further empha-
sized how special that 2008 national
championship was.
We do have a chance to have a
great team, Self said. But theres
not as much a margin for error as
what we had maybe when we had
basically seven pros playing a couple
years ago.
Self pointed out how Aldrich can
develop as a player by improving his
lower body strength.
Hes got to be stronger lower body
and have a stronger base about him,
Self said. I do think visiting with a
lot of people that have watched him
and have been impressed with his
progress, thats one area that he make
himself a better player, is through
lower body strength.
Kansas will have some potential
growing pains in Big 12 conference
play as small forward Damion James
is returning to Texas for his senior
season, after withdrawing his name
from the upcoming NBA draft.
James return along with the return
of Collins and Aldrich, has coaches
singing the praises of the Big 12 con-
ference for next season.
Its probably made this league,
unfortunately for coaches, probably
the best league thats going to be
in the country next season, said
Nebraska coach Doc Sadler. The
league is going to be really, really fun
for people to watch.
Texas coach Rick Barnes said the
Big 12 is as strong as its ever been.
Weve got a lot of teams that can do
a lot of damage.
Edited by Jason Baker
Self anticipates growing pains for next season
mens basketball
The wait is over: major
League drafts fve players
Hall, Afenir sign with
Yankees, Narodowski
with Diamondbacks
I was just watch-
ing the draft tracker
online when I got the
phone call.
david narodowski
Junior shortstop
matt Bristow/KANSAN
Junior infelder David Narodowski, reaches back to make a catch against Chicago State at Hogland
Ballpark. The Arizona Diamondbacks drafted Narodowski, who signed a professional contract.
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West Clinton
Pkwy
W 24th Pl
1
wednesday, june 17, 2009
sports
21
By Jason Baker
jbaker@kansan.com
Te Kansas track and feld team
ended the outdoor season, sending
four of its members to Fayetteville,
Ark., for the Outdoor Champion-
ships on June 10-13. Despite its best
eforts, Kansas wasnt able to win at
any of the events that it competed in.
Senior Zlata Tarasova, the only
Jayhawk competing in the feld
events, qualifed for the fnals in the
Hammer Trow and competed in the
fnals on Friday.
Tarasova placed fourth in the qual-
ifying rounds Wednesday, throwing
57.14 meters (188 feet) on her frst
attempt. In the fnals on Friday, Tara-
sova took 11th overall throwing 56.44
meters on her fnal attempt.
On the track, junior Lauren Bonds
competed in the 1500-meter run fn-
ishing ninth in her preliminary heat
running 4:26.37, not qualifying for
the fnals.
Senior Nickesha Anderson made
it through the preliminary round of
the 200 meter dash Tursday plac-
ing second, running 23.76 seconds,
then missed the cut an hour later in
the semi-fnals in the same event.
Andersons time of 23.70 tied with
Kristy White of the University of Mi-
ami for ninth. However it was ruled
that Whites time was 0.05 faster than
Andersons.
Freshman hurdler Keith Hayes
got through to the semi-fnals of
the 110-hurdles event on Tursday.
In the event, the top three hurdlers
of the four heats advance on to the
semi-fnals. Hayes took fourth in his
heat running 14.08 seconds.
Te event also took the six fast-
est times that didnt automatically
advance to make a total of 18 for
the semi-fnals. Hayes time was fast
enough to give him a spot in the
semi-fnals placing him 15th of the
18 semi-fnalists.
In the semi-fnals on Friday, Hayes
ran 14.01 seconds taking ninth place
and 16th overall, missing the fnals.
For Hayes, its a chance to build on
his performance Hayes was one of
fve freshmen that competed in the
semi-fnal round.
Hayes will compete along with
freshmen Keyen Porter, Nick Canton,
Corey Fuller and Mackenzie Wills at
the USA Junior Outdoor Track and
Field Championships. Junior Jordan
Scott, who redshirted this year, will
compete as an individual at the USA
Outdoor Track and Field Champion-
ships.
Both meets will take place in Eu-
gene, Ore., June 25-28.
Edited by David Ugarte
Track & field
Athletes fall short
at championships
NBa
Lakers parade continuing on despite riots
By DaIsy nGUyen
Associated Press
LOS ANGELES Looting
and vandalism that broke out in
the aftermath of the Los Angeles
Lakers basketball championship
wont keep the city from celebrat-
ing the teams victory: City offi-
cials and the Lakers are planning
a victory parade they hope will
overshadow unrest the police chief
blames on a mob of knuckle-
heads.
A parade was being planned
for Wednesday. City officials were
meeting Monday afternoon to
plan for security along the parade
route and a rally to be held at Los
Angeles Memorial Coliseum.
Trouble erupted Sunday night
in the area around Staples Center,
the Lakers home court, even
though the team won its 15th
National Basketball Association
championship in Florida, defeat-
ing the Orlando Magic 99-86 in
Game 5 of the final series.
In 2000, a large crowd that
watched the Lakers win the
NBA title turned into a mob that
torched police cars, a TV van and
caused about $750,000 in prop-
erty damage to businesses.
ASSOCIATED PRESS
Los Angeles Lakers fans break the windshield and try to fip a police car while celebrating their
teams victory in the NBA Finals over the Orlando Magic in downtown Los Angeles, Sunday, June 14.
1
sports 22 wednesday, june 17, 2009
commentary
Success depends on positioning
H
ope abounds in the
months ahead of Memorial
Stadiums first kickoff of the
fall.
Dont be ashamed if Big 12 North
title and January bowl dreams have
littered your imagination. Youre not
alone if youve pored over Kansas
upcoming schedule, examined the
returning players and justified why
the newcomers will be better than
pundits are crediting them to be.
But as can be said for the No. 1
team down to the 119th, this squad
has its questions preceding the 2009
campaign. If the reloading and tran-
sitioning at certain positions go off
without a hitch and if the stars align
at certain points in the schedule,
Kansas could well win up to 10 or
11 regular season games, head to
Cowboys Stadium for the Big 12
championship and add an 11th or
12th victory in January. All told, it
could be a swell send-off for one of
the programs finest senior classes.
There also exists the possibility
that this team again finishes the reg-
ular season with seven victories.
Whether were talking about the
former or the latter, come December
it will depend largely on the teams
success in addressing some of the
questions below that come to mind
this preseason.
road trippin
Upon first glance the Sept. 26 tilt
against Southern Mississippi appears
to be Kansas toughest nonconference
challenge. After all, the Golden Eagles
have appeared in seven consecutive
bowls and possess one of the nations
top ground attacks not exactly
something that elates a team replacing
its entire starting linebacker corps.
Southern Miss will certainly be a
tough out, but its another Conference
USA foe that could first blemish the
Jayhawks record if theyre not careful.
On Sept. 12 Kansas plays its second
game of the season at UTEP, a team
that gives up points in bunches but
can make up for it on the other side
of the ball.
Whats got me worried is this stat:
2-10. Thats Kansas record in the
first away game of the season the
last 12 years. Big 12 play wont be
any easier than last season with just
three true home games. During coach
Mark Manginos tenure, Kansas is just
7-23 in Big 12 road games, with four
of those victories coming in 2007.
Aside from that year, Kansas has
never won more than one conference
away game.
The trip to UTEP will be an early
indication of the mettle of the new
faces at linebacker and offensive line
the two positions with the highest
turnover. Which brings me to.
next in line
When a team loses three starting
linebackers that were as entrenched
in its defense as Mike Rivera, Joe
Mortensen and James Holt were the
last several seasons, its a given that
preseason attention will largely be
devoted to gauging how their alma
mater will go about replacing them.
The trios departure is as big a hit to
the team as any but dont overlook the
offensive lines similar challenge.
Edited by Justin Hilley
By Stephen montemayor
smontemayor@kansan.com
THE
FULL MONTY
mLB
Cardinals player to return,
but likely in diferent role
ST. LOUIS Khalil Greene will
likely be at a new position when
he returns to the Cardinals from an
absence caused by anxiety issues.
Greene has been playing third
base instead of his usual spot, short-
stop, during a rehab assignment he
began last week.
Manager Tony La Russa said
switching positions could lessen the
pressure on Greene. Plus, the team
still needs a fll-in for injured third
baseman Troy Glaus.
The Cardinals also have two good
alternatives at shortstop with Bren-
dan Ryan and rookie Tyler Greene.
Khalil Greene was hitting .200
with a team-high seven errors. Ryan
was hitting .299 and Tyler Greene
was at .262.

Associated Press

This isnt all! For the rest of
this blog and more of
The Full Monty, check out
Kansan.com.
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c a m p u s c l o t h c a m p u s c l o t h c a m p u s c l o t h c a m p u s c l o t h
1
wednesday, june 17, 2009
sports
23
pga
Woods prepares for U.S. Open
BY DOUG FERGUSON
Associated Press
FARMINGDALE, N.Y. Tiger
Woods began his final practice
round of the U.S. Open by hitting
a 5-wood for his second shot on a
par 4, which is rare for someone
with his power.
Ive already hit too many 3-irons
on par 4s today, he said.
The scorecard at Bethpage Black
shows an additional 212 yards from
2002, when Woods was the only
player to finish under par and won
the U.S. Open by three shots over
Phil Mickelson.
With soggy turf and rain part of
every forecast, the Black feels even
longer.
This is probably the most dif-
ficult golf course weve faced from
tee to green, Woods said Tuesday.
Obviously, its not the green com-
plexes this week certainly not
Oakmont, or its not Winged Foot.
But from tee to green, this golf
course is all you want. With the
weather coming in here this week,
its only going to get longer and
harder. And its going to be even
more difficult.
And that could be right up his
alley.
Woods has been on the fast track
in the majors for as long as he has
been a pro, and more history could
await this week.
Add to that Woods 65 in the
final round to win the Memorial
two weeks ago, and he is an over-
whelming favorite.
Thats where this chance for a
repeat started for Woods.
In a victory no less spectacular
even a year later, he won his 14th
major by playing on only one good
leg. Ligaments in his left knee were
shredded, and Woods had a double
stress fracture in his left leg, but still
managed to beat Rocco Mediate in
a playoff before having surgery a
week later that ended his season.
You have to have every facet
of your game going, Woods said.
Generally, this is the hardest major
we face year in and year out.
As for Woods?
I like my chances in any major,
he said.
MLB
Brewers triumph
against Indians,
Fielder slams
ASSOCIATED PRESS
CLEVELAND Prince Fielder hit
a go-ahead grand slam in Milwaukees
six-run eighth inning and the Brewers
rallied to beat the Cleveland Indians
14-12 on Monday night.
Fielder fnished with a career-high
six RBIs for the NL Central-leading
Brewers, who won for just the second
time in their last eight games. Ryan
Braun homered and drove in fve
runs.
Todd Cofey (2-1) pitched 1 1-3
scoreless innings to pick up the win
and Trevor Hofman got three outs for
his 16th save.
Victor Martinez, Shin-Soo Choo,
Mark DeRosa and Travis Hafner hom-
ered for Cleveland. Hafners three-run
shot in the sixth gave the Indians a
12-7 lead.
Milwaukee rallied in the eighth,
taking advantage when Cleveland re-
lievers Luis Vizcaino and Matt Herges
walked the bases loaded. Rafael Perez
(1-2) replaced Herges afer Brauns
infeld single cut the Indians lead to
12-9.
Fielder hit Perezs frst pitch into
the seats in right-center feld for his
16th homer and frst career slam. Mat
Gamel added an RBI single later in the
inning.
Some people live for the
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Stay tuned for Secret Shopper
prizes throughout the
Summer!
JUNE 3, 10, 17, 24
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Come by our table every
Wednesday in front of
Stauffer-Flint Hall
WEEKLY SUMMER EDITION WEDNESDAY, JULY23, 2008
VOLUME 118 ISSUE 155
P. 13
Student looks for his
biological parents,
nds himself
Finished football
complex boasts
amenities that rival
most ve-star hotels
Former KU athlete
qualies for 2008
Olympics with lengthy
javelin throw
Mindy Ricketts/KANSAN
Tyshawn Taylor, a native of NewJersey, is one of seven newcomers to the Kansas basketball team. Taylor and his six cohorts moved to Lawrence this
summer in preparation for the upcoming season. Read more about Taylor and his teammates on p. 18.
Keeping it fresh
Kansas basketball welcomes
seven new faces to campus
P. 26
P. 22
1
Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday
$2 Imports
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$3 Guiness
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$1 Wells
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Stay cool with this great offer! 50% off 24oz Iced Lattes
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Offer ends June 24
Everyday special: One slice, salad & a drink-$6.35
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