What do you like about the t t? b t th text? What do y like d you about the text?

What did Wh t d d you f d find new or surprising? What did you find new or surprising? What did you love about the t t/id ? b t th text/idea? What did y love d d you about the text/idea?

What would you change? How would you do it? What would you change? How g would you do it? What parallels another text? How? What parallels another text? How?

What sticks in your mind? O d? Or pokes your thinking? thi ki ? What sticks in your mind? Or pokes your thinking?

Shape Up Discussion Strategy
Students it t tables i St d t sit at t bl in my classroom. They are grouped in a variety of ways,: colors, l Th di i t f l rainbows, etc. No matter how I’ve created my groups, I add a layer of choice by dangling shapes from the group signs. We use the shapes to spark and guide discussions, so before, during or after instruction (or reading) I can quickly say, “Think about your response to … Choose a shape that matches how you respond to the text/idea. Move to that group and discuss.” This is not a new discussion strategy. I’ve been asked in several trainings to choose a discussion table based on whether the ideas “are still circling or if they “square” with my are circling” square thinking. In my own classroom though, I needed more than four groups, so I added shapes and descriptions. Infinite possibilities for adaption. •Read/view a common text. •Tell students to choose a discussion group based on their response to the text/ideas. •Give students time to talk in the shape group. p g p •Switch groups for additional discussion rounds (if time). •Debrief the discussion as a whole class. What did you discover? What common ideas surfaced? What surprised you about the group’s discussion?

Circle: The student wants to discuss ideas are still circling in their mind. (need processing time before forming an opinion). Square: The student wants to discuss how or why the ideas “square” or agree with his thinking. Star: The student wants to talk about what sticks (is memorable) or what poke at previous thinking. thi ki Thumbs: The student wants to talk about which aspects of the text/idea he likes and why. Star Burst: The student wants to discuss new or surprising components of the text. Heart: The student wants to talk about which elements of the text or idea he loves. loves Parallelogram: The student wants to talk about connections (or parallels) between this text and something else. Triangle: The student wants to talk about ways the text can affect change or how he would ideas in the text and or how the text is written.

Sign up to vote on this title
UsefulNot useful