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AUGUST 15-21, 2012
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Editorials . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
INSIDE THIS ISSUE
World Series
10U Bulldogs win trip
to tournament. PAGE 2
BY HEATHER FIORE
The Hopewell Sun
On Sunday, July 29, four juvenile
males were charged with burglary
and criminal mischief after they al-
legedly vandalized several areas in-
side of Bear Tavern Elementary
School in Titusville, officials said.
Officer Michael Toth responded to
a fire alarm at Bear Tavern, where he
found the exterior doors to the gym
propped open. There were no signs of
a fire or a smoke condition at the
building.
After further investigation inside
of the school, it became apparent
that someone had caused a large
amount of damage throughout the en-
tire building, according to Lieu-
tenant Lance Maloney.
The suspects, all 14-year-old males,
discharged a number of dry chemical
fire extinguishers, broke several inte-
rior glass windows, overturned and
broke various pieces of furniture,
damaged several computers and
servers, tipped over several book-
shelves, and threw paint across the
walls, floors and cafeteria stages, ac-
cording to Maloney.
One of the big things is dry chemi-
cal from fire extinguishers creates a
mess for clean up, Maloney said.
Overall, the four boys damaged sev-
eral areas of the school, including the
gymnasium, the cafeteria, the main
office, the library, and several class-
rooms and hallways.
On Aug. 6, Principal Bruce Arcurio
explained to residents at a special
meeting at Stony Brook Elementary
School that the four boys allegedly
conducted the vandalism more than
once over the course of a day, mean-
ing they left and revisited the school
several times on July 29 to cause more
damage with each visit.
The school district estimated the
damage cleanup alone to be more
than $100,000, but cannot determine
the total amount of damage until the
staff is allowed back into the school to
conduct an inventory of the items.
The total cost of the clean-up, re-
pairs, and replacement is covered by
the districts insurance policy, Arcu-
rio said.
One of the teens, who is believed to
have helped the others access the in-
side of the school, is also being
charged with having burglar tools.
He used a hammer to break a win-
dow outside the school, Maloney
Special to The Sun
Shown are various rooms within the Bear Tavern Elementary School in Titusville that were vandalized. Four juvenile
males were charged with burglary and criminal mischief, according to police.
please see DAMAGE, page 12
Police: Teens vandalized school
2 THE HOPEWELL SUN AUGUST 15-21, 2012
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BY HEATHER FIORE
The Hopewell Sun
The Hopewell Valley 10U Bull-
dogs beat Marylands Hickory
Hornets in the Mid-Atlantic Re-
gionals on July 30, advancing
them to the 2012 Cal Ripken 10
Year-Old World Series in Ben-
tonville, Ark., from Aug. 10-17.
This is the Bulldogs second
consecutive Mid-Atlantic Region-
al Championship win, according
to Manager Jeff Tagliareni.
Ever since we won last years
regionals, this has been their
whole focus, he said. It got to a
point where I had to ban them
from using the A word
[Arkansas] because thats all they
were worried about.
Now that the teams determina-
tion has paid off, Tagliareni ex-
pects the boys to compete, but
also wants them to enjoy them-
selves at the same time.
My expectations are to be
competitive, but I want them to
relax and enjoy the whole thing,
he said. Hopefully the pressure
is off of them a little bit. Its a
once in a lifetime thing so I hope
they focus on that and arent
nervous even though they prob-
ably will be because its nothing
to be nervous about.
The Bulldogs started off the
Mid-Atlantic Regionals by losing
their first pool play game, but
they won five straight games af-
terward to take the title home.
We played six games in total,
Tagliareni said. We lost the first
game, won the following three
pool play games, and then won
two playoff games.
The format of the regionals
ran along the same lines of the
World Series, with two pools and
five games in each pool, as well as
10U Bulldogs head to
Cal Ripken World Series
please see TEN, page 4
AUGUST 15-21, 2012 THE HOPEWELL SUN 3
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Nicola Burrow, a resident of
Hopewell, has been named to
Alvernia University's deans list
for the spring 2012 semester. Bur-
row is a Sophomore Special Ed
Pre K-8/ECE Cert PreK-4 major.
The Hopewell Borough Recre-
ation Committee's Summer Line-
up will continue with Friday
Night Concerts at Gazebo Park on
Aug. 17 at 7 p.m. featuring Sarah
Donner. Come out with your
friends and family and enjoy the
music in the park. Rained out
concerts will take place the Sun-
day following at the same time.
Refreshments will be available for
purchase.
Saturday Starlight Movies at
the Historic Train Station will be
held on Sept. 1 at 8 p.m., and will
feature the film Ferris Bueller's
Day Off. Enjoy our feature film
on the big screen under the stars.
Bring your own chair or blanket.
Rained out movies will take place
the Sunday following at the same
time.
Join us every Wednesday at 7
p.m. at the Historic Train Station
for a friendly game of quoits and
horseshoes from now through
Labor Day.
More information on these
events and others sponsored by
Hopewell Borough Recreation
can be found at www.hopewell-
boro-nj.us.
on campus
Sarah Donner performs on Aug. 17
4 THE HOPEWELL SUN AUGUST 15-21, 2012
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Ten teams in series
a top playoff game for each pool.
The World Series is running
along the same format, with 10
teams participating in two divi-
sions American and National.
The Bulldogs are part of the
American Division, and will be
competing against the Pacific
Northwest Regional Champion
from Oregon, the Midwest Plains
Regional Champion from North
Dakota, and the host team from
Bentonville, Ark.
Theyre guaranteed to play at
least four games because its a
pool play format, but can play
more if they beat the three teams
listed above.
If we make the playoffs, then
they play the other pool [National
Division] with the other five
teams, Tagliareni said. Pool
play ends on Tuesday [Aug. 14],
and then playoffs are on Wednes-
day, Thursday, and Friday.
The Bulldogs main pitcher,
Jack Hanes, explained how the
Bulldogs have been practicing
and training six days a week to
prepare for the World Series,
which he is excited to attend.
It feels good because not
everybody has an experience to
go to the World Series, and its
pretty cool to have that, he said.
Hopefully were going to win,
but were going to play good
teams from other regions, so
were going to play our best and
see how we do.
This year, the Bulldogs had an
impressive record of 40-2 against
all of the other towns, slightly
below their almost perfect record
of 49-1 last year.
However, the majority of the 12
boys on the team have been play-
ing together since they were 7 or 8
years old, which has allowed
them to develop a bond that helps
them play better together.
TEN
Continued from page 2
please see PARENTS, page 5
AUGUST 15-21, 2012 THE HOPEWELL SUN 5
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Parents crucial to teams
success, says coach
They spend a lot of time to-
gether, usually five or six days a
week, Tagliareni said.
Tagliareni also explained how
the parents of the boys are cru-
cial to the teams success, and are
one of the main reasons that the
boys have succeeded and gotten
this far this year.
When you have parents that
are committed, it really helps, he
said. In order to be the best in
the region, youre the best of
many hundreds. It has to be be-
cause the kids work year-round
and if they dont, theyre not
going to get better. As far as the
commitment, if you join my
team, you dont miss (no vaca-
tions, no family reunions) thats
the deal. Thats why Im lucky to
have those parents that under-
stand that. Were trying to play at
the level that we are, and thats
why we made the champi-
onships.
Check back in next weeks edi-
tion of The Hopewell Sun to see
the Bulldogs results from the
2012 Cal Ripken 10 Year-Old World
Series.
PARENTS
Continued from page 4
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6 THE HOPEWELL SUN AUGUST 15-21, 2012
20 Nassau Street, Suite 26A
Princeton, NJ 08542
609-751-0245
The Sun is published weekly by Elauwit
Media LLC, 20 Nassau Street, Suite 26A,
Princeton, NJ 08542. It is mailed weekly to
select addresses in the 08560, 08525 and
08534 ZIP codes. If you are not on the mail-
ing list, six-month subscriptions are avail-
able for $39.99. PDFs of the publication are
online, free of charge. For information,
please call 609-751-0245.
To submit a news release, please email
news@hopewellsun.com. For advertising
information, call 609-751-0245 or email
advertising@hopewellsun.com. The Sun
welcomes suggestions and comments from
readers including any information about
errors that may call for a correction to be
printed.
SPEAK UP
The Sun welcomes letters from readers. Brief
and to the point is best, so we look for letters
that are 300 words or fewer. Include your
name, address and phone number. We do not
print anonymous letters. Send letters to
news@hopewellsun.com, via fax at 609-751-
0245, or via the mail. Of course, you can drop
them off at our office, too. The Hopewell Sun
reserves the right to reprint your letter in any
medium including electronically.
PUBLISHER Steve Miller
GENERAL MANAGER & EDITOR Alan Bauer
VICE PRESIDENT OF SALES Joe Eisele
NEWS
MANAGING EDITOR Mary L. Serkalow
PRODUCTION EDITOR Kristen Dowd
HOPEWELL EDITOR Heather Fiore
OPERATIONS
DIGITAL MEDIA DIRECTOR Tim Ronaldson
ART DIRECTOR Tom Engle
CHAIRMAN OF THE BOARD Russell Cann
CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER Barry Rubens
VICE CHAIRMAN Michael LaCount, Ph.D.
ELAUWIT MEDIA GROUP
CHAIRMAN OF THE BOARD Dan McDonough, Jr.
VICE CHAIRMAN Alan Bauer
W
hen Gov. Christie last week
signed a bill that overhauled
teacher tenure in the state,
it was a landmark moment. But its not
the final piece of the puzzle. Not even
close.
The measure, which was supported
by both parties, strives to make teach-
ers more accountable through evalua-
tions and reviews. If they get bad re-
views, they could be removed from the
classroom. The bill also added a year
before tenure is granted.
Were all for rewarding the best
teachers and getting the bad ones out
of the classroom. In theory, this move
is a step toward that.
But questions remain.
What will the final version of the
teacher evaluation system look like? In
other words, can the state implement a
system that effectively identifies teach-
ers who need to be rewarded and those
who need to go? Will local districts
have to hire more managers or super-
visors? Will that lead to tax hikes?
Student achievement is another ele-
ment of the bill, and another area in
which teachers are to be measured.
Does that mean standardized test re-
sults will be used? What about those
teachers who teach grades that dont
have standardized testing? Is it smart
to teach to the test? Since a childs
educational foundation begins early, is
it fair to hold a teacher accountable for
educational shortcomings that should
have been addressed years earlier?
Also, the measure is silent on the
last in, first out system when it comes
to layoffs.
Make no mistake significant ad-
vances were made in this bill. The
state is heading in the right direction
and should be congratulated for taking
initial steps to improve public educa-
tion.
But we shouldnt expect changes to
happen overnight. And we shouldnt
expect a perfect system right out of the
starting gate.
There are too many questions still to
be answered.
in our opinion
Tenure measure a first step
The ultimate goal is to ensure students receive the best education possible
Teacher tenure revised
Last weeks measure is no doubt a step
in the right direction and a landmark
moment for education in New Jersey.
But a lot of questions still have to be
answered before anyone can pro-
nounce this move a success.
The following reports are on file with
the Hopewell Township Police Depart-
ment:
On July 25 at 2:30 p.m., Officer Christo-
pher Vaccarino charged an 18-year-old
male with the possession of marijuana
(over 50 grams). This charge stems from an
investigation that began on July 24 that
also resulted in charges against two juve-
niles (one male, one female) for the posses-
sion of marijuana (over 50 grams) and
charges against an additional juvenile
male for the possession of marijuana (over
50 grams), possession of drug parapherna-
lia, and possession with intent to distrib-
ute marijuana. The mans case will be for-
warded to the Mercer County Prosecutors
Office for review.
On July 25 at 5:50 a.m., a marijuana in-
vestigation resulted in charges against two
juvenile boys and a juvenile girl. A 17-year-
old Pennington boy and a 17-year-old
Hopewell Township girl were charged with
the possession of marijuana (over 50
grams). A 17-year-old Hopewell Township
boy was charged with the possession of
marijuana (over 50 grams), possession of
drug paraphernalia, and possession with
intent to distribute marijuana. These
charges will be heard in Family Court.
Twenty marijuana plants were found dur-
ing this investigation. The investigation is
ongoing.
On July 26 at 8:48 a.m., Officer Christo-
pher Vaccarino took a theft report. Some-
time between 11:30 a.m. and noon on July
25, someone took an Apple iPhone from a
shopping cart at Shop Rite after the owner
accidentally left it in the cart in the park-
ing lot. The loss was estimated at $680.
On July 30 at 11:39 a.m., Officer Joseph
McNeil responded to a Harbourton Mt.
Airy Road residence for the report of crim-
inal mischief. Sometime between 5 p.m. on
July 26 and 1 p.m. on July 30, someone dam-
aged the rear door to the home. The dam-
age was estimated to be less than $500.
On July 31 at 5:15 a.m., Officer George
Sabatino responded to Federal City Road
for the report of recycling cans on fire. Of-
ficer Sabatino arrived and found two recy-
cling cans smoldering near a residential
driveway. The plastic cans were melted and
cans, bottles and paper that had been in the
buckets were charred. The Pennington
Fire Department responded to the scene
and extinguished the fire.
On July 29 at 12:30 p.m., Officer Michael
Toth responded to a River Drive address
for the report of a possible burglary. The
resident reported that a rear window had
been broken and it appeared that someone
had entered the home during the night and
eaten some food. Further investigation by
police report
please see POLICE, page 9
AUGUST 15-21, 2012 THE HOPEWELL SUN 7
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of Mercer County
A choral group is forming at
the senior center this fall.
Hopewell Valley Senior Servic-
es is looking for at least eight men
and women who are passionate
about singing and would like to
be part of a choral group that will
meet on the second and fourth
Wednesday from 3 to 4:30 p.m. at
the Hopewell Valley Senior Cen-
ter.
This is a great chance to
enjoy singing and meet new peo-
ple.
The group will sing oldies,
show tunes, and holiday songs (in
preparation for a holiday show at
the senior center).
The group will be led by
Hopewell Township resident
Diane Beebe, who is the former
president of the Oakland Senior
Club in Oakland, and is
currently the cantor at two local
churches.
If interested, please call
Hopewell Valley Senior Services
at (609) 737-0605, ext. 692 or email
awaugh@hopewelltwp.org by
Sept. 12.
Choral group forming at senior center
Pennington Dance is accepting
online registrations for its 33rd
season, which begins on Monday,
Sept. 10.
Classes include full-year pro-
grams in ballet and pointe, tap,
jazz, hip hop, pre-school dance
and pilates mat work. Workshops
include musical theater produc-
tion, original Broadway
repertoire and contemporary
dance.
Private pilates apparatus class-
es are scheduled by appointment.
Open houses will be held from
10:30 a.m. until noon on Saturday,
Aug. 18, Aug. 25, and Sept. 8 at the
Cyrus Lodge studio location at
131 Burd Street in Pennington.
The open house is an opportu-
nity to meet staff, see the spacious
fully equipped studio space, and
watch a DVD of last Junes per-
formance.
To register call director Nancy
Warner at (609) 737-7596 or visit
www.penningtondance.com.
Registration going on now for Pennington Dance
WEDNESDAY AUG. 15
Paper Stars Craft: Ages 8 and old-
er. 3 p.m. at Hopewell Public
Library. Sign up required. Visit
www.hopewellpublicilbrary.blogs
pot.com.
Star Gazing: 7 p.m. at the Hopewell
Train Station.
SUNDAY AUG. 19
Hopewell Presbyterian Church:
Worship service at 10:30 a.m.
Intergenerational Sunday School
from 9 to 10:15 a.m. Coffee fellow-
ship from 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.
80 West Broad St., Hopewell.
Hopewell United Methodist
Church: Worship service at 10
a.m. Teen/adult education from 9
to 9:45 a.m. Sunday school at 10
a.m. Youth group at 6:30 p.m. 20
Blackwell Ave., Hopewell.
St. Alphonsus Roman Catholic
Church: Mass at 7:30, 9 and 11:15
a.m. 54 East Prospect St.,
Hopewell.
Word Christian Fellowship Interna-
tional: Worship service at 10 a.m.
Sunday school at 10:30 a.m. 44
Van Dyke Road, Hopewell.
MONDAY AUG. 20
Kids Open Craft: Ages 3 to 8. 4 to
5:30 p.m. at Hopewell Branch of
the Mercer County Library Sys-
tem. Children can stop in to con-
struct the craft of the week. Staff
member will be present to help.
Yoga: 5:30 to 6:30 p.m. at Hopewell
Branch of the Mercer County
Library System. Bring yoga mat
or large towel. Registration
required; call (609) 737-2610.
Tai Chi: 7:30 to 8:30 p.m. at
Hopewell Branch of the Mercer
County Library System. Learn
this ancient art to promote good
health and relaxation. No regis-
tration required.
Hopewell Township Recreation
Advisory Committee meeting: 7
p.m. at the Hopewell Municipal
Building, 201 Washington Cross-
ing-Pennington Road. Open to
the public. Visit www.hopewell
twp.org to confirm time or for
more information.
TUESDAY AUG. 21
Story Time: Ages 2 to 5; siblings
welcome. 2 to 3 p.m. at Hopewell
Branch of the Mercer County
Library System. Action rhymes,
songs and felt board activities.
Age-appropriate craft follows sto-
ry time. Parental supervision
required.
Baby Time: Ages birth to 2. 11 to
11:30 a.m. Adult supervision
required. This program is a great
way to introduce children to
library story times and reading.
Age appropriate books are
shared with the group. Songs,
nursery rhymes, puppets, and felt
board figures create a rich audio-
visual and social experience.
After about 20 minutes of struc-
tured group time, there is time
for play and for socializing.
Yoga: 5 to 6 p.m. at Hopewell Branch
of the Mercer County Library Sys-
tem. Bring yoga mat or large tow-
el. Registration required; call
(609) 737-2610.
Hopewell Township Environmental
Commission meeting: 7:30 or 8
p.m. at the Hopewell Township
Municipal Building, 201 Washing-
ton Crossing-Pennington Rd. the
third Tuesday of the month. Veri-
fy time at hopewelltwp.org.
Historic Preservation Commission
meeting: 7:30 p.m. in the
Hopewell Township Main Admin-
istration Building the third Tues-
day of the month. For more infor-
mation visit hopewelltwp.org.
CALENDAR PAGE 8 AUGUST 15-21, 2012
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Detective Daniel McKeown led to
the arrest of a 24 year-old male
who was charged with criminal
trespassing and criminal mis-
chief. He was processed at police
headquarters and was later re-
leased. This case will be forward-
ed to the Mercer County Prosecu-
tors Office for review.
On Aug. 4 at 3 p.m., Sergeant
Michael Cseremsak responded to
Castleton Court for the report of
solicitors going door to door. Ser-
geant Cseremsak located the so-
licitors. Two 20-year-old males
and one 19-year-old male were is-
sued summonses for soliciting
without permits, which will be
heard in municipal court.
On July 29 at 3:33 a.m., Officer
Alexis Mirra took a burglary re-
port. Sometime between July 3
and July 26, someone entered an
unlocked residence on West
Prospect Street and removed jew-
elry from the home. The loss was
estimated at $8,600.
On Aug. 1 at 2:46 a.m., Officer
Gerard Infantino stopped a car
along Pennington Road after ob-
serving it make an unsafe lane
change and weave in and out of
its lane. Officer Infantino spoke
with the driver, a 19-year-old male
who had the odor of alcohol on
his breath. After performing field
sobriety tests, he was placed
under arrest and transported to
police headquarters for process-
ing. He was charged with DWI,
reckless driving, failure to keep
right and unsafe lane change,
which will be heard in municipal
court. He was later released to an
acquaintance.
On Aug. 3 at 1:22 a.m., Officer
Michael Toth responded to a bur-
glar alarm at the Its Nutts restau-
rant along Route 29. Officer Toth
arrived and found a window
smashed out on the building. A
cash box had been taken and the
loss was estimated at $900. A
short time later, Sergeant Christo-
pher Kascik located a white Ford
pick up truck in the parking lot of
St. Georges Church. A male who
appeared to be in his early twen-
ties was seen running from the
truck into the Washington Cross-
ing State Park. A search of the
area was conducted by respond-
ing officers and a K9 unit from
the Trenton Police Department
but the suspect wasnt located.
The truck was impounded for fur-
ther investigation. Detective
Kevin Zorn is assisting with this
investigation.
AUGUST 15-21, 2012 THE HOPEWELL SUN 9

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POLICE
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Parents Anonymous/
Family Helpline
(800) 843-5437
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The Center for Continuing
Studies (CCS) at Mercer County
Community College has an-
nounced an array of courses to
start in September that are de-
signed to give adults a conven-
ient, concentrated route to en-
hanced skills and new careers.
Among the center's popular ca-
reer programs are business man-
agement, computer technology,
health care certifications, contin-
uing education for educators, and
certifications for the construction
field. Classes for personal interest
range from cooking and fitness to
writing, languages, personal fi-
nance and more.
Taught by experts in their
fields, many of the courses are of-
fered as certificate series, but also
can be taken on an individual
basis. Most classes meet in the
evening and on weekends on the
colleges West Windsor campus
located at 1200 Old Trenton Road.
With the goal of continuing to
address community need, the
CCS has added 30 new classes for
the fall.
Most sessions have been de-
veloped based on requests from
working professionals who are
trying to take their careers to the
next level or for those who are
seeking to change their career di-
rection, Director of Continuing
Studies Carol Clark said. We aim
to respond quickly to accommo-
date what people require in their
professional development.
A Back to School Night for
Adults information session will
be held on Tuesday, Aug. 28, at 6
p.m. Staff and instructors will be
on hand to describe programs, an-
swer questions and offer career
advice. Information sessions for
specific programs include Vet-
erinary Assistant on Thursday,
Aug. 23, at 5:30 p.m.; Clinical De-
velopment and Regulatory Af-
fairs on Wednesday, Sept. 5, at
5:30 p.m.; and New Pathways to
Teaching in New Jersey on
Thursday, Sept. 13, at 5:30 p.m. All
sessions will start promptly and
are held on the colleges West
Windsor campus. Check the CCS
website at www.mccc.edu/ccs for
information session locations or
call (609) 570-3311.
Among the new business class-
es are Business Writing that
Works from Sept. 4 through Oct.
16; Time Management from
Sept. 24 through Oct. 11; Princi-
ples of Investing in Real Estate
from Oct. 1 through 29; Improve
Your Global Culture Intelligence
Quotient for Business from Nov.
12 through 26; and Advanced
Topics in Bookkeeping from De-
cember through Feb. 2.
With computer software cours-
es ranging from the most basic to
highly advanced, the CCS intro-
duces MS Basic Outlook 2010,
the latest version of the popular
email program, from Oct. 3
through 17.
At the other end of the skills
spectrum is Designing Websites
for Smartphones and Tablets
from Dec. 1 through 15. For those
trying to trying to get the most
out of their Apple devices, the
CCS presents Exploring the
Power of Your iPhone and iPad
Nov. 7 through 14.
Among the centers courses for
prospective teachers are How to
Become an Adjunct Instructor,
for those with a masters degree,
on Oct. 1 and repeated on Nov. 5;
How to Become an Effective Sub-
stitute Teacher, offered in three
different sessions during the fall;
and Montessori Teacher Certifi-
cation, a multi-course program
that begins Sept. 4. Those with a
college degree who did not com-
plete a traditional teacher
preparatory program may enroll
in New Pathways to Teaching in
New Jersey. The program begins
with a mandatory Introduction
to the Teaching Profession from
Sept. 20 through Oct. 22.
Courses start in September
that lead to certificates in the
health care field including
Gerontology, Clinical Develop-
ment and Regulatory Affairs,
Pharmacy Technician and
Certified Nurse Aide. Two on-
line certificates focus on alterna-
tive approaches: Complemen-
tary and Alternative Medicine
and Holistic and Integrative
Health.
New offerings in the health
professions include Emergency
Medical Technician from Sept. 4
through Dec. 20 and Phlebotomy
Technician from October 8
through Dec. 10. New in the Med-
ical Billing/Coding Specialist cer-
tificate series are: ICD9 to 10
Mapping from Nov. 14 through
Dec. 19, and Billers and Coders
Medical Terminology from Nov.
30 through Dec. 7.
The Center continues to offer
hundreds of classes online for
both professional development
and personal enrichment. Most
run for six weeks and include 24
or more hours of instruction.
Classes can be accessed from par-
ticipants home computers, any
time day or night. A list of online
courses is available at
www.mccc.edu/ccs.
For further information
and/or to register for noncredit
courses, call (609) 570-3311, or e-
mail comed@mccc.edu. The fall
2012 bulletin arrives in the homes
of county residents in July and is
also available online at
www.mccc.edu/ccs. Those inter-
ested in being added to the Center
for Continuing Studies monthly
e-mail newsletter list should con-
tact Brielle Parady at
paradyb@mccc.edu.
Career growth is goal of MCCCs Center of Continuing Studies
10 THE HOPEWELL SUN AUGUST 15-21, 2012
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PSA
The two after-school programs
that have served Hopewell Valley
students for many years will open
this September as a single pro-
gram.
The Hopewell Valley After
School Program (HVASP) and the
Hopewell Valley YMCA will
merge under the umbrella of the
YMCA to offer the Before and
After Care of Hopewell Valley
program. HVASP Director Karen
Sharp and YMCA Program Direc-
tor Dan Williams will continue to
lead the new program.
Before- and after-care will con-
tinue to be offered at all four
Hopewell Valley elementary
schools and Timberlane; however,
the hours will be extended to 7
a.m. to 6:30 p.m. Most adult
staffers will remain in the new
program and the fees will be
roughly the same as last year, ac-
cording to the directors.
We are also working to expand
the program to include age-appro-
priate activities for the different
levels of students attending,
YMCA CEO Doug Pszczolkowski
said. That could include enrich-
ment programs, homework help
and even tutoring.
The new organization will be
under contract with the Hopewell
Valley Regional School District
(HVRSD), which will have over-
sight of the program. Also new is
the development of a Parent Ad-
visory Committee, comprised of
parents and school administra-
tors, who will meet quarterly to
discuss the program.
We are very excited to be en-
tering this new partnership,
Pszczolkowski said. The pro-
gram will continue to be flexible,
offering child care one to five
days a week, as well as drop-in
availability and extended hours.
Parents whose children are in
the program should be receiving
registration paperwork in the
next few weeks. Parents with
questions are encouraged to con-
tact the Hopewell Valley YMCA
by calling (609) 737-3048, or by
emailing info@hvymca.org.
Members of the Hopewell Val-
ley Regional Board of Education
last year brought up the issue of
merging the two programs which
have, for years, operated side-by-
side in the schools with no writ-
ten contract.
Because the programs are run
at our schools and care for our
students, the school administra-
tion and school board wanted to
have more control and input
when it came to how the pro-
grams are run and what is of-
fered, Superintendent Thomas
Smith said.
For several months, the board
and administration considered
proposals from several different
care providers, including the
HVASP and YMCA. In the end,
they decided to allow the existing
programs to combine into a sin-
gle program.
This agreement meets our
goals for childcare in the dis-
trict, School Board President
Lisa Wolff said. We wanted ex-
panded enrichment opportunities
and a single program to simplify
things. We also wanted our school
administration to have more
oversight of the program, and a
formalized contract that clarifies
the use of our facilities and fees.
We will accomplish all of these in
our new program.
AUGUST 15-21, 2012 THE HOPEWELL SUN 11
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12 THE HOPEWELL SUN AUGUST 15-21, 2012
said. Thats how they gained
entry.
Maloney wasnt able to disclose
exactly how the suspects were ap-
prehended after the incident, but
stated that they werent at the
scene when police arrived.
Information was developed
while the officers were on the
scene, he said. Somebody came
forward with information that led
us to them.
This case was further investi-
gated by Officer James Hoffman,
Sergeant Christopher Kascik, De-
tective Daniel McKeown and De-
tective Michael Sherman, who as-
sisted Officer Toth in catching the
suspects.
The four boys cases will be
heard in Family Court, where
they will face consequences rang-
ing from probation to community
service to restitution.
When asked by residents if the
individuals involved would be re-
sponsible for restitution at the
meeting on Aug. 6, Arcurio de-
tailed how thats out of the
schools hands.
Restitution is in the hands of
the civil court and the insurance
company at this point, he said.
Clean-up and restoration of the
school is being conducted by In-
surance Restoration Specialists
(IRS), a company based out of
Monroe, and will take two weeks
to fully restore Bear Tavern to its
original setting, according to
General Manager of IRS John
Lewis.
Lewis explained that IRS was
contacted through Hopewell Val-
ley Regional School Districts Di-
rector of Facilities Norman
Torkelson on Monday, July 30,
and began cleaning up the school
right away.
In only two days, IRS crew of
workers cleared out and restored
the cafeteria, hallways and some
of the classrooms.
The only reason its going to
take IRS two weeks to restore
Bear Tavern is because of the
emission of the contents inside of
the fire extinguishers magne-
sium sulfate which is very
harmful for the breathing system,
according to Lewis.
Were using air filtration de-
vices, or negative air machines,
he said. Were hepa-vaccing
every inch of that school, and
then doing a wiping process.
Arcurio also detailed to resi-
dents that the biggest piece of the
cleanup process if the environ-
mental piece, which is the reason
why the school has been off-lim-
its.
Discharging all of the fire ex-
tinguishers has left a residue
throughout the building on all
surfaces and in air ducts that is
not safe to breathe in over time.
He said. The IRS cleaning crew
is wiping down everything in the
affected areas and cleaning the
schools ventilation system.
After IRS completes its portion
of the cleanup process, the school
must be certified safe by PARS
Environmental, an environmen-
tal consulting firm, so that the
students and faculty can reenter
come September.
Bear Tavern will reopen for
normal business on Aug. 20, and
will be open to the public for a
walk through at 9 a.m., according
to Arcurio.
When school starts on Sept. 6,
he also explained how teachers
will be addressing the incident to
students.
Teachers will talk to children
in an age appropriate fashion to
answer their questions, he said.
We will focus on the respect that
we should have for property and
our responsibility to take care of
our community. We will also
focus on making choices and the
consequences of our choices.
As part of the efforts to
reestablish Bear Taverns image,
Arcurio revealed the schools new
motto, Better Together! Better
Than Ever! which will be dis-
played on banners hanging in
front of the school, and on t-shirts
that will be distributed to all stu-
dents and staff members.
If residents want to assist Bear
Tavern in its recovery, Arcurio
explained that there are several
things that people can help do, in-
cluding help from families to cre-
ate and decorate hallway bulletin
boards with the Better Togeth-
er theme in mind, helping teach-
ers set up their classrooms, help-
ing paint the staff lounge, and as-
sisting Mrs. Muhlbauer [librari-
an] get the library back in shape
(reorganizing and restacking
books and shelves).
When the school officially re-
opens on Aug. 20, Arcurio also
asked if community members
could assist staff members in
walking the grounds of Bear Tav-
ern to pick up litter.
Bear Tavern is a strong com-
munity and we can weather any
storm, Arcurio said. This is
only a minor setback, but it al-
lows us to show our true charac-
ter. It allows us to show our re-
solve. It allows us to demonstrate
our connection to one another.
DAMAGE
Continued from page 1
Damage cleanup estimated at more than $100,000
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T HE HO P E WE L L S U N
AUGUST 15-21, 2012 PAGE 14
W H A T Y O U N E E D T O K N O W
All ads are based on a 5 line ad, 15-18 characters per line. Additional lines: $9, Bold/Reverse Type: $9 Add color to any box ad for $20. Deadline: Wednesday - 5pm for the following week.
All classified ads must be prepaid. Your Classified ad will run in all 10 of The Sun newspapers each week! Be sure to check your ad the first day it appears.
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