EDUCATION

Ryan Supported Block Granting of Education Programs. . In 1999, Ryan voted in favor of a bill that would establish a new block grant combining three existing education programs – a teacher performance program, the Goals 2000 program and a program to reduce class size by hiring 100,000 teachers. The new grant was authorized at $2 billion per year for five years, and states were given greater flexibility in deciding how to spend the funds. The bill passed 239-185 [Roll Call 320, H 1995, 07/20/1999] Paul Ryan Supported Block Granting of Education Programs. In 1999, Paul Ryan voted in favor of a bill that would establish a new block grant combining three existing education programs – a teacher performance program, the Goals 2000 program and a program to reduce class size by hiring 100,000 teachers. The new grant was authorized at $2 billion per year for five years, and states were given greater flexibility in deciding how to spend the funds. The bill passed 239-185. [Roll Call 320, H 1995, 07/20/1999] Ryan Voted For Ed Flex Bill. Ryan voted in favor of Passage of the bill to expand the current Education Flexibility Partnership program by making all 50 states eligible to participate in the program, instead of just the 12 states permitted under current law. Under the bill, participating states could waive certain federal statutory or regulatory requirements for education programs, as well as state requirements. The bill removes the Ed-Flex program from the Goals 2000 statute, but requires states to have implemented content and performance standards and assessments required under the Title I program for disadvantaged students. He also voted for the conference report. [Roll Call 94, H 800, 04/21/1999] Ryan Supported Removing Nearly 112,000 Students from Work Study Programs. In 1999, Ryan voted in favor of the 2000 GOP budget resolution, which would remove nearly 112,000 students from the Work Study Program. The budget passed 220 to 208. [Roll Call 85, S 68, 04/14/1999] Paul Ryan Supported Removing Nearly 112,000 Students from Work Study Programs. In 1999, Paul Ryan voted in favor of the 2000 GOP budget resolution, which would remove nearly 112,000 students from the Work Study Program. The budget passed 220 to 208. [Roll Call 85, S 68, 04/14/1999] Ryan Voted For Ed Flex Bill. Ryan voted in favor of Passage of the bill to expand the current Education Flexibility Partnership program by making all 50 states eligible to participate in the program, instead of just the 12 states permitted under current law. Under the bill, participating states could waive certain federal statutory or regulatory requirements for education programs, as well as state requirements. The bill removes the Ed-Flex program from the Goals 2000 statute, but requires states to have implemented content and performance standards and assessments required under the Title I program for disadvantaged students. He also voted for the conference report. [Roll Call 41, H 800, 03/11/1999] Ryan Voted Against an Amendment Prohibiting the Diversion of Funds from Poorer School Districts. On March 11, 1999, Ryan voted against a Scott (D-VA) amendment to an education flexibility bill. The bill would prohibit states from waiving Title 1 requirements if 35% of the children or more in the school district come from low-income families. According to the Wisconsin State Journal, “Two Wisconsin Democrats, however, were among those voting against the House bill, claiming it could take money away from needy school districts. ‘This bill makes it easier to divert money from schools that need help the most to schools that need help the least,’ said Rep. David Obey of Wausau. Rep. Tom Barrett said he voted against the measure because it lacked assurances that it will not steer money away from the Title 1 program, which directs funds to poorer schools. ‘Everybody likes the idea of more flexibility, but there needs to be a balance struck between flexibility and fairness,” said the Milwaukee Democrat. A Democratic amendment offered to address this issue was defeated 195-223. [Roll Call 40, H 800, 03/11/1999; Wisconsin State Journal, 03/12/99]

Affordability
Ryan Voted to Strip $5.9 Billion in Health Care Funding to Extend Student Loan Interest Rates. On April 27, 2012, Ryan voted for extending current student loan interest rates. According to the New York Times, “The bill, which would strip $5.9 billion from a program within the health care law to pay to keep rates on subsidized undergraduate loans at 3.4 percent, is all but certain to fail in the Senate, where lawmakers have put together their own measure to keep the rate from reverting to 6.8 percent by closing tax loopholes for some wealthy business owners.” [Roll Call 195, H 4628, 04/27/2012; New York Times, 4/28/12] Paul Ryan Voted Against Expanding Access To Higher Education. Paul Ryan voted against a measure to replace costly private student loans with federal government loans by eliminating the Federal Family Education loan program. The legislation would provide for a competitive bidding process for entities to service the loans. The bill would make several modifications to education programs, including increasing funding for Pell grants, early-childhood education and community colleges. [Roll Call 719, H 3221, 09/17/2009] Ryan Voted Against a $2,500 Tax Credit for College Students. Ryan voted against the conference report of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009. The act created the American Opportunity Tax Credit, an expansion of an existing tax break called the Hope Scholarship Credit. The new credit allowed for 100 percent of the first $2,000 in tuition and related fees and 25 percent of the second $2,000 (for a total of $2,500). That increased from a maximum of $1,800 previously. [Roll Call 70, H 1, 02/13/2009; Chicago Tribune, 3/01/09]

For-Profit Colleges
Ryan Voted to Repeal New Department of Education Rules Governing For-Profit Colleges. On February 28, 2012, Ryan voted for the bill that would rescind Education Department regulations that define a credit hour and set minimum requirements that all higher education institutions must meet to be considered authorized by a state. It also would bar the Education secretary from establishing or enforcing any new rules to define the term “credit hour.” According to the Washington Post, “The House sent the Senate a bill (HR 2117) to repeal new Department of Education rules governing for- profit colleges and universities. One rule requires such institutions to meet accreditation requirements in each state in which they have students and establishes state-by-state processes for handling student complaints. Another rule targeted by the bill sets a uniform definition of what constitutes a credit hour for purposes of allocating federal financial aid. The rules are scheduled to take effect in July 2014. For-profit schools, many of which specialize in online or ‘distance’ degree programs, account for 11 percent of U.S. higher-education students and rely heavily on federally backed student loans and federal grants for their revenue. Their students receive about one-quarter of all student loans and make up 43 percent of those who default on such loans, according to the Department of Education. Some of the best- known for-profit institutions are Capella, Kaplan and DeVry universities and the University of Phoenix.” [Roll Call 79, H 2117, 02/28/2012; Washington Post, 3/8/12]

Funding
Ryan Opposed Increase for Special Education, Teacher Quality Programs. In 2003, Ryan voted against the Consolidated Appropriations bill for fiscal year 2003, which increased funding for the IDEA special education programs. The bill included a $3.2 billion increase for education programs over the FY 02 level of

$49.9 billion (for a total of $53.1 billion). Specific increases included $1.4 billion increases for Title I (for a total of $11.7 billion) and IDEA special education (for a total of $8.9 billion). The bill also increased investments for Teacher Quality (increase from $2.85 billion to $2.93 billion) and Math-Science programs (increase from $12.5 million to $100.3 million). The bill passed 338-83. [Roll Call 32, S 2, 02/13/2003] Paul Ryan Voted For Across-The-Board Cut To Education Initiatives. In 1999, Ryan voted for the conference report on the fiscal 2000 DC/Labor-HHS-Education appropriations bill, which would make an across-the-board cut of 0.97 percent to the agencies it funded. President Clinton pledged a veto because of the damage he said the spending cuts would inflict on schools and other programs. [Roll Call 549, H 3064, 10/28/1999; AP, 10/28/99] Paul Ryan Opposed Fiscally Responsible FY 2009 Budget With $85.3 Billion for Education. In 2008, Paul Ryan voted against a budget resolution that would establish the congressional budget for FY 2009. The resolution would call for expenditures of $3.1 trillion and would allow up to $1 trillion in discretionary spending, plus $70 billion for the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan and $5.8 billion for hurricane recovery. The bill would also include $85.3 billion for education, training, employment and social services, an amount that was $7.1 billion more than President Bush had requested. [Roll Call 141, S 312, 03/13/2008; Congressional Quarterly; “Summary of the 2009 Democratic Budget,” House Committee on the Budget, 3/11/08] Ryan Opposed Reauthorization of Higher Education Act. In 2008, Ryan voted against a bill that would reauthorize the Higher Education Act through fiscal 2012, including a wide range of post-secondary programs, including student loans and teacher training. The measure would raise the maximum Pell grant award from $5,800 to $9,000 and allow the grants to be used year-round. A major provision included increasing the amount of information that schools and lenders must provide students and barring lenders from giving schools any perks to get on a “preferred lender” list. It would also create a “higher education price index” to compare tuition increases. The bill also would allow the federal government to penalize states that substantially decrease their contributions to public colleges and universities. The bill passed 354-58 [Roll Call 40, H 4137, 02/07/2008; Congressional Quarterly Weekly, 2/09/08] Ryan Voted to Sustain Bush Veto on Labor, Health and Human Services, and Education Appropriations. In 2007, Ryan voted against an override of President Bush’s veto of the bill to appropriate $150.7 billion in fiscal 2008 for the departments of Labor, Health and Human Services and Education and related agencies. The legislation provided $63.6 billion for the Education Department, including $14.5 billion for Pell Grants; $15 billion for the Labor Department, including $3.6 billion for training and employment services; and $30 billion for the National Institutes of Health. The veto override failed, 277-141. [Roll Call 1122, H 3043, 11/15/2007; Congressional Quarterly] Ryan Opposed FY08 Budget that Invested in Education, Innovation Agenda. In 2007, Ryan voted against the fiscal year 2008 budget conference report that began to reverse six years of Republican fiscal mismanagement, provided for middle-class tax relief and would return the budget to balance – reaching a surplus of $41 billion in 2012 – without raising taxes. The budget provided $9.5 billion more for education, training, and social services than President Bush requested, including funding for No Child Left Behind programs, special education, and aid to help students afford college. The budget also increased funding for Head Start and child care while funding the House Democratic innovation agenda, putting us on a path to double funding for the National Science Foundation and providing significant increases in K-12 math and science education. The budget passed 214-209 [Roll Call 377, S 21, 05/17/2007; House Budget Committee, Overview of FY2008 Budget Conference Agreement, 5/16/07, SCR 21, House Budget Committee, Conference Agreement on the FY 2008 Budget Resolution: Building on the “Six for ‘06, 5/24/07] Ryan Supported Higher Education Funding Bill that Did Not Make College More Affordable. In 2006, Ryan voted in favor of a bill authorizing funds for higher education aid. The measure would simplify the financial aid application and make Pell Grants, the major grant that helps low- and middle-income

students, available for summer study. The bill would also raise the spending cap on Pell Grants to $6,000, up from $5,800. The increase would be largely symbolic, however, as the maximum grant Congress appropriates has been frozen for four years at $4,050. The bill would set the interest rate for subsidized loans at 6.8 percent, regardless of whether commercial rates rise or fall. The bill did not reverse any of the $12.7 billion in cuts to federal student aid enacted by the Republican Congress in February 2006. The bill passed 221-199. [Roll Call 81, H 609, 03/30/2006; New York Times, 3/31/06; Committee on Education and Workforce release, 3/30/06] Ryan Voted for $496.6 Billion FY 2005 Labor-HHS-Education Appropriations Budget. In September 2004, Ryan voted for a bill that would appropriate $496.6 billion, including $142.5 billion in discretionary spending, for the Labor, Health and Human Services and Education departments and related agencies in fiscal 2005. It would provide $57.7 billion for the Education Department, including $12.2 billion for special education; $14.9 billion for the Labor Department; $374.3 billion for Health and Human Services, including $28.4 billion for the National Institutes of Health. The bill includes a total of $4 billion for countering bioterrorism. As amended, the bill also would prohibit funds from being used to administer or implement any regulation that would take away eligibility for overtime for workers. The vote succeeded, 388-13. [Roll Call 440, H 5006, 09/09/2004] Ryan Voted For $14 Billion Increase in Labor, Health and Education Funding. In 2001, Ryan voted in favor of House passage of the $396 billion fiscal 2002 appropriations bill for the Labor, HHS, and Education departments. Of the total, $123 billion was approved by the House, with the remainder automatically allocated to entitlement programs. The bill would provide almost $14 billion more than in the previous year – and $7 billion more than Bush requested at the start of 2001. [Roll Call 381, H 3061, 10/11/2001; AP, 10/11/01] Ryan Voted For Education Bill With Substantially Less Funding Than House Plan. Ryan voted for an education plan with $9 billion less funding than the Senate plan Johnson voted for. The House plan included only $24 billion for elementary and secondary education, while the plan Johnson supported contained $33 billion. [Roll Call 145, H 1, 05/23/2001] Ryan Voted To Reauthorize Title I And Raise Achievement Standards In Public Schools. On October 21, 1999 Ryan voted for the Student Results Act of 1999, which was a “$9.9 billion bill Thursday that imposes strong federal requirements to raise achievement standards in public schools. The bipartisan bill, known as the Student Result Act, is a 5-year reauthorization of Title I of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act, originally created in 1965.” The bill passed 358-67. [Roll Call 526, H 2, 10/21/1999; University Wire, 10/26/99] Ryan Supported Extreme Cuts to Education. In 1999, Ryan voted in favor of a Republican Budget plan that called for drastic cuts to education programs. Among the programs highlighted for cuts and even elimination were the initiative to fund 100,000 new teachers, after-school programs and teacher quality and recruitment programs. Based on the Labor/Health and Human Services and Education bill passed by the House Appropriations Committee on September 23, 1999, here is a partial list at some the programs that would have been impacted: Eliminated the 100,000 new teachers program. This included eliminating the funding for the 30,000 teachers that were hired in 98, the 8,000 new teachers that would be hired in 1999 and any future teachers; Eliminated funding for programs that help states and localities to turn around failing schools; Cut funding for after-school and summer school programs, denying at least 300,000 students access to the programs; Cut funding for teacher quality and recruitment programs; Cut funds for the GEAR UP program, denying more than 130,000 disadvantaged young people the help they need to get into college. The budget passed 221-208. [Roll Call 77, S 68, 03/25/1999]

Head Start
Ryan Voted for Bipartisan Early-Childhood Education Program. In 2007, Ryan voted for an amendment agreeing to a conference report to reauthorize the Head Start program through 2012.The Head Start program has provided over 24 million children with education and needed social services, like health and nutrition, since its inception in 1965. The conference report increased Head Start teacher salaries, increased the number of eligible participants, tightened program accountability, and authorized $24 million for the program from 2008-2010. The final version did not include a provision to take faith-based hiring into account for religious providers of Head Start services. “Head Start is one of America’s most popular investments because it is one of our most effective,” said Congresswoman Nancy Pelosi. ”This legislation builds on its success and strengthens Head Start for the future.” The conference report passed 381-36 [Roll Call 1090, H 1429, 11/14/2007; Congressional Quarterly, 11/19/07 Congresswoman Nancy Pelosi press release, 12/12/07] Ryan Supported Cutting Head Start Enrollment. In 2003, Ryan voted in favor of legislation to reauthorize the Head Start Act, including provisions that would weaken the program. The Republican Head Start bill started to dismantle the high-quality federal standards and comprehensive services that have made Head Start the premiere early childhood education program for American toddlers. At the time, funding only allowed three out of five eligible children to be served. And yet, instead of expanding Head Start to serve more children, the Republican bill froze funding levels in real terms and ultimately cut enrollment in Head Start for the first time in history. The bill also created a block grant that specified no minimum for class size, child-teacher ratios or curriculum effectiveness. The bill passed 217-216. [Roll Call 444, H 2210, 07/25/2003] Ryan Voted Against Full Funding For Head Start. Ryan voted against providing full funding for Head Start. Gephardt opposed an amendment to provide for investments in education, including new school construction grants and full funding for Head Start; funding for Medicare prescription drug benefit; funding for election reform; and funding for affordable housing construction. [Roll Call 496, S 1438, 12/13/2001]

Higher Education
Ryan Voted In Favor of GOP Bill To Prevent An Increase In Student Loan Interest Rates. According to the Wisconsin State Journal, “Student loan interest rates: Members on Friday voted, 215-195, to prevent interest rates on student loans from doubling on July 1 from 3.4 percent to 6.8 percent. The GOP bill would offset the $6 billion cost with cuts in the 2010 health law’s preventive-care section. A yes vote was to pass HR 4628. Voting yes: Ryan, Sensenbrenner, Petri, Duffy, Ribble.” [Wisconsin State Journal, 4/28/12] Ryan Supported 2003 Reauthorization of Higher Education Act. In 2003, Ryan voted in favor of the reauthorization of Title II of the Higher Education Act of 1965. The reauthorization bill made improvements to the teacher training programs funded under Title II of the Higher Education Act to provide the teachers of tomorrow with the skills they will need to be ready to teach when they enter the classroom. The bill passed 404-17 [Roll Call 340, H 2211, 07/09/2003] Ryan Voted for Reauthorizing the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act. On April 30, 2003, Ryan voted for reauthorizing the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act. According to Asbury Park Press, the bill aims to ensure “each special education pupil has a plan which must be reviewed each year and necessary changes made. The House proposal would no longer hold educators and parents to a one-year review, but permit an option of once every three years.” According to The Honolulu Star, “the bill would also make it easier to discipline children with disabilities. Currently, families can challenge efforts to remove such students from class for more than 10 days in a school year, unless the violation involves weapons or drugs, or

the child is likely to injure himself or others. The measure would allow such students to be sent to alternative educational settings for up to 45 days, just like other students, whether or not their misbehavior was linked to their disability. Schools now must prove the misbehavior is not related to the disability in order to do so.” [Roll Call 154, H 1350, 04/30/2003; Asbury Park Press 06/18/2003; Honolulu Star 4/22/2003]

No Child Left Behind
Ryan Voted to Cut No Child Left Behind by $784 Million. In 2005, Ryan voted in favor of the Labor, HHS & Education appropriations conference report that cut $1.5 billion from key domestic priorities. The measure cut education programs by $59 million - including a $784 million cut from No Child Left Behind programs. The bill provided less than a one percent increase in Title I reading and math assistance for lowincome children - the smallest increase in 8 years. In addition, the bill cut $87 million from programs that helped nearly 14,000 school districts that relied on the funding for school safety, drug prevention and antiviolence activities. The bill failed 209-224 [Roll Call 598, H 3010, 11/17/2005; House Appropriations Committee Democratic Staff, “Summary of the Conference Agreement - HR 3010,” 11/16/05] Ryan Supported Bill that Underfunded NCLB by $8 Billion. In 2003, Ryan voted in favor of the appropriations bill for the Departments of Labor, Health and Human Services, and Education. The bill underfunded the landmark No Child Left Behind Act by $8 billion and provided the smallest percentage increase in education funding in eight years. Because of the bill, 54,000 fewer teachers would receive federally supported professional development. Special education programs would receive a $1 billion funding increase, compared to the $2.2 billion increase promised by Republicans. Pell Grants would finance only 38 percent of the cost of a public university, compared to 84 percent when the Pell Grant program was established. The bill passed 215-208 [Roll Call 353, H 2660, 07/10/2003] Ryan Supported Budget Cutting NCLB by $1 Billion. In 2003, Ryan voted in favor of a budget resolution that provided for $1.3 trillion in tax cuts over ten years, while cutting programs for children and public education by $38 billion over ten years, below the amount needed to maintain current service levels. It provided virtually no increase for education programs overall and cut funding for No Child Left Behind programs by $1 billion (from $23.8 billion to $22.8 billion). In addition, the House Budget eliminated 46 education programs (such as Rural Education, the National Board for Professional Teaching Standards, and Preparing Tomorrow’s Teachers to Use Technology), cut the after school program by 40 percent (or $400 million), and reduced the maximum Pell Grant award (from $4,050 to $4,000). The budget passed 215-212 [Roll Call 82, S 95, 03/21/2003] Paul Ryan Supported Budget Cutting NCLB by $1 Billion. In 2003, Paul Ryan voted in favor of a budget resolution that provided for $1.3 trillion in tax cuts over ten years, while cutting programs for children and public education by $38 billion over ten years, below the amount needed to maintain current service levels. It provided virtually no increase for education programs overall and cut funding for No Child Left Behind programs by $1 billion (from $23.8 billion to $22.8 billion). In addition, the House Budget eliminated 46 education programs (such as Rural Education, the National Board for Professional Teaching Standards, and Preparing Tomorrow’s Teachers to Use Technology), cut the after school program by 40 percent (or $400 million), and reduced the maximum Pell Grant award (from $4,050 to $4,000). The budget passed 215212. [Roll Call 82, S 95, 03/21/2003] Ryan Supported No Child Left Behind Bill. In 2001, Ryan voted in favor of President Bush’s No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB) to overhaul education proposals to increase school accountability and reauthorize the Elementary and Secondary Education Act for six years. The final version of the bill required states to annually test students in reading and math in grades three through eight, provide new accountability measures for schools that fail to make adequate yearly progress, and give schools greater flexibility to spend federal

funds. It included about $26.3 billion for federal elementary and secondary education programs and $13.5 billion for Title I programs for disadvantaged children in fiscal 2002.The bill passed 381-41. [Roll Call 497, H 1, 12/13/2001]

Pell Grants
Ryan Voted Against Reauthorizing the Higher Education Act, Doubling the Maximum Number of Pell Grants. On July 31, 2008, Ryan voted against reauthorizing the Higher Education Act. According to the Washington Post, “Congress yesterday passed a major overhaul of federal higher-education programs aimed at expanding financial aid and bringing greater clarity and disclosure to the student loan process. By overwhelming bipartisan votes, the House and Senate approved a five-year reauthorization of the Higher Education Act. It will nearly double the maximum amount of Pell Grants by 2014 and will require the Education Department to collect and publish better data on soaring tuition costs at universities and colleges. […] In addition to increasing Pell Grants, the legislation seeks to clarify the application process. One provision, written by Rep. Rahm Emanuel (D-Ill.), simplifies a financial aid form by reducing the number of questions asked and mandating it contain more easily understood language. […] The legislation also imposes new regulations on financial institutions that make private loans to students not in the federal student loan program. It requires those lenders to disclose 27 pieces of information, such as mandating lenders to reveal three times in the application process all potential finance charges, late fees, penalties and adjustments to the loan. It also gives student borrowers up to 30 days to terminate a loan after an application is approved.” [Roll Call 544, H 4137, 07/31/2008; Washington Post, 08/01/08] Ryan Voted Against Raising Pell Grants. On July 11, 2007, Ryan voted against the bill that would cut nearly $19 billion from federal student loan lender subsidies and redirect most of those funds to financial aid for students, colleges and universities. According to the Washington Post, the bill would “cut taxpayer subsidies of firms that provide student loans by $19 billion over five years and allocate most of the savings to programs that directly benefit students and institutions of higher education. The bill would halve interest on student loans to 3.4 percent; raise Pell Grants for poor students to a maximum of $5,200; provide tuition aid to students preparing to teach in disadvantaged neighborhoods; authorize grants to Hispanic and historically black institutions; provide student-loan forgiveness to first responders and nurses; and cap student-loan repayments at 15 percent of discretionary income.” [Roll Call 613, H 2669, 07/11/2007; Washington Post 07/15/2007] Ryan Voted To Block Legislation To Save Thousands Of Dollars For Pell Grants . On July 01, 2010, Ryan voted to block legislation that would help prevent thousands of teacher layoffs across the nation. The legislation would invest $10 billion to teachers’ jobs and $16 billion to help cover state Medicaid payments. The legislation also invests $4.95 billion for Pell grants, which help support low-income students attend institutions of higher education. [Roll Call 430, H 4899, 07/01/2010] Ryan Supported Pell Grant Award Cuts. In 2003, Ryan voted in favor of a budget resolution that provided for $1.3 trillion in tax cuts over ten years, while cutting programs for children and public education by $38 billion over ten years below the amount needed to maintain current service levels. It provided virtually no increase for education programs overall and cut funding for No Child Left Behind programs by $1 billion (from $23.8 billion to $22.8 billion). In addition, the House Budget eliminated 46 education programs (such as Rural Education, the National Board for Professional Teaching Standards, and Preparing Tomorrow’s Teachers to Use Technology), cut the after school program by 40 percent (or $400 million), and reduced the maximum Pell Grant award (from $4,050 to $4,000). The budget passed 215-212. [Roll Call 82, S 95, 03/21/2003] Paul Ryan Supported Pell Grant Award Cuts. In 2003, Paul Ryan voted in favor of a budget resolution

that provided for $1.3 trillion in tax cuts over ten years, while cutting programs for children and public education by $38 billion over ten years below the amount needed to maintain current service levels. It provided virtually no increase for education programs overall and cut funding for No Child Left Behind programs by $1 billion (from $23.8 billion to $22.8 billion). In addition, the House Budget eliminated 46 education programs (such as Rural Education, the National Board for Professional Teaching Standards, and Preparing Tomorrow’s Teachers to Use Technology), cut the after school program by 40 percent (or $400 million), and reduced the maximum Pell Grant award (from $4,050 to $4,000). The budget passed 215-212. [Roll Call 82, S 95, 03/21/2003]

Teachers
Ryan Voted to Cut Title 1 Funding for Local Educators by $693.5 Million. Ryan voted for a House continuing resolution that contained severe cuts to Title 1 funding. According to the National Education Association, the GOP House Continuing Resolution contained severe cuts to Title 1 funding. “Funding for Title 1 would be cut by $693.5 million in fiscal year 2011 from current levels, which would reduce or eliminate additional academic support for more than 957,000 low-income students and could lead to more than 9,000 job losses.” [Roll Call 147, H 1, 02/19/2011; National Education Association, 2/19/11] Ryan Voted to Block Funding of Education Department “Gainful Employment” Rules. On February 18, 2011, Ryan voted for an amendment that would bar the use of funds made available in the bill to implement, administer or enforce an Education Department regulation or rule with respect to the definition or application of the term “gainful employment” under the Higher Education Act. Congressional Quarterly Today reported, “In a victory to the for-profit college industry, the House adopted an amendment Friday that would block the Obama administration from implementing new regulations aimed at curtailing deceptive marketing practices by the schools [...] Among those is a “gainful employment” regulation, which would eliminate federal financial aid for programs where high proportions of students are not repaying the principal on their student loans, or end up with excessive debt loads compared with the salaries they can earn.” [Roll Call 92, H 1, 02/18/2011; Congressional Quarterly Today, 02/18/2011] Paul Ryan Voted against Education Funding to Help Avoid Teacher Layoffs. Paul Ryan voted against the conference report of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 included $53.6 billion for a state fiscal stabilization fund of which, $39.5 billion would be used to enhance local school budgets. Governors were to channel money to avoid teacher layoffs and modernization of school buildings. Also included $1 billion for Head Start programs. The measure also included $15.84 billion for student financial assistance and to carry out the Higher Education Act of 1965. [Roll Call 46, H 1, 01/28/2009; CQ Bill Analysis HR1; New York Times, 2/14/09] Ryan Opposed Helping Schools Reduce Class-Size; Train Teachers. Ryan voted in favor of a Republican budget resolution that cut all funding for the 100,000 new teachers program. This included eliminating the funding for the 30,000 teachers that were hired in 1998, the 8,000 new teachers that would be hired in 1999 and any future teachers. The budget passed 221-208 [Roll Call 77, S 68, 03/25/1999] 1999: Paul Ryan Voted To Eliminate Funding For New Teachers. Paul Ryan voted in favor of a Republican budget resolution that cut all funding for the 100,000 new teachers program. This included eliminating the funding for the 30,000 teachers that were hired in 1998, the 8,000 new teachers that would be hired in 1999 and any future teachers. The budget passed 221-208. [Roll Call 77, S 68, 03/25/1999]

Student Loans
Ryan Voted to Block Federal Student Loan Money From Going to ACORN. On September 17, 2009, Ryan voted for a motion to recommit HR 3221 with instructions to add language blocking federal student loan money from going to ACORN. According to Congressional Quarterly Today, “The House passed a landmark overhaul of the student lending system Thursday that will establish the government as the only provider of loans and put tens of billions of dollars toward various scholarship and education programs. [...] The House approved, by a vote of 345 to 75, a motion by Darrell Issa, R-Calif., to clarify that no funding under the bill would be directed toward the activist group ACORN -- a provision that Miller encouraged members to vote in favor of, as ACORN would receive no funding under the bill anyway.” [Roll Call 718, H 3221, 09/17/2009; Congressional Quarterly Today, 09/17/2009] Ryan Voted to Increase Annual Loan Limits on College Loans. In 2008, Ryan voted in favor of a motion to concur on a Senate amendment that would increase annual loan limits on federal college loans and give the Education Department a bigger role in ensuring loan availability. Despite originally opposing the legislation, President Bush came to support it, saying the federal government “had an obligation to encourage and support people pursuing higher education.” By granting the Department of Education greater authority to purchase Federal student loans, the measure would “ease the anxiety many students may feel about their ability to finance their education this fall,” Bush said. The motion was agreed to 388-21. [Roll Call 239, H 5715, 05/01/2008; House Education and Labor Committee Release, 5/01/08, White House Release, 5/01/08] Ryan Voted for Increased in Limits for College Loans. In 2008, Ryan voted in favor of a bill that would increase annual loan limits on federal college loans and give the Education Department a bigger role in ensuring loan availability. The bill would increase the annual loan limits on both direct loans from the federal government and government-guaranteed loans by $2,000 for all students. The bill would also increase the total amount of federal loans students could borrow to $31,000 for dependent undergraduates and $57,000 for independent undergraduates. The bill passed 383-27. [Roll Call 204, H 5715, 04/17/2008] Ryan Opposed Largest Increase in Student Aid Since the GI Bill. In 2007, Ryan voted against legislation that provided the largest increase in student aid since the G.I. Bill. The conference report of the bill cut government subsidies to student loan firms by about $20 billion and redirected most of the money to aid for students and college graduates. It also included $750 million in federal budget deficit reduction. The maximum Pell grant award would be increased by $490 in 2008 and by $1,090 over five years. It also provided debt forgiveness to certain public-sector workers after 10 years of service, and capped student loan repayments at 15 percent of discretionary income. The bill passed 292-97 [Roll Call 864, H 2669, 09/07/2007] Ryan Opposed College Student Relief Act. In 2007, Ryan voted against cutting the interest rate on subsidized student loans for undergraduates in half over five years – cutting the interest rate from 6.8% today to 3.4% by 2011 – helping 5.5 million students. Once fully phased in, this bill would save the typical borrower, with $13,800 in subsidized federal student loan debt, approximately $4,400 over the life of their loans. The bill passed 356-71. [Roll Call 32, H 5, 01/17/2007] Ryan Supported Cutting Student Loan Funding, Social Programs and Agriculture Funding but Prevented HMO Cuts. In 2006, Ryan voted in favor of the conference agreement to cut mandatory spending programs by $39.7 billion over the following five years. Due to the billions of dollars in tax cuts passed separately, the budget reconciliation package would increase the deficit. The measure cut $12.7 billion from student loan programs - the largest single cut in history. The bill also put billions of dollars in student aid at risk by cutting all of the critical funds ($2.2 billion) used to carry out and administer the student aid programs. The measure cut $2.6 billion from programs serving single-parent families, foster children and low-

income elderly and disabled people. The cuts included $1.5 billion from child support enforcement, $343 million from foster care programs and $732 million from Supplemental Security Income for the elderly. The bill reduced the amount of direct payments available to farmers in advance to 40% in 2006 and 22% in 2007 and extended the Milk Income Loss Contract through 2007, at a cost of $998 million. The bill canceled funds, for a total cut of $1 billion over five years, for several programs including the Initiative for Future Agriculture and Food systems. Additionally, the bill cut important farm bill conservation programs by $934 million over five years. The measure did not touch a $5 billion HMO slush fund established by the 2003 Medicare bill, and after intense lobbying from the health insurance industry, the budget saved HMOs $22 billion dollars. The bill passed 216-214. [Roll Call 4, S 653, 02/01/2006; CQ Today, 2/1/06; Washington Post, 2/2/06] Ryan Opposed Cutting Student Loan Interest Rates, Reversing Cuts to Student Aid. In 2006, Ryan voted against a Democratic alternative to the higher education authorization bill that would have cut student loan interest rates in half (from 6.8 percent to 3.4 percent) for one year for those most in need. Students taking out a subsidized loan during that year would be able to lock in the low fixed interest rate for the life of their loans, thereby saving thousands of dollars in interest costs. The average college student graduates from college with $18,000 of debt. The measure would have also reversed previously enacted cuts to student loan programs. The measure was defeated 200-220 [Roll Call 80, H 609, 03/30/2006; New York Times, 3/31/06; Committee on Education and Workforce release, 3/30/06] Ryan Supported Increasing Student Loan Forgiveness for Teachers. In 2003, Ryan voted in favor of a bill that would increase from $5,000 to $17,500 the amount in student loans that could be forgiven for math, science and special education teachers who serve low-income students. Loan forgiveness also would be available to reading teachers who have obtained a separate state credential in reading. Teachers would have to be ‘highly qualified’ as defined in the 2001 education reauthorization law and work in a Title I school in which more than 40 percent of its students come from families below the poverty line. It also would accelerate the timetable for forgiveness to allow a teacher to have a portion of their loans forgiven after only two years of service. The bill passed 417-7 [Roll Call 343, H 438, 07/09/2003]

Vouchers
Ryan Voted to Extend D.C. School Voucher Program. On March 30, 2011, Ryan voted for a bill that would extend funding for the D.C. Opportunity Scholarship program, which provides low-income students with scholarships, also known as “school vouchers”, that allows them to attend the school of their choice within the District of Columbia. In 2009, Democrats closed the program to new students but kept it open to current ones. The Washington Post reported that “House Speaker John A. Boehner’s bill – known as the SOAR Act – would reopen it, offering $20 million annually for five years for new scholarships, along with another $20 million apiece for D.C. charter schools and traditional D.C. public schools. […] Boehner’s bill would provide students from low-income families with as much as $8,000 to attend elementary school or $12,000 for high school – amounts that wouldn’t cover tuition at most of the city’s elite private schools but would cover the costs of many parochial schools. Boehner has been a strong supporter of Washington’s Catholic schools, some of which are struggling financially.[…] President Obama weighed in Tuesday, issuing a statement through the Office of Management and Budget saying that he ‘strongly opposes expanding the D.C. Opportunity Scholarship Program and opening it to new students’.” [Roll Call 204, H 471, 03/30/2011; Washington Post, 3/30/11]

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