You are on page 1of 22
Sex & Relationships How Do I Figure This Out? Self-Advocates Becoming Empowered
Sex & Relationships How Do I Figure This Out?
Sex & Relationships
How Do I Figure This Out?

Self-Advocates

Becoming Empowered

Katherine McLaughlin
Katherine McLaughlin

www.disabilityworkshops.com

Katherine, an expert on sexuality and developmental

disabilities, has taught sexuality education to people with developmental disabilities as well as trained them to be peer sexuality educators themselves. She has trained nationally at conferences and workshops, has developed and led

parent workshops on Talking to Your Kids with Disabilities about Sexuality, and has trained staff on how to address sexuality with people with disabilities. Katherine has co- authored two curricula for Planned Parenthood of Northern

New England: Sexuality Education for Adults with

Developmental Disabilities and Sexual Violence in Teenage Lives. Katherine leads workshops as a private consultant and also teaches Human Sexuality at Keene State College in NH.

Goals
Goals

Discuss sexual feelings and

choices

Examine what being sexual with another person means Explore reasons people decide not to have sex and have sex

Explore ways to talk about sex with a partner

Introduction
Introduction

This webinar was developed from the following shared values:

We are all sexual beings. Sexuality is a positive and pleasurable part of life.

The fundamental principles of self-advocacy

that people with developmental disabilities can

have control over their own lives, make their own decisions, solve problems and speak for themselves extend to sexuality and

relationships.

People have the right to choose their own partners same sex, opposite sex, differently- abled.

Introduction
Introduction

Everyone has a right to the facts about health and sexuality information provided in an accessible manner.

Relationships are learning opportunities. We move in, out, and within them in different ways.

Treat adults as adults. Have respect for an individual’s right to make choices and mistakes.

Accept people where they are; support people in discovering who they are. No judging do not push your values on someone else.

Group

Agreements

Respect

Randy

1. All feelings are okay. It is okay to feel whatever you feel - embarrassed, fear, shy…

okay to feel whatever you feel - embarrassed, fear, shy… oops 2. Show respect for everyone’s

oops

to feel whatever you feel - embarrassed, fear, shy… oops 2. Show respect for everyone’s opinion.

2. Show respect for everyone’s opinion. We don’t all have to agree with each other but we do need

to respect each other. Express your feelings in a

kind way. For example:

Do not say… Instead say…

“That’s gross!” “I don’t like that.”

say… “That’s gross!” “I don’t like that.” 3. No questions is a silly question. It is

3. No questions is a silly question. It is okay and important

to ask questions; just not personal and private questions. For example, you can say, How do I ask someone out?” But it is not okay to ask someone if they had sex last night.

it is not okay to ask someone if they had sex last night. 4. Talking about

4. Talking about relationships can be fun - but it can

also be tough work! We all agree to do the best we can at each class - to listen, to share, and to be respectful.

What Are Sexual Feelings? You may feel …  warm inside,  nervous and silly
What Are Sexual Feelings?
What Are Sexual Feelings?

You may feel …

warm inside,

nervous and silly when that person is around,

Like you want to kiss someone, see the

person naked,

horny, turned on, heart pounds

It is normal to have sexual feelings and there

are choices that you can make about these feelings

8/7/2012

8/7/2012 15
8/7/2012 15

15

8/7/2012 16
8/7/2012 16

8/7/2012

8/7/2012 16

16

Who is it okay to be sexual with? Can a potential partner be…. • Someone
Who is it okay to be sexual with?
Who is it okay to be sexual with?

Can a potential partner be….

Someone of the same gender?

Someone already in a

relationship?

Someone who has said she/he

is not interested?

A paid support person?

Someone under 18?

in a relationship? • Someone who has said she/he is not interested? • A paid support
Communication and Pleasure

Communication and Pleasure

Communication and Pleasure
Communication and Pleasure
Sexually Healthy Person
Sexually Healthy Person
Sexually Healthy Person
Sexually Healthy Person
Sexually Healthy Person
Sexually Healthy Person
Katherine McLaughlin
Katherine McLaughlin

www.disabilityworkshops.com

Katherine, an expert on sexuality and developmental

disabilities, has taught sexuality education to people with developmental disabilities as well as trained them to be peer sexuality educators themselves. She has trained nationally at conferences and workshops, has developed and led

parent workshops on Talking to Your Kids with Disabilities about Sexuality, and has trained staff on how to address sexuality with people with disabilities. Katherine has co- authored two curricula for Planned Parenthood of Northern

New England: Sexuality Education for Adults with

Developmental Disabilities and Sexual Violence in Teenage Lives. Katherine leads workshops as a private consultant and also teaches Human Sexuality at Keene State College in NH.

Continue the discussion through our FORUMS! You will receive an email shortly with a link

Continue the discussion through our FORUMS!

You will receive an email shortly with a link to our discussion board. The PowerPoint and recording will also be provided in this email. Email Jennifer (jsladen@autismnow.org) if you experience any issues.

Website:

Information & Referral Call Center:

1-855-828-8476

Next Webinar:

Tuesday, August 14, 2012, 2:00-3:00 PM, EDT Autism & Online Dating!