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COLLEGE OF HEALTH DEPARTMENT OF EXERCISE AND SPORT SCIENCE

ESS 4387/6387: Resistance Training for Health and Rehabilitation


Course Syllabus Fall 2012
Note: This syllabus has been prepared according to the Syllabus Guidelines 2008 recommended by the Undergraduate Council of the University of Utah. It is not a binding legal contract. It may be modified by the instructor when students are given reasonable notice of the modification, particularly when the modification is done in consultation with students to rectify an error that would disadvantage the students. COURSE INFORMATION LOCATION: TIME: CREDITS: PREREQUISITES: Online Varies 3 credit hours ESS 3091 Physiology of Fitness or equivalent or permission of the instructor. This course is designed for advanced undergraduate and beginning graduate students. Accommodations may be made for undergraduates without the prerequisite experience and advanced graduate students (please consult with instructor for arrangements). http://learn-uu.uen.org

Canvas:

INSTRUCTOR INFORMATION NAME: Ryan D. Burns, MS., CSCS*D OFFICE: Sport Pedagogy and Physical Activity Assessment Laboratory HPER-West OFFICE HOURS: Monday 1pm-3pm, Friday 1pm-3pm PHONE: (801) 695-5693 E-MAIL ryan.d.burns@utah.edu (preferred) NAME: OFFICE: OFFICE HOURS: OFFICE PHONE: FAX: EMAIL: James E. (Jay) Graves, Ph.D. Room 200 HPR N Wednesday 11:00 AM 12:00 Noon, Thursday 9 AM 10:00 AM, and by appointment (preferred) (801) 581-8537 (801) 581-5580 james.graves@hsc.utah.edu (Canvas email preferred)

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HOME PHONE:

(801) 277-7094 (no calls between 10 p.m. and 7 a.m. please)

COURSE DESCRIPTION This course will review the physiology of acute and chronic resistance exercise (strength training) and present the application (prescription) of resistance exercise for a variety of populations. The main focus of the course will be the influence of resistance training on health, disease and injury prevention, and the prescription of resistance exercise for the rehabilitation of clinical populations experiencing acute injury and chronic disease and disability. In addition, the course will provide a foundation in the knowledge of resistance exercise for graduate students who will be conducting academic research in related areas. Beginning midsemester, content will be devoted to the epidemiology and pathophysiology of various diseases or conditions under consideration as well as the application of resistance exercise to individuals with that disease or condition and the influence of resistance exercise on the underlying pathophysiology. Course content will be delivered online and through directed reading and independent study. Online learning will be accomplished via Canvas. COURSE OBJECTIVES (Learning Outcomes) Upon successful completion of this course you will be able to: List the primary professional certifications related to the prescription of exercise Describe the physiology of acute and chronic resistance exercise and how resistance exercise influences neuromuscular, metabolic, cardiovascular, pulmonary, and endocrine function and body composition Employ the current guidelines for the prescription of resistance exercise in healthy populations and illustrate the development of these guidelines from a historical perspective Recognize and apply the unique applications and influences of resistance exercise in the following populations: children women elderly and severely deconditioned persons injured athletes persons exercising for weight control Describe the pathophysiology of and the unique applications and influences of resistance exercise on the following chronic visceral diseases and disabilities: coronary heart disease (CHD) hypertension and stroke solid organ transplants chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) diabetes mellitus physical disabilities arthritis low back pain (LBP) and dysfunction osteoporosis renal disease

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cancer, HIV, and AIDS List the safety considerations and limitations of resistance exercise and resistance exercise training in these populations Develop and evaluate a resistance exercise prescription for these conditions Present the current guidelines for the prescription of resistance exercise and the influence of resistance exercise on pathophysiology in a clinical population of interest to you. TEACHING METHODS This is a web-based (online) course that uses readings, reflection, discussion, online resources, written assignments and interactive instruction. This course emphasizes the application of resistance exercise to a variety of populations using different online tools, approaches, and resources. COURSE PHILOSOPHY AND REQUIREMENTS The course structure is based on a philosophy of self-directed learning. This online course is designed in an asynchronous format to provide students with flexibility in managing their learning. Asynchronous means that there is no requirement for students to be present in a physical classroom location or online at a specific time. Requirements for the course have been established on a weekly basis and you may fulfill these requirements at your convenience during the week. Students of exercise science and exercise professionals are often called upon to design specific exercise programs for a variety of individuals. Exercise program design is referred to as exercise prescription and considers many factors including the fitness level of the participant, family history and medical status, personal goals and objectives, and available resources. The design and structure of this course (discussion, personal reflection, group assignment, and research/application paper) have been chosen to develop skill in prescribing exercise (specifically resistance exercise) to a variety of populations (including those with chronic visceral disease and disability) and in communicating the components of the exercise prescription to these populations. Students electing to take online courses should possess a high level of initiative, autonomy and ability to work independently. Time management and organizational skills are essential to the successful completion of an online course. Weekly discussion postings are due on Sundays at 11:55 PM. Other assignments will have specific due dates and times. To promote effective time management, no late assignments will be accepted unless prior arrangements have been made with the instructor. The course is divided into six parts: Part I: Welcome and Introduction to Course Part II: Introduction to Resistance Training Part III: Special Populations and Conditions Part IV: Chronic Visceral Diseases Part V: Chronic Physical Disabilities Part VI: From Theory to Practice

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PARTICIPATION IN DISCUSSION This course uses online discussions to facilitate interaction and idea sharing. Typically, participation in online discussions is based on posted responses and replies (Dawley, 2007). For this course, a response is defined as a discussion board posting that addresses the specific discussion topic and a reply is defined as a discussion board posting that addresses a posting of another student or the instructor. For this course, responses are required, replies are very encouraged, but optional. Participation points for responses are assigned as follows: Full credit (5 points): thoroughly addresses each part of the discussion instructions or question; is effectively organized; displays correct grammar and spelling; shows evidence of critical thinking; and meets the required deadline. Partial credit (2 - 3 points): posting is complete but does not meet the full credit requirements. Zero credit (0 points): no posting (participation) on the assigned discussion topic. PERSONAL REFLECTION (WEEKLY ELECTRONIC JOURNAL) Each student enrolled in the course will keep their own electronic journal. This is a place to identify lessons learned, important points to remember, ideas for the application of course material, new questions or ahas!. You are expected to contribute at least one entry to your journal each week, beginning the second week of the course. In contrast to the discussion postings, the journal entries may be casual and written in your own style. Here are some areas to help get started (adapted from Kelly, 2007, p. 250): Key points I would like to remember from this reading or online activity. New questions that I have as a result of this reading or online activity. Ways I can use the information from this reading or online activity. How the information from this reading or online activity helps to explain a situation that I have observed or experienced.

Credit is given as follows: Full credit (5 points): the presence of a weekly entry Zero credit (0 points): no entry. At the end of the course, journal points will be totaled and entered into the grade book. You may keep your journal for future use. QUIZZES There will be four quizzes that cover the reading and discussion material (Parts II V) during the semester. Quizzes are open book and may be completed at any time during the week that they are delivered. You may discuss the quiz with your fellow students (in fact it is encouraged). An online chat room will be created during the week of the quiz for this purpose.

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GROUP ASSIGNMENT Small discussion groups created early in the semester will have an opportunity to collaborate on a group assignment. The group will collectively revise a case statement pertaining to the prescription of resistance exercise for the prevention and treatment of a specific disease or condition. Each group member is expected to make one contribution to the revision. Each group member will earn the collective grade for the group on this assignment. Instructions for the format of the group assignment will be provided during the semester. RESEARCH/APPLICATION PAPER Each member of the class will independently research a specific disease or condition that can benefit from the application of resistance exercise. Graduate students (ESS 6387) will then develop a research idea to add new knowledge to the field. Undergraduate students (ESS 4387) will develop a specific exercise prescription for the chosen topic. Papers submitted will be approximately three to five double spaced typewritten pages in length. Instructions for the format of these papers will be provided during the semester. ASSIGNMENT POLICY Assignments must be submitted or posted to Canvas by 11:55 PM on the day they are due. Late assignments will not be accepted unless prior arrangements have been made with the instructor. ATTENDANCE POLICY Attendance is not required for this class. Participation online is required

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COURSE EVALUATION Participation in Discussion Weekly Journal Entries Quizzes (4 @ 10 % ea.) Group Assignment Research/Application Paper 30 % 10 % 40 % 10 % 10 % 100 %

Total Points:

GRADES will be based on a percentage of the total points possible: 93.0% = A, 90.0% - 92.9% = A-, 87.0% - 89.9% = B+, 83.0% - 86.9% = B, 80.0% - 82.9% = B-, 77.0% - 79.9% = C+, 73.0% - 76.9% = C, 70.0% - 72.9% = C-, 67.0% - 69.9% = D+, 63.0% - 66.0% = D, 60.0% 62.9% = D-, below 60.0% = E. COMMUNICATION Announcements. The announcement feature in Canvas will be used to broadcast messages intended for everyone enrolled in the course. You should check for new announcements on a regular basis and whenever you log in to Canvas. Discussions. The discussion board feature in Canvas will be used for online discussions about specific topics; as a place to post questions and answers between students and faculty; and a place for students to communicate with each other. Email. Please use Canvas email, not Outlook, to communicate with the instructor. Outlook may be used if Canvas is down on campus. Use email if a message is private in nature. Check your email frequently since this is the primary means of direct communication. Students should check for new email on a regular basis and whenever they log in to Canvas. Responses from the instructor. Unless otherwise noted you may expect a response from the instructor within 48 hours. Phone/Personal appointment. Although this is an online course the instructor is available for inperson communication. If you have questions or need clarification after reviewing the online instructions and material or simply feel the need to meet in person, please do no hesitate to contact the instructor. You may drop by my office during regularly scheduled office hours (please call first to confirm that my schedule has not changed for that day). You may also schedule a phone or inperson appointment via Canvas email or calling Nancy Parker, my Executive Assistant, at (801) 581-8537.

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ONLINE GUIDELINES There are unique responsibilities that come with taking a course with an online component. Electronic or equipment failure: It is your responsibility to maintain your computer and other equipment needed to participate in online forums in a manner that enhances your experience. Equipment failures will not be an acceptable excuse for late or absent assignments. Classroom equivalency: Online communications, including e-mail, discussion threads, and chat rooms are equivalent to communication in a physical classroom and are subject to the Student Code of Conduct. Specifically: Posting photos or comments that would be off-topic or offensive in a classroom are still off-topic in a discussion thread. Off-color language (swearing) is never appropriate. Using angry or abusive language is called "flaming", and is not acceptable. Do not use ALL CAPS, except for titles, since it is the equivalent of shouting online, as is overuse of certain punctuation marks such as exclamation points (!!!!) and question marks (?????). Online communications, including e-mail in Canvas, are University property and subject to GRAMA regulations. Privacy regarding Canvas communications must not be assumed unless mutually agreed upon in advance.

As with assignments, the instructor will respond to email in a reasonable amount of time (usually with 48 hours). Use the Canvas email address as the preferred means of communication. Note that content may be shared with the class when there are valid teaching/learning reasons for doing so and mutual privacy agreements for the communications have not been previously made. TECHNOLOGY REQUIREMENTS AND ASSISTANCE The following Online course guidelines apply:

It is your responsibility to maintain your computer and related equipment in order to participate in this online course. Equipment failures will not be an acceptable excuse for late or absent assignments. You are responsible for making sure your assignments, including attachments, are received before the deadline. You are responsible for submitting the assignment with the required naming convention, correct file extension, and using the software type and version required for the assignment.

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Your professor may elect to use a plagiarism detection service in this course, in which case you will be required to submit your paper to such a service as part of your assignment.

Resources for technology related questions include: UOnline: https://uonline.utah.edu/ Email: uonline-admin@lists.utah.edu phone: (801) 585-5959 TACC (Technology Assisted Curriculum Center): http://tacc.utah.edu/ Email: webct-admin@lists.utah.edu phone: (801) 585-0536 TEXT Graves, J.E., & B.A. Franklin (Eds.). Resistance Training for Health and Rehabilitation. Champaign, IL, Human Kinetics Publishers, 2001. SUPPLEMENTARY TEXTS (on reserve in the Eccles Health Sciences Library) Thomas, J.R., & J.K. Nelson, Research Methods in Physical Activity (4th ed.). Champaign, IL, Human Kinetics Publishers, 2001. APA Publication Manual 4th Edition, Washington, DC, American Psychological Association, 1994. ADDITIONAL READINGS: Pertinent journal articles for review may be placed on electronic reserve. All reading assignments will be posted on Bb.

COMPLIANCE WITH SECTION 504 OF THE REHABILITATION ACT OF 1973 The University of Utah seeks to provide equal access to its programs, services and activities for people with disabilities. If you will need accommodations in the class, reasonable prior notice needs to be given to the Center for Disability Services, 162 Union Building, 581-5020 (V/TDD). CDS will work with you and the instructor to make arrangements for accommodations.

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STATEMENT ON ACADEMIC HONESTY Cheating will not be tolerated. Any evidence of cheating will be fully investigated and the maximum penalty will be applied under the circumstances. The Code of Student Rights and Responsibilities specifies students rights and consequences of conduct involving cheating, plagiarism, collusion, fraud, theft, etc. Wherever the ideas or words of others appear in your work they must be properly cited. Failure to make clear the sources of any outside material that you incorporate in your work constitutes plagiarism and is against University policy. FACULTY AND STUDENT RESPONSIBILITIES All students are expected to maintain professional behavior in the classroom setting, according to the Student Code, spelled out in the Student Handbook. Students have specific rights in the classroom as detailed in Section II of the Code. The Code also specifies proscribed conduct (Section III) that involves cheating on tests, plagiarism, and/or collusion, as well as fraud, theft, etc. Students should read the Code carefully and know they are responsible for the content. According to Faculty Rules and Regulations, it is the faculty responsibility to enforce responsible classroom behaviors, beginning with verbal warnings and progressing to dismissal from class and a failing grade. Students have the right to appeal such action to the Student Behavior Committee. Facultymust strive in the classroom to maintain a climate conducive to thinking and learning. PPM 8-12.3, B. Students have a right to support and assistance from the University in maintaining a climate conducive to thinking and learning. PPM 8-10, II. A. REFERENCES CITED Dawley, L. (2007). The Tools for Successful Online Teaching. Hershey: Information Science Publishing. Kelley, D. & Teevan, J. (2007). Understanding what works: Evaluating personal information management tools. In W. Jones & J. Teevan (Eds.), Personal Information Management. Seattle: University of Washington Press.

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