En INTERPOL 2000-2010 Fighting 21st Century Crime | Organized Crime | Police

2000-2010

INTERPOL
Fighting 21st century crime

INTERPOL

A global presence
Nine new countries* have joined INTERPOL over the past decade, bringing our membership to 188.

Afghanistan*, Albania, Algeria, Andorra, Angola, Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Armenia, Aruba, Australia, Austria, Azerbaijan, Bahamas, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belarus, Belgium, Belize, Benin, Bhutan*, Bolivia, Bosnia Herzegovina, Botswana, Brazil, Brunei, Bulgaria, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Canada, Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chad, Chile, China, Colombia, Comoros, Congo, Congo (Democratic Rep), Costa Rica, Côte d’Ivoire, Croatia, Cuba, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Djibouti, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Equatorial Guinea, Eritrea, Estonia, Ethiopia, Fiji, Finland, Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, France, Gabon, Gambia, Georgia, Germany, Ghana, Greece, Grenada, Guatemala, Guinea, Guinea Bissau, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, Hungary, Iceland, India, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Jamaica, Japan, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Korea (Rep. of), Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Laos, Latvia, Lebanon, Lesotho, Liberia, Libya, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Madagascar, Malawi, Malaysia, Maldives, Mali, Malta, Marshall Islands, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mexico, Moldova, Monaco, Mongolia, Montenegro*, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Namibia, Nauru, Nepal, Netherlands, Netherlands Antilles, New Zealand, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, Norway, Oman, Pakistan, Panama, Papua New Guinea, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Poland, Portugal, Qatar, Romania, Russia, Rwanda, St Kitts and Nevis, St Lucia, St Vincent and the Grenadines, Samoa*, San Marino*, Sao Tome and Principe, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Serbia, Seychelles, Sierra Leone, Singapore, Slovakia, Slovenia, Somalia, South Africa, Spain, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Swaziland, Sweden, Switzerland, Syria, Tajikistan*, Tanzania, Thailand, Timor-Leste*, Togo, Tonga, Trinidad and Tobago, Tunisia, Turkey, Turkmenistan*, Uganda, Ukraine, United Arab Emirates, United Kingdom, United States of America, Uruguay, Uzbekistan, Vatican City State*, Venezuela, Vietnam, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe
Regional Bureaus: Argentina, Cameroon, Côte d’Ivoire, El Salvador, Kenya, Zimbabwe Liaison Office: Thailand Offices of the Special Representative of INTERPOL: United Nations in New York, European Union in Brussels

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Contents

New millennium, new crimes Making it work; the key players National Central Bureaus: our engine Executive Committee: our direction General Secretariat: our support Innovating with new ideas and technology Timeline of key events Reinforcing our support of national police Our growing operational role A stronger voice on the international stage Increasing transparency and accountability The future

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New millennium, new crimes
The first decade of the 21st century has seen major changes in the way criminals operate.

“Following the terrorist attacks of 11 September 2001, I made a commitment that no day, hour or minute would pass without INTERPOL being there for our member countries. Since then, the lights have never gone out at INTERPOL.”
Ronald K. Noble, INTERPOL Secretary General

The huge growth of the World Wide Web and the explosion of new technologies have revolutionized the way we live and work. But these same tools have also enabled criminals to co-ordinate and bolster their activities under a cloak of anonymity and have opened myriad new avenues for fraud, child sexual exploitation and other online crimes. Acts of terrorism have hit many more countries since the World Trade Center bombings of 2001. The Internet has facilitated terrorists’ activities, strengthening their ability to communicate, spread propaganda, recruit, conduct surveillance and raise funds. The ease and affordability of international travel has led to increased physical mobility for criminals everywhere. Transnational organized crime has reached macro-economic proportions as illicit goods are sourced in one continent, trafficked cross another and marketed in a third. Organized crime has infiltrated existing financial and commercial markets, moving illegal products and profits through established routes. The criminal underworld has become inextricably linked to the global economy and vice versa. The events of September 2001 gave INTERPOL a new purpose and a new determination to play a role in fighting these crimes. We knew we had to become more dynamic and more relevant to the world’s police. We started by opening a 24-7 command centre, and went on to develop a diverse range of innovative tools and services for global law enforcement. The digital age has opened up immense opportunities in international policing: fast, secure communications and instant access to real-time data are now easily available. Preventing terrorists’ movements and enhancing border security are achievable without great expense. At INTERPOL, we have embraced the 21st century and the opportunities and challenges it has brought to our member countries, and have struck new ground in the services we offer to law enforcement officials to help them fight crimes that cross borders.

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INTERPOL

Any organization is only as strong as the people it comprises: at INTERPOL today, we have the strength of a network of 188 member countries, each represented by a National Central Bureau and committed on a daily basis to international police co-operation. Their voice is our annual General Assembly; their leadership is our Executive Committee; and day-to-day support is provided by staff at the General Secretariat and its Regional Bureaus. National Central Bureaus: our engine Every day, the highly trained police officers who staff the INTERPOL National Central Bureau (NCB) in each member country draw on our databases and services for their investigations. The NCBs not only provide the link with national law enforcement and authorities, but also co-operate on cross-border operations and arrests. Given the cross-border nature of organized crime, NCBs work together increasingly on a regional basis. In all regions of the world, we see our member countries combining resources and expertise in successful interventions against those crime areas that affect them the most – from tackling counterfeit and pirated goods in South America, to illegal soccer gambling in Asia and ivory trafficking in Africa. In the past decade, NCBs have become more active in shaping INTERPOL’s activities and plans. The Heads of NCB Conference, initiated in 2005, provides a unique forum for building relationships, sharing information and working together to find joint solutions to common challenges. In addition to meeting with the heads of NCBs in Lyon, the Secretary General, Ronald K. Noble, has visited senior police officials in some 140 member countries over the course of the decade to listen to their needs and raise awareness of new services the Organization has created to support their crime-fighting efforts.

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Making it work; the key players

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Executive Committee: our direction Our President and Executive Committee (EC) set organizational policy and direction. The EC’s members sit at the top level of policing in their own countries and bring many years of experience and knowledge to advise and guide us. The EC is behind many visionary decisions that have changed the course of our activities and has been a driving force in recent efforts to enhance our strategic planning and develop targeted and sustainable growth for the Organization. Recognizing a need for an increased budget to fund ground-breaking operational services, their support enabled us, for example, to create the 24-7 Command and Co-ordination Centre.

General Secretariat: our support Reflecting the diversity of our membership, a total of 106 nationalities have served at the Secretariat and its regional offices over the past decade. Today, 89 nationalities are represented among the 645 staff. Having a presence in all regions of the world ensures the Organization can provide enhanced support wherever it may be needed. Recognizing the value of bringing together police within a region to share experiences and tackle common crime issues, we have opened new regional offices in El Salvador, Kenya and Cameroon, bringing the total to seven. Our staff have developed new tools, databases and services to help member countries fight a wide range of criminal activities and to encourage communication and co-operation between NCBs.

Commitment and diversity

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Innovating with new ideas and technology
Police today need instant access to criminal data and the past decade has seen a powerful drive to harness the potential of technology to our benefit. The development of the Internet has played a key supporting role in this. A bid to link all our member countries together for the first time on a secure communications system was launched in 2003 with the creation of I-24/7; by 2007, all countries were connected. To push this connectivity beyond the NCB and directly out to field officers, for example, airport border officials, we created mobile and fixed network databases which we call MIND and FIND. This technology allows law enforcement officers to connect to our databases from their office or from the field, giving them instant access to real-time criminal information. Switzerland was the first country to implement MIND and FIND in 2005, and 55 other countries have followed since then. One of our most powerful tools in tracking international fugitives, the Red Notice, alerts police in other countries of a wanted person and can now be published immediately by any member country, thanks to our I-link system unveiled in 2009. We have continued to enhance our databases. The Stolen and Lost Travel Documents database, created in 2002, now holds more than 22 million records. Terrorists and serious criminals – who often need false documentation to avoid detection or capture or to commit more crimes – are now up against better equipped law enforcers. Child sexual abuse has grown phenomenally, fuelled by greater demand for images as the Internet has grown. Our original 2001 database of child abuse images was replaced in 2009 by the International Child Sexual Exploitation Image Database, giving authorized specialists direct access to help identify and rescue child victims. Recognizing the increased value of forensics in providing evidence and matching previously unconnected crime scenes or criminals, we created a new database of DNA profiles in 2003, to support our fingerprints database. Since 2000, the fingerprints database has been directly accessible to member countries via a user-friendly automatic fingerprint identification system (AFIS). Property theft thrives worldwide with an increasing international outlook, and our databases on stolen motor vehicles and works of art continue to support police in identifying and recovering items. Stolen and Lost Travel Documents: Records 2003 299,264 2005 8,954,461 2009 19,857,921 Total Notices issued: 2000 2005 2009

Technology and innovation at the heart of all our activities

Searches 1,486 212,875 320,186,307

Hits 32 664 28,174

1,417 3,261 7,290

1,453 The total number of victims of child sexual abuse identified and rescued between 2001 and 2009. 292 The number of DNA matches to date, combining data from 30 different countries. The DNA database now contains more than 100,000 profiles in total.

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Timeline of key events
The past decade has seen much innovation and change in INTERPOL’s activities, services and approach. Below are just a few of the milestones in our recent history.

Deployment of the first Incident Response Team to Bali, following a bombing. Creation of the first-ever global database on stolen and lost travel documents. The world’s first global database on persons linked to terrorist activity goes live.

The Office of the Special Representative of INTERPOL at the United Nations opens in New York. Deployment of the first INTERPOL Major Events Support Team to Lisbon for the UEFA European Football Championship. Deployment of our first Disaster Victim Identification team in the aftermath of the Asian tsunami.

First-ever address by an INTERPOL Secretary General at the UN General Assembly. Proposal for a Global Complex in Singapore to build a new role in research and development.

The Organization elects a new President and Secretary General.

The importance of police training is recognized and we create a dedicated office.

The Commission for the Control of INTERPOL’s Files becomes an official body of the Organization.

2000

2001
Following the terrorist attacks of September 11, we create a Command and Co-ordination Centre and become operational round the clock. Launch of our first database of child sexual abuse images.

2002

2003
I-24/7 launches to connect all National Central Bureaus on a secure communications system. Creation of the DNA database.

2004

2005
The launch of MIND/ FIND takes INTERPOL tools to frontline officers. INTERPOL-UN Security Council Special Notice supports identification of suspected terrorists.

2006

2007
For the first time, all National Central Bureaus are connected to the same secure communications system (I-24/7). Operation Vico is our first appeal to the public to find a criminal; eleven days later a child sex abuser is arrested.

2008

2009
The Office of the Special Representative of INTERPOL at the European Union opens in Brussels. A ministerial meeting between INTERPOL and the United Nations pledges to increase the role of police in peacekeeping missions.

2010

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INTERPOL

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Reinforcing our support of national police
As an international organization fighting crime, we support all our member countries 24 hours a day, seven days a week. Our Command and Co-ordination Centre (CCC) has provided roundthe-clock multilingual support since 2001, offering a point of contact for any member country seeking urgent police information or facing a crisis situation. More than 50 Incident Response Teams (IRTs) have been deployed since the first one to Bali in 2002. Comprising experts in different fields, according to the need, they can be deployed in a matter of hours to deliver an emergency response or specialized investigative support. Our INTERPOL Major Event Support Teams (IMESTs) assist with the advance planning, preparation and implementation of security arrangements at events with a high public profile. More than 40 have been deployed since their inception in 2004, to events such as the G8 summit and the Olympic Games. Hands-on operations Although – contrary to popular belief – INTERPOL does not have agents, we do provide specialized support to national police carrying out field operations. Often preceded by training in the use of our tools and resources, these operations range from seizing counterfeit products and medicines to identifying stolen vehicles. Hunting down international fugitives, arresting wildlife poachers and environmental criminals, rescuing children who have been trafficked for labour, and dismantling drug trafficking networks: these activities reflect the scope and purpose of our operations. Training police in effective use of our services Porous borders and untrained police officers are weak links in the global fight against crime, easily exploitable by criminals. Our police training and development activities encourage countries to share experiences and learn how secure their borders using our tools and databases. An online training resource, the INTERPOL Global Learning Centre, was launched in 2009 to widen the reach of training.

Specialized and targeted support, 24-7

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Combining the strength of police, public and media

Expert assistance in computer forensics In March 2008, we provided neutral and expert assistance to a member country when Colombia asked us to carry out an independent forensic analysis of computers and hardware seized during an anti-narcotics and anti-terrorist operation on a FARC camp. We assembled a team of forensic experts who used cutting-edge tools to analyse a vast amount of data, including encrypted files, and whose recommendations created best practice procedures for first responder units faced with electronic evidence.

Identifying victims of the Asian tsunami The tsunami that devastated Southeast Asia at the end of 2004 led to the most extensive operational response in INTERPOL’s history. Experts in disaster victim identification were deployed to Indonesia, Thailand and Sri Lanka, providing support in forensics, logistics and communications. The operation also established standards and protocols for any major tragedy that requires a rapid and coordinated police response.

Ensuring security at major events A risk to major sporting events and international gatherings is that of terrorists or criminals using falsified, stolen or lost passports to enter a country undetected in order to commit their crimes. The 2010 FIFA World Cup in South Africa and the 2007 Cricket World Cup in the Caribbean were just two events to benefit from an INTERPOL Major Events Support Team. Comprising experienced officers from different countries, the teams provide direct access from venues and borders to INTERPOL’s databases to help identify potential criminals.

Our growing operational role

Operation VICO (2007) was INTERPOL’s first-ever appeal to the public to help identify a child sex abuser featuring in photos found on the Internet by police. Police successfully reversed “swirl” manipulations that obscured the man’s face in the photos, which were then posted on INTERPOL’s website and picked up by the media worldwide. Harnessing the collective efforts of police, the media and the public, the appeal led to a man being identified and arrested while on the run in Thailand after just 11 days.

Our activities have grown in diversity, responding to the changing crime landscape and with it, requests for our global network to provide assistance in new and different situations.

Countering the threat of terrorism Created in 2002 in response to the alarming rise in the scale and sophistication of international terrorist attacks, the Fusion Task Force has established a global network of more than 200 specialized officers. It helps member countries identify active terrorist groups and members through tailored resources, including a searchable database of wanted or suspected terrorists, and analytical support.

Closing in on organized jewel thieves Set up in 2007, our Project Pink Panthers coordinates joint action to identify, locate and arrest criminals behind audacious and highvalue armed robberies. The gang, believed to have hundreds of members, has struck in 26 countries, making the exchange of police information such as fingerprints, photographs and DNA essential. A database created for this purpose and co-operation among police globally has already led to the arrest of a number of key gang members.

Rounding up international fugitives Launched in 2009, Operation Infra-Red brings together police worldwide to track down selected fugitives wanted for severe offences such as murder, rape and drug trafficking. Making use of the latest available technology and input from the public, the operation has led to the location or arrest of more than 175 criminals, for whom an INTERPOL Red Notice (wanted persons notice) exists. Some of these criminals had been on the run for several years.

A new role for police in peacekeeping An unprecedented meeting in October 2009 to develop a new role for police in peacekeeping brought together the United Nations Department of Peacekeeping Operations, more than 60 foreign, justice and home affairs ministers and senior police officials from 153 INTERPOL member countries. The ensuing plan of action will bring international police expertise to peacekeeping missions and help build sustainable peace in post-conflict countries.

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A stronger voice on the international stage
Transnational crime cannot be tackled in isolation; its reach is wider than traditional law enforcement. Partnerships with other organizations and the private and public sectors are essential to tackle challenges in common areas. INTERPOL has solidly strengthened its presence on the international stage to support its aims. We have built more partnerships and developed joint initiatives. From customs to copyright, we have signed 56 co-operation agreements with other international organizations since 2000, taking to 64 the total in force today. Our collaboration with the United Nations, already formalized in 1996 by a co-operation agreement that includes observer status at respective general assemblies, was further boosted by the opening of an INTERPOL special liaison office at the UN in New York in 2004. This facilitated the creation of the INTERPOL-United Nations Security Council Special Notice for individuals and entities subject to UN counter-terrorism sanctions, and to a landmark ministerial meeting in 2009 on the role of police in UN peacekeeping missions. To strengthen our relationship with the European Union, a special liaison office in Brussels was opened in 2009, and our collaboration with Europol is strengthened continually through an exchange of officers. Generous funding from the EU has enabled us to implement many projects, such as the expansion of access to our global communications system (I-24/7) at remote sites throughout the Commonwealth of Independent States. The Group of Eight has provided important backing for our initiatives, including the development of the International Child Sexual Exploitation image database, while we have collaborated successfully with the World Health Organization, in particular in leading the enforcement arm of their International Medical Products Anti-Counterfeiting Taskforce (IMPACT). In acknowledgment of the need for specialist anti-corruption training for investigators worldwide, we initiated a concept that led the way to the founding in 2010 of the International Anti-Corruption Academy. Additionally, we have forged partnerships with the private sector in areas such as currency and document security. We are working with private companies on the INTERPOL Travel Document initiative which aims to facilitate the international travel of officials on INTERPOL business by waiving visa requirements.

Reaching out and building partnerships

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Increasing transparency and accountability
Our integrity is paramount to INTERPOL; we strive to ensure the accuracy and independence of our data and our work, reaching new ideals and strengthening existing structures to provide a solid platform for our activities and our reputation. As an independent international organization, we are not subject to any national law, while our Constitution prohibits ‘any intervention or activities of a political, military, religious or racial character’. These principles of neutrality and independence were reaffirmed by the General Assembly in 2006.

2000

Albania, Algeria, Andorra, Angola, Anguilla, Antigua & Barbuda, Argentina, American Samoa, Armenia, Aruba, Australia, Austria, Azerbaijan, Bahamas, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belarus, Belgium, Belize, Benin, Bermuda, Bolivia, Bosnia-Herzegovina, Botswana, Brazil, Brunei, Bulgaria, Burkina-Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Canada, Cape Verde, Cayman Islands, Central African Republic, Chad, Chile, China, Colombia, Comoros, Congo, Costa Rica, Croatia, Côte d'Ivoire, Cuba, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Djibouti, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Equatorial Guinea, Eritrea, Estonia, Ethiopia, Fiji, Finland, Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, France, Gabon, Gambia, Georgia, Germany, Ghana, Greece, Grenada, Guatemala, Guinea, Guinea Bissau, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, Hungary, Iceland, India, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Jamaica, Japan, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Laos, Latvia, Lebanon, Lesotho, Liberia, Libya, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Macau, Madagascar, Malawi, Malaysia, Maldives, Mali, Malta, Marshall Islands, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mexico, Moldova, Monaco, Mongolia, Montserrat, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Namibia, Nauru, Nepal, Netherlands, Netherlands Antilles, New Zealand, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, Norway, Oman, Pakistan, Panama, Papua New Guinea, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Poland, Portugal, Puerto Rico, Qatar, Republic of Korea, Romania, Russian Federation, Rwanda, St Kitts & Nevis, St Lucia, St Vincent & the Grenadines, Sao Tome & Principe, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Seychelles, Sierra Leone, Singapore, Slovakia, Slovenia, Somalia, South Africa, Spain, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Swaziland, Sweden, Switzerland, Syria, Tanzania, Thailand, Togo, Tonga, Tortola BVI, Trinidad & Tobago, Tunisia, Turks & Caicos Islands, Turkey, Uganda, Ukraine, United Arab Emirates, United Kingdom, United States, Uruguay, Uzbekistan, Venezuela, Vietnam, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe, Albania, Algeria, Andorra, Angola, Anguilla, Antigua & Barbuda, Argentina, American Samoa, Armenia, Aruba, Australia, Austria, Azerbaijan, Bahamas, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belarus, Belgium, Belize, Benin, Bermuda, Bolivia, Bosnia-Herzegovina, Botswana, Brazil, Brunei, Bulgaria, Burkina-Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Canada, Cape Verde, Cayman Islands, Central African Republic, Chad, Chile, China, Colombia, Comoros, Congo, Costa Rica, Croatia, Côte d'Ivoire, Cuba, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Djibouti, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Equatorial Guinea, Eritrea, Estonia, Ethiopia, Fiji, Finland, Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, France, Gabon, Gambia, Georgia, Germany, Ghana, Greece, Grenada, Guatemala, Guinea, Guinea Bissau, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, Hungary, Iceland, India, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Jamaica, Japan, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Laos, Latvia, Lebanon, Lesotho, Liberia, Libya, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Macau, Madagascar, Malawi, Malaysia, Maldives, Mali, Malta, Marshall Islands, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mexico, Moldova, Monaco, Mongolia, Montserrat, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Namibia, Nauru, Nepal, Netherlands, Netherlands Antilles, New Zealand, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, Norway, Oman, Pakistan, Panama, Papua New Guinea, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Poland, Portugal, Puerto Rico, Qatar, Republic of Korea, Romania, Russian Federation, Rwanda, St Kitts & Nevis, St Lucia, St Vincent & the Grenadines, Sao Tome & Principe, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Seychelles, Sierra Leone, Singapore, Slovakia, Slovenia, Somalia, South Africa, Spain, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Swaziland, Sweden, Switzerland, Syria, Tanzania, Thailand, Togo, Tonga, Tortola BVI, Trinidad & Tobago, Tunisia, Turks & Caicos Islands, Turkey, Uganda, Ukraine, United Arab Emirates, United Kingdom, United States, Uruguay, Uzbekistan, Venezuela, Vietnam, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe, Albania, Algeria, Andorra, Angola, Anguilla, Antigua & Barbuda, Argentina, American Samoa, Armenia, Aruba, Australia, Austria, Azerbaijan, Bahamas, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belarus, Belgium, Belize, Benin, Bermuda, Bolivia, Bosnia-Herzegovina, Botswana, Brazil, Brunei, Bulgaria, Burkina-Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Canada, Cape Verde, Cayman Islands, Central African Republic, Chad, Chile, China, Colombia, Comoros, Congo, Costa Rica, Croatia, Côte d'Ivoire, Cuba, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Djibouti, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Equatorial Guinea, Eritrea, Estonia, Ethiopia, Fiji, Finland, Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, France, Gabon, Gambia, Georgia, Germany, Ghana, Greece, Grenada, Guatemala, Guinea, Guinea Bissau, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, Hungary, Iceland, India, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Jamaica, Japan, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Laos, Latvia, Lebanon, Lesotho, Liberia, Libya, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Macau, Madagascar, Malawi, Malaysia, Maldives, Mali, Malta, Marshall Islands, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mexico, Moldova, Monaco, Mongolia, Montserrat, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Namibia, Nauru, Nepal, Netherlands, Netherlands Antilles, New Zealand, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, Norway, Oman, Pakistan, Panama, Papua New Guinea, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Poland, Portugal, Puerto Rico, Qatar, Republic of Korea, Romania, Russian Federation, Rwanda, St Kitts & Nevis, St Lucia, St Vincent & the Grenadines, Sao Tome & Principe, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Seychelles, Sierra Leone, Singapore, Slovakia, Slovenia, Somalia, South Africa, Spain, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Swaziland, Sweden, Switzerland, Syria, Tanzania, Thailand, Togo, Tonga, Tortola BVI, Trinidad & Tobago, Tunisia, Turks & Caicos Islands, Turkey, Uganda, Ukraine, United Arab Emirates, United Kingdom, United States, Uruguay, Uzbekistan, Venezuela, Vietnam, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe, Albania, Algeria, Andorra, Angola, Anguilla, Antigua & Barbuda, Argentina, American Samoa, Armenia, Aruba, Australia, Austria, Azerbaijan, Bahamas, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belarus, Belgium, Belize, Benin, Bermuda, Bolivia, Bosnia-Herzegovina, Botswana, Brazil, Brunei, Bulgaria, Burkina-Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Canada, Cape Verde, Cayman Islands, Central African Republic, Chad, Chile, China, Colombia, Comoros, Congo, Costa Rica, Croatia, Côte d'Ivoire, Cuba, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Djibouti, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Equatorial Guinea, Eritrea, Estonia, Ethiopia, Fiji, Finland, Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, France, Gabon, Gambia, Georgia, Germany, Ghana, Greece, Grenada, Guatemala, Guinea, Guinea Bissau, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, Hungary, Iceland, India, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Jamaica, Japan, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Laos, Latvia, Lebanon, Lesotho, Liberia, Libya, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Macau, Madagascar, Malawi, Malaysia, Maldives, Mali, Malta, Marshall Islands, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mexico, Moldova, Monaco, Mongolia, Montserrat, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Namibia, Nauru, Nepal, Netherlands, Netherlands Antilles, New Zealand,

INTERPOL AT WORK

Adhering to international norms

INTERPOL’s activities necessarily involve the processing of personal data (such as names, fingerprints and DNA). The Commission for the Control of INTERPOL’s Files (CCF) is an independent body officially responsible for monitoring the application of our data protection rules in order to protect the fundamental rights of individuals as well as the co-operation among police internationally. In 2008 the General Assembly adopted a resolution that strengthened the CCF’s role and independence. To reinforce our accountability and ensure an efficient management of INTERPOL’s resources, an internal audit office was established in 2007. The office encourages a culture of performance within the Organization, assisting individual departments to manage and assess their activities with a view to best achieving their aims. Their work conforms to international standards and code of ethics. External auditors are used for a formal audit of the Organization’s finances, carried out in compliance with international accounting standards and published in our Annual Report. This role was carried out by the French Cour des Comptes from 2004 until the end of their mandate in November 2010. Financial transparency was boosted in 2007 by the complete implementation of the International Public Sector Accounting Standards.

2010
18-19

INTERPOL

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The future
The future holds its own new challenges. The security landscape has been changing at unprecedented speed, with threats constantly multiplying in complexity, scope and reach. To respond to this call, three imperatives will guide our approach to the next decade and the fulfilment of our mandate. To the frontlines – Further empowering our National Central Bureaus and police officers in the field is the most effective way to fight international crime. We will strive to ensure that NCBs can communicate effectively with us and with each other, and that our global databases can lead to real-time responses through the enhanced reliability and viability of our network. We will enhance the scope of our databases so that valuable intelligence can be gained through seamless communication. And we will boost the capacity of our NCBs, police in our member countries and our headquarters staff to use the skills and knowledge facilitated by INTERPOL tools to their maximum benefit in order to respond adequately to the changing nature of international crime. Strategic use of resources – It is our duty is ensure that even during these difficult financial times, our member countries can firmly rely on INTERPOL’s support. Our enhanced Strategic Planning Framework will allow us to better align our priorities and our resources, to improve both the efficiency and effectiveness of our action. Ahead of the curve – Innovation must become our best ally, not a threat. The proposed establishment of the INTERPOL Global Complex (IGC) in Singapore is the cornerstone of an upgraded approach to international policing, where cutting-edge research on identification of crimes and criminals, capacity building and operational support are integrated to go beyond the traditional reactive law enforcement model. With these imperatives firmly in our sight, we look ahead, confident in our strengths. From the policeman on the ground to the police chiefs and ministers who set policy, our network of member countries is INTERPOL’s greatest asset. Together, we are a powerful force; today and tomorrow.

Our vision: Connecting police for a safer world

Our mission: Preventing and fighting crime through enhanced co-operation on police matters

INTERPOL

INTERPOL

The world’s largest international police organization, INTERPOL facilitates cross-border police co-operation and supports and assists all organizations, authorities and services whose mission is to prevent or combat international crime.

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© INTERPOL 2010 All rights reserved. No part of this document may be reproduced, copied or used by any means without prior permission in writing from INTERPOL. Published by: INTERPOL 200, quai Charles de Gaulle 69006 Lyon France This report is printed on paper that is a blend of 60% recycled and 40% from sustainably managed forests, certified by the Forest Stewardship Council. Photo credits: INTERPOL, Reuters, iStockphoto, Fotolia, Photodisc, United Nations, European Union

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