monday, march 14, 2011 www.kansan.

com volume 123 issue 114
D
AILY
K
ANSAN
T
HE
U
NIVERSITY
The student voice since 1904
triumph
All contents, unless stated otherwise, © 2011 The University Daily Kansan
Classifieds. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9A
Crossword. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4A
Cryptoquips . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4A
Opinion. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5A
Sports. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1B
Sudoku. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4A
WEATHER
AM Rain/Snow
45 27
— weather.com
today
PM Showers
58 35
tuesday
Mostly Cloudy
70 52
Wednesday
INDEX
ARTs | 3A
The Spencer Museum of Art hosted
areading Sunday
Poet Laureates read work
BY DAVID ELLIOTT
delliott@kansan.com
Te Lawrence City Commission
and Mayor Mike Amyx declared
next week as “Stay Safe During
Spring Break Week” to promote
safe behavior from students dur-
ing their spring break activities.
According to Amyx’s procla-
mation statement, student safety
while traveling both within the
country and abroad is very im-
portant.
According to the proclamation
“the Lawrence Police Department,
Te University of Kansas Ofce of
Public Safety, and Te Jayhawk
Buddy System are sponsoring a
variety of events this week to en-
courage students to use protective
behaviors before, during, and af-
ter spring break.”
Te movement to declare the
week as a safety week is in con-
junction with a national campaign
for student safety during spring
break. A news release put out by
the United States Department of
State on Feb. 9 stresses safety while
traveling abroad for spring break.
Te release gives several examples
of possible problems that students
may run into while overseas.
According to the release, “stu-
dents traveling abroad should
be aware that standards of safety
overseas are diferent from those
in the United States.”
— Edited by Samantha Collins
BY ALEX GARRISON
agarrison@kansan.com
Tousands are beginning clean-
up eforts afer a huge earthquake
hit Japan on Friday, setting of tsu-
nami warnings across the Pacifc.
Te University of Kansas has
confrmed that there are 10 stu-
dents currently in study abroad
programs in Japan, ninth of whom
are in Tokyo. Te 10th is in western
Japan, far from the epicenter. Jill
Jess, associate director of Univer-
sity Relations, said the University
has been in contact with represen-
tatives of that student’s host univer-
sity, who said there is no damage in
the area.
Tough that student has not yet
been in touch with University of-
cials, “there is no reason to believe
he or she is not safe,” Jess said.
None of the students’ names
have been released.
Jess said that there are 40 stu-
dents who are from Japan and that
University ofcials have contacted
each one, ofering assistance in
reaching family members and
counseling services. As of Friday
afernoon, none of these students
have decided to take aid, and all de-
clined to speak with Te Kansan.
— Edited by Brittany Nelson
events on campus
to promote spring
break safety
When: Today
Where: in front of the
Kansas Union
When: Tuesday, March
15,11 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Where: in front of the
Kansas Union
When: Wednesday, March
16, 11 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Where: in front of Strong
Hall
City promotes safety
during spring break
LocaL
hoW to donate to reLief
efforts in japan
You can text REDCROSS to 90999 to donate $10 directly
from your phone to the American Red Cross.
According to its website, the American Red Cross ofers
“community services that help the needy; support and com-
fort for military members and their families; the collection,
processing and distribution of lifesaving blood and blood
products; educational programs that promote health and
safety; and international relief and development programs.”
Efects of quake
hit KU campus
internationaL
Taking home the trophy
Mike Gunnoe/KANsAN
The men’s basketball teamcelebrates its victory against Texas for the Big 12 Championship title. The Jayhawks defeated the Longhorns 85-73.
BY TIM DWYER
tdwyer@kansan.com
A day after winning its eighth
Big 12 Championship in the 12-
year history of the league, Kansas
was named the No. 1 seed in the
Southwest region for the NCAA
Tournament.
The Jayhawks will play their first-
and second-round games — against
16-seed Boston University and
the winner of the eight/nine-seed
matchup between UNLV and Illinois
— at the BOK Center in Tulsa, Okla.
Their first game is Friday.
Boston is the champion of the
America East Conference. There is
the now infamous connection to
Bucknell and Bradley — who beat
Kansas in the first round in 2005
and 2006, respectively — as an auto-
matic bid school that starts with the
letter ‘B,’ but Kansas players aren’t
worried.
“No concerns from me,” senior
guard Tyrel Reed said. “I wasn’t here
for those. Maybe Brady was here,
but he’s been here forever.”
The Jayhawks have ties to both
UNLV and Illinois, assuming they
break the ‘B’ curse and continue the
perfect record of top seeds against 16
seeds. Kansas coach Bill Self hasn’t
played against Illinois since leaving
the school for the Kansas job eight
years ago, and UNLV starts former
Kansas power forward Quintrell
Thomas, who transferred after his
freshman year.
“Whoever we play, whether it
be UNLV — with Elijah, all that
stuff, Quintrell — or Illinois and the
connections that exist there,” Self
said, “there will be some sentimental
value attached to that game.”
The Jayhawks will play, if
they reach the Sweet 16, in the
Alamodome in San Antonio for the
first time since winning a national
title there in 2008. Self said it’s far
too early to go down memory lane,
though.
“Ask me that in a week,” he said,
“if we’re fortunate enough to get
there.”
— Edited by Emily Soetaert
INvEsTIGATIoN | 2A
Locals troubled after corpse was discovered near the housing duplex
Body found near Hawks Pointe
baLLin’ | 1b
The Jayhawks showed few faws
Saturday against the Longhorns
taylor helps lead
team to victory
Dead male found
near Hawks Pointe
by ADAM STRUNK
astrunk@kansan.com
The Lawrence Police Depart-
ment is investigating a deceased
male found behind a housing
duplex near the 700th block of
Michigan Street.
The Lawrence police respond-
ed to a medical emergency call
at 1:21 p.m. and found a male
body lying near a shallow creek
behind the housing duplex and
next to the heavily wooded area
that borders Hawks Pointe apart-
ments.
In a press release given Sunday
night, the Lawrence police said
that “a cause of death is not
known at this time pending au-
topsy results, but there appears
to be no foul play involved. “
At about 5 p.m., police and a
coroner loaded the body onto a
stretcher. The coroner left shortly
afterward. At 5:19 p.m., police
took down the yellow crime
scene tape.
Valerie Rotes, who lives a
block away from where the body
was found, said the occurrence
troubled her.
“I’m more paranoid now,” she
said. “I have my daughter and I
live alone. I get scared. I have to
walk outside and there are no
street lights out here.”
Jef Eubanks, another neigh-
borhood resident, was surprised
by the incident.
“I’m kind of creeped out a bit,”
he said. “I live in this neighbor-
hood. I walk through it every day.
I’m wondering who I’m not going
to see now.”
The Lawrence police said the
name of the subject would not
be released at this time.
— Edited by Amanda Sorell
2A / NEWS / MONDAY, MARcH 14, 2011 / THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN / kANSAN.cOM
QUOTE OF THE DAY
“The future is something which
everyone reaches at the rate of 60
minutes an hour, whatever he does,
whoever he is.”
— C. S. Lewis
FACT OF THE DAY
Arizona is the only state in the con-
tinental United States that does not
observe Daylight Savings Time.
— factmonster.com
mONDAY
March 14
THURSDAY
March 17
FRIDAY
March 18
WEDNESDAY
March 16
SATURDAY
March 19
What’s going on?
n Life in congress is a public event at the Dole
Institute of Politics from 4 to 5 p.m. This weekly
study group with former congressman Dennis
Moore discusses topics dealing with congress.
nSUA and kU Dining Services are presenting
an evening with Danny O’Neill, the founder of
The Roasterie. The event is from 5:30 to 7 p.m. in
Alderson Auditorium at the kansas Union. The
event is free.
n The frst round of games of the NcAA tourna-
ment will be shown in the lobby of the kansas
Union. Food will be provided when kU plays in
the tournament. The time will be announced.
TUESDAY
March 15
nThe department of Human Resources and
Equal Opportunity is hosting a workshop titled
Everyday creativity. The event challenges partici-
pants to change their perspectives and “reframe
problems into opportunities.”The free event is
from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m in the centennial Room
of the kansas Union.
SUNDAY
March 20
nThe baseball team will play Oklahoma State at
1 p.m. in Hoglund Ballpark. General admission is
$8.
n The Langston Hughes center is present-
ing a Jesse B. Semple Brownbag Series
lecture entitled The Quest for citizenship:
African American and Native American
Education in kansas with kim Warren. The
lecture is from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. in the
kansas Union, Alcove A. nElizabeth Berghout will perform on the 53
bronze bells housed in the World War II Memorial
campanile from 5 to 5:30 p.m.
ET CETERA
The University Daily kansan is the
student newspaper of the University
of kansas. The first copy is paid
through the student activity fee.
Additional copies of The kansan are 50
cents. Subscriptions can be purchased
at the kansan business office, 2051A
Dole Human Development center,
1000 Sunnyside Dr., Lawrence, kan.,
66045.
The University Daily kansan (ISSN
0746-4967) is published daily during
the school year except Saturday,
Sunday, fall break, spring break and
exams and weekly during the summer
session excluding holidays. Annual
subscriptions by mail are $250 plus
tax. Send address changes to The
University Daily kansan, 2051A Dole
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STAYING CONNECTED
WITH THE KANSAN
Get the latest news and give us
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kansan on Twitter @Thekan-
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Facebook.
CONTACT US
Tell us your news.
contact Nick Gerik, Michael Holtz,
kelly Stroda, courtney Bullis, Janene
Gier or Aleese kopf at (785) 864-4810
or editor@kansan.com. Follow The
kansan on Twitter at Thekansan_
News.
kansan newsroom
2000 Dole Human Development
center
1000 Sunnyside Ave.
Lawrence, kan., 66045
(785) 864-4810
kJHk is the student
voice in radio. Each day
there is news, music,
sports, talk shows and
other content made for
students, by students. Whether it’s
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mEDIA PARTNERS
check out kansan.
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what you’ve read in today’s kansan
and other news. Updates from the
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p.m., 6 p.m., every Monday through
Friday. Also see kUJH’s website at
tv.ku.edu.
Three laptops and two
external hardrives were
stolen from the Wagnon
Student Athlete center on
March 11. The value of the
loss is undetermined.
ON THE RECORD
CRImE
INVESTIGATION
Megan Singer/KANSAN
Emergency workers investigate the discovery of a dead body in a creek behind duplexes on Seventh and Michigan streets. The body was found
Sunday afternoon.
ODD NEWS
mONDAY: A slight chance of snow before noon. cloudy skies clearing later in the day with a high of 44.
Winds out of the northeast at 5 to 10 mph. chance of precipitation is 20 percent.
Monday Night: Partly cloudy with a low of 26. East wind of around 5 mph.
TUESDAY: Mostly sunny with a high of 53. Winds out of the southwest at 5 to 10 mph.
Tuesday Night: Partly cloudy with a low of 31. Southwest wind of around 5 mph.
WEDNESDAY: Mostly sunny with a high of 66.
Wednesday Night: Mostly clear with a low of 50.
THURSDAY: A 30 percent chance of showers and thunderstorms. Partly sunny with a high of 70.
Thursday Night: A 30 percent chance of showers and thunderstorms. Mostly cloudy with a
low of 46.
FRIDAY: Mostly sunny with a high of 67.
Friday Night: Mostly clear with a low of 42.
— Forecasters Jordan Carroll
and Aaron White
Weather forecast
A curious court
companion
AMHERST, Va. — A
woman turned a few
heads when she walked
into a rural Virginia court-
house with a tiny monkey
clad in a pink-and-white
dress tucked in her bra.
The woman brought the
palm-sized marmoset to
Amherst county court-
house on Thursday for a
hearing in Juvenile and
Domestic Relations court.
Ofcials apparently didn’t
notice the monkey until
the woman went to an
ofce to complete some
paperwork.
— Associated Press
enroll@ku.edu
785-864-5823
online.ku.edu/udk
110875
Talk to Your Advisor
www.advising.ku.edu
START NOW
FINISH OVER THE SUMMER!
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with KU Independent Study
We offer more than 120 courses
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KANSAN.COM / THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN / MONdAy, MArCh 14, 2011 / NEWS / 3A
By Ann Wilson
awilson@kansan.com
The Campus Safety Advisory
Board is working to make life at
the University of Kansas a little bit
safer for students by gaining aware-
ness and funding.
Past CSAB projects include the
campus emergency blue phones
and Segways provided for the KU
Public Safety Office. The money
for these projects came from the
$1 campus safety fee charged each
semester and 50 cents during the
summer, according to the Office
of the Registrar’s website. However,
the fee was eliminated two years
ago because the accumulated
$212,000 was not being spent.
Outlined in the Student Senate
rules and regulations, CSAB must
decide how to allocate the cumula-
tive funds from past years through
various funding raising and the
past student fees. And some of
the projects are costly, such as the
$307,010 Oread Neighborhood
Lighting Project that will provide
street lights in areas with a high
number of student residents begin-
ning this summer.
CSAB is the only student board
to receive matching funds from the
Office of the Provost on all capi-
tal improvement projects such as
infrastructure improvements and
cross walks, according to assistant
vice provost Jason Hornbeger.
Other projects being considered
include four options for lighting
in Parking Lot 16 costing $6,000
to $45,000. However, the board
chose not to vote on the issue
during last week’s meeting until it
receives input from the scholarship
hall residence, who will be most
affected. CSAB chairwoman Libby
Johnson, a senior from Lawrence,
said she would meet with scholar-
ship halls Tuesday. Johnson said
the CSAB always researched each
project before committing money.
“We don’t want to waste our
resources and implement another
program that students just aren’t
going to use,” she said.
To help raise the CSAB’s aware-
ness and to promote student
involvement in discussing safety
issues at the University, the board
voted 5-0 last week to spend
$40,000 for promotional events
throughout the semester. Johnson
said the group also planned to
partner with the Jayhawk Buddy
System. Johnson said she hoped
CSAB’s involvement in the JBS
and KU Public Safety Office’s “Safe
Spring Break” campaign next week
will generate greater exposure of
the group and its projects.
“I want student input because I
have only one set of experiences,
and it’s our job to vocalize the
needs of this campus as a whole,”
said Nicole McClure, CSAB secre-
tary and a senior from Topeka.
“We’d love to have more people
involved in the discussions and
the decision making process,”
Johnson said.
Johnson said she if anyone who
would like to get involved with
CSAB, to visit its Facebook page
or e-mail her at libbyjohnson54@
gmail.com. CSAB will meet at 5:30
p.m. Tuesday with an open forum
at the beginning for student dis-
cussion.
— Edited by Samantha Collins
C S A B
there are
18
members
it originated
in the 70s as
the “lightening
committee”
CSAB meets
tri-weekly;
anyone is
welcome to
attend
the chair-
woman is
Libby
Johnson
campus safety advisory board
graphic by: sarah hockel
Working to fund student safety projects
CAmpUS
By MAx RothMAn
mrothman@kansan.com
An Alaskan honored the late
John Haines and illustrated blue
ribbon eels with neon mouths that
coughed near Fiji. A western aide
revisited a parasite dipping tank in
Zaire. A student begged a teacher
to taste the syllables of her haiku.
These speakers were three of
the 10 poet laureates who read
their works for the “Poet Laureati”
Sunday at the Spencer Museum
of Art. A collection of poet lau-
reates’ works,
“An Endless
Skyway,” was
released at the
event.
The event
continues today
at the Lawrence
Arts Center,
940 New
Hampshire St.,
with six work-
shops, a dis-
cussion panel, multiple auctions
and a second reading session.
Ted Kooser, who is the 13th poet
laureate of the United States and
has written poetry for more than
50 years, said he writes or thinks
about writing every single day.
“It was girls,” Kooser said. “I had
no athletic ability, I couldn’t play a
band instrument and I somehow
got the idea that being a poet might
make me attractive and mysteri-
ous.”
Publisher Steve Semken said
“An Endless Skyway,” which was
one of 28 Ice Cube Press books for
sale at the event, has a wide variety
of voices.
“Part of the state poet’s job is
to integrate poetry with the way
people live,” Semken said.
Raven Bookstore displayed 52
books of all 20 poet laureates par-
ticipating in the events.
On Sunday, each poet read cho-
sen works with conviction, mea-
sure and passion to a mostly mid-
dle-aged crowd in the museum’s
auditorium.
Kooser first read “Success,”
which shared
his experi-
ences as the
United States
poet laure-
ate consultant
in poetry to
the Library of
Congress from
2004 to 2006.
“I can feel
the thick yel-
low fat of
applause building up in my arter-
ies, friends, yet I go on,” he said. “A
fool for adoration.”
Kooser’s “A Morning In Early
Spring” defined the current season
as sunshine spoiled into rain out-
side the museum’s doors.
“Light rain fingers the porch
roof, trying the same cold key over
and over,” he said. “Spatters of rain-
drops, cold as dimes, and a torn
gray curtain of cloud floats out of a
broken window of sky.”
—Edited by Helen Mubarak
Poets fll museum
with their passion
ARTS
“Part of the state poet’s
job is to integrate poetry
with the way people live.”
Steve SeMKeN
Publisher
INTERNATIoNAL
Japan still shocked from earthquake, tsunami
AssoCiAtED PREss
KORIYAMA, Japan — Japanese
ofcials warned of a possible second
explosion Sunday at a nuclear plant
crippled by the earthquake and tsu-
nami as they raced to stave of mul-
tiple reactor meltdowns, but they
provided few details about whether
they were making progress. More
than 180,000 people have evacuated
the area, and up to 160 may have
been exposed to radiation.
Four nuclear plants in northeast-
ern Japan have reported damage, but
the danger appeared to be greatest
at the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear
complex, where one explosion oc-
curred Saturday and a second was
feared. Operators have lost the abil-
ity to cool three reactors at Dai-ichi
and three more at another nearby
complex using usual procedures,
afer the quake knocked out power
and the tsunami swamped backup
generators.
Chief Cabinet Secretary Yukio
Edano said Sunday that a hydrogen
explosion could occur at Dai-ichi’s
Unit 3, the latest reactor to face a
possible meltdown. Tat would fol-
low a hydrogen blast Saturday in the
plant’s Unit 1.
“At the risk of raising further pub-
lic concern, we cannot rule out the
possibility of an explosion,” Edano
said. “If there is an explosion, how-
ever, there would be no signifcant
impact on human health.”
Operators have been dump-
ing seawater into units 1 and 3 in a
last-ditch measure to cool the reac-
tors. Tey were getting water into
the other four reactors with cooling
problems without resorting to cor-
rosive sea water, which likely makes
the reactors unusable.
Edano said residents within about
12 miles (20 kilometers) of the Dai-
ichi plant were ordered to evacuate
as a precaution, and the radioactivity
released into the environment so far
was so small it didn’t pose any health
threats.
Such statements, though, did little
to ease public worries.
“First I was worried about the
quake,” said Kenji Koshiba, a con-
struction worker who lives near the
plant. “Now I’m worried about ra-
diation.” He spoke at an emergency
center in Koriyama, about 40 miles
(60 kilometers) from the most trou-
bled reactors and 125 miles (190 ki-
lometers) north of Tokyo.
At the makeshif center set up in
a gym, a steady fow of people —
mostly the elderly, schoolchildren
and families with babies — were met
by ofcials wearing helmets, surgical
masks and goggles.
About 1,500 people had been
scanned for radiation exposure, of-
fcials said.
Up to 160 people, including 60 el-
derly patients and medical staf who
had been waiting for evacuation in
the nearby town of Futabe, and 100
others evacuating by bus, might
have been exposed to radiation, said
Ryo Miyake, a spokesman from Ja-
pan’s nuclear agency. It was unclear
whether any cases of exposure had
reached dangerous levels.
A foreign ministry ofcial brief-
ing reporters said radiation levels
outside the Dai-ichi plant briefy
rose above legal limits, but had since
declined signifcantly.
Edano said none of the Fukush-
ima Dai-ichi reactors was near the
point of complete meltdown, and he
was confdent of escaping the worst
scenarios.
Ofcials, though, have declared
states of emergency at the six reac-
tors where cooling systems were
down — three at Dai-ichi and three
at the nearby Fukushima Daini com-
plex. Te U.N. nuclear agency said a
state of emergency was also declared
Sunday at another complex, the
Onagawa power plant, afer higher-
than-permitted levels of radiation
were measured there. It said Japan
informed it that all three reactors
there were under control.
4A / NEWS / MONDAY, MArch 14, 2011 / THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN / kANsAN.cOM
ARIES (March 21-April 19)
Today is a 6
Yesterday’s challenges continue.
You can overcome them. Focus
on your roots. Make sure you’re
properly grounded. It’s not a good
day for financial decisions.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20)
Today is a 6
There are contradictions in the
communication. Don’t sweat the
small stuff. It’s best to go work
out and burn calories and frustra-
tions. Think positive.
GEMINI (May 21-June 21)
Today is a 7
Money may come unexpectedly,
but it may also leave the same
way. Be grateful for what you
have. Make investment decisions
another day. Enjoy good com-
pany.
CANCER (June 22-July 22)
Today is an 8
Write a haiku now. Notice spring-
time and word play. You can’t
go wrong here. Find a new way
to express your message. People
want to hear what you have to
say.
LEo (July 23-Aug. 22)
Today is a 6
To quote Monty Python, “Always
look on the bright side of life. If
life feels jolly rotten, there’s some-
thing you’ve forgotten, and that’s
to smile and laugh and dance
and sing.”
VIRGo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22)
Today is a 6
career goals seem important
today. After all, your reputation is
at stake. Focus on goals, but think
long term. Don’t get frustrated by
challenges.
LIbRA (Sept. 23-oct. 22)
Today is a 7
Business as usual may be good,
but don’t get so comfortable that
you get caught off guard by rocky
finances. It’s always good to save
up for tomorrow.
SCoRpIo (oct. 23-Nov. 21)
Today is a 7
Today could present challenges.
Accept them as a gift. After all,
adventure has been knocking on
your door, and it’s all related. Will
you answer?
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21)
Today is a 6
sometimes it’s best to be quiet
and just listen. Emotion and anxi-
ety may fill the air. Your calm pres-
ence can make a difference, even
if you don’t speak.
CApRICoRN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19)
Today is a 7
Feeling like you’ll do well entering
an exam can actually influence
the results. say, “I can do it.” share
this with a group to empower
them. Get physical practice.
AqUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18)
Today is a 6
Who’s afraid of the big bad wolf?
Not you. You see him for who
he is: a hungry animal, trying
to survive, who’s more afraid of
you. Go ahead and bring treats to
Grandma.
pISCES (Feb. 19-March 20)
Today is a 6
Do you surprise yourself with
your own brightness sometimes?
Get ready for that. You may dis-
cover a new artistic skill that you
didn’t know you have.
Nick Sambaluk
THE NExT pANEL
HoRoSCopES
ENTERTAINMENT
NICHoLAS SAMbALUK
A conversation with Leno
on nightmares and nerves
Mcclatchy-tribune
There’s an elephant on the line
and his name is Conan O’Brien.
Jay Leno signed off on a phone
interview to promote his stand-
up tour with the stipulation that
the “Tonight Show” short-timer’s
name not come up in conversa-
tion. Despite the restriction, Leno
did address at least one of his
competitors, as well as a number
of other topics:
Q: What’s your (corporate
nightmare story)?
A: There was this company and
they asked if I would pick on a
few people in the audience. Bob
Walker, they said, is a big office
flirt. If you do anything about sex
or girls, just throw to Bob and
you’ll get a big laugh. OK, fine. So
I do a joke about prostitutes and
I say, “Bob, you know what I’m
talking about.” Big laugh. Later
I say, “Bob, you use condoms
when you’re on the road, right?”
Ha, ha, ha. I start in on a third
joke, and this woman starts cry-
ing and tears out of the building.
Apparently, they had completely
forgotten that Bob’s wife didn’t
know he was the office flirt.
Q: When was the last time you
were really nervous?
A: Really nervous? Let’s see ...
the White House Correspondents
Dinner with Ronald Reagan. It
was my first time. I was back-
stage and this general-looking
guy says, “This is the president.
You don’t do jokes about the
president.” Yessir. Yessir. Next
guy who comes up to me is
(Secretary of State) George
Shultz. He says, “Ronnie loves a
good joke. Nail him. He’ll think
it’s hilarious.”
Q: What did you do?
A: My opening joke was con-
gratulating Nancy for being
named humanitarian of the year
and beating out that conniving
little bitch, Mother Teresa.
Man’s burglary
eforts hampered
MEsA, Ariz. — A man is in
custody after police say he
broke into an Arizona town-
home and got stuck in a clothes
hamper underneath the win-
dow he climbed through.
Mesa police say 20-year-old
Michael Trias was arrested on
suspicion of burglary and crimi-
nal damage.
Authorities say no property
was taken from the home, but
there was some damage done
to the window.
— Associated Press
oDD NEWS
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James Naismith’s Original Rules of Basketball
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the rules’ fnal destination be?
O
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Length: 300 words
The submission should include the
author’s name, grade and hometown.
Find our full letter to the editor policy
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how to submit A LEttER to thE EDitoR
Nick Gerik, editor
864-4810 or ngerik@kansan.com
Michael Holtz, managing editor
864-4810 or mholtz@kansan.com
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864-4810 or kstroda@kansan.com
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864-4924 or dscott@kansan.com
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864-4924 or mmatney@kansan.com
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864-4358 or cbattle@kansan.com
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864-4477 or jcassin@kansan.com
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tHe editORiAL BOARd
Members of The Kansan Editorial Board are Nick
Gerik, Michael Holtz, Kelly Stroda, D.M. Scott and
Mandy Matney.
contAct us
PAGe 5A tHe uNiVeRsitY dAiLY KANsAN
In a victory for improvement in the
justice system, the Supreme Court
ruled on March 7 that convicted pris-
oners can seek DNA testing as a civil
rights action to have their convic-
tions overturned.
As we have seen, 267 people
in the U.S. have been exonerated
because of DNA evidence, according
to the Innocence Project, an original
dedicated to helping wrongfully con-
victed people. This is clearly a step in
the direction of a fairer and more just
judicial system.
But most cases still do not incor-
porate DNA evidence. In those cases,
there is less of an opportunity for
organizations like the Innocence
Project to help those that might be
wrongly accused from arguing their
cases.
In that case, what about death row
inmates who may be innocent? Re-
gardless of whether they have DNA
evidence to help them plead their
cases or not, the stakes are irrefut-
ably higher when it is the question of
life or death.
There are plenty of arguments
made about the death penalty being
a deterrence or “worth the price”
of a few innocent people dying at
the hands of the state. I will not
discuss those issues here, but I hope
students openly discuss them with
each other.
The most compelling argument
against capital punishment is the
possibility of executing innocent
persons and – innocent or not – the
devastating efects on the family
members of those executed.
In making our decisions about
whether or not we support the death
penalty, it is important to remember
that homicide by lethal injection cre-
ates another set of devastated family
members and loved ones. It is, in
some respects, trying to rectify loss
by creating more loss.
We supposedly reserve death row
for the worst of the worst — only
those cases in which we are sure
beyond any doubt of the perpetra-
tor’s guilt. But that has not stopped
us from wrongly convicting and sen-
tencing to death at least 138 people.
In 2004, Cameron Todd Willingham
was executed in the state of Texas,
and since then, investigators have
proven that none of the evidence
used to convict Willingham was valid.
There is sufcient doubt that Troy
Davis is guilty, yet he still sits on
death row in Georgia.
Clearly the practice of capital
sentencing is arbitrary and certainly
not reserved for cases without any
shadow of doubt.
House Bill 2323 would abolish the
death penalty in Kansas. Currently
the bill is being considered in the
Kansas House, and support for the
legislation is growing. In order to
push the bill forward, it is imperative
that students and community mem-
bers voice their opinions. Students
should call their representatives
to make it known they no longer
support such an antiquated form of
“justice.”
The Kansas Coalition Against the
Death Penalty website (ksabolition.
org) provides more information on
how to support the bill.
Kelly Cosby is a junior in political
science and english from Overland
Park. Follow her on twitter @Kel-
lyCosby.
Freeall
for
Best quote ever from my Dad: “With
Craigslist, you have to be a whore.”
So true, so true.
I think I am the only person who,
instead of taking gas money,
exchanges it for alcoholic drinks.
Picture Jersey Shore mixed with
True Life mixed with at least three
other reality shows multiply that by
10,000,000 and you will have my life.
Girl: Why do guys like boobs? Guy:
Why do girls like breathing?
I walked in on my friend using the
Shake Weight this weekend. I don’t
think I can ever look at him the same
way any more.
My mother just found out the saint
she named me after was sainted for
having an orgasm. That was a fun
conversation.
Realized: No matter the time of day,
men in long, creepy trench coats
never mean well when they say,
“Hello there, ladies.”
Please abide by the rules of the
road: STAY IN THE RIGHT LANE. In
hallways AND stairwells!
Dear Mom, The date went well. We
practically had sex. Love, your frst
born.
Know who wears Birkenstocks?
Dwight Schrute. Way to live a classy
life, bro.
Sometimes you have to let yourself
have a day of trashy TV and cream
cheese icing.
Why do Sweet Tarts taste better
when they are shaped like chicks,
ducks and bunnies?
Independent Living: having a
pound of Skittles for supper.
Any homework/exam this week or
next week is pointless. Brains are on
Spring Break already.
Fake Patty’s: The only thing keeping
Manhattan alive.
I guess we did to Texas what
K-State couldn’t do to Colorado.
#noweowntexas.
I think we should refer to him only
as Admiral Reed from now on.
I just burped and it tasted like
perfume. WTF did I do last night?
Started wearing sunglasses in
class to avoid being blinded by the
bright-colored frat shorts.
You know you’ve been in Lawrence
too long when Birkenstocks start to
look appealing.
Just heard a woman call someone
and wish them a happy birthday.
While she was peeing.
I was mad that all of my friends
have spring break a week before
ours. Then I realized that our
frst weekend back is the Final
Four. Hello study-free basketball
watching. Well played, KU.
opinion
apps.facebook.com/dailykansan
MONdAY, MARCH 14, 2011
I lived in Okinawa, a tiny island off
the coast of Japan, for three and a half
years. It is a small island; so small that
you can drive the entire length of it in
a day.
I was young when I lived in
Okinawa, but my memories living
in Asia are the first of my life; slid-
ing down the dangerous but thrilling
roller park slides, taking my shoes
off at the door of a restaurant, sitting
cross-legged on the floor to eat and
playing with my Japanese neighbors
even though we didn’t speak each
other’s language.
This morning I find myself won-
dering what’s happening to that little
neighbor girl who used to share her
Hello Kitty candy with me.
Early Friday, March 11, Japan was
hit by an 8.9 magnitude earthquake,
the world’s fifth largest earthquake in
the past 100 years. The earthquake
prompted a tsunami with 30-foot
waves.
The initial earthquake was followed
by more than 50 aftershocks — most
of them were recorded at a magnitude
of more than 6.0.
The video and photographic cover-
age of this disaster has been the stuff
of Hollywood. Giant waves swept
cars, boats and airplanes off their
paths mixed with debris of buildings
and trees. Houses that were not torn
apart by the earthquake were washed
away by the waves; some were seen
on fire in Kesennuma city in Miyagi
Prefecture, near Sendai.
Casualty estimates are still com-
ing in. As of yesterday, NHK, Japan’s
public broadcasting network, reported
that 1,300 people had been confirmed
dead. However, in Minami-Sanriku, a
coastal city that was struck hard by the
tsunami, 10,000 of the 17,000 residents
are missing. The Washington Post
estimates the final death toll to exceed
10,000. The prime minister of Japan,
Naoto Kan, has called the disaster the
country’s biggest crisis since World
War II.
Naturally, this catastrophe has
caught the attention of the world
media. The coverage is detailed and
the images and video of the quakes
and the following tsunami are shock-
ing. But American media couldn’t
leave it at that.
It seemed that immediately after
this tragic and horrific event — which
is still an ongoing nightmare for the
people of Japan — has been turned
into “how is the United States going
to be affected by this?” by American
media outlets.
Before the death toll in Japan
is even calculated, our national
media jumped straight into specula-
tions about Hawaii and California.
American press made the decision to
focus on our home front.
I am aware of how important it is
to warn people in the line of the tsu-
nami’s trajectory. Precautions must be
taken to avoid additional loss of life.
But does it have to be the overriding
focus, the headline of every article?
ABC News quoted Brian Shiro of
the Pacific Tsunami Warning Center
saying, “Some places in California will
see 6 feet, in some cases 9 feet. This
could certainly be a bad day for people
on the beach. If you have a house right
on the water ... it could be flooded.”
That’s right. Sorry Americans, you
can’t spend your Friday afternoon at
the beach. Put your sunscreen down
until tomorrow, we are oh-so-sorry
about this inconvenience. All the while
people are dying in Japan, trapped in
their houses and cars, but hey, we need
to know if our weekend plans should
be postponed a few hours.
When did we first begin desen-
sitizing ourselves to foreign deaths?
Americans weren’t involved in the
situation in Japan until there was a
possibility that it would affect us.
This ‘‘If we don’t see it firsthand it
doesn’t matter to us” mentality has to
stop. There shouldn’t even be an “us”
versus “them.” It should be a “we,”
because we are all people and when
anyone dies it should matter to every-
one. I have never been more disap-
pointed to be an American.
Jessie Blakeborough is a sopho-
more in international studies and
journalism from Baltimore. She’s
also a writer for the Kansan Editorial
Board.
Japanese lives should matter more than U.S. interests
iNteRNAtiONAL
T
h
e
P
o
l
l

W
e
e
k
l
y
In response to “Animal slaughter
for human consumption is morally
indefensible,” I know many good
people who maintain a strict veg-
etable diet. Frequently, the same indi-
viduals assert the rights of animals as
a basis to their eating habits.
Still, I wonder how they can justify
their judgmental, patronizing frowns
when I support local commerce,
carry out basic animal physiology
and uphold my beliefs on animal
rights. Why are some people com-
pelled to label omnivores as ignorant,
narcissistic boors when their life-
styles are as, if not more, destructive
than a person who eats meat occa-
sionally?
With 300 words I cannot ade-
quately reply to each of the points
made in Friday’s column, but I will,
however, address the moral “indefen-
sibleness” of an omnivore’s diet.
If a non-human animal retains the
same rights as a human — that is
equal privilege to a free life without
slaughter, exploitation and slavery
— it’s necessary to hold all animals
accountable for their actions uni-
formly. As beings of equal right we
have a responsibility to uphold the
intrinsic value of life.
As stated in the column: “Because
of issues at birth or injury, some
humans are less intelligent than ani-
mals.” Valid point; I’ve seen videos of
Missouri fans that make chimps look
like hair-covered Einsteins. Yet, as we
see in nature, chimps are omnivores.
How can we let their murderous acts
against other creatures continue?
They can learn sign language, damn
it!
Therefore, as nature’s most intel-
ligent animal, we humans have an
obligation to redraft the Bill of Rights
to include non-human animals in
order to stop nature’s madness. We
might have trouble keeping chimps
on the stand from eating their own
poop, but to protect animals every-
where we must begin by making
murderers answer to their “indefen-
sibly” corrupt behavior.
And as the supreme models of
moral goodness, I insist vegetarians
create this necessary revision — get
to work.
Bobby Burch is a senior from
Wichita.
Nicholas sambaluk
Vote now at Kansan.cOm/POLLs
Death penalty should be abolished
while reasonable doubt continues
LetteR tO tHe editOR
By kelly cosBy
kcosby@kansan.com
GOVeRNMeNt
CARtOON
Animals must be held
accountable for ‘rights’
weet of the week
tweet us your opinions to @kansanopinion
If your tweet is particularly interesting, unique, clever,
insightful and/or funny, it could be selected as the tweet
of the week. You have 140 characters, good luck!
editORiAL CARtOON
6A / NEWS / MONDAY, MArch 14, 2011 / THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN / kANsAN.cOM
BY LAURA SATHER
lsather@kansan.com
The smell of homemade can-
dles and the sight of handcrafted
crafts filled the Douglas County
Fairgrounds Saturday.
Lawrence’s Parks and Recreation
department hosted the sixth annual
Spring Arts and Crafts Festival, and
special events supervisor Duane
Peterson said it featured both com-
mercial and noncommercial ven-
dors. Participants occupied all 81
booths, and vendors sold everything
from steel sculptures to homemade
pork skins and dip. Peterson said
festivals like these are becoming
increasingly popular because of the
job market.
“There are a lot of people this
time around that have been laid
off,” he said. “So they’re using this as
another way of making money.”
Ann Dahl, an exhibitor from
Liberty, Mo., sold license plate art
at the fair. She said she used to do
a lot of woodworking on her own,
and she has always collected license
plates. Then, about a year and a half
ago she decided to start making it
all into art.
Dahl takes her license plates, cuts
them up and uses a nail gun to fasten
the letters and numbers to wooden
planks to spell out words. She said
she made one of her pieces for her-
self, and then her friends started
wanting them. Dahl makes custom
pieces now, but her best-seller is a
piece that spells “man cave.”
Even though the job market is
suffering and the economy has taken
a hit, Dahl said she thought the fact
that people would spend money on
her pieces says something about the
importance of art.
“I’d like to think that there’s a great
interest in art,” Dahl said. “People
want something unique, and when
they come here, they say, ‘I’ve never
seen that before.’ People are will-
ing to still buy gifts for people they
love.”
The festival is economically
advantageous for Lawrence, as well.
The city only has to rent the space,
and participants have to pay a fee
to feature their work at the fair, so
the city makes a large profit from
the event.
Peterson said many of the exhibi-
tors are from out of town, so they
will come into town on Friday night,
stay in a hotel and eat downtown,
which he said also helps Lawrence’s
economy.
The city hosts three other fairs
like this one every year; one in
September, one in November and
one in December.
— Edited by Amanda Sorell
LocAL
Arts and Crafts Festival brings boost to vendors, city
Aaron Harris/KANSAN
Susan Kiefer, an Olathe resident, talks to customers at her booth of homemade hair accessories at the sixth annual Spring Arts and Crafts Festival.
The festival took place Saturday afternoon at the Douglas County Fairgrounds.
For more coverage of this
story, check out kUJh’s
newscast today at 4 p.m.
www.ContinuingEd.ku.edu (keyword: testprep) · Iêî-êã4-îê11
GRE
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TEST PREPARATION
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100097
SUMMERIZE.
Pure Learning Power
Okay. It’s FINALIZED. You’re
going home for the summer.
Only, you don’t want your
academicsJEOPARDIZED. Or your
summerINSTITUTIONALIZED.
Or pay a bill that’s SUPERSIZED.
So prioritize. Become
FAMILIARIZED with learning
that’s BUTLER-IZED. Cost-wise,
we’re BITE-SIZED. And your
transfer is MOBILIZED.
That’s power – SUMMERIZED.
ENROLL ON spring break
316-322-3255 ll butlercc.edu
KANSAN.COM / THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN / MONdAy, MArCh 14, 2011 / NEWS / 7A
BY SARA SNEATH
sneathsk@ku.edu

She’d fallen in love and everywhere she
turned reminded her of the object of
her affection; tiny sweaters, bandanas and
chew toys screamed, “buy me” from the
shelf. It was then that Kaitee Tyner, a
junior from Council Grove, realized she
was crazy about her sister’s puppy and
wanted one of her own.
That was seven months ago, when Tyner
held more reserves about picking up dog
feces and knew less about how to take care
of her new companion. Today, her phone is
filled with images of the 15-pound Maltese
mix, Roxy. There’s a lot to learn as a first-
time dog owner—love is expensive.
“I went to Bradley Animal Hospital and
they gave me an estimate of $416 to get
her fixed,” Tyner said. “I was about in tears
because that’s the same day I paid $250 for
her appointment. I had no idea she would
be that expensive. I don’t have a savings
account because of her.”
ESTImATED CoST
The Lawrence Humane Society adop-
tion process requires applicants to answer
several questions regarding living accom-
modations and how much they believe
a pet will cost per year. Executive direc-
tor of Lawrence Humane Society, Midge
Grinstead, says dog owners should expect
to pay at least $500.
“You have to be prepared to take care
of the dog like it’s a child,” Grinstead said.
“Time is the first thing and the second
thing is money.”
Grinstead says heartworm prevention
medication and flea and tick treatment
alone — which should be given year-round
— cost $20 a month.
FIRST YEAR moST ExpENSIVE
When considering the cost of buying a
kennel, paying pet deposits, dog training
and vaccines, owning a dog is most expen-
sive the first year. Robin Michael, a veteri-
narian at Clinton Parkway Animal Hospital
said this was especially the case when you
got a puppy. The Clinton Parkway Animal
Hospital recommends you bring in your
puppy for its first set of immunizations at
six to eight weeks old, with booster immu-
nizations every three to four weeks until
they are 16 weeks old.
“An adult dog probably only needs to see
those vaccines once a year,” Michael said.
CUTTINg DoWN oN VET BILLS
Keep prescription drugs, chocolate,
grapes, raisins and garlic away from
dogs, all of these items are detrimental
to their health. Dogs also tend to eat
socks and underwear and these items can
cause blockage and may require surgery
to remove.
Work your dog slowly into exercise:
“They need to be conditioned into it.
Where we see people get in trouble is first
thing in the spring,” Michael said. “Every
dog is a little different. The main point is,
you wouldn’t go out and run a marathon if
you haven’t run a 5k.”
Dogs should not be kenneled longer
than eight hours. Puppies can be kenneled
for the equivalent of their age in months,
plus one. For example, a 4-month-old
puppy can be kenneled five hours.
Michael said if dog owners was unsure
about something they should call their
vet. Often times the veterinary technicians
can answer their questions. She also said
the Internet was a good resource and that
most vets had websites with FAQs and
additional sources of information.
As for Tyner, she’s keeping Roxy.
“I cannot imagine giving her up,” Tyner
said.
— Edited by Brittany Nelsonn
pETS
3000
4000
5000
Number of frst-time enrolled freshmen at
KU since 1997.
year
1997 2000 2004 2008 2010
number of
students
2000 2002 2004 2005 2008 2010
year
number of
students
number of resident
freshmen
number of nonresident
freshmen
Number of resident compared to nonresident freshmen at
KU since 2000.
4,000 freshmen: The number of frst-time students Lisa
Kress, director of the offce of admissions, said the department hopes to
reach every year.
The size of graduating
high school classes in
Kansas.
1000
1500
2000
2500
3000
3500
By Max Lush
Percentage of Kansas
high school graduates
applying to KU.
=
Interest shown in
KU from out-of-
state high school
graduates according
to Kress
Though in 2008 KU won the Orange
Bowl and men’s basketball
championship, Kress said there is
no found correlation between sports
success and enrollemnt; however, he
said it does help increase the school’s
visibility.
ADmISSIoNS
Following KU enrollment trends
For frst-time dog owners,
learning the ropes is crucial
please recycle
this newspaper
340 Fraser | 864-4121
www.psych.ku.edu/psych_clinic/
Counseling Servicesfor
Lawrence & KU
Paid for by KU
8A / NEWS / MONDAY, MArch 14, 2011 / THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN / kANsAN.cOM
CHRISTOPHER HONG
chong@kansan.com
Student Union Activities
(SUA) hosted its third annual
International Film Festival this
weekend at the Kansas Union
and featured films from Mexico,
France and Germany.
Students who attended got
the opportunity to see award-
winning foreign films from the
Guanajuato International Film
Festival last summer.
“The festival is unique because
it features a lot of international
short films,” said Bea Kilat, films
and media coordinator for SUA.
The festival also hosted a com-
petition for student film makers,
featuring a grand prize of $500
and a 10-day internship with
Guanajuato International Film
Festival. The competition had
more than 30 entries this year.
Films in the competition had to
be made in the past year and had
to be less than 15 minutes. On
Sunday, SUA announced the win-
ner of the competition, “Poeta” by
Devin Schwyhart.
Schwyhart, a senior from
Winfield, said he had been mak-
ing films since he was 12 years
old and film had always been his
obsession. After taking a hiatus
from film making, he made the
move to the department of film
and media studies.
“I was a mechanics assistant
for an autoshop for two years,” he
said. “I kind of thought, I’m 23, its
not going to come any sooner so I
just need to go for it.”
“Poeta” is a documentary about
Stan Lombardo, a KU professor
of classics who translates Greek
epics into a 21st century context.
Schwyhart said an internship with
a film festival would give him the
opportunity to make contacts in
the film industry.
When asked what his plans
were after graduation, Schwyhart
gave a simple reply.
“I’m boarding the first flight to
L.A.,” he said.
—Edited by Emily Soetaert
ARTS
‘Poeta’ wins flm festival
ScIENcE
Springing ahead could be unhealthy
MCClaTCHy TRIbuNE
HARTFORD, Conn. —
Researchers say that shifting
our internal clocks twice a year
might affect us adversely — from
more traffic accidents to lower
SAT scores.
One worry about daylight sav-
ing time, which happened Sunday
morning at 2 a.m., is sleep depri-
vation. When we spring forward,
we lose one hour of sleep. That
may not seem like much of a
jolt, but studies suggest most of
us don’t get enough sleep as it is,
so losing even an hour can take
its toll.
The one-hour time shift also
seems to wreak havoc with our
circadian rhythms, the 24-hour
cycle our bodies are accustomed
to. The cycle sets itself according
to sunrise and sunset.
Daylight saving time was
adopted in the United States in
1918, long before the medical
community began looking into
seasonal affective disorder — a
feeling of depression and slug-
gishness that comes from the
lack of exposure to sunlight.
Andrew Winokur, director
of psychopharmacology at the
University of Connecticut, said
we thrive on consistent patterns.
“When there’s a sudden change
in that, we as humans can feel it,”
he said. “We get used to, and
more comfortable, being on a
specific pattern, and when that
changes, we’re more likely to feel
out of sorts than better. I would
say it’s slightly analogous to jet
lag.”
Of particular concern to Paul
Desan at Yale University is how
little we know about the long-
term effects of seasonal affective
disorder.
“In my opinion, the research
is not very complete and is con-
tradictory,” said Desan, a profes-
sor of psychiatry who specializes
in seasonal affective disorder.
“We’re doing this vast public
experiment without knowing
what we’re doing.”
110967
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KANSAN.COM / THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN / MONdAy MArCh 14, 2011 / NEWS / 9A
BY LAURA NIGHTENGALE
lnightengale@kansan.com
A forum was held at the
Lawrence Public Library, 707
Vermont St., to discuss the library’s
expansion. The city manager, two
Gould Evans architects, library
representatives and 15 community
members met in the library’s audi-
torium for about an hour and a
half.
Architects Steve Clark and Jane
Huesemann gave a summary of
construction plans before begin-
ning a question and answer ses-
sion.
“It’s good to get people’s com-
ments. Hopefully, they’ll continue
to stay involved,” Huesemann said.
Several representatives of the
Old West Lawrence neighbor-
hood attended the meeting. They
addressed concerns about two
main issues:
safety and aes-
thetics.
“This isn’t a
matter of com-
plaining about
a n y t h i n g , ”
David Carttar,
president of Old
West Lawrence
Association said. “This is an
opportunity to offer constructive
input.”
Carttar said that the association’s
concerns were less about style and
more about the functionality of the
building and the ability to safely
facilitate traffic from the adjacent
park and swimming pool.
Pedest r i an
safety was heav-
ily discussed
at the meet-
ing. Because
it’s across the
street from
Watson Park
and Outdoor
Aquatic Center,
the library shares automobile and
pedestrian traffic with other family
activities.
City officials will continue to
work with architects and encour-
age public opinion as construction
plans move forward. Individuals
with concerns or suggestions are
encouraged to contact the library
or city hall for information.
— Edited by Sean Tokarz
For more coverage of this
story, check out KUJh’s
newscast today at 4 p.m.
Forum discusses library expansion
LocAL
“This is an opportunity to
ofer constructive input.”
dAvid CArttAr
president of Old West
Lawrence Association
NATIoNAL
ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK — Passengers
and witnesses to a horrifc New
York City crash that sheared the
top of a bus and killed 14 people
told investigators that the driver’s
account of getting clipped by a
tractor-trailer didn’t match up to
what they felt and saw before the
vehicle slid of the road and into
a sign pole.
Driver Ophadell Williams told
police that his World Wide Tours
bus was hit just as it crossed the
New York City line early Saturday
on a trip from the Mohegan Sun
casino in Connecticut.
But passengers said Williams
had already swerved at times to
the right for no reason before the
accident, a law-enforcement of-
cial said Sunday.
Te ofcial said passengers
said they didn’t feel anything hit
them and that other motorists on
Interstate 95 said they didn’t see
the bus get hit. Te ofcial said
police spoke to the tractor-trailer
driver, who said he was following
the bus.
Williams remained hospital-
ized in stable condition Sunday.
Driver, riders disagree
on cause of bus crash
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THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN
monday, march 14, 2011 www.kansan.com PaGE 1b
Kansan basketball beat writers Tim Dwyer and Mike Lavieri make predictions for the
NCAA tournament
Big 12 Bracket Bash
March MadneSS | 6B
Megan Singer/KanSan
Senior pitcher Nolan Mansfeld pitches against Eastern Michigan Saturday afternoon. The Jayhawks lost the contest 8-1.
Jayhawks
match
wins from
last season
Kansas vs.
arKansas
Where: Fayetteville, A.K.
Time: Tuesday, 3 p.m.
ballin’
Few FlawS in Big 12 triuMph
BY TIM DWYER
tdwyer@kansan.com
Tyshawn Taylor smiled and
shyly leaned away from the micro-
phone, staring down the table
at his coach with something in
between hope and cockiness in
his eyes.
Taylor had just said that he
hoped his 20-point, five-assist,
four-rebound performance was
good enough to prove “that I could
start for the rest of the time.”
Coach Bill Self smirked, obvi-
ously pleased with his mercurial
point guard’s outstanding perfor-
mance on the day, but unwilling
to be effusive in his praise with
Taylor in the room.
“Still had those two turnovers,”
Self said.
Self was, of course, joking, but
it was that kind of day for the
Jayhawks, where two turnovers on
an otherwise perfect stat line were
worth even a sarcastic mention.
In looking at the box score,
there’s little the
Jayhawks didn’t
do well. They
outrebounded
the fifth-best
r e b o u n d i n g
team in the
country. They
shot 57 percent
from the floor
and 41 percent
from three-
point range. They dominated the
battle inside, scoring 38 points in
the paint to Texas’ 18.
“When we play like that, it’s
going to be hard to stop us,” said
Marcus Morris, who was named
the tournament’s most outstand-
ing player after the game.
Basically, if there were flaws,
they were miniscule and very dif-
ficult to find. The Jayhawks got
their dream rematch with Texas,
the only team they had played and
not beaten, and they made the
most of it.
“It just happened the perfect
way for us to get them in the Big
12 Championship and for all the
marbles,” Morris said.
The Morris twins, who strug-
gled in the first meeting with
Texas, flourished with defensive
stalwart Tristan Thompson rel-
egated to the bench with foul
trouble. Thompson played just
11 minutes and his backups were
unable to hold the twins. Marcus
finished with 17 points and six
rebounds on 6-of-9 shooting,
while Markieff had 14 and nine
rebounds on 6-of-9 shooting.
And as efficient as the Jayhawks
were offensively, they may have
been better defensively.
“That was the best defense that
we played in a while,” Self said.
“We played the scouting report
very well.”
The Longhorns scored 73
points, nowhere near the few-
est Kansas has allowed this sea-
son, but the
high score
was more a
product of the
frenetic pace
than of any
particular effi-
ciency from
the Longhorns’
offense. Jordan
Hamilton —
who was a
member of the all-tournament
team alongside the Morris twins,
Colorado’s Alec Burks and Texas’
Thompson — led the Longhorns
with 21 points, but it took him 21
shots to get there.
“I thought we guarded in a
high-possession game,” Self said.
“Especially the first half. And I
think that set the tone for a lot
of things.”
— Edited by Amanda Sorell
Mike gunnoe/KanSan
Junior guardTyshawnTaylor goes up for a layup at the Sprint Center Saturday. Taylor led the Jayhawks with 20 points.
“When we play like that,
it’s going to be hard to
stop us.”
MArcus Morris
Junior forward
BY HANNAH WISE
hwise@kansan.com
Last season, the softball
team ended its season with a
21-35 record. This season the
team holds a 21-3 record after
five weeks of play. The team
went 4-0 in the North Florida
Tournament with victories
against Mount Saint Mary (3-2),
Alabama State (16-2 in five
innings), Delaware State (8-0 in
five innings) and North Florida
(2-1).
“We still had some of the same
struggles as last weekend,” coach
Megan Smith said. “We weren’t
as focused throughout the first
entire game. Today we did make
as many offensive adjustments
as we needed to, but overall
this weekend our pitchers did
extremely well and that was a
sofTball
See wins on page 10B
Kansas vs.
lipscomb
Where: conway, s. c.
Time: Firday, 9 a.m.
Jayhawks drop weekend series to Eastern Michigan
baseball
BY MIKE VERNON
mvernon@kansan.com
The Jayhawks walked away from
their three-game series against
Eastern Michigan at Hoglund
Ballpark disappointed after losing
two out of three games, including a
10-4 loss Sunday in a crucial third
game.
With conference play lurk-
ing around the corner, a victo-
ry Sunday would have given the
Jayhawks some major momentum
heading into conference play, as
well as boosting their record back
above .500.
After Saturday’s 8-1 loss to the
Eagles, coach Ritch Price con-
firmed that Sunday’s result could
be very important the rest of the
Jayhawks’ season.
“I think we’ll get tested tomor-
row,” Price said on Saturday. “We’ll
see if we can grow up and take a
step forward.”
One of the Jayhawks’ biggest
issues Saturday was their attitude
and lack of energy after giving up
an early lead. The Jayhawks gave
up three first inning runs and the
Eagles tacked on another three in
the fourth to take a 6-0 lead early
in the game.
Kansas appeared flat after giving
up the lead, and only managed to
scrape together five hits for one
run in the game.
“I didn’t think our body lan-
guage was very good from the sixth
inning on, and I don’t think we
were very competitive after we got
behind,” Price said.
While the Jayhawks failed to
take a step forward on the score-
board Sunday, losing 4-10, Price
felt the Jayhawks corrected some of
Saturday’s major issues.
“I was pleased with the energy in
our dugout today and the progress
we made offensively,” Price said.
The Jayhawks responded to
Saturday’s underwhelming effort
with 13 hits. While four runs for
13 hits isn’t a strong ratio, the
numbers at the plate were some
of the best Kansas has had all sea-
son. In game one of the series, the
Jayhawks posted a season-high 14
hits, as well.
“This weekend, I think we had
two games where we had over 10
hits, and that is a big confidence
booster,” senior outfielder Case
Lytle said. “We’re improving more
and more.”
One of the reasons the Jayhawks
could only muster four runs was
the three double plays the Jayhawks
grounded into. The Jayhawks also
left six men on base, three of whom
were left stranded by junior out-
fielder Jason Brunansky.
Junior first baseman Chris
Manship also hurt the Jayhawks
when he dropped a routine ball
at first base in the second inning.
The Eagles went on to take the lead
from Kansas later in the second,
scoring four runs.
The Jayhawks had four errors
in the game, and gave up up three
unearned runs. The starting pitch-
er, sophomore Tanner Poppe, had
a tough time recovering from the
defensive blunders giving up five
hits and five runs in five innings
pitched. Three of those five runs
were unearned. Poppe though, was
not one to make excuses.
“It was tough today, and they
were good hitters,” Poppe said. “I
just put myself in bad situations.”
While Poppe and the Jayhawks
didn’t come away with the results
they desired, coach Price said they
had no choice but to remain opti-
mistic and look forward.
— Edited by Amanda Sorell
Check out the softball rewind
for stats from the weekend
matches
reWind | 10b
Softball
Rewind
I
’m not a sports fan.
I care about and enjoy Kansas basketball,
but I’ll admit that the tiny amount about
it I do know, I learned from years of being
in the newsroom here at The Kansan. Even
worse, when I do watch, I have to admit I’m
horribly guilty of making terrible non-sports
junkie comments such as my infamous line
from Friday, “Oh, you rarely see Self in a gray
suit.”
I’m fully aware I’ll probably never live that
down.
It’s not that I’ve never played sports. In
fact, I’m a regional champion under-15
women’s sabre fencer. (So don’t try any Three
Musketeers moves, but do feel free to make
Princess Bride jokes.) I chalk up a lot of my
ignorance of red-blooded American football
to my teenage years, which were spent more
in northern England than here in the wonder-
ful land of Oz (and Dr. Naismith).
In England, I fell in love with a lot of
things. Most notably for the Morning Brew,
I fell in love with soccer, with the woefully
hopeful England team and with Manchester
City, the blue-clad loveable underdog of the
Premier League.
I saw at least snippets of every notable
League match from 2004 to 2008, plus, of
course, the terrible (for England) 2006 World
Cup — which is as much a mandated reli-
gion as the U.K. really has. And in the years
since, I’ve picked up following Man City
here and there, and kept up with the other
mandated spirituality, rooting against Nadal
at Wimbledon, but have been very much a
passive fan.
But something happened last week, I’m
happy to report, that finally spurred me back
out of my sports-ignorance funk. Sporting
KC, formerly the Wizards, an equally bad
name, announced it had sold the naming
rights of its still-under-construction stadium
in Kansas City, Kan., to the Livestrong foun-
dation.
Did I jump for joy because of corporate
sponsorship of a sports team? No. Even I
know that focusing on the business of sports
completely misses the point of the bliss of
being involved in the Beautiful Game (or bas-
ketball, the truly worldwide sport). What hap-
pened instead was that the news story caught
my attention and got me thinking about
Sporting’s chances.
I think they’re pretty good.
Don’t get me wrong, I’m still very, very
ignorant about the stats of the team, and
about the mechanics in the passion of follow-
ing it.
But I’m going to learn.
I’m going to learn because I’m excited
about the possibilities of rooting for the home
team, headquartered just a few blocks from
my family’s Wyandotte County home. The
team that has now what the Wizards really
didn’t — a lot of support, and a lot of buzz.
It’s not about Sporting’s slightly botched
rebranding (I recently overheard again the
very good point that “KC FC” would have
been the better choice, had it not already
been taken by a youth team) to try to make
it more European, nor about its branding of
its stadium. Nor is it about jumping on the
bandwagon of fellowship — I’ve managed to
live in the mecca of college basketball for four
years without going to a single game, a sin!
I know. It’s about the personal reawakening
of an interest, and a desire to get involved,
because the excitement is genuinely beneficial
for Kansas City — and by extension, those of
us here in Lawrence.
Sporting KC may turn out to be ter-
rible, new pitch or no new pitch, and I fear
American soccer may always be painfully
slow to my European-reared eyes, but I’ve
decided I don’t care. I’m going to throw myself
out there and try to become a real human
being — that is, someone who has the heart to
unabashedly love at least one or two sports.
I plan to read up and get smart(er) about
sports other than fencing (which is kick-ass,
FYI, if you’ve never seen it done well) because
I’ve tasted the fruit now. I’m incredibly excited
about getting the kick of being at least a sports
watcher, if not obsessive fan. I know I’m going
to have the privilege of cheering on the home-
town teams, which will forever be the best in
the world in my fellow fans’ eyes.
In the meantime, Rock Chalk Jayhawk.
And live strong, Sporting Kansas City. Live —
and play — strong.
2B / NEWS / MONDAY, MArch 14, 2011 / THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN / kANsAN.cOM
MoRNINg bREW
QUoTE oF THE DAY
“I just think that it just hap-
pened in a perfect way for us to
get them in the Big 12 champion-
ship and for all the marbles.”
— Junior forward Marcus Morris on play-
ing Texas in the championship.
FACT oF THE DAY
Marcus Morris is the sixth Jay-
hawk to win the Big 12 champi-
onship Most Outstanding Player
award.
— Kansas Athletics
TRIVIA oF THE DAY
Q: Name the other fve:
A: sherron collins in 2010, Bran-
don rush in 2008, Mario chalmers
in 2006, Jef Boschee in 1999 and
Paul Pierce in 1997 and 1998.
— Kansas Athletics
THIS WEEK IN
kANsAs AThLETIcs
ToDAY
There are no events scheduled
for today.
TUESDAY
baseball
vs. Arkansas
3 p.m.
Fayetteville, Ark.
WEDNESDAY
There are no events scheduled
for today.
THURSDAY
Swimming
NcAA championships
All day
Austin, Texas
FRIDAY
Softball
vs. Lipscomb University
9 a.m.
conway, s. c.
vs. Providence
11 a.m.
conway, s. c.
Swimming
NcAA championships
All day
Austin, Texas
baseball
vs. Oklahoma state
3 p.m.
Lawrence
Sports for the sports illiterate
By Alex GArrison
agarrison@kansan.com
By GeoFFrey CAlVerT
gcalvert@kansan.com
All six members of the Kansas
track and field team who com-
peted in the NCAA Indoor
Championships this weekend
in College Station, Texas, were
named All-Americans after fin-
ishing in the
top eight of
their events.
The Jayhawk
women tied for
30th with six
points, while
the men’s team
scored eight
points, good
for 26th place.
Sophomore
Mason Finley was the highest-
placing Jayhawk, taking second
in the shot put and losing to
BYU’s Leif Arrhenius by only
4.5 inches.
Freshman Diamond Dixon
competed in both the women’s
400 meters and the 4x400 meter
relay. Dixon broke the school
record in the 400 meters for the
third time in the Friday pre-
liminaries with a time of 53.06
seconds. In the
Saturday finals,
she ran her
third best mark
of the season,
53.32 seconds.
On Saturday,
Dixon anchored
the 4x400 meter
relay team
with sopho-
more Denesha
Morris, senior Kendra Bradley
and sophomore Taylor
Washington. They ran a school
record time of 3:34.05, finishing
seventh.
Sophomore Andrea Geubelle
was the sixth All-American for
the Jayhawks, placing eighth in
the women’s triple jump. Her
mark of 42 feet, 8.75 inches was
good for third best in school
history.
Both the men’s and wom-
en’s teams improved on their
final place at the 2010 Indoor
Championships. Last season,
the men finished in a tie for
40th and the women finished in
a tie for 46th.
The Jayhawks will begin their
outdoor season this Saturday in
Puerto Rico at the Mayaguez
Spring Classic.
— Edited by Amanda Sorell
TRACK & FIELD
Six players return from
Texas as All-Americans
CoLLEgE bASKETbALL
Duke wins third straight ACC title
CoLLEgE bASKETbALL
AssoCiATeD Press
GREENSBORO, N.C. — Add
another Atlantic Coast Confer-
ence championship to ffh-ranked
Duke’s record haul.
Nolan Smith had 20 points and
the Blue Devils ended No. 6 North
Carolina’s run of big comebacks at
the ACC tournament, beating the
Tar Heels 75-58 in Sunday’s cham-
pionship game.
Kyle Singler added 11 points for
the Blue Devils (30-4), who led the
entire way for a record 19th tourna-
ment title. In the frst meeting be-
tween the ferce rivals in the fnals
in a decade, second-seeded Duke
led by 18 points in the frst half and
never let the top-seeded Tar Heels
(26-7) build any momentum for a
third straight tournament escape.
North Carolina had rallied from
19 down in the fnal 10 minutes to
beat Miami on a last-play layup in
the quarterfnals, then rallied from
14 down to force overtime and beat
Clemson in the semifnals. Tis
time, however, the Tar Heels got no
closer than nine afer halfime as
the veteran Blue Devils maintained
frm control from the tip.
Te Blue Devils won their third
straight tournament and their 10th
in 13 years, putting them two ahead
of the Tar Heels in the all-time
standings.
Smith was named tournament
MVP afer overcoming a jammed
toe in the quarterfnals against
Maryland and fnishing with 10
assists, while Singler had a better
showing afer struggling mightily
against the Tar Heels in the two reg-
ular-season meetings. But on Sun-
day, the supporting cast backed up
Duke’s senior stars in a way it had
failed to do in last week’s loss to the
Tar Heels that gave North Carolina
the ACC regular-season title out-
right.
Seth Curry had 11 points, includ-
ing a crucial 3-pointer afer the Tar
Heels had pulled to within nine.
Ryan Kelly added another 3 a few
minutes later helped silence North
Carolina’s last-gasp push to get back
in it and fnished with nine points.
Duke shot 62 percent in the frst
half and 50 percent for the game.
Te Blue Devils shut down North
Carolina’s ofense and held the Tar
Heels to 34 percent shooting in a
dominant performance that could
put the reigning national champi-
ons in line for a No. 1 seed in the
NCAA tournament.
Harrison Barnes struggled to
get things going a day afer scor-
ing a tournament freshman record
40 points against Clemson, fnish-
ing with 16 points to lead the Tar
Heels.
Tyler Zeller had 14 points while
John Henson added 10 points and
18 rebounds, but North Carolina
never looked anything like the team
that had won 19 of 21 games and
handled the Blue Devils with rela-
tive ease in last week’s 81-67 vic-
tory.
Ten again, the Tar Heels never
looked like themselves in Greens-
boro at all.
Kentucky defeats
Florida 70-54 to win
SEC once again
ATLANTA — Te Kentucky
freshmen donned their champion-
ship caps, cut down the nets and
hopped around like this something
new to them.
Which, of course, it was.
For the Wildcats, though, this
was just business as usual at the
Southeastern Conference tourna-
ment.
Brandon Knight scored 17
points, Darius Miller hit two cru-
cial 3-pointers and No. 15 Ken-
tucky cruised to another SEC title,
routing regular-season champion
Florida 70-54 on Sunday.
“Te way my team is playing
right now, let’s have it! Come on!
Bring it!” coach John Calipari said
of the NCAA tournament. “Tis is
a very smart team. Te basketball
sense of this team, the savvy.”
Te 12th-ranked Gators (26-
7) had a miserable day shooting,
especially guards Kenny Boynton
and Erving Walker. Tey combined
to go 7 of 26 from the feld, their
woes epitomized in the closing
minutes when they put up back-to-
back airballs trying desperately to
bring Florida back.
Kentucky (25-8) streaked into
the NCAAs with its sixth straight
win, second straight SEC tourney
crown and 27th title overall —
more than every other school com-
bined.
— Associated Press
Sophomore Mason
Finley was the highest-
placing Jayhawk, tak-
ing second in the shot
put and losing only 4.5
inches.
A
one seed is just a title. Will
Kansas fall early in the
NCAA tournament, or go
all the way? Here’s a look at poten-
tial opponents on the road ahead.
First Round
(16) Boston University: I’m
Beantown-bred, but I hold no
qualms here. Jordan Juenemann
has a better chance at a double-
double than the Terriers’ chances of
beating the Jayhawks.
Second Round
(9) Illinois: Bill Self could be
taking on his former team in the
second round. Luckily, Self ’s with
us, so guys on par with Deron
Williams and Dee Brown cannot
be found. Point guard Demetri
McCamey has premier talent, but
lacks consistency.
(8) UNLV: Long gone is the
Tarkanian era, but the Runnin’
Rebels should not be taken lightly.
Their shaky offense is masked with
pesky man-to-man defense that
often installs full-court pressure.
And we all know that Kansas is
no lock to get past the second
round.
Sweet Sixteen
(13) Morehead State: Let’s get
this out of the way: this school is
a respected institution and not
a region of pubescent dreams.
I don’t think the Eagles have
enough scorers to get out of the
first round, but their .416 field-goal
defense could prove me wrong.
(12) Richmond: The Spiders pos-
sess an NBA-bound duo with point
guard Kevin Anderson and power
forward Justin Harper. They didn’t
beat anyone scary this season, but
they’ve got classic upset ingredients:
steady zone defense and rain show-
ers of threes.
(5) Vanderbilt: Every year, it
seems the Commodores are posi-
tioned with a similar seed, and
often fall to some hungry, smaller
school. Siena in 2008. Murray State
last year. I’m sensing a trend here.
(4) Louisville: Hidden beneath
the goliaths of the Big East, the
Cardinals can reach the Final Four
almost every year. Guard Preston
Knowles (no relation to Beyonce)
leads a turnover-inducing, three-
point firing squad that may pose
Kansas with its biggest threat.
Elite Eight (This writer
thinks Akron, St. Peter’s,
Southern California, Virginia
Commonwealth and Florida State
won’t be around.)
(7) Texas A&M: Those Aggies
were awfully bothersome in an ugly
64-51 victory at Allen Fieldhouse
on March 2. Their physical defense
must be matched with offense that
they usually struggle to find.
(6) Georgetown: The Hoyas are
another Big East beast, but guard
Chris Wright broke a bone in his
non-shooting hand. Will they fig-
ure it out without Wright or drop
in the early rounds?
(3) Purdue: The Boilermakers
again lost Robbie Hummel to a
knee injury, but they’ve still got
a dangerous senior duo with Big
Ten Player of the Year JaJuan
Johnson and E’Twaun Moore. If the
Jayhawks get this far, this is my bet
for the matchup.
(2) Notre Dame: With Ben
Hansbrough (brother of NBA for-
ward Tyler) at the helm, the Irish
are optimistic, but recent history
goes against them. They haven’t
won more than one tourney game
since 2003.
Final Four/Championship
Will it be Pittsburgh, Kansas
State, Duke, Connecticut, Texas,
Ohio State, Syracuse, North
Carolina or someone else? Here’s
hoping we even care in April.
— Edited by Emily Soetaert
By max rothman
mrothman@kansan.com
commentary
T
ad Boyle, Anthony Grant,
Randy Bennett and Seth
Greenberg won’t receive
apologies or explanations from
the NCAA Tournament selec-
tion committee.
Maybe they should, though.
Those four — who coach
Colorado, Alabama, Saint Mary’s
and Virginia Tech, respectively
— were widely acknowledged as
the biggest snubs in the NCAA
Tournament, glossed over in
favor of these last four teams:
USC, Virginia Commonwealth,
UAB and Clemson.
Greenberg canceled a press
conference he had scheduled on
Thursday night and Bennett told
local media that he was having
a hard time understanding how
his team wasn’t in the tourna-
ment field.
Kansas coach Bill Self had
plenty to say on behalf of Boyle
and the Buffaloes.
“You beat K-State three times
and Texas,” Self said about the
Buffaloes’ performance this sea-
son. “To me those are two teams
that have a chance to be Final
Four-type teams, and I think
that speaks for itself right there.
Somebody’s going to have a gripe
every year, but I would say, from
my standpoint, and I’m a little
biased, I would say Colorado
has a reason to gripe as much as
anybody.”
Colorado’s résumé is stronger
than most, but it’ll wind up on
the outside looking in after a
.500 season in the Big 12. The
Buffaloes are one of only 12
teams in the country to have a
winning record against teams in
the top 25 of the RPI.
“I thought they deserved to
be in,” Kansas guard Tyrel Reed
said. “They’re a great team.
They’ve got two elite scorers,
and they were playing really well
at the end.”
The Jayhawks had plenty of
time to comment on the plight of
some other schools — Self also
said he thought Texas would be
a two seed, when they wound
up as a four — because they
are camped comfortably atop the
Southwest region as the No. 1
seed. Along with them, Ohio
State, Pitt and Duke are the other
one seeds, with the Buckeyes
taking the top overall spot.
“I like my team a lot,” Self said,
“but Ohio State deserved to be
the number one overall seed. I
think they’ve been the most con-
sistent performing team. When
we play really well, I think you
can make a case for us, but we
haven’t been as consistent play-
ing to that level as they have.”
Throughout the selection
show, the camera cut to live
feeds of each team as it watched
the announcement. Most teams,
predictably, reacted with excite-
ment bordering on jubilation.
When the camera cut to Kansas,
though, there was scattered
applause, but the joy was muted.
“We’re all excited,” senior
guard Brady Morningstar said.
“We’ve just been through this
process a lot of times. We knew
we were going to be a one seed.”
— Edited by Helen Mubarak
By tim dwyer
tdwyer@kansan.com
commentary
What’s to come in NCAA
n0. 1 KanSaS

region: Southwest
Second round opponent: Boston
(Friday, march 18)

Coach Bill Self thought his team
was a lock for a No. 1 seed after
defeating Oklahoma State on
Thursday, and this was no sur-
prise. Kansas will be traveling to
Tulsa, Okla., before it potentially
moves on to San Antonio, where
it won the National Championship
in 2008. Kansas will most likely get by
Boston with ease, because a No. 16 seed
has never defeated a No. 1 seed. The Jayhawks
could see either No. 8 UNLV or No. 9 Illinois. This
is the third time in four years that UNLV is on the 8/9
line when Kansas is the No. 1 seed. It will be a sentimental
matchup if it is either team because former Jayhawk Quin-
trell Thomas is now a Running Rebel and sophomore
guard Elijah Johnson was recruited by UNLV. If Kan-
sas plays Illinois, then there’s the history of Self’s
former team.

no. 4 texaS

region: West
Second round opponent: oakland (Friday, march 18)

It is shocking to see Texas as a four seed, especially in the West
Region. A few weeks ago, before Texas lost three of its last fve
conference games, Texas was considered one of the best, if not
the best, team in the nation. After Saturday’s loss to Kansas, Texas
looked like a two seed, but the NCAA Selection Committee didn’t
see it that way. Texas has proven itself and
has what it takes to make it to the Final
Four.


no. 5 KanSaS State

region: Southeast
Second round opponent: Utah State (thurs-
day, march 17)

A fve seed might be a little generous. Kansas
State did fnish the season strong, but that might
be looked at a little too much. This team faces a
very senior-heavy Utah State squad, whose fans travel
very well. If the Wildcats do advance out of the Second Round, it will
most likely face Wisconsin, who defeated the No. 1 overall seed Ohio
State earlier in the season. Kansas State was lucky enough to
make it in after its start in conference play, but its stay in the
tournament might not be as long as it hoped.


no. 7 texaS a&m

region: Southwest
Second round opponent: Florida State
(Friday, march 18)

This seed is a little low. Texas A&M didn’t play
well down the stretch, but still won. It should re-
ally be the fve seed and Kansas State should be
the seven seed. Texas A&M will have a difcult
frst game against Florida State, but if
it does advance to the Third Round,
it will play a Notre Dame team that is
only 72 miles away from home. Texas
A&M will be able to slow down the tempo, which doesn’t
bode well for Notre Dame. Texas A&M played some great bas-
ketball against Missouri on Thursday in the quarterfnals of
the Big 12 Tournament and coach Mark Turgeon should be
pleased heading into the NCAAs.

no. 11 miSSoUri
region: West
Second round opponent: cincinnati (thursday, march 17)

Missouri was only 1-7 on the road in conference play and it will play
a conference caliber team in Cincinnati. The Bearcats are a tough team
to rebound against, but if the Tigers can control the tempo, they will
have the upper hand. The 11 seed is a little under-seeded, just like the
rest of the Big 12, except for Kansas, which was spot on, and Kansas
State, which was over-seeded. If Missouri wins, it will most likely face
Connecticut, which is coming of fve wins in fve days to capture the
Big East Conference Championship. UConn likes to play an up-tempo
game with Kemba Walker running the show. Missouri doesn’t have
anybody who will be able to guard him, making Missouri out in the
Third Round at the latest.

no. 1 colorado
region: nit

The Bufaloes got snubbed. Coach Tad Boyle said he was
shocked his team didn’t make it and that his players were devas-
tated. He isn’t concerned about Tad Boyle, Colorado Basketball or
the younger players on the team, but
is concerned for the seniors who nev-
er had the opportunity to play in the
big dance. This team should have
been in, considering it defeated
No. 5 Kansas State three times.
It had six wins against the RPI
Top 50. Many bracketolo-
gists had Colorado in, but
the NCAA Selection com-
mittee didn’t see eye-to-
eye. This team will most
likely be the favorite to
cut down the nets in New
York City, with Alec Burks
and Corey Higgins leading
the way.
— Mike Lavieri
Snubs deserve explanation
BRACKET BASH
6B / SPORTS / MONDAY, MArch 14, 2011 / THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN / kANsAN.cOM
2nd ROUND
March 17-18
2nd ROUND
March 17-18
3rd ROUND
March 19-20
3rd ROUND
March 19-20
SWEET 16
March 24-25
SWEET 16
March 24-25
ELITE EIGHT
March 26-27
ELITE EIGHT
March 26-27
FINAL FOUR
April 2
FINAL FOUR
April 2
NATIONAL
CHAMPIONSHIP
April 4
1 OSU
16 UTSA/ALST
8 GMU
9 VILL
5 WVU
12 UAB/CLEM
4 UK
13 PRIN
6 XAV
11 MARQ
3 SYR
14 INST
7 WASH
10 UGA
2 UNC
15 LIU
1 DUKE
16 HAMP
8 MICH
9 TENN
5 ARIZ
12 MEM
4 TEX
13 OAK
6 CIN
11 MIZZ
3 CONN
14 BUCK
7 TEM
10 PSU
2 SDSU
15 UNCO
1 KU
16 BU
8 UNLV
9 ILL
5 VAN
12 RICH
4 LOU
13 MORE
6 GTWN
11 USC/VCU
3 PUR
14 SPC
7 TA&M
10 FSU
2 ND
15 AKR
1 PITT
16 UNCA/UALR
8 BUT
9 ODU
5 KSU
12 USU
4 WIS
13 BEL
6 SJU
11 GONZ
3 BYU
14 WOF
7 UCLA
10 MSU
2 FLA
15 UCSB
Newark
Anaheim
San Antonio
New Orleans
Houston
EAST
WEST
SOUTHWEST
SOUTH EAST
2011 NATIONAL CHAMPION
Ohio State
Villanova
West Virginia
Kentucky
Marquette
Syracuse
Washington
North Carolina
Duke
Michigan
Arizona
Texas
Mizzou
UConn
Penn State
San Diego State
OSU
West Virginia
OSU
Syracuse
Syracuse
Washington
Michigan
Texas
Texas
Connecticut
UConn
SDSU
Kansas
UNLV
Vanderbilt
Louisville
Georgetown
Purdue
Texas A&M
Notre Dame
Pitt
Butler
Utah State
Wisconsin
St. John’s
BYU
UCLA
Florida
Kansas
Louisville
Purdue
Texas A&M
Pitt
Utah State
St. John’s
UCLA
Kansas
Purdue
Pitt
UCLA
OSU
Texas
Kansas
Pitt
OSU
Kansas
OSU
2nd ROUND
March 17-18
2nd ROUND
March 17-18
3rd ROUND
March 19-20
3rd ROUND
March 19-20
SWEET 16
March 24-25
SWEET 16
March 24-25
ELITE EIGHT
March 26-27
ELITE EIGHT
March 26-27
FINAL FOUR
April 2
FINAL FOUR
April 2
NATIONAL
CHAMPIONSHIP
April 4
1 OSU
16 UTSA/ALST
8 GMU
9 VILL
5 WVU
12 UAB/CLEM
4 UK
13 PRIN
6 XAV
11 MARQ
3 SYR
14 INST
7 WASH
10 UGA
2 UNC
15 LIU
1 DUKE
16 HAMP
8 MICH
9 TENN
5 ARIZ
12 MEM
4 TEX
13 OAK
6 CIN
11 MIZZ
3 CONN
14 BUCK
7 TEM
10 PSU
2 SDSU
15 UNCO
1 KU
16 BU
8 UNLV
9 ILL
5 VAN
12 RICH
4 LOU
13 MORE
6 GTWN
11 USC/VCU
3 PUR
14 SPC
7 TA&M
10 FSU
2 ND
15 AKR
1 PITT
16 UNCA/UALR
8 BUT
9 ODU
5 KSU
12 USU
4 WIS
13 BEL
6 SJU
11 GONZ
3 BYU
14 WOF
7 UCLA
10 MSU
2 FLA
15 UCSB
Newark
Anaheim
San Antonio
New Orleans
Houston
EAST
WEST
SOUTHWEST
SOUTH EAST
2011 NATIONAL CHAMPION
Ohio State
George Mason
West Virginia
Kentucky
Xavier
Syracuse
Washington
North Carolina
Duke
Michigan
Arizona
Texass
Missouri
Connecticut
Temple
San Diego State
OSU
Kentucky
OSU
UNC
Xavier
UNC
Duke
Texas
Duke
Connecticut
Connecticut
San Diego State
Kansas
UNLV
Vanderbilt
Morehead State
Georgetown
Purdue
Texas A&M
Notre Dame
Pitt
Butler
Utah State
Wisconsin
St. John’s
BYU
5UCLA
Florida
Kansas
Vanderbilt
Purdue
Texas A&M
Pitt
Wisconsin
St. John’s
UCLA
Kansas
Purdue
Wisconsin
St. John’s
OSU
Connecticut
Kansas
Wisconsin
OSU
Kansas
Kansas
— MIKE LAVIERI
— TIMDWYER
Basketball beat writers make NCAA predictions
BASEBALL REWIND
Friday Saturday Sunday
Kansas 8
Eastern Michigan 2
Kansas 1
Eastern Michigan 8
Kansas 4
Eastern Michigan 10
Game to Forget
Jason Brunansky in game 3
Brunansky struggled at the plate and on the feld in
Sunday’s game. The center dropped a deep fy ball
in the ffth inning, and went 0-5 at the plate, leaving
three men on base.
Brunansky
Key Game
Game 3
After splitting the frst two games, Eastern Michigan took the series,
beating Kansas 10-4. Both teams hit well at the plate, but Eastern
Michigan’s 14 hits and 10 runs were too much as the Eagles took game
3, 10-4. BY ALEC TILSON
atilson@kansan.com
After Eastern Michigan bat-
tered the Kansas baseball team
this weekend, winning decisively
in two of three ballgames, the
Jayhawks found themselves in
limbo. The Jayhawks, a week away
from conference play, are search-
ing for an identity, some charac-
ter-defining aspect of its makeup.
After falling behind 6-0 in the
fourth inning on Saturday, coach
Ritch Price didn’t see the fight he
expected from his team, and said
he didn’t think they were very
competitive. Which could be why
there was no walk-up music for
hitters or pitchers on Sunday, a
unique and individual privilege
usually allowed players.
To find that toughness, it’s only
natural to look to the upperclass-
men to demonstrate that grind-it-
out mentality.
“Any time you put your col-
lege baseball team together, you’re
counting on the upperclassmen
on your roster to carry your club,”
Price said.
Much of that pressure sits on
the seniors in the lineup: short-
stop Brandon Macias and out-
fielders Jimmy Waters and Casey
Lytle. Given that this team does
not have the pop last year’s roster
had, the process of scoring runs
has required patience and maybe
more creativity.
It’s no surprise, then, that
opposing pitching this year differs
from a year ago; the team did lose
139 RBI and three bats that hit
above .330. With that protection
gone, it’s been a struggle to figure
out opposing pitchers.
“It’s just a process,” Waters said.
“I’m not being pitched the same.
This year, I work into a 2-0 count
and I’m geared up to hit a fastball,
I get a changeup. So it’s just been
adjusting to that.”
Macias, Waters and Lytle are
in the lineup every day — Macias
sat one game against Southern
Utah — and are adjusting to the
added weight. If they were in the
choir last year, this year they’ve got
lead roles.
This series showed positive
signs for each of them. Lytle had
five hits, Macias had four and
Waters three. They combined for
two runs, but did not manage any
RBI.
Lytle admits, as a senior and a
leader, that the other details, apart
from swinging the bat, matter just
the same.
“When things aren’t going your
way, you want to make sure you
show every day that you still got
that confidence and that little bit
of swagger in you,” he said.“When
you come to park every day, those
younger kids can learn that, OK,
he might have had a bad day yes-
terday, but he’s coming in here
every day playing hard on defense,
running the bases hard and doing
everything else he needs to do.”
Senior starting pitchers T.J.
Walz and Wally Marciel shoulder
the same expectations of leading
a team that, as Price put it, is “not
very mature yet.”
Walz (2-2) did his job as the
Friday starter by allowing two
runs. He struck out 10 batters
and walked just one, but the
Jayhawks could not build on that
momentum. Marciel (2-2), who
was chased in the fourth inning on
Saturday, is keeping a level head
about the weekend.
“You’ve just got to learn from
it,” he said. “You can’t really dwell
on it too much. That’s how you
get better — you learn from your
mistakes.”
— Edited by Amanda Sorell
Quote of the Weekend
“When you’re going bad everything gets magnifed.
We just have to keep the right approach, we’ve got
to be professional and we’ll get better and we’ll play
through it.”
— Coach Ritch Price on dropping two of three games this
weekend.
Price
Stat of the Weekend
The number of hits the two teams combined for in Sun-
day’s series fnale. Kansas had 13 of them, but only four
men crossed the plate in a six-run loss.
27
Series Notes
Senior pitcher T.J. Walz struck out 10 batters on Friday, his frst 10 K
performance since April 30 last year versus Oklahoma State.
Sophomore infelder Jake Marasco blasted his frst career home run on
Friday. He leads the team with a .389 batting average.
Senior pitcher Wally Marciel gave up back-to-back home runs to
Eastern Michigan’s Kyle Peterson and Ken Battison, part of a three-run
inning that buried the Jayhawks.
Game to Remember
Daniel Russell in game 3
The Eagles left felder went 4-5 in the crucial third
game of the series. Russell also had four RBIs and one
run, contributing to fve of the Eagles 10 runs on the
day.
Russell
Team looks to seniors for strength
BaSeBall
Aaron Harris/KAN-
SAN
1) Senior outfeld-
er Jimmy Waters
swings at a ball
during the game
against Eastern
Michigan Sunday
afternoon at
Hoglund Ballpark.
Kansas lost the
game 10-4.
2) Sophomore
catcher Alex De-
Leon takes of his
batting gloves.
3) Junior out-
felder Jason
Brunansky looks
back as he misses
a catch.
2
1
3
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KANSAN.COM / THe UNIVeRSITY DaIlY KaNSaN / MONdAy, MARCH 14, 2011 / SPORTS / 7B
MEN'S BASKETBALL REWIND
48 | 37 — 85 Kansas
33 | 40 — 73 Texas
Jayhawk Stat Leaders
Points Rebounds Assists
Morningstar
6
Robinson and Mk. Morris
9
Taylor
20
Texas
Kansas
Player FG-FGA 3FG-3FGA Rebs A Pts
Markief Morris 6-9 1-3 9 2 14
Marcus Morris 6-9 1-2 6 2 17
Tyshawn Taylor 7-10 2-2 4 5 20
Brady Morningstar 5-7 1-2 1 6 13
Tyrel Reed 4-12 2-6 7 1 11
Thomas Robinson 5-7 0-0 9 3 10
Elijah Johnson 0-0 0-0 0 0 0
Mario Little 0-3 0-1 1 0 0
Josh Selby 0-1 0-1 1 0 0
Totals 33-58 7-17 38 19 85
8B / SPORTS / Monday, MaRch 14, 2011 / THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN / kanSan.coM
Kansas 85, texas 73
Player FG-FGA 3FG-3FGA Rebs A Pts
Gary Johnson 1-9 0-0 9 2 4
Tristan Thompson 3-4 0-0 2 0 7
Jordan hamilton 9-21 1-8 7 2 21
dogus Balbay 0-0 0-0 0 1 0
cory Joseph 5-14 2-4 3 2 14
Jai Lucas 3-4 0-0 1 2 6
J’covan Brown 5-12 4-8 4 1 17
alexis Wangmene 1-1 0-0 1 0 4
Matt hill 0-1 0-0 3 2 0
Totals 27-66 7-20 33 12 73
Mike Gunnoe/KANSAN
Senior guard Brady Morningstar fghts for a loose ball while junior guardTyshawnTaylor tries to call timeout. Morningstar had six assists.
Mike Gunnoe/KANSAN
Senior guardTyrel Reed is fouled while going up for a basket in the second half. Reed scored 11
points in the game.
Mike Gunnoe/KANSAN
Sophomore forwardThomas Robinson attempts to lay the ball up Saturday at the Sprint Center.
Kansas defeatedTexas to improve to 32-2 for the season.
Mike Gunnoe/KANSAN
The men’s basketball teamcelebrates their victory over Texas for the Big 12 Championships title. It was their ffth conference tournament title under head coach Bill Self.
Mike Gunnoe/KANSAN
Junior guardTyshawnTaylor is fouled while going up for a shot in the second half Saturday. Kansas
shot 12 for 18 at the line.
Mike Gunnoe/KANSAN
Junior guardTyshawnTaylor makes a one-handed dunk of of a steal Saturday against Texas.
Taylor fnished with 20 points in the game.
KANSAN.COM / THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN / MONdAy, MArCh 14, 2011 / SPORTS / 9B
“Tonight he was fabulous. I mean, he
played like a point guard should play.
he initiated. he fnished when he
needed to.”
—Bill Self on Tyshawn Taylor
Elijah Johnson
Not only did Johnson lose his starting job
to Tyshawn Taylor, he also played fewer min-
utes in the last two games of the tournament
than Josh Selby, as well. Selby didn’t respond
with good minutes for the Jayhawks, so
there’s a defnite chance that Johnson is
at least the No. 2 point guard in the NCAA
Tournament. But considering where he was a
week ago, competition for the backup spot is
not where he wanted to be.
Tyshawn Taylor
Taylor was excellent against Colo-
rado in the semifnals, but that game
didn’t hold a candle to his performance
against Texas in the championship game.
Taylor fnished with 20 points, fve assists
against two turnovers and four rebounds
in what was arguably his best perfor-
mance as a Jayhawk. he played well
enough to make the ballot of at least one
all-tournament voter I spoke with.
Tournament to remember
Tournament to forget
Key stats
Taylor
Self
Prime plays
Johnson
Quote of the night
Notes
Kansas has won eight Big 12 Championship titles. •
Kansas was 4-0 at the Sprint Center this season. •
Kansas has 32 victories in four of its last fve seasons. •
Kansas had six players score in double fgures,
led by Tyshawn Taylor’s 20.
6
Kansas won the rebounding battle 38-33 against
the ffth-best rebounding team in the country. 38-33
Kansas scored 1.25 points per possession, the
most Texas has allowed all season. 1.25
FIRST HALF
15:18 — A Tyrel reed three pointer is followed by a Marcus Mor-
ris three pointer. (14-9)
12:49 — Thomas robinson goes up and under for a pretty
layup. It was very NBA-esque. (19-13)
12:25 — Tyrel reed has his frst dunk of his college career when
he streaks down the court on the fast break and throws it down
with his right hand. he modestly runs back on defense with no
celebration. (21-13)
5:42 — Brady Morningstar blocks a Jordan hamilton shot and
then on the ofensive end buries a three pointer. (37-23)
4:14 — Marcus Morris blocks a Corey Joseph layup that leads
to an emphatic dunk by Tyshawn Taylor. Texas is forced to call a
timeout. (39-23)
0:07 —With seconds remaining in the half, Tyshawn Taylor
drives hard to the basket and makes a layup, giving Kansas a
15-point lead at halftime. (48-33)
BY MIKE LAVIERI
mlavieri@kansan.com
KANSAS CITY, Mo. —
Redemption is spelled: Big 12
champions.
After Friday’s 90-83 semifinal
victory against Colorado, some
Jayhawks didn’t care whether they
faced Texas or Texas A&M. But if
they had to choose, they wanted
Texas. They wanted to avenge the
loss earlier in the season.
Kansas improved to 8-1 in the
championship game after an 85-73
victory against Texas, which fell to
0-5 in the championship game.
On Jan. 22, Texas went into
Allen Fieldhouse and snapped
Kansas’ 69-game winning streak
with a 74-63 victory, a day after
sophomore forward Thomas
Robinson’s mother Lisa died.
Junior guard Tyshawn Taylor
said that the team’s attention span
was somewhere else. He said the
team knew it had a game the next
day, but the focus was on more
important things.
“Our focus for that game kind
of dropped a little bit,” Taylor said,
“We were fully focused for this
game.”
Junior forward Marcus Morris
didn’t want to make an excuse,
but said that the first game wasn’t
a fluke and that the team wasn’t a
full strength.
“Since the loss we’ve been talk-
ing about that we really wanted
another shot at them, because a
lot of people have been saying that
they were the best team in the Big
12,” Morris said.
Well, Kansas proved their
doubters wrong, even though it
didn’t have many. Kansas won its
seventh Big 12 regular season con-
ference title in a row after Texas
lost three of its last five games of
the season. Three of the last five?
Doesn’t sound like the best team
in the conference.
Morris’ brother Markieff said he
needed to back up the talk about
wanting Texas. He did by scoring
14 points on 6-of-9 shooting and
he grabbed nine rebounds. All the
while, he was one of two Jayhawks
and four on the floor to be named
to the Big 12 All-Championship
team.
“Texas beat us,” Markieff said.
“That was enough for us to back
the talk up, for us to come out and
play the way we played today.”
Coach Bill Self said that this
was probably the best defense
Kansas has played in a while.
“I think that we’re getting it
together,” Self said. “I didn’t think
our defense against Colorado was
any good last night. I thought
against Okie State and Missouri
and A&M it was much better and
tonight was probably the best we
played defensively in rebounding
the ball, considering that was a
big-boy game and there’s men out
there playing.”
— Edited by Brittany Nelson
MEN’S BASKETBALL REWIND CONTINUED
Kansas scored 38 points in the paint to Texas’ 18.
38-18
Kansas had just 10 bench points, all from Thomas
robinson. 10
— BY TIMDWYER
— BY MIKE LAVIERI
bIg 12
Championship victory redeems earlier loss
SEcOND HALF
7:11 —Markief Morris throws a dunk down directly of a missed shot
by Marcus. (68-55)
3:15 — Thomas robinson comes fying across the right side of the lane
and puts a missed shot back up on the left side of the basket with his
left hand. (75-63)
1:25 — Marcus Morris looks to be shooting a turn-around jumper but
instead fnds Markief for the ally-oop. (79-67)
1:11 — The rock Chalk Chant is as loud as it is at Allen Fieldhouse. The
fans know that Kansas has earned its redemption. (81-67)
Mike Gunnoe/KANSAN
Junior guardTyshawnTaylor is all smiles while watching the year in reviewvideo after the game.
Kansas defeatedTexas for the Big 12 Championship title.
check out the photo gallery of Kansas’ victory at
kansan.com/photos/galleries
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Sophmore guardTravis Releford, freshman guard Josh Selby, sophomore guard Elijah Johnson and sophomore forwardThomas Robinson celebrate as the Jayhawks lengthened their lead in the fnal of
the Big 12 Championships. The Jayhawks defeated the Longhorns 85-73.
10B / SPORTS / MONDAY, MArch 14, 2011 / THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN / kANsAN.cOM
SOFTBALL REWIND
Friday Saturday Sunday
kansas 3
Mount st. Mary’s 2
kansas 16
Alabama state 2
kansas 2
North Florida 1
Game to Remember
Senior catcher Brittany Hile, Junior outfelder Liz
Kocon, freshman utility Kendra Cullum
Saturday: Kansas 6, Alabama State 2
Each hit a home run saturday in the
Jayhawks 18-2 win against Alabama
state. It was cullum’s frst career
home run. hile has nine homers this
season and her 19th career home
run. kocon’s home run was her sixth
this season and her 20th career.
kocon
Game to Forget
Ashley Newman, freshman shortstop
Friday: Kansas 2, Minnesota 1
Newman bobbled a ground ball against North
Florida, allowing the only UNF run of the contest.
Newman
Key Game
Friday’s game against Mount saint Mary showed the Jayhawks’ ability
to rally together to get a win. The ofense was stagnant until the sixth
frame when all three kansas runs were scored. Freshman pitcher kristin
Martinez and senior pitcher Allie clark kept saint Mary’s to only six hits
and two runs.
Game 1
kansas 8
Deleware state 0
Game 2
strength for us this weekend.”
The Jayhawk pitchers held strong
throughout the weekend, striking
out 25 batters and allowing only 12
hits. The offense also performed
well throughout the weekend, out-
scoring its opponents 29-5.
Playing against Mount Saint
Mary Friday, the offense did not
get going until the sixth inning.
Junior outfielder Liz Kocon led off
with a single followed by a double
from sophomore infielder Mariah
Montgomery. Freshman outfielder
Elsa Moyer came in as a pinch run-
ner for Kocon and freshman utility
Marisa Malazzo did the same for
Montgomery.
Montgomery’s hit allowed Moyer
to advance to third, then an errant
throw allowed Moyer to score a run
at home plate. Sophomore outfield-
er Maggie Hull stepped up next
and hit a single, allowing Malazzo
to advance. Then a bunt by sopho-
more outfielder Rosie Hull brought
Malazzo home. Maggie stole third
and then scored off a bunt by fresh-
man utility Kendra Cullum.
The team showed its full poten-
tial Saturday, outscoring opponents
24-2 on the day against Alabama
State and Delaware State. Both con-
tests ended in five innings because
of the run rule. Senior pitcher Allie
Clark pitched a complete game
shutout, giving up one run and one
walk but striking out four batters.
Against Alabama State, nine dif-
ferent Jayhawks recorded a com-
bined season-high 18 hits. Senior
catcher Brittany Hile, Kocon and
Cullum each recorded a home run.
It was Cullum’s first career round-
tripper.
“We literally batted all the way
through our lineup like three
innings in a row,” Rosie Hull said.
“Everyone was hitting and it was
just so much fun. It was like hit
after hit after hit and we were all
really excited in the dugout.”
In Sunday’s game against North
Florida, freshmen pitchers Kristin
Martinez and Clark kept the
Ospreys from becoming an offen-
sive threat. Martinez pitched the
first four and one third innings,
allowing one run, five hits and no
walks.
Clark entered in scoreless relief
in the fifth. She allowed one hit
while picking up her first save of
the year. She struck out three of
ten batters.
“I think going 4-0 for a tour-
nament again is just great and
each game we played as a team
this weekend,” Hile said. “We had
everything going, our defense, our
offense, pitching, everythin. It was
a complete team effort.”
The weekend showed a return
of the powerful team that was 10-0
during the first two weekends of
the season. The players are work-
ing together to generate runs and
outs that lead to wins. This season’s
team has matched the total win
record from the previous season
after only five weeks.
The difference between last sea-
son and this season is due to the
coaching staff changing the pro-
gram’s atmosphere during the fall
and the winter.
“We really have made it a point
to work extremely hard and expect
to win and go out there every game
expecting and wanting to win and
not expecting anything less,” Smith
said. “I think we have a lot of young
players, which has helped us. We
have a lot of new talent and a lot of
depth in the pitching circle, which
has helped us as well.”
— Edited by Helen Mubarak
WINS (continued from 1b)
Some Numbers Quote of the Weekend
“I think going 4-0 for a tournament again is just great
and each game we played as a team this weekend.
We had everything going, our defense, our ofense,
pitching, everything it was a complete team efort.”
— senior catcher Brittany Hile
hile
Player of the Tournament
Senior pitcher Allie Clark
clark struck out 11 batters on the weekend and did
not allow any runs. she pitched a complete game
shutout against Delaware state and is now 8-1 from
the circle.
The number of wins from this season and last
weekend 21
Weeks it took to acquire 21 wins this season
5
Losses this season compared to 35 last season 3
runs scored on saturday when the Jayhawks
defeated Alabama state 16-2 and Delaware state
8-0
24
INDIANAPOLIS — Jared
Sullinger had 15 points and 11
rebounds and No. 1 Ohio State
defeated Penn State 71-60 in the
Big Ten tournament final on
Sunday to strengthen its case for
the No. 1 overall seed in the
NCAA tournament.
Sullinger, the tournament’s
most outstanding player, aver-
aged 16.3 points and 14 rebounds
in the tournament to help the top-
seeded Buckeyes (32-2) repeat as
champions.
William Buford scored 18
points and Jon Diebler added 15
for the Buckeyes, who also won
the league’s regular-season title.
Talor Battle scored 24 points
and Jeff Brooks added 19 for Penn
State (19-14), which reached the
final for the first time.
The Nittany Lions haven’t
reached the NCAA tournament
since 2001. Penn State was trying
to become the first team since
Iowa in 2001 to win four consec-
utive games to claim the title.
The Buckeyes won their sev-
enth straight game and became
the second team in conference
history to play in the final for
three straight years. They became
the first repeat tournament cham-
pion since Michigan State in 1999
and 2000, and both of those teams
reached the Final Four.
— ASSOCIATEDPRESS
Sullinger leads No. 1
Ohio State in Big 10
COLLEGE BASKETBALL
After two losses, victorious weekend at home
LACROSSE
clark
BY BLAKE SCHUSTER
bschuster@kansan.com
In front of a small crowd, the KU
lacrosse team put on a huge perfor-
mance this weekend with blowout
victories against St. Cloud State
and Arkansas at Lawrence High
School.
The Jayhawks, who played their
first two home games of the season
during the weekend, had a com-
bined weekend score of 35-10.
On Friday afternoon the
Jayhawks (3-4) bullied St. Cloud
State (0-1) for an 18-7 victory.
Francis Enright, senior from
Winnetka, Ill., led Kansas again
in scoring with four goals and five
assists.
“We were just laxin’ and junk
and were able to put it together for
a good game,” Enright said.
Enright also attributed his per-
formance to his teammates, calling
Vincent Santucci, a senior from
Wichita, the best passer he has ever
played with.
It was a quality victory for the
Jayhawks, who were coming off two
demoralizing losses in Colorado
last weekend.
Kansas had the day off Saturday
and returned to the turf on Sunday
to take on division rival Arkansas
(1-3).
The Jayhawks caught fire early
and scored often, entering halftime
with an 8-2 lead.
Again, Enright led the Jayhawks
in scoring with five goals and one
assist. He now has 42 points on
the season and is averaging 4.67
a game.
Enright was particularly impres-
sive in the second half when he
scored after pulling off a spin move
to juke a Razorback defender and
streak right to the net where he
sniped the goalie.
With four games left before the
playoffs, Enright will need to finish
as strong as he started the season
if he hopes to pass his career high
point total of 53 from last season.
Toward the end of the game,
Kansas coach Dennis Shults put
in back-up goalie Ryan Mattie, a
senior from Overland Park, at the
attack position.
“I told him since he wouldn’t be
in net today that if we got up 12
goals I’d put him in,” Shults said.
The Jayhawks kept feeding
Mattie the ball in hopes that he
would score a goal, but he wasn’t
able to put one in the net.
Kansas ended up demolishing
Arkansas with a final score of 17-3.
The victory keeps the Jayhawks
undefeated in the Great Rivers
Lacrosse Conference, and makes
them 5-4 overall this year.
On the whole, the weekend went
very well for the Jayhawks. Shults
said he was very satisfied with his
team’s play, with their only problem
being too many penalties.
“We got to rotate all of our play-
ers this weekend, so from a team
standpoint, the weekend went real-
ly well,” Shults said.
The Jayhawks have three weeks
off and will return to play versus
divisional rival Nebraska on April
2 in Lawrence.
— Edited by Amanda Sorell
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