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Friday Aug. 17, 2012 Vol XII, Edition 314
BIDEN VS RYAN
NATION PAGE 7
BOY TOO LARGE
FOR FOOTBALL
SPORTS PAGE 11
EXPENDABLES 2
EXPLOSIVE FUN
WEEKEND JOURNAL PAGE 18
NO. 2S KEY IN WHITE HOUSE CAMPAIGN
By Michelle Durand
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
More than a quarter-century after
Annette Thurs beaten body was
found down an embankment off
Skyline Boulevard, a 49-year-old
sex offender in Placerville was
arrested for the teens kidnapping,
rape and murder.
Sheriffs deputies linked John
William Kelley to the December
1986 death of Annette Thur, a 17-
year-old Ben Lomand resident, after
investigators reopened the case ear-
lier this year and matched his DNA
to that found at the scene.
Deputies arrested Kelley
Wednesday at his Placerville home
and brought him back to the
Maguire Correctional Facility.
Prosecutors will decide by late this
morning whether to arraign him this
afternoon on the charges.
Thurs case sat cold for years
because no viable suspects were
identied after her body was found
Dec. 6, 1986 just north of Alpine
Road in unincorporated San Mateo
County by a tourist taking in the
view from Skyline Boulevard.
After attending a party in Boulder
Creek earlier that day, Thur planned
to hitchhike home, according to a
Sheriffs Ofce announcement.
Instead, she was sexually assault-
ed and beaten. Investigators inter-
viewed numerous associates of
Thur and others but no one was pin-
pointed as a suspect until Kelley
was a DNA match after the countys
forensic labor took another look.
The Sheriffs Ofce said a subse-
quent interview of Kelley
Wednesday established sufficient
probable cause for an arrest but did
not disclose further details.
Kelley is a registered sex offender
who has lived in California and
Oregon. He is not listed on the
Megans Law website and the
Sheriffs Ofce did not release the
nature of his prior offenses.
Kelley is in custody without bail.
Anyone with information about
the crime or Kelley is asked to con-
tact Detective Andy Armando at
363-4347 or
aarmando@smcgov.org or
Detective Matt Broad at 363-4363
or mbroad@smcgov.org. Callers
may also use the Sheriffs Ofce
Anonymous Witness Line at (800)
547-2700.
Arrest made in decades-old rape, murder of teen
By Bill Silverfarb
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Tips from the public led to a
SWAT standoff in the North Fair
Oaks area of unincorporated
Redwood City
that ended when
he surrendered
at around 6:30
p.m. yesterday.
Nearly all day,
police had sur-
rounded the
home of Miguel
A n g e l
Caballero, a sus-
pect in a string
of robberies in the area the past two
weeks, police said.
Caballero, 30, is suspected in as
many as ve armed robberies in the
Redwood City area and was tracked
to a home at 3080 William Ave. near
Third Avenue, where police and
sheriffs deputies were camped out
since about 9 a.m. surrounding the
home, sheriffs Lt. Larry
Schumaker said.
He reportedly pointed his gun at a
pregnant womans belly, one of the
clerks in the ve robberies who gave
Caballero an unknown amount of
Standoff ends in arrest
Suspect in string of robberies hides in home nearly all day
BILL SILVERFARB/DAILY JOURNAL
A SWAT team member sets his sights on the home of Miguel Angel Caballero on William Avenue in the North
Fair Oaks neighborhood yesterday. Caballero is suspected of robbing ve businesses in Redwood City the past
two weeks.
At large
parolee
arrested
Man wanted for attempted
murder in S.F. faces firearm
charges in Contra CostaCounty
By Bill Silverfarb
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
A parolee at large wanted for
attempted murder in San Francisco
escaped capture earlier this month in
San Mateo County but his wife was
subsequently arrested on numerous
charges after police received two
calls at about the same time Aug. 5
one a kidnap claim and the other
a report of a car accident on
Interstate 280.
California Highway Patrol ofcers
responded to a report of a solo-vehi-
cle crash on Interstate 280 and
Bunker Hill Road and found a silver
Dodge Avenger unoccupied with
both airbags deployed.
Early Sunday morning, Aug. 5,
the CHP also received a call at about
the same time from the Bunker Hill
Road call box on Interstate 280 from
a woman claiming she was pushed
out of a car after being kidnapped
from a San Bruno gas station.
On arrival, CHP ofcers deter-
mined the car was stolen in conjunc-
tion with a felony and was registered
to Enterprise Rent-A-Car. The driv-
er associated with the vehicle was
listed as 25-year-old Charles
Chatman III, a parolee at large want-
ed for attempted murder and last
arrested in San Francisco in 2008 on
a rearms-related charge.
The woman claiming to have been
kidnapped, Chardae Chatman,
turned out to be the parolees wife
and failed to cooperate with ofcers
when they arrived at the scene at
about 6 a.m., a CHP ofcial said.
See CHATMAN, Page 23
Miguel
Caballero
See SWAT, Page 23
By Hannah Dreier
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SACRAMENTO Criminals
who were sentenced as juveniles to
life in prison without the possibility
of parole would get a chance at free-
dom if a bill approved by the
Assembly becomes law.
The bill, SB9, passed the state
Senate last year but failed repeated-
ly in the Assembly
before lawmakers
approved it by a
single vote
Thursday after a
heated debate.
The legislation
would allow inmates convicted
while they were minors to petition
for reconsideration of their sentence
after serving 15 years. A judge
would then have the option of
reducing their sentence to 25 years-
to-life if the inmates show evidence
of remorse and efforts toward reha-
bilitation.
Supporters say young criminals
deserve second chances because
their brains are not fully mature
when they commit their crimes.
Assemblyman Gil Cedillo, D-Los
Angeles, who carried the bill in that
chamber, urged his fellow lawmak-
ers to bring California into line with
federal recommendations. He point-
ed to the U.S. Supreme Courts rul-
ing earlier this summer that classi-
ed mandatory life-without-parole
sentences for juvenile murderers as
cruel and unusual punishment.
Children who engage in crimes
Inmates convicted as juveniles could get reprieve
See page 3
Inside
Court strikes
down 110-year
sentence
See REPRIEVE, Page 23
FOR THE RECORD 2 Friday Aug. 17, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
The San Mateo Daily Journal
800 S. Claremont St., Suite 210, San Mateo, CA 94402
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Actor Sean Penn is
52.
This Day in History
Thought for the Day
1982
The rst commercially produced com-
pact discs, a recording of ABBAs The
Visitors, were pressed at a Philips fac-
tory near Hanover, West Germany.
Where words
leave off, music begins.
Heinrich Heine, German poet and critic (1797-1856)
Actor Robert
DeNiro is 69.
Singer Donnie
Wahlberg is 43.
In other news ...
Birthdays
REUTERS
A reghting tanker plane drops re retardant on homes threatened by the Taylor Creek Fire outside Cle Elum,Washington.
Friday: Cloudy in the morning then
becoming partly cloudy. Patchy fog in the
morning. Highs in the 60s. West winds 10 to
20 mph.
Friday night: Partly cloudy in the evening
then becoming cloudy. Patchy fog after
midnight. Lows in the lower 50s. Northwest
winds 10 to 20 mph.
Saturday: Mostly cloudy. Patchy fog in the morning. Highs in
the 60s. Northwest winds 5 to 15 mph.
Saturday night: Partly cloudy in the evening then becoming
mostly cloudy. Patchy fog after midnight. Lows in the lower
50s. Northwest winds 10 to 20 mph.
Sunday: Mostly cloudy. Patchy fog. Highs in the 60s.
Sunday night: Mostly cloudy. Patchy fog. Lows in the lower
50s.
Local Weather Forecast
Lotto
The Daily Derby race winners are No.04 Big Ben
in rst place; No. 01 Gold Rush in second place;
and No.12 Lucky Charms in third place.The race
time was clocked at 1:48.67.
(Answers tomorrow)
HILLY MOVED DETECT WINERY
Yesterdays
Jumbles:
Answer: After his pine tree died, his neighbor did this
NEEDLED HIM
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.
THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek
Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
GENAT
FOCFS
FCEEDT
NOYKEM
2012 Tribune Media Services, Inc.
All Rights Reserved.
F
in
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n

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A:
6 2 5
15 23 34 39 55 32
Mega number
Aug.14 Mega Millions
2 6 18 22 38
Fantasy Five
Daily three midday
7 7 8 1
Daily Four
7 6 8
Daily three evening
In 1807, Robert Fultons North River Steamboat began head-
ing up the Hudson River on its successful round trip between
New York and Albany.
In 1912, the second movie inspired by the Titanic disaster, a
German production titled In Nacht und Eis (In Night and
Ice), was released. (Unlike the rst, Saved From the Titanic,
In Nacht und Eis still exists.)
In 1915, a mob in Cobb County, Ga., lynched Jewish busi-
nessman Leo Frank, whose death sentence for the murder of
13-year-old Mary Phagan had been commuted to life impris-
onment. (Frank, whod maintained his innocence, was par-
doned by the state of Georgia in 1986.)
In 1942, during World War II, U.S. 8th Air Force bombers
attacked German forces in Rouen, France. U.S. Marines raided
a Japanese seaplane base on Makin Island.
In 1943, the Allied conquest of Sicily was completed as U.S.
and British forces entered Messina.
In 1960, the newly renamed Beatles (formerly the Silver
Beetles) began their rst gig in Hamburg, West Germany, at the
Indra Club. The West African country of Gabon became inde-
pendent of France.
In 1961, the United States and 19 Latin American countries
signed the Charter of Punta del Este in Uruguay, creating the
Alliance for Progress aimed at promoting economic growth
and social justice.
In 1962, East German border guards shot and killed 18-year-
old Peter Fechter, who had attempted to cross the Berlin Wall
into the western sector.
In 1969, Hurricane Camille slammed into the Mississippi coast
as a Category 5 storm that was blamed for 256 U.S. deaths,
three in Cuba.
In 1978, the rst successful trans-Atlantic balloon ight ended
as Maxie Anderson, Ben Abruzzo and Larry Newman landed
their Double Eagle II outside Paris.
Actress Maureen OHara is 92. Former Chinese president
Jiang Zemin is 86. Author V.S. Naipaul is 80. Former MLB All-
Star Boog Powell is 71. Movie director Martha Coolidge is 66.
Rock musician Gary Talley (The Box Tops) is 65. Rock musician
Sib Hashian is 63. Actor Robert Joy is 61. International Tennis
Hall of Famer Guillermo Vilas is 60. Rock singer Kevin Rowland
(Dexys Midnight Runners) is 59. Rock musician Colin
Moulding (XTC) is 57. Country singer-songwriter Kevin Welch
is 57. Olympic gold medal gure skater Robin Cousins is 55.
Singer Belinda Carlisle is 54. Author Jonathan Franzen is 53.
Jazz musician Everette Harp is 51.
Rep: Bobby Brown in
rehab after March DUI arrest
NEW YORK Bobby Brown has
checked himself into rehab.
Browns represen-
tative said in an
email Thursday that
the R&B singer
checked into a con-
fidential rehabilita-
tion center last
week as part of his
agreement following
his March arrest for
drunken driving in
Los Angeles.
His publicist says that Browns plea
agreement in the case requires that he
requires that he get treatment for alcohol
use. His attorney Christopher Brown
says in a statement that Brown takes his
agreement very seriously.
The 43-year-old singer is the former
husband of Whitney Houston, who died
this year. He married his manager Alicia
Etheredge-Brown in June.
Brown still plans to perform sched-
uled solo concerts and tour with his
group New Edition. His rst album in 14
years came out this summer.
Downey hurt on Iron
Man 3 set; filming on hold
LOS ANGELES Production on
Iron Man 3 is on hold after star Robert
Downey Jr. hurt his foot during lming.
Marvel Studios
said Thursday that
Downey was injured
while performing a
stunt and there will
be a short delay in
production while he
recuperates. The 47-
year-old actor is
shooting the third
installment in the
superhero franchise
in North Carolina.
Iron Man 3 is set for release next
summer. Downey plays billionaire play-
boy Tony Stark and Gwyneth Paltrow is
his love, Pepper Potts. Guy Pearce and
Ben Kingsley also star.
Police look for thieves
who took 500 canaries
MIAMI Police are looking for two
people they say stole more than 500
canaries from the home of an 87-year-
old Florida man.
Police say the men entered Manuel
Sanchezs home on May 27 and took the
birds. The next day, they sold the birds
to at least three pet shops.
The canaries are valued at $30 each,
which means the thefts were worth
about $15,000 in all.
Police on Wednesday asked the public
for help in identifying the suspects.
Authorities say images of the suspects
selling the birds were captured by video
surveillance cameras.
Man fires insect
repellent in Oregon robbery
ROSEBURG, Ore. Police in
Roseburg, Ore., say a man who robbed a
restaurant was armed with a can of bug
spray.
Sgt. Aaron Dunbar says the robber
entered Elmers Restaurant late Monday
wearing a green hooded sweatshirt,
gloves and a beanie atop a shoulder-
length blond wig that was pulled partly
across his face.
A bartender tried to bat away the can
of insect repellent when the robber bran-
dished it, but the employee got a direct
spray to the face.
Avengers sequel
planned for May 2015
LOS ANGELES The Avengers
are returning for a superhero sequel
three years from now.
Disney and its Marvel Studios unit
announced Thursday that the follow-up
to this years biggest hit will arrive in
theaters on May 1, 2015.
The studio announced last week that
Joss Whedon will be back to write and
direct the as-yet-untitled sequel.
Released in May, The Avengers
gathered such Marvel comic-book
heroes as Iron Man (Robert Downey Jr.),
Captain America (Chris Evans), the
Hulk (Mark Ruffalo) and Thor (Chris
Hemsworth). The lm has taken in near-
ly $1.5 billion worldwide.
2 18 23 24 39 5
Mega number
Aug. 15 Super Lotto Plus
Bobby Brown
Robert
Downey Jr.
3
Friday Aug. 17, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
2
0
1
2
2
0
1
2
Senior Showcase
FREE
ADMISSION
Presented by Health Plan of San Mateo and The Daily Journal
Senior Resources and Services
from all of San Mateo County
over 40 exhibitors!
Fer mere n|ermcIen cc|| 503445200 senershewccsemp.evenIbrIe.cem
' Wh|e supp|es |csI. 5eme resIrcIens cpp|y. EvenIs subjecI Ie chcnge.
Free Services include
Refreshments
Door Prizes and Giveaways
Blood Pressure Check
Dementia Screening
Ask the Pharmacist
by San Mateo Pharmacists Assn.
Goody Bags for frst 250
guests, and MORE
Senior Showcase
Information Fair
Saturday, August 25 from 9:00am to 1:00pm
Little House, 800 Middle Avenue, Menlo Park
Free Admission, Everyone Welcome
SAN MATEO
Theft. Someone reported seeing a juvenile
shoplifting on the 1000 block of Park Place
before 12:56 p.m. on Wednesday, Aug. 15.
Suspicious circumstances. Someone was
reportedly seen on the 700 block of East
Poplar Avenue attempting to steal a bicycle
before 12:06 p.m. Wednesday, Aug. 15.
Suspicious circumstances. Someone on the
1300 block of Cypress Avenue reported seeing
a group of at least ve subjects in their late
teens or early 20s hopping the fence across
from 19 Kingston Street before 7:27 p.m.
Tuesday, Aug. 14.
Suspicious circumstances. Someone reported
a ght between four males on the 100 block of
36th Avenue before 7:17 p.m. Tuesday, Aug.
14.
Theft. A theft occurred at Hollister at the
Hillsdale Shopping Center before 2:35 p.m.
Tuesday, Aug. 14.
Vandalism. Someone reported their vehicle
was keyed while they were on vacation on the
400 block of North Bayshore Boulevard
before 10:21 a.m. Tuesday, Aug. 14.
REDWOOD CITY
Burglary. Items were reportedly stolen from
an outside storage unit on Hess Road before
11:11 p.m. Wednesday, Aug. 15.
Petty theft. A black Schwinn bicycle was
reportedly stolen from a yard on Eighth
Avenue before 3:42 p.m. Wednesday, Aug.15.
Petty theft. A gray and black mountain bike
was reportedly stolen from a yard on Marsh
Road before 3:13 p.m. Wednesday, Aug.15.
Suspicious person. A man was reportedly
seen buying alcohol for two juveniles on El
Camino Real before 1:20 p.m. Wednesday,
Aug.15.
Police reports
Power shortage
Several generators were stolen from a
fenced area on the 3700 block of Haven
Avenue in Redwood City before 8:11 a.m.
Monday, Aug. 6.
By Bill Silverfarb
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
St. Matthew Catholic Church and school in
San Mateo suffered a setback Tuesday night
when the citys Planning Commission voted
overwhelmingly against its plans to build a
gymnasium and add parking on the site on El
Camino Real near downtown.
The commission will hear the item again at
the end of the month when it will adopt a res-
olution to recommend to the City Council
disapproval of the project with the appropri-
ate ndings for denial.
The Planning Commission shot down a
similar proposal in 2009.
The churchs project manager Brian Swartz
said, however, that the church is committed to
seeing the project completed.
We have spent three years working on
this, Swartz told the Daily Journal. The
improvements to the site, he said, would both
benet the city and surrounding neighbor-
hood.
The proposal includes an addition of 108
new parking spaces on site, for a total of 306,
and construction of a new gymnasium with
approximately 12,000 square feet in overall
oor area.
The site, bounded by Notre Dame Avenue
and Aragon Boulevard on El Camino Real,
currently has parking for only 198 vehicles.
The project includes a master plan to regu-
late the allowable uses on the site including:
limiting the use of the gymnasium to athletic
events related solely to St. Matthew School;
restrictions to prohibit the simultaneous use
of the gymnasium and existing auditorium;
limitations on the number of special events
held annually on the site; and a requirement
for police ofcer patrol in the neighborhood
during special events to enforce trafc and
parking violations.
Many residents in the Parrot Park
Homeowners Association and along Aragon
Boulevard have stood against the churchs
expansion plans for years, contending streets
near the church already get clogged with traf-
c and parking as parents drop off and pick
up their children from the private Catholic
school.
The church rst proposed adding to its
property back in 2006 and submitted plans
for the project with the city in 2009.
If the City Council ultimately denies the
project, Swartz said the church will likely
submit a new application to build a gym and
add parking to the site.
We are going to continue to work with the
city and community to improve the existing
conditions on the site. Thats our focus,
Swartz said.
Churchs growth suffers setback
Planners reject plan for new gym, parking at St. Matthews
By Julia Cheever
BAY CITY NEWS SERVICE
The California Supreme Court ruled in San
Francisco Thursday that a sentence of 110
years to life in prison for a man who committed
three attempted murders at age 16 is unconsti-
tutional cruel and unusual punishment.
The court said a sentence that exceeds a juve-
niles expected life span is equivalent to life in
prison without possibility of parole and violates
a 2010 Supreme Court decision.
In the 2010 ruling, the federal high court said
it is unconstitutional for juveniles who commit
crimes that are not murders to be sentenced to
life without parole. The U.S. court said such
youths must be given a realistic opportunity to
seek parole.
The California court unanimously ordered a
resentencing in Los Angeles County Superior
Court for Rodrigo Caballero, who was given
the term of 110 years to life for attempting to
murder three rival gangmembers in Palmdale in
2007, when he was 16.
Caballero, a member of the Lancas gang,
shot at three members of the Val Verde Park
gang. He wounded one victim and missed the
other two.
The California court did not say what sen-
tence Caballero should receive, but it ordered
that he must be given a meaningful opportuni-
ty to seek release based on demonstrated matu-
rity and rehabilitation.
The panel also said that other California
youths sentenced to the equivalent of life terms
for non-homicide crimes could le habeas cor-
pus petitions in trial courts to seek modication
of their sentences.
David Durchfort, a lawyer for Caballero on
appeal, estimated that the decision could affect
between 700 and 800 California inmates who
received such sentences for crimes committed
as juveniles.
It gives kids convicted of serious offenses
who received long terms a chance to demon-
strate they deserve a second chance, Durchfort
said. It gives them hope and gives them some-
thing to work for, he said.
Durchfort said the California court is the rst
state supreme court in the nation to rule that the
U.S. Supreme Court decision banning life
without parole in juvenile non-homicide cases
applies to sentences that are the equivalent of
life terms.
Court strikes down 110-year sentence
4
Friday Aug. 17, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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By Michelle Durand
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
A 50-year-old man facing evic-
tion from his Miramar landlady
because she was fearful of him is
facing trial for arson after allegedly
using shots of vodka to set the car-
pet in his rented room ablaze.
Lars Dohn Ehlers previously
pleaded not guilty to felony arson
and committing a serious felony in
the July 6 re but was held to
answer on the charges Thursday
after a judge found sufcient evi-
dence at a preliminary hearing.
The defense called no witnesses.
Prosecutors say Ehlers rented a
room in the 400 block of Alameda
Avenue but his attitude frightened
his landlord.
He was just
always angry,
spouting off all
of a sudden and
being horribly
rude, said
District Attorney
Steve Wagstaffe.
Ehlers report-
edly responded
to a three-day eviction notice by
sending threatening texts like You
kicked me out ... I can do lots of
things and, on July 6, set the carpet
in his room on re. After deputies
arrived just before 11 p.m. that night
they reported nding in his room a
scorched patch of carpet, burn
marks on an adjacent deck and some
lighter uid.
Ehlers initially claimed he was
just barbecuing but later authori-
ties gured out he had used shots of
vodka to ignite the carpet, Wagstaffe
said.
There was no barbecue at the
scene, he said.
Ehlers has two prior misde-
meanors but nothing similar to his
current case.
He returns to court Aug. 31 to
enter a Superior Court plea and pos-
sibly set a trial date. He remains in
custody in lieu of $100,000 bail.
Michelle Durand can be reached by
email: michelle@smdailyjournal.com
or by phone: (650) 344-5200 ext. 102.
Evicted tenant to trial for torching room
Lars Ehlers
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT
The Shakespeare San Francisco
Festival takes a trip south for the
remainder of the month, offering free
open air performances of Henry V
the nal two weekends at Sequoia
High School in Redwood City.
The performances this weekend
and next mark the 30th anniversary
of San Franciscos Shakespeare sta-
ple and is part of Redwood Citys
2012 summer event series. Showings
will be held on Saturday evenings
followed by afternoon performances
the next day.
Henry V, thought to be written
by the Bard in roughly 1599, tells the
story of the young English king after
he assumes the throne in the early
15th century and invades France.
Organizers say the stagings are the
perfect chance to grab family and
friends, pack a picnic and blanket
and watch an exciting tale about the
glories and costs of war.
Free Shakespeare in the Park
launched in 1983 and grew over
three decades beyond performances
in Golden Gate Park to annual pro-
ductions also in Redwood City,
Pleasanton and Cupertino between
July and September.
Local area sponsors include the
Redwood City Parks, Recreation and
Community Services division, One
Marina Homes, Recology San Mateo
County and the Redwood City Civic
Cultural Commission.
All events are free and wheelchair
accessible. Performances are 7:30
p.m. Saturday Aug. 18 and 25 and 2
p.m. Sunday, Aug. 19 and 26 at
Sequoia High School, 1201 Brewster
Ave., Redwood City. For more infor-
mation on the Shakespeare San
Francisco Festival visit
www.sfshakes.org. For more infor-
mation on Redwood City events visit
www.redwoodcity.org/events/stage.h
tm.
Shakespeare stages Henry V in Redwood City
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SAN FRANCISCO A city
panel has decided that San
Franciscos suspended sheriff
committed official misconduct
after a domestic violence convic-
tion.
After a hearing Thursday that
lasted more than 10 hours, the
five-member San Francisco Ethics
Commission voted 4-1 on the mis-
conduct. But it delayed until
September its recommendation
over whether the sheriff should be
removed from office.
The board is advisory only. Its
final recommendation will be sent
to the Board of Supervisors, which
will ultimately decide Sheriff Ross
Mi r k a r i mi s
fate.
Mayor Ed Lee
s u s p e n d e d
Mirkarimi in
March without
pay after the
sheriff pleaded
guilty to a mis-
d e m e a n o r
charge of false
imprisonment related to a New
Years Eve fight with his wife. She
suffered a bruised bicep.
Prosecutors originally charged
Mirkarimi with other charges
including misdemeanor domestic
violence.
Lee is asking for the sheriffs
permanent removal.
S.F. panel says sheriff
committed misconduct
Ross Mirkarimi
By Tracie Cone
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
FRESNO A man died and a
woman became seriously ill after
contracting a rare rodent-borne dis-
ease that might have been linked to
their stay at a popular lodging area
in Yosemite National Park, ofcials
said Thursday.
The man was the rst person to
die from hantavirus pulmonary syn-
drome contracted in the park,
though two others were stricken in a
more remote area in 2000 and 2010,
ofcials said.
Testing by the Centers for Disease
Control and the California
Department of Public Health
showed the virus was present in
fecal matter from deer mice trapped
in Curry Village, an historic, family
friendly area of cabins.
Man dead from rodent
disease at Yosemite Park
5
Friday Aug. 17, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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Man in jail for burglarizing Steve Jobs house
A 35-year-old Antioch man is in jail after being arrested for
burglarizing the Palo Alto home of deceased Apple co-founder
and CEO Steve Jobs.
According to the police report, Kariem McFarlin broke into
the vacant, under-construction Waverly Street home of Steve
Jobs on the night of July 17.
McFarlin is accused of taking a number of items from the
Jobs residence.
Along with high tech devices like iMac computers, iPads,
and iPods, he is accused of stealing a soda maker, a blender,
Cristal Champagne, a Prada bag, an Armani watch, the key to
a Mercedes, more than $50,000 worth of Tiffany jewelry and
the late Jobs wallet with his drivers license and credit cards
inside, the police report said.
According to police, McFarlin said he was having money
problems, was sometimes living in his car and had begun steal-
ing from under-construction houses in San Francisco.
McFarlin said he did not know the house belonged to Jobs
until he broke in and saw a letter addressed to the legendary
Apple CEO, police said.
Once he had stolen the items from the home, McFarlin told
police he threw furniture cushions over the side of the fence to
prevent damaging the items as he moved them off Jobs prop-
erty, police said.
People affected by refinery fire sue Chevron
RICHMOND Nine people have sued Chevron Corp. over
a California renery re that sent thousands to hospitals with
respiratory issues and contributed to higher gasoline prices on
the West Coast.
The lawsuit led Wednesday in Contra Costa County
Superior Court claims Chevron was grossly negligent in its
handling of refinery maintenance as well as emergency
response to the blaze in Richmond.
The suit was led by attorney John Burris and two colleagues
on behalf of the nine people, including three children. The
attorneys expect more plaintiffs to join the case and said a
class-action suit is likely against Chevron.
They had information at the very outset that the pipes that
were in that area were old, subject to leaks and failed to take
any action accordingly, Burris has said. That was last year,
2011.
San Ramon-based Chevron said it will review the lawsuit.
The area around the renery was engulfed by a towering
vapor cloud before a volatile blaze ignited on Aug. 6.
The lawsuit says some of the plaintiffs showed symptoms
such as wheezing, dry heaving, seizure and difculty breathing.
Appeals court reinstates nursing homes lawsuit
SAN FRANCISCO An appeals court has reinstated a law-
suit claiming the owner of 16 Alameda County nursing homes
fails to meet California nurse-stafng standards.
A group of patients led suit claiming Covenant Care nurs-
ing homes had violated stafng standards at least 35 percent of
the time over a four-year period.
A Superior Court judge had agreed with Covenant Care
lawyers that only state regulators had the authority to enforce a
requirement that skilled nursing homes provide 3.2 hours of
care per day to each patient.
The case was dismissed.
But the 1st District Court of Appeal in San Francisco rein-
stated the lawsuit on Wednesday, saying patients can sue nurs-
ing home operators for failing to meet the California standards.
Around the Bay
By Don Thompson
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SACRAMENTO Democratic lead-
ers in three big states have used this
summers mass shooting in Colorado to
push bills that would crack down on
assault weapons and ammunition sales,
rekindling a debate that has not gained
much traction in Congress or on the
presidential campaign.
In Illinois, Gov. Pat Quinn proposed
that his state enact a strict ban on assault
weapons, similar to Californias. New
York lawmakers have proposed wide-
ranging legislation that would limit
weapons purchases.
California Attorney General Kamala
Harris and the Democratic state Senate
leader back a bill that would make it
more difcult and time-consuming to
reload assault weapons. The chairmen of
public safety committees in Californias
Assembly and Senate co-authored a bill
that would require dealers to report pur-
chases of large quantities of ammunition
to law enforcement authorities.
The suspect in the July 20 Colorado
shooting, James Holmes, legally bought
6,000 rounds of ammunition online
without raising authorities attention. He
had four weapons, including an assault
rie, on him after the rampage that killed
12 people and injured 58 at a midnight
movie screening.
California sets the pace for the coun-
try. If theres no action in Congress, we
better do something here and hope it
catches re in other states, said state
Sen. Leland Yee, D-San Francisco/San
Mateo,who authored the legislation that
would slow down the process of reload-
ing an assault weapon with a new maga-
zine.
With strong support from Democratic
Gov. Andrew Cuomo, New York law-
makers have offered a similar rationale
for proposing a series of bills that
together would give their state the
nations toughest gun control laws.
Colorado shooting prompts gun bills
By Juliet Williams
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SACRAMENTO Supporters of
Gov. Jerry Browns November tax initia-
tive, including both of Californias U.S.
senators, called Thursday on a rival cam-
paign to stop its criticism, warning that
attacks and negative campaigning will
jeopardize prospects for both measures.
School funding would be hardest hit if
voters are turned off and reject the initia-
tives, Browns backers said in their letter
to the California PTA.
It said the campaign for Proposition
38, funded by wealthy civil rights attor-
ney Molly Munger and backed by the
PTA, has become increasingly negative
in recent months, even personally attack-
ing Brown.
These attacks have called the gover-
nor untruthful, attacked Prop 30 as a
shell game, and a tiny Band-Aid that
is terrible for kids, and even included
the false claim that Prop 30 will make
schools lose money, the letter states.
It is signed by Sens. Dianne Feinstein
and Barbara Boxer, Senate President Pro
Tem Darrell Steinberg and Assembly
Speaker John Perez, all Democrats.
The letter proposes that both cam-
paigns adopt a positive campaign com-
pact in which they refrain from directly
attacking or referring to one another in
all ads, public statements and voter out-
reach.
While we may not all agree on the
ultimate funding solution, education
advocates across California can surely
agree on the worst outcome for our
state: one where both initiatives fail, it
said.
Backers of Browns tax measure want clean campaign
California sets the
pace for the country. If theres no
action in Congress, we better do something
here and hope it catches re in other states.
Sen. Leland Yee, D-San Francisco/San Mateo
6
Friday Aug. 17, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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Law enforcement ofcers confer outside the Family Research Council ofce after a shooting
Wenesday.
By Eric Tucker and Ben Nuckols
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON As authorities revealed
details about the Family Research Council
shooting, the head of the inuential conserva-
tive organization blamed the attack on reck-
less rhetoric, but then delivered his own polit-
ically-charged remark, saying critics gave the
accused gunman a license to shoot an
unarmed man.
Tony Perkins comments Thursday fanned
already-inamed statements from both sides,
tapped into deep divisions over abortion and
gay marriage, and drew more nger-pointing.
Meanwhile, the accused shooter, Floyd Lee
Corkins II, was ordered held without bond on
accusations he opened re a day earlier inside
the lobby of the councils headquarters.
Corkins, whose parents said he strongly sup-
ported gay rights, had a backpack full of
Chick-l-A sandwiches and a box of ammuni-
tion when he said I dont like your politics
and shot a security guard, authorities said.
The guard was shot in the left arm but
helped subdue the gunman, police said.
It wasnt immediately clear why Corkins,
28, had the chicken sandwiches.
The Family Research Council has stead-
fastly supported the president of Chick-Fil-A
and his staunch opposition to same-sex mar-
riage.
While blaming Corkins for the shooting,
Perkins also faulted the Southern Poverty Law
Center, an Alabama-based civil rights organi-
zation that tracks and litigates against hate
groups. The law center labeled the council a
hate group in 2010 for what it called the orga-
nizations anti-gay stance.
Corkins was given a license to shoot an
unarmed man by organizations like the
Southern Poverty Law Center that have been
reckless in labeling organization hate groups
because they disagree with them on public
policy, Perkins said.
Mark Potok, a senior fellow at the SPLC,
called Perkins accusation outrageous. He
said the council earned the designation for
spreading false propaganda about the gay
community, not for its opposition to same-sex
marriage.
The FRC routinely pushes out demonizing
claims that gay people are child molesters and
worse claims that are provably false, he
said in a statement. It should stop the demo-
nization and afrm the dignity of all people.
Conservative, gay rights
group spar after shooting
By Larry Margasak
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON A Democratic commit-
tee chairman overrode his own subpoena three
years ago in an investigation of former sub-
prime mortgage lender Countrywide Financial
Corp. to exclude records showing that he,
other House members and congressional aides
got VIP discounted loans from the company,
documents show.
The procedure to keep the names secret was
devised by Rep. Edolphus Towns, D-N.Y. In
2003, the 15-term congressman had two loans
processed by Countrywides VIP section,
which was established to give discounts to
favored borrowers.
The effort at secrecy was reversed when
Towns Republican successor as chairman of
the House Oversight and Government Reform
Committee, California Rep. Darrell Issa,
issued a second subpoena. It yielded
Countrywide records identifying four current
House members, a former member and ve
staff aides whose loans went through the VIP
unit. Towns was on the list.
Issa, in a statement to the Associated Press
on Wednesday, said, It was a long ght to
expose how Countrywide used its VIP pro-
gram to advance its business and policy
goals.
Most of the names had dribbled out to the
media by the time Issa issued the committees
nal report last month on Countrywides use
of loan discounts to buy inuence with gov-
ernment ofcials. But there was no ofcial
conrmation until Issa made his report public.
Towns effort to keep the loans secret was at
odds with statements by Republicans and
Democrats alike that full disclosure of law-
makers nancial dealings was the best means
for keeping the public aware of congressional
perks, unethical conduct and fundraising.
Countrywide had been the nations largest
home loan originator before the housing mar-
ket collapse. Many of its borrowers were left
unable to repay mortgages that, in many cases,
required no proof of income or a down pay-
ment. The company was purchased in 2008 by
Bank of America, which now holds the VIP
loan les.
The original Towns subpoena had asked for
all les that went through the Countrywide
VIP unit and specically mentioned House
members and aides. Bank of America sent a
spreadsheet that identied 18,000 les that
listed a borrowers employer, but without
names to maintain privacy.
The spreadsheet identied several les list-
ing the House or Congress as the employer.
Since the vast majority of the employers in the
spreadsheet were of no interest to the commit-
tee, committee Republicans then in the
minority and majority Democrats each
drew up a separate list of loan les to be
turned over by the bank.
The Republican list totaled 3,000 les and
included borrowers listing the House as an
employer. Towns narrowed the les to about
300 and excluded references to the House. It
was Towns truncated list that went to Bank of
America.
Bank of America conrmed in a statement
to the Associated Press that it produced the
les requested in the truncated list.
The committee provided the bank with
specic instructions and modications regard-
ing the scope of the subpoena, and the bank
followed and fullled all instructions and fully
complied with the subpoena as modied by
the committee, the bank said.
The AP reviewed the original bank spread-
sheet of 18,000 and conrmed there were ref-
erences to the House or Congress.
House members VIP loans
excluded from subpoena
NATION 7
Friday Aug. 17, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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By Steve Peoples
and Matthew Daly
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
DENVER Paul Ryan likes exer-
cise, budget charts and the Green Bay
Packers. Joe Biden likes train rides, for-
eign policy and talking a lot.
In some ways, these presidential tick-
et No. 2s could not be more different.
They are separated
in age by nearly
three decades, were
born to families in
different regions of
the country and have
views on opposite
ends of the political
spectrum.
But in other ways,
the 42-year-old
Republican congressman and 69-year-
old Democratic vice president are very
much alike. Both were born to Catholic
families in working-class neighbor-
hoods and were young stars in their par-
ties who became experts on the inner
workings of Washington.
And perhaps above all, these men
both do political things their respective
No. 1s cannot.
Biden, with his back-slapping image,
big smile and hardscrabble roots in
Scranton, Pa., is seen as more effective
than President Barack Obama at court-
ing white working-class voters. Ryan,
while less known outside his Janesville,
Wis., hometown, is a favorite of the
Republican Partys conservative base, a
group that long has been skeptical of
Republican presidential contender Mitt
Romneys conservative credentials.
Over the next three months, Biden
and Ryan will play key roles in the
White House race, raising money, criti-
cizing the opponent and helping lend
credibility in complicated policy
debates Biden on foreign policy and
Ryan on federal budgeting. They will
also inevitably create headaches for
their bosses, as Biden did this week
when he told a Virginia crowd that
included hundreds of black people that
Romneys plans for Wall Street would
put them back in chains.
No. 2s key in White House campaign
By Steve Peoples
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WARREN, Ohio Republican vice
presidential contender Paul Ryan says he
never would have included a $700 billion
Medicare cut in his budget if President
Barack Obama hadnt done it rst.
He put those cuts there, Ryan said
Thursday, responding to a reporters
question while eating a hot dog in a
restaurant. We would never have done
it in the rst place.
Medicare, the health care program
for tens of millions of seniors, has
become a key issue in the race for the
White House.
The Wisconsin congressman is per-
haps best known for authoring a contro-
versial budget plan that would trans-
form Medicare into a voucher-like sys-
tem. He and Romney say the change is
needed to preserve the popular program
for future generations.
The Republican candidates have
launched a new strategy recently to crit-
icize Obama for taking more than $700
billion in Medicare funds to help pay
for his health care overhaul.
The president was talking about
Medicare yesterday. Im excited about
this, Ryan said during a morning cam-
paign stop in North Canton. This is a
debate we want to have, this is a debate
we need to have and this is a debate
were going to win.
But Ryan did not mention that his
own budget proposal included the same
cut. A reporter pressed him on the issue
during an impromptu stop at a local hot
dog restaurant.
Ryan pointed out that he voted to
repeal the presidents health care law,
which would have repealed the
Medicare cut. The Senate did not take
up the bill.
Ryan on Medicare cut:
Obama put those there
REUTERS
Paul Ryan speaks during a campaign rally at Miami University.
Joe Biden
REUTERS
Mitt Romney shakes hands with coal miners during the
Beallsville Coal event at the American Energy Corporation in
Beallsville, Ohio.
Romney: Never
paid less than 13
percent in taxes
By Charles Babington and Steve Peoples
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
GREER, S.C. Republican presidential contender Mitt
Romney declared Thursday he has paid at least 13 percent of his
income in federal taxes every year for the past decade, offering
that new detail while still decrying a small-minded fascination
over returns he will not release. President Barack Obamas cam-
paign shot back in doubt: Prove it.
Campaigning separately, Romney and running mate Paul Ryan
also scrambled to explain their views on overhauling Medicare,
the health care program relied on by millions of seniors.
Romney, the former company CEO, set up a whiteboard to
make his case with a marker, while lawmaker Ryan resorted to
congressional process language to explain why his budget plan
includes the same $700 billion Medicare cut that he and Romney
are assailing Obama for endorsing.
Essentially, Ryan said, he had to do it because Obama did it
rst.
Politically, both topics tie into major elements of the presiden-
tial race less than three months before the election: how well the
candidates relate to the daily concerns and to the life circum-
stances of typical voters. Democrats are using the tax issue to
raise doubts about Romneys trustworthiness or, as
Republicans contend, to distract from a weak economic recovery
under Obama.
Romneys comments in South Carolina at a news confer-
ence designed to focus on Medicare showed that he remains
sensitive to criticism of his tax payments but still is determined
to release no more than two years of records despite contrary
advice from some prominent Republicans.
The Obama campaign has aired an ad that, without evidence,
raises the prospect that Romney paid no taxes some years. Senate
Majority Leader Harry Reid, D-Nev., elevated that suggestion by
claiming, also without proof, that an anonymous source told him
Romney had not paid taxes for 10 years.
LOCAL/WORLD 8
Friday Aug. 17, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
A
dvanced sommelier Nichole
Dishman of Viognier restaurant
in San Mateo will be competing
in the third annual StarChefs.com Somm
Slam! This years Somm Slam, held Sept.
30 through Oct. 2, will challenge 12 com-
petitors to test their skills in the uncharted
waters of real-time, mano-a-mano pairing
competition, supplemented with high-pres-
sure blind tastings and a game-show style
Q&A for the detail-oriented (detail-
obsessed) sommelier. So loosen your neck-
ties, lose the high heels and sign up for the
third annual StarChefs.com Somm Slam.
Good luck Nichole on your quest for
grapey glory.
***
Congratulations to Millbrae, which was
recently awarded the Certificate of
Achievement for Excellence in Financial
Reporting by the Government Finance
Officers Association of the United States
and Canada for its comprehensive annual
financial report. The certificate is the high-
est form of recognition in the area of gov-
ernmental accounting and financial report-
ing, and its attainment represents a signifi-
cant accomplishment by a government and
its management.
Finance Director LaRae Brown and the
finance department are primarily responsi-
ble for preparing the award-wining annual
report.
The CAFR has been judged by an impar-
tial panel to meet the high standards of the
program including demonstrating a con-
structive spirit of full disclosure to clear-
ly communicate its financial story and
motivate potential users and user groups to
read the CAFR.
***
The congregation at Pilgrim Baptist
Church in San Mateo is celebrating the
25th pastoral anniversary of Dr. Larry
Wayne Ellis next month with several cele-
bration activities planned starting Sept. 4.
He joined the church in 1987. For more
information visit www.pilgrimbcsm.org.
***
A frequent visitor to the Twin Pines
Senior and Community Center, William
Pearce, left a portion of his estate to the
center after his death. Tuesday night, the
Belmont City Council accepted a $55,055
donation from Pearces estate that will go
toward upcoming improvements to the cen-
ter.
***
San Mateo Mayor Brandt Grotte has
gotten mostly positive responses from the
public in his quest to ban leaf blowers out-
right in the city, he informed the Daily
Journal. Most support the ban and others
support a softer approach, he said. The
City Council will consider amendments to
city code later this year that could limit the
use of the devices or possibly ban them
completely for residential use.
***
After attorney Ted Hanning told the
Board of Supervisors during public com-
ment at its Tuesday morning he was there
to report good news a sailing fundraiser
that distributed a half-million dollars to
local youth charities Board President
Adrienne Tissier overrode the usual time
limit for speakers. An extra two minutes
then, she joked.
***
Construction on an Aloft hotel in
Millbrae, where the Clarion was previous-
ly located, is nearly complete. Recently the
sign went up along Highway 101. The ren-
ovated hotel is set to open next month.
Planning for the new hotel began in 2007.
***
My New Red Shoes worked with 270
summer volunteers to create more than
4,000 gift bags for local homeless children.
To learn more about the Burlingame-based
nonprofit that offers clothing to local
homeless children visit www.mynewred-
shoes.org.
***
The Burlingame Green Street Fair has
just a few booth spaces left for the annual
event from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Sunday, Sept.
16 in downtown Burlingame. This will be
the fifth annual Burlingame Green Street
Fair. Last year, it featured 60 exhibitors
and attracted more than 1,000 visitors. In
addition to showcasing green businesses
and lifestyle choices, the Burlingame
Green Fair offers entertainment, demon-
strations, complimentary samples and free
art projects for families. For more informa-
tion visit www.burlingamegreenfair.com or
email
burlingamegreenstreetfair@gmail.com.
***
Hillsdale Shopping Center is set to
open a 1,800 square-foot Michael Kors
store, the world-renowned, award-winning
designer label. The new space will be
located in Macys Center Court. The
opening is set for Sept. 13.
The reporters notebook is a weekly collection of
facts culled from the notebooks of the Daily
Journal staff. It appears in the Friday edition.
Reporters notebook
Daly City father found
guilty of murdering son
Jurors deliberated barely two hours the
week of Aug. 17, 2007 before convicting a
Daly City father for the second-degree mur-
der and assault of the 17-month-
old son he brought to a hospital
three years prior with bruises,
head injuries and the
questionable explana-
tion that the boy fell
off a bed and into a
wall heater.
Despite Pedro Joaquin Olivas
story, which formed the backbone of his
defense, the prosecution told jurors the 50-
year-old father was only concerned that doc-
tors and authorities didnt consider him a
suspect. He was so steadfast in protecting
himself he refused to tell doctors how the
child sustained such severe bruising and
bleeding, the prosecution told jurors during
closing arguments.
Test scores stay stagnant
Standardized school test scores showed lit-
tle change both state- and county-wide the
week of Aug. 17, 2007, with local students
continuing to post marks higher than most
around California.
Changes since the prior year were minimal
at best with a 1 percent statewide increase in
English prociency and no change in math,
according to the 2007 Standardized Testing
and Reporting Program results released that
week. While students in San Mateo County
boasted higher scores than the state average,
local students failed to make any big
changes.
Belmont bans smoking in condos
The week of Aug. 17, 2007, the Belmont
City Council
banned smok-
ing in condo-
miniums and townhouses that are part of a
multi-level, multi-family building.
There was a 14-month phase-in stage for
the multiple-unit homes affected by the pro-
posed law and an amendment required in the
lease agreements. Under the ordinance,
smoking would also be banned at city-spon-
sored events.
The council considered banning smoking
at any event requiring a city permit but
decided against such a move since it would
extend to block parties.
It was one of the rst laws in the nation to
ban smoking in private multi-residential
buildings.
From the archives highlights stories originally
printed ve years ago this week. It appears in the
Friday edition of the Daily Journal.
By Raphael Satter and Gonzalo Solano
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
LONDON Hes won asylum in Ecuador,
but Julian Assange is no closer to getting
there.
The decision by the South American nation
to identify the WikiLeaks founder as a
refugee is a symbolic boost for the embattled
ex-hacker. But legal experts say that does lit-
tle to help him avoid extradition to Sweden
on sexual assault allegations.
Instead, with British officials asserting
they wont grant Assange safe passage out of
the country, the case has done much to drag
the two nations into an international faceoff.
Were at something of an impasse,
lawyer Rebecca Niblock said. Its not a
question of law anymore. Its a question of
politics and diplomacy.
The silver-haired Australian shot to inter-
national prominence in 2010 after he began
publishing a huge trove of American diplo-
matic and military secrets
including a quarter
million U.S. Embassy
cables that shed a harsh
light on the backroom
dealings of U.S. diplo-
mats. Amid the ferment,
two Swedish women
accused him of sexual
assault; Assange has been
fighting extradition to
Sweden ever since.
Interpol, the Lyon, France-based interna-
tional police agency, issued a statement late
Thursday saying Assange remains on the
equivalent of its most-wanted list, the
Ecuadorian decision notwithstanding.
The convoluted saga took its latest twist on
Thursday, when Ecuadorean Foreign
Minister Ricardo Patino announced that he
had granted asylum to Assange, who has
been holed up inside the small, coastal
nations embassy since June 19.
Ecuador grants asylum
to WikiLeaks Assange
Julian Assange
OPINION 9
Friday Aug. 17, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Track the money
Editor,
Theyd better be careful what they
wish for. If their lawsuit goals material-
ize, theyll have succeeded in totally
screwing their own constituents.
It was fun for awhile the notion of
the little guys slaying the high-speed
rail dragon. They had nothing to lose.
Theyd be heroes. The ofcials of Palo
Alto, Menlo Park and Atherton
together with their publicly-nanced,
high-priced lawyer were riding high.
The lawyer, in particular, had no reason
to be reasonable or to settle because
hed lose the continuation of his sever-
al-years-and-counting citizen-nanced
bankroll. So far, his tab is running at
$50,000.
Then the dragon awoke and outma-
neuvered the bumpkins. It tied the one
project that unites Peninsula riders and
residents electrication, new and
faster trains, more trains, more quiet,
less pollution and signal safety
improvement to a $700 million gift
to be supplied by the dragon itself. But
if the bumpkins keep throwing rocks
and immobilize the dragon, the dragon
cant spend that $700 million gift on
the Peninsula. The likely result: one
rich lawyer and zero rail improvements
for 3 million people in San Francisco,
San Mateo and Santa Clara counties. In
a single sentence, heres what the three
cities are doing: Against the resounding
vote of their residents, they are spend-
ing their own citizens money to contin-
ue the slow, less-than-frequent, air-pol-
luting, lung-polluting, grade-crossing-
rich, noisy system of the present as
long as possible instead of facilitating
faster, more frequent, non-polluting,
safer, quieter transportation to benet
their constituents as quickly as possi-
ble.
Its time the three cities aspiring
heroes and their lawyer realize theyve
been checkmated. They should stop
challenging their own voters over-
whelmingly-expressed preferences and
wasting their constituents money and
go for the free $700 million improve-
ment.
Stanford M. Horn
Millbrae
Removing Hetch Hetchy
Reservoir not such a bad idea
Editor,
Your editorial from the Aug. 15 edi-
tion of the Daily Journal (Removing
Hetch Hetchy Reservoir a terrible
idea) on the effort to restore the Hetch
Hetchy Valley in Yosemite National
Park leaves out a few key points: First,
there would be no need to nd a new
source of water; people in San Mateo
County and other parts of the Bay Area
would still be drinking the same water,
which comes from the Tuolumne River,
and it would be stored downstream.
Hetch Hetchy is only one of nine reser-
voirs in the system, and there is room
in those other reservoirs.
Second, San Francisco owns and
maintains almost total control over the
system, necessitating the placement of
the initiative on the ballot only in San
Francisco (the fairness of the system
ownership and control is a subject for
another editorial). Finally, the Hetch
Hetchy Valley is in Yosemite National
Park. No other city is allowed to use a
national park as its water tank.
This is a bold restoration project that
can and should be undertaken. Its time
for San Francisco to update its destruc-
tive 20th-century water system.
Kathy Schrenk
Atherton
Letters to the editor
The Orange County Register
A
s many as 6.3 million private-
sector California workers
have no retirement plan
through their employers, apart from
Social Security. But that doesnt justify
the state government forcing California
businesses to provide employees with
retirement options or face a nancial
penalty, or coercing their employees
into enrolling.
State Sen. Kevin De Leons Senate
Bill 1234 would require businesses to
steer employees to a government estab-
lished retirement system if they are not
already covered by retirement plans on
the job. Mr. De Leon, D-Los Angeles,
says low-income working people can
afford to save for retirement, but choose
not to. Thats not good enough for him.
Consequently, SB1234 automatically
would enroll such employees in
California Secure Choice Retirement
Savings Plans, and ne employers up to
$750 per worker if companies dont
comply.
Small businesses havent supported
the bill, concerned they may become
liable, such as when guaranteed
investment returns fall short, though the
law states they wont be. Wider opposi-
tion in the nancial services industry
notes that scally beleaguered state
government could become liable,
despite the laws assurances otherwise.
But theres an even more fundamen-
tal nancial industry complaint:
Government has no business dictating
retirement plans in competition with
private providers, even if investments
would be managed by private rms
contracting with the government, as the
law would allow.
The laws nominal accounts resem-
ble the restrictiveness of Social Security
because the individual shall not have a
specic right or claim to any specic
assets of the account. If workers
shopped around, they probably could
nd more exible private plans provid-
ing greater ownership of their assets.
Mr. De Leon says employees can opt
out, but only after automatically being
enrolled. He says this will nudge
people into the plan to stay who other-
wise would be reluctant to participate.
That ignores that those 6.3 million
Californians are more than reluctant.
They choose every day not to save the 3
percent of wages this bill would auto-
matically deduct from their paychecks.
Unlike Mr. De Leon, we credit peo-
ple with being smart enough to manage
their retirement savings, weighed
against their daily needs. There are
more than 500,000 nancial services
employees in California, working in
storefronts and equipped with tele-
phones and online access. If 6.3 million
people choose not to contact them,
what business is it of government?
The nearly $7 billion Mr. De Leon
estimates can be extracted in the rst
year from private-sector worker pay-
checks would create another govern-
ment bureaucracy to dictate rules,
impose nes and spend up to 1 percent
of the proceeds nearly $70 million
on administration. This scheme is
as likely to expand government as it is
to empower private saving.
We also wonder whether the intention
is to divert the publics attention away
from the arguably luxurious, yet under-
funded public pensions threatening to
further burden taxpayers. SB1234 is
intrusive, unneeded, potentially costly
and may even be a mechanism to bring
billions in private savings under man-
agement of the governments California
Public Employees Retirement System,
which the law also would allow. The
Legislature should kill this bill or, if
not, the governor should veto it.
Dont nudge millions into new pension system
Whats next for
electrification?
I
ts been a month since Gov. Jerry Brown signed an $8
billion funding measure to begin work on Californias
high-speed rail line.
Construction on the rst section of high-speed rail, a 130-
mile stretch in the Central Valley, could break ground by the
beginning of 2013. In the meantime, ofcials at Caltrain, the
beneciary of $735 million
in money for electrication
authorized by the legisla-
tion, are busy dusting off a
modernization plan last
worked on in 2009. With
an expected completion
date of 2019, the electri-
cation of Caltrain still has a
long track to travel and it
begins with studies and
community meetings.
Sounds fun, huh?
Considering the world of
hurt the High-Speed Rail
Authority encountered
when it proposed changes
to the Caltrain line in its
initial phases, this will be a
delicate, complicated and thorough process. To get to the
critical construction phase, Caltrain Communications
Manager Jayme Ackemann said the agency must rst get
the environmental impact report for electrication certied
by the state and, in doing so, will host many community
meetings on topics such as noise, vibration and impact on
surrounding communities. The goal is to get the certication
completed by the end of 2013. Another moving piece is
what is called the capacity analysis, which will provide
information on what might be needed when high-speed rail
decides to roll through. That could mean no additional
tracks if there are to be two high-speed trains an hour, or
passing tracks if there are to be more. Keep in mind that
Caltrain nished construction of passing tracks for its $127
million baby bullet express service eight years ago and there
was little disruption and high praise when it was completed.
The completion goal for that capacity analysis is the end of
2013, about the same time the certication of the electrica-
tion EIR is to be completed, ngers crossed.
After the EIR is certied, design work begins and a con-
struction contract will be issued and construction will begin.
Caltrain ofcials say the two-track system will remain but it
will be inter-operable with a high-speed train. So while it
wont need high-speed rail, it will be ready. The main
change will be electric cantilevers similar to the ones seen
in Europe or the light-rail in Sacramento and San Jose.
Trains can stop and start faster so there could be added
stops and better service. In addition, there will no longer a
need to rely on diesel fuel. Timelines for design work and
construction are all in the works but it has to move quickly
if Caltrain is to meet its 2019 completion deadline.
High-speed rail has a completion goal of 2029, so it
seems as if there will be some time for additional study and
meetings and, well, lets face it, community concern, but the
groundwork for what changes may be in store will be found
in the capacity analysis in which Caltrain will identify pos-
sible locations for passing tracks and list issues and benets
of each spot. But what about grade separations, in which the
road and tracks are separated so cars go under or over the
tracks? Caltrain ofcials say it depends on how often high-
speed rail will want to run its trains and how fast. If the
trains remain at the current speed of 70 mph, there should
be no problem, but if they go faster or more frequent, there
may be an issue with impact on local trafc because gates
would come down more often. But thats a while off and
there will be plenty of opportunity for input, Ackemann
said.
And just how will all this be paid for? With high-speed
rail, thats an open-ended and ongoing question since
Browns signing of this summers legislation will only pay
for a fraction of the entire length from San Francisco to Los
Angeles. But the legislation authorized $735 million for
Caltrain electrication, which is estimated to cost $1.5 bil-
lion. There is no timeline of when those bonds will be sold,
but Caltrain is relying on several pots of money to begin the
process and, since the bulk of the cost will be in construc-
tion, its OK to wait. The remaining money will come by
$500 million in federal funds, $195 million in local funds
through Caltrain member agencies, a local half-cent sales
tax measure passed years ago, along with air quality and
bridge toll money. And there might even need to be some
loose change found under a Caltrain seat or two when this
whole thing is done.
Jon Mays is the editor in chief of the Daily Journal. He can
be reached at jon@smdailyjournal.com.
Other voices
Follow us on Twitter and Facebook:
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BUSINESS 10
Friday Aug. 17, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Dow 13,250.11 +0.65% 10-Yr Bond 1.836 +1.72%
Nasdaq3,062.39 +1.04% Oil (per barrel) 95.209999
S&P 500 1,415.51 +0.71% Gold 1,613.70
By Matthew Craft
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK Encouraging earnings
from Cisco and hopeful signs in a hous-
ing report lifted the stock market
Thursday. The gains nudged the
Standard & Poors 500 index near the
four-year high it reached earlier this
year.
Cisco Systems, the worlds largest
maker of computer networking equip-
ment, led the 30 stocks in the Dow Jones
industrial average, surging 10 percent.
Cisco beat profit expectations late
Wednesday and raised its quarterly divi-
dend to 14 cents per share from 8 cents.
Cisco gained $1.67 to $19.02.
Before the market opened Thursday,
the Commerce Department reported that
construction of single-family homes and
apartments dipped 1.1 percent in July
compared with June.
But market analysts seized on another
number: Building permits jumped to
812,000, the most since August 2008
and a hint of stronger construction in
coming months.
I think the housing numbers really
got investors attention, said Tim
Speiss, chairman of the personal wealth
advisers practice at EisnerAmper.
Presumably, ground is going to get
broken. Houses are going to get built,
he said. It feeds other parts of the econ-
omy. A house isnt just sticks and bricks.
Its everything else that goes into build-
ing a house.
The report helped push the S&P and
Dow near their highest closing levels
since 2007.
The Standard & Poors 500 index
gained 9.98 points to close at 1,415.51,
less than four points shy of its April 2
high. The Dow rose 85.33 points to
13,250.11, an increase of 0.6 percent and
29 points away from its May 1 peak of
13,279.
Wal-Mart Stores trailed other Dow
stocks. The worlds largest retail chain
sank 3 percent after it posted quarterly
net income and sales that fell short of
what analysts had predicted. Its stock
lost $2.30 to $72.15.
In other trading, the Nasdaq composite
index rose 31.46 points to 3,062.39.
Facebook fell 6 percent on the rst day
that its early investors and a handful of
founders were free to sell their stock. In
all, 271 million shares can be sold,
according to Facebooks regulatory l-
ings. The social networking company
lost $1.33 to $19.87.
S&P nears four-year high
Wall Street
Stocks that moved substantially or traded
heavily Thursday on the New York Stock
Exchange and Nasdaq Stock Market:
NYSE
Blyth Inc., up $6.27 at $43.36
The candle maker said it plans to spin off its
weight-loss business through an initial public
offering of stock worth $175 million.
Nasdaq
Sears Holdings Corp., up $3.69 at $60.29
The department store chain said cost-cutting
and reduced inventory helped narrow its loss in
the second quarter from a year ago.
Dollar Tree Inc., down 89 cents at $49.11
The discount retailer said that its net income
rose nearly 26 percent in the second quarter as
people spent more at its stores.
Cisco Systems Inc., up $1.67 at $19.02
The computer networking equipment makers
fourth-quarter results beat Wall Street
expectations. It raised its dividend 75 percent.
Coinstar Inc., up $3.66 at $51.88
The New York Post reported that the owner of
the Redbox DVD rental kiosks may be
considering selling itself to a private equity rm.
Perry Ellis International Inc., down $3.47 at
$18.80
The clothing company posted a $2.4 million
second-quarter loss and cuts its full-year prot
outlook citing higher costs.
PetSmart Inc., up $3.09 at $70.53
Thanks to stronger sales, the pet supply store
said its second-quarter net income rose and it
raised its 2012 prot guidance.
Bon-Ton Stores Inc., down 8 cents at $7.28
The department store operator said that its
scal second-quarter loss widened, dragged
down by severance charges and other costs.
Big movers
By Anne Dinnocenzio
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK Gap Inc. reported a
29 percent increase in second-quarter
net income, evidence the fashion retail-
ers moves to liven up its clothing with
brightly colored trendy looks are win-
ning over shoppers.
Gap, which operates stores under its
namesake, Old Navy, Banana Republic
and Athleta, also raised its full-year
profit guidance for the second time
since May. The forecast, however, still
fell short of analysts expectations.
The company, based in San
Francisco, has struggled for years to
reclaim its fashion status. But the latest
results offer more confidence that a
comeback, started in the first quarter, is
taking hold.
The Gap has stepped up its marketing
and this spring and summer pushed
trendy clothing like brightly colored
jeans and tops.
There was a lot of bright spots inside
the business that we feel good about,
Glenn Murphy, Gaps chairman and
CEO told investors during a conference
call late Thursday. Theres been a lot
of effort, a lot of energy, being directed
to get us to where we are today.
But Murphy cautioned that the chain
has to maintain that momentum the rest
of the year. One problem that needs to
be fixed is that store traffic was down in
the quarter, he said.
Gap earned $243 million, or 49 cents
per share, in the three-month period
ended July 28. That compares with
$189 million, or 35 cents per share, in
the year-ago period. Revenue rose 6
percent to $3.58 billion in the quarter.
Analysts had expected a profit of 48
cents on revenue of $3.57 billion,
according to FactSet.
Gaps 2Q profit up 29 percent
THE RESULTS:
Gap Inc. reported a 29 percent
increase in net income and a 6 percent
increase in revenue for the second
quarter.
BEHIND THE RESULTS:
The companys move to liven up its
fashions with brightly colored jeans
and tops has helped to excite
shoppers.
THE OUTLOOK:
Gap now expects earnings per share
for the full year to be in the range of
$1.95 to $2.Thats up from the original
forecast of $1.78 to $1.83.Analysts had
expected $2.09 per share.
Gaps profit
By Kevin Begos
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
PITTSBURGH In a surprising turn-
around, the amount of carbon dioxide
being released into the atmosphere in the
U.S. has fallen dramatically to its lowest
level in 20 years, and government ofcials
say the biggest reason is that cheap and
plentiful natural gas has led many power
plant operators to switch from dirtier-
burning coal.
Many of the worlds leading climate
scientists didnt see the drop coming, in
large part because it happened as a result
of market forces rather than direct govern-
ment action against carbon dioxide, a
greenhouse gas that traps heat in the
atmosphere.
Michael Mann, director of the Earth
System Science Center at Penn State
University, said the shift away from coal is
reason for cautious optimism about
potential ways to deal with climate
change. He said it demonstrates that ulti-
mately people follow their wallets on
global warming.
Theres a very clear lesson here. What
it shows is that if you make a cleaner ener-
gy source cheaper, you will displace dirti-
er sources, said Roger Pielke Jr., a cli-
mate expert at the University of Colorado.
In a little-noticed technical report, the
U.S. Energy Information Agency, a part of
the Energy Department, said this month
that energy related U.S. CO2 emissions
for the rst four months of this year fell to
about 1992 levels. Energy emissions make
up about 98 percent of the total. The
Associated Press contacted environmental
experts, scientists and utility companies
and learned that virtually everyone
believes the shift could have major long-
term implications for U.S. energy policy.
While conservation efforts, the lagging
economy and greater use of renewable
energy are factors in the CO2 decline, the
drop-off is due mainly to low-priced natu-
ral gas, the agency said.
A frenzy of shale gas drilling in the
Northeasts Marcellus Shale and in Texas,
Arkansas and Louisiana has caused the
wholesale price of natural gas to plummet
from $7 or $8 per unit to about $3 over the
past four years, making it cheaper to burn
than coal for a given amount of energy
produced.
CO2 emissions in U.S. drop to 20-year low
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON Software maker
Oracle Corp. has agreed to pay $2 mil-
lion to settle federal civil charges of fail-
ing to prevent secret payments in its
sales operations in India.
The Securities and Exchange
Commission announced the settlement
Thursday. The SEC said Oracle violated
the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act by
allowing its Indian subsidiary to secretly
set aside money that went to phony local
vendors. Oracle ran the risk of the secret
funds being used for bribes, the SEC
said.
The agency said the violations
occurred from 2005 to 2007. It said the
subsidiary sold software licenses and
services to the Indian government and
kept some of the sale proceeds off
Oracles books.
Oracle, based in Redwood Shores,
Calif., neither admitted nor denied
wrongdoing in the settlement.
It said it red the employees involved
in the alleged violations after conducting
an investigation. It informed the govern-
ment and cooperated with the SECs
inquiry.
Oracle paying $2 million to settle SEC charges on India
<< Warriors Curry near full strength, page 13
Alex Smith making big strides, page 13
Friday, Aug. 17, 2012
OFF TO A GOOD START: THE PETALUMA LITTLE LEAGUE SQUAD WON ITS FIRST GAME AT LITTLE LEAGUE WORLD SERIES >>> PAGE 12
By Julio Lara
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
The PacWest Conference announced on
Thursday that nearly 1,000 of their student-
athletes earned academic marks worthy of its
2011-2012 Academic All-Conference Team.
Making a strong showing was Notre Dame de
Namur University.
The PacWest is an NCAA Division II con-
ference, which is comprised of schools in
Arizona, California, Hawaii and Utah.
Of the 967 total athletes on the list, 69 were
Argos, including a whopping 14 from both the
womens soccer and softball teams.
Its always very exciting to have that many
athletes on the All-Conference Team, said
Notre Dame athletic director Joshua Doody.
I think our university has done quite well
over the past few years on the academic side
and were really proud of our student-ath-
letes.
The 69 athletes on the list make up nearly
40 percent of the entire athletic department at
Notre Dame. As a whole, athletes at Notre
Dame boast a 3.194 grade point average,
according to Doody.
We do mandate a study hall for our ath-
letes, Doody said. And in our recruiting
efforts, were always looking out for athletes
who are strong academically.
Athletes from 10 different sports made the
list: golf (4), mens basketball (6), mens cross
country (2), mens soccer (9), softball (14),
volleyball (4), womens basketball (8),
womens cross country (4), womens soccer
(14) and womens tennis (4) 48 women
and 21 men.
As a unit, the members of the All-Academic
team hold a 3.44 GPA with mens cross coun-
try leading the way at 3.65. But perhaps most
impressive are the women from the softball
NDNU athletes named to PacWest All-Academic Team
REUTERS
Defensive tackle Tommy Kelly believes this years Raiders defense can be a top-ve unit, despite being ranked 29 of 32 teams last season.
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NAPA Tommy Kelly needed only one
preseason game to become convinced
Oaklands defense is already vastly improved
from a year ago.
The veteran defensive tackle has fully
embraced the changes made by rst-year
coach Dennis Allen and defensive coordinator
Jason Tarver and said he expects the Raiders
(tied for No. 23 in the AP Pro32) to have one
of the top ve defenses in the NFL in 2012.
Most definitely, Kelly said following
practice Thursday. (If) we cut down on the
mental errors and the penalties, man, people
are going to have a hard time dealing with us.
That might be asking a bit much from a
team that ranked 29th in overall defense and
surrendered the second-most touchdowns in
the league last season.
Then again, Kelly has been defying odds
since he entered the NFL as an undrafted
rookie in 2004.
A Pro Bowl alternate each of the past two
seasons, Kelly has developed into a player
who Allen believes can be one of the games
premier defensive tackles. Allen is counting
on the 6-foot-6, 300-pounder to help anchor
Oaklands front four.
The Raiders rst-team defense got off to an
encouraging start in the 3-0 loss to Dallas on
Monday, allowing only three yards rushing in
two series. Kelly also sacked quarterback
Tony Romo for a 12-yard loss to force the
Cowboys into a third-and-24 before they
punted.
Kelly excited about D
By Linda Steward Ball
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
MESQUITE, Texas A suburban Dallas
boy has been barred from playing peewee
football because the league says he is just too
big at nearly 300 pounds.
Mesquite Pee Wee Football Association
President Ronnie Henderson said the rules are
clear and 12-year-old Elijah Earnheart is not
eligible. The 6-foot-1-inch boy exceeds the
135-pound limit for sev-
enth-graders, and he got
the bad news last Sunday
when the league held its
ofcial weigh-in.
Henderson said he
asked Elijah whether he
was in sixth or seventh
grade, then told him no
need going any further.
Cindy Earnheart, the
boys mother, said she was
incensed and Elijah was humiliated.
They would not even let him weigh in on
the scales like every single boy out there, she
said. He might be the size of a grown man
but hes 12 years old and he has feelings, too.
Elijah, who describes himself as a gentle
giant and dreams of someday playing pro
football, said the turn of events was unfair.
Im not sad, Im mad that I dont get to
play, Elijah said. Ive been practicing for
three weeks.
Henderson said three other boys were
turned away that day because of safety con-
cerns for other players.
Weve got little boys that play against him
that are 85, 95 and 100 pounds, Henderson
said. We have to look out for all the kids, not
just him.
Boy too
big for
football
By Janie McCauley
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SAN FRANCISCO San Francisco
Giants general manager Brian Sabean insists
his clubs two suspended veteran players
should have known better than to use per-
formance-enhancing drugs.
A day after outelder and All-Star game
MVP Melky Cabrera received a 50-game sus-
pension for a positive testosterone test,
Sabean said Thursday he was shocked when
he received word of the suspension from
Major League Baseball on
Wednesday morning, not
long before San
Franciscos series finale
against the Washington
Nationals. Manager Bruce
Bochy broke the news to
his team about 90 minutes
before rst pitch.
I was so taken aback it
was deflating, Sabean
said. I was actually in the meeting with
Bruce when he talked to the players and I kind
of got emotional because I
didnt see something like
this coming. Weve all
been around this game a
long time. You get used to
making changes and
adjustments. Things hap-
pen out of left eld, a lot
like life, and this was one
of those things youre
punched in the stomach
with. But youve got no choice but to gure
out how to move on.
The Giants who trailed the Dodgers by
one game in the NL West heading into
Thursdays off day will continue to work to
educate players regarding the major league
drug program.
In our case, its two veteran players who
should know the policy and should know the
consequences and should know better,
Sabean said on a conference call. We follow
the lead of Major League Baseball, and they
do have a program in place, along with the
Giants Sabean shocked by Cabrera suspension
See RAIDERS, Page 15
I think our university has done quite well over the past few years on
the academic side and were really proud of our student-athletes.
Josh Doody, NDNU athletic director
See NDNU, Page 14
See GIANTS, Page 14
Brian Sabean Melky Cabrera
See BOY, Page 14
Elijah
Earnheart
SPORTS 12
Friday Aug. 17, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Nicaragua a learning
experience for Morgan
Nia Morgans What did you do over sum-
mer vacation? story to her Burlingame High
School classmates a couple of days into the
new school year has to be one of the best on
campus.
Thats because the junior accomplished
what she set out to do earlier this summer as
part of her Soccer Without Borders mission to
Nicaragua in Central America and that was to
change the lives of other by playing the sport
she loves.
Nicaragua was a great experience,
Morgan told the Daily Journal via email,
adding that yes indeed, the nacatamales
traditional Nicaraguan cuisine were deli-
cious. It was really hot, but the kids were so
much fun to play with and everyone was so
welcoming.
Morgan joined 14 other girls on the trip to
Nicaragua where they focused on boosting the
self condence of young girls and helping
them succeed in the workplace and in life
through soccer.
Soccer Without Borders is a nonprot group
that runs community-led, year-round, youth
development programs in under-served areas
in the U.S. and abroad.
According to its website, they provide pro-
gramming to youth who are traditionally
excluded from sports-based and extracurricu-
lar activities while providing participants with
an avenue for positive engagement, a platform
for personal growth and a toolkit for a brighter
future.
Borders currently operates four core pro-
grams, four seasonal programs and 12 camps
in six countries including El Salvador,
Guatemala and Egypt.
Honestly, my favorite part of the trip was
just playing with the kids in my barrio every
night, Morgan said. After our daily activi-
ties, we would go back to our barrio where all
the kids were waiting for us to play soccer
with them, hide-and- go-seek, and many other
games. We would play for hours from around
9 to 11 [p.m.].
Just playing with the kids and feeling wel-
comed and feeling like part of their family
was great. All my expectations for the trip
were met and turned out even better.
Before taking off to Nicaragua, Morgan
hosted a soccer clinic for Peninsula girls
where she raised over $500 for SWB.
Anthem auditions
If you think you have what it takes to sing
the national anthem at a professional athletic
competition, then the San Francisco Bulls
want to hear from you.
In their inaugural season as part of the East
Coast Hockey League this October, the Bulls
are offering fans a chance to sing the Star
Spangled Banner prior to the puck dropping in
one of six homes games.
Tryouts will be held this Saturday at Pier 39
on the Crystal Geyser Alpine Spring Water
stage in San Francisco, starting at 1 p.m. and
ending at 3 p.m.
Following all the bombs bursting in airs and
home of the braves, the Bulls will host a meet-
and-greet with select players and coaches at
the Players Sports Grill and Arcade from 3 to
4 p.m.
Dan Ashley (of ABC7 News), Kevin Kurz
(of Comcast Sports Bay Area), Vicki Liviakis
(of KRON 4) and Emily Morse (of Bravos
Miss Advised) will serve as guest judges.
The Bulls are part of the Western
Conference of the ECHL and will play a 72-
game schedule with 36 home games to take
place at the legendary Cow Palace.
Local sports briefs
By Genaro C. Armas
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SOUTH WILLIAMSPORT, Pa. After a
hard-earned win Thursday, the team from
Petaluma got two days off to get ready for its next
game at the Little League World Series.
Thirteen-year-old Austin Paretti had other plans.
Swimming, the outelder exclaimed with
eyes wide open in anticipation.
The pint-sized Paretti and his teammates earned
a little down time after a 6-4 victory Thursday over
Faireld, Conn., on a sun-splashed opening day
for the youth baseballs biggest tournament.
Japan also won its early game, 7-0 over
Curacao, while Taiwan routed a team from
Ramstein Air Base in Germany, 14-1.
Kearney, Neb., will make history in the prime-
time game against Goodlettsville, Tenn., as the
rst team from Nebraska to make it to South
Williamsport.
California starting pitcher Bradley Smith made
an impression, too, after striking out seven and
going 4 for 4 at the plate with a homer and three
RBIs to help the West region champs hold on
against Connecticut.
The 13-year-old Smith strikes an imposing pose
with his 6-foot-3 frame. But he had some early jit-
ters on the mound after giving up a rst-inning
home run to Biagio Paoletta.
You cant be nervous in these games. Youre
one of the top 16 teams ... in the world, Smith said
calmly. So I was thinking, What do I have to be
nervous about?
He felt much better in the third after hitting a 2-
0 curveball deep to left-center that just eluded out-
elder Matt Clarkins glove and just cleared the
fence 225 feet away for a two-run homer and 3-1
lead. Smith also struck out seven over four
innings.
But California couldnt shake Connecticut. Will
Lucas tripled home a run before scoring on a
passed ball to get Connecticut within a run in the
bottom of the fth.
Connecticut threatened again in the sixth, but
reliever Andrew White got a double play and
strikeout to end the game. The 12-year-old lefty
pumped his st after he left the mound to be greet-
ed by giddy teammates.
The 5-foot Paretti, the smallest player on his
team, came up big with a two-run single in the
fth.
Its been amazing, its just so exciting to play
with teams all around and now were in the same
position, Paretti said. Just seeing them (at the
tournament) and now were in the same position,
its really awesome.
Connecticut outelder Ryan Meury left the
game with a bloodied lip after getting by a pitch,
but got an ovation after walking back to the
dugout. A Little League spokesman said Meury
needed a couple stitches to close the gash. It was
unclear if Meury would be ready for Connecticuts
next game Saturday.
Petaluma Little League wins World Series opener
SPORTS 13
Friday Aug. 17, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
OAKLAND Stephen Curry finished
working out with a couple of Golden State
Warriors teammates Thursday and plopped
into a chair ready to meet with the media for
the first time since re-
injuring his right ankle in
mid-March.
Its been a three-month
rehab and Im making
good progress, Curry
said. Were being patient
with it, so that by Oct. 31 I
am playing without any
restrictions and no hesita-
tion.
Curry, who missed 41
of the teams 67 games last season with the
sprained right ankle, is working out at the
Golden State Warriors practice facility as part
of his rehab from the injury, which has both-
ered him the past two years.
I have the mindset that I am getting myself
ready for camp, he said. Im not concerned
about the last two years. I want everything to
be 100 percent clear in my mind.
He thinks this offseason will be different
because of the design of his training schedule,
which began about June 1 and continues
through training camp.
I dont think I gave it enough rest when I
hurt it earlier, Curry said. During the season
its a little harder to do that. Once it felt better
I went out and played full speed.
The Warriors are gambling Curry stays
healthy, letting popular guard Monta Ellis go
last year in an attempt to develop depth
around Curry.
Its an opportunity for me to be a vocal
leader, Curry said. I want to lead the charge
as the point guard. Ive let the rookies know
were going to be a tight-knit group. My job is
to put it all together.
The Warriors certainly missed their 2009
rst-round draft pick. They were 12-14 in
games Curry appeared and 11-30 without him
in the lineup.
If everyone stays healthy, Curry thinks the
Warriors could make the playoffs.
We have size, we have shooting and we
have a better defensive unit, he said. When
you add all those things up, it adds up to more
wins.
Warriors Curry is
near full strength
Steph Curry
Bills QB Vince Young owes
loan company $1.7 million
BUFFALO, N.Y. Quarterback Vince
Young has been ordered to pay a loan compa-
ny nearly $1.7 million after missing a pay-
ment in late May, shortly after signing with
the Buffalo Bills.
The ruling against Young was made in New
York State Supreme Court in Manhattan on
July 2, according to court documents.
Young took out a high-risk loan from Pro
Player Funding for $1.877 million during the
NFL lockout in May 2011, while he was still
under contract with the Tennessee Titans. The
loan plus $619,000 in interest was due
to be paid back in January 2013 at an annual
interest rate of 20 percent. That rate jumped
another 10 percent if Young missed a pay-
ment.
A ruling in the lending companys favor was
made because Young agreed he understood the
terms by signing whats called an afdavit of
confession of judgment upon taking out the
loan. The afdavit is regarded as proof and
could be used at any time by the lender in the
event a client defaults on the loan.
TMZ.com rst reported the ruling against
Young last week.
NFL brief
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SANTA CLARA Alex Smith is an expert.
So says Jim Harbaugh, and hes the one who truly
matters on this topic.
Harbaugh gures it typically takes a quarter-
back two full seasons in a new offense to become
a so-called expert.
In the case of Smith, how-
ever, hes already right there
if you ask the coach of the
49ers (No. 4 in the AP
Pro32).
Smith got a chuckle out of
hearing that the reigning
NFL Coach of the Year was
dishing out such high praise
after practice Thursday, and
he hardly believes he has
come close to mastering
Harbaughs unique version of the West Coast
offense.
No, no, no, Smith said. Not at all. A lot to
learn.
While Harbaugh said his starters might play
more in the teams second preseason game
Saturday at Houston (No. 6), he has already seen
plenty from Smith on the eld to be condent in
his play-caller as his second training camp winds
down.
He already has great ideas, already very cre-
ative, already very knowledgeable on how to use
everything in the system, Harbaugh said. Way
ahead of the curve. I think after a year, you really
know it. But it takes about two years in the system
to become a real expert at it from the quarterback
position. But hes cut that in half.
It has certainly helped to be mentored by the
former NFL quarterback, Harbaugh, and to play
under the same offensive coordinator Greg
Roman in consecutive seasons for a change.
The 2005 No. 1 overall draft pick out of Utah,
Smith worked under a different offensive coordi-
nator in each of his rst seven NFL seasons.
Smith thrived under 15-year quarterback
Harbaugh last year and helped lead the franchise
to its rst postseason berth and winning record in
nine years.
What Smith will say is that hes more comfort-
able in this offense than any other he has been in
during his career and he has only played for
one other offensive-minded head coach in Norv
Turner.
It always just comes down to the details,
Smith said. Its not drawing up something on a
white board or on a piece of paper. Its not the Xs
and Os. Its all the little details of the execution,
whats really going on on the eld, all the little
things. I think the other part of it is just getting a
good understanding of intent, getting a great feel
for (Roman) and why were calling stuff and what
were trying to do and what were trying to get out
of it. I feel Im better at handling those situations.
Harbaugh can already tell Smith is clicking
with newcomers Randy Moss and Mario
Manningham in the upgraded receiving group.
Its better than it was a year ago, Smith said,
referencing the lockout-shortened offseason of
2011. I feel like its progressed. When youre
playing quarterback, I feel like youre always just
working to get better and working to learn. Its
never-ending.
Its not on any particular day or date or throw
or play. Its just been a process, Harbaugh said.
By the time we get here next year, hell have well
passed me.
Alex Smith making big
strides in 49ers offense
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
KANSAS CITY, Mo. Coco Crisp and
Yoenis Cespedes homered, and Dan Straily
picked up his rst major league victory as the
Oakland Athletics beat the Kansas City
Royals 3-0 on Thursday night.
Crisp, who played for the Royals in 2009,
was 2 for 27 this season against Kansas City
before the home run.
Crisp drilled a 2-0 pitch from Luke
Hochevar deep to right. The ball hit high off a
green wall beyond the fence and caromed
back onto the eld. It was rst ruled a double,
but manager Bob Melvin disputed that. After
the umpires viewed replays, it was changed to
a home run.
Straily (1-0), a 24th-round draft pick in
2009, held the Royals to three singles over 6
1-3 innings in his third major league start.
Straily, who walked two and struck out two,
pitched out of a bases loaded jam in the sec-
ond inning.
Hochevar (7-11) gave up three runs and four
hits in seven-plus innings. Hochevar is 0-8
with a 6.52 ERA in nine career starts against
Oakland.
As avoid sweep in K.C.
Alex Smith
As 3, Royals 0
SPORTS 14
Friday Aug. 17, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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team, who have 14 members on the list who average a 3.62 GPA.
In fact, the three highest female GPAs (3.97) belong to
Luciada Knudson, Kayla Anderson and Amanda Wallach all
members of the softball team.
Notre Dames top scholar athlete was Trent Henwood, a for-
ward on the mens basketball team, who has a 3.99 GPA.
Those are our prized student-athletes, Doody said, the ones
you get excited about.
By focusing on recruiting students with strong academic back-
ground, Doody said eligibility isnt something too many Notre
Dame coaches have to worry about.
At the end of the four years, Doody said, its always great
to see our student-athletes graduate. Thats our ultimate goal.
In the PacWest, for the third straight year, womens soccer
posted the most recipients with 173 Academic All-Conference
Team members a jump of 55 over last season. Mens soccer
nished runner-up for the second consecutive year with 135 (an
increase of 21), while softball wound up third with 125 a leap
of 43 student-athletes.
Every athletic program in the conference saw an increase,
while baseball and womens cross country saw signicant
climbs.
Student-athletes on the 2011-12 PacWest Academic All-
Conference Team represent 70 percent of the United States or
35 of the states.
The PacWest now will choose a Scholar-Athlete of the Year for
each of its 11 sports. Institutions have been presented with an
opportunity to nominate one student-athlete from each of its ath-
letic programs.
The winners will be announced in late August with a PacWest
Mens and Womens Scholar-Athlete of the Year selected from
the top vote getters in each sport.
Continued from page 11
NDNU
Cindy Earnheart said her son was feeling self-conscious about his
size until he discovered peewee football. His barber happened to
coach a team, the Mesquite Vikings, and suggested the boy join.
Coach Marc Wright said a passage in the rulebook seemed to indi-
cate that youths who weigh more than 135 pounds could play, but
only on the offensive or defensive line.
At his physical last month, Elijahs doctor said he weighed 297
pounds and stood 6-feet-1 1/2 inches tall. His mother said they spe-
cial-ordered his helmet, shoulder pads, pants and jersey because of
his size, which she said is hereditary in her family.
Elijah took the practice eld, looming over boys more than half
his size, and was thrilled..
When hes playing football Elijah said, I feel energetic. I feel
happy.
He practiced with the Vikings for three weeks and even took part
in a scrimmage. Then came the weigh-in.
Henderson said the exception in the rulebook was meant for sixth-
graders who can weigh as much as 160 pounds. He suggested Elijah
play for his middle school team, but the boy doesnt have much
football experience and was hoping to feel his way in peewee rst.
Cindy Earnheart said barring her son was discrimination.
No one is telling boys who are too thin or too small that they
cant play football, she said. Why tell my kid hes too big?
She added: Isnt bigger better in football? Football is a contact
sport. If you dont want your son tackled, get him off the eld.
Continued from page 11
BOY
union. I think our staff has been very diligent and has bent over
backwards.
Gregor Blanco will move into the regular role as left elder
in place of Cabrera, who joins reliever and teammate
Guillermo Mota as two of the four big leaguers suspended this
season.
San Francisco is calling up right-hander Eric Hacker and
outelder Justin Christian ahead of a weekend series at San
Diego. In terms of nding another outelder or hitter via the
waiver wire, Sabean isnt optimistic that will happen to boost
his roster for the playoff push.
Not too compelling or interesting, said Sabean, who made
several late-season acquisitions that paid off during his teams
improbable run to the World Series title two years ago.
Sabean began to hear rumblings last month of a possible pos-
itive test by Cabrera, who publicly acknowledged to CSN Bay
Area on July 27 that he had been tested the previous week.
When it rst came out, I think we were taken aback and
wondering if it was rumor or it had any substance, Sabean
said. He noted his trade with Philadelphia to acquire right
elder Hunter Pence on the July 31 trade deadline was a sepa-
rate case altogether as Pence is someone the Giants tried to get
at last years deadline.
The Giants had already spoken with Cabreras representative
about a possible contract extension considering he becomes a
free agent after this season, yet those talks didnt last long as it
was well before the suspension.
It was a conceptual conversation and it never really went
anywhere, Sabean said.
Cabrera might have cost himself tens of millions with this.
The suspension of Cabrera is the rst for a high-prole play-
er since 2011 NL MVP Ryan Braun had his suspension over-
turned by an arbitrator last winter.
That is crushing, obviously, just to hear that our best hitters
not going to be in the lineup, pitcher Tim Lincecum said.
Cabrera is batting .346 with 11 home runs and 60 RBIs in his
rst season with San Francisco and is ve hits shy of 1,000 in
his big league career. Flashing bright orange spikes, he singled
and hit a two-run homer off Texas pitcher Matt Harrison last
month in the National Leagues 8-0 win in the All-Star game,
earning MVP honors for the game and securing homeeld
advantage for the World Series.
Whether the Giants will even get to the postseason after
missing last year is unclear. Sabean and Bochy are encouraged
by the offensive strides from both Brandon Belt and Brandon
Crawford, and how the team already weathered two injury
absences by All-Star third baseman Pablo Sandoval and also
the loss of closer Brian Wilson for the year.
Continued from page 11
GIANTS
SPORTS 15
Friday Aug. 17, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Honest, professional and reliable. Yelp
East Division
W L Pct GB
Washington 73 45 .619
Atlanta 69 49 .585 4
New York 56 62 .475 17
Philadelphia 54 63 .462 18 1/2
Miami 53 66 .445 20 1/2
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Cincinnati 70 46 .603
Pittsburgh 64 52 .552 6
St. Louis 63 53 .543 7
Milwaukee 52 63 .452 17 1/2
Chicago 45 70 .391 24 1/2
Houston 39 79 .331 32
West Division
W L Pct GB
Los Angeles 65 54 .546
San Francisco 64 54 .542 1/2
Arizona 58 59 .496 6
San Diego 52 68 .433 13 1/2
Colorado 45 71 .388 18 1/2
ThursdaysGames
Pittsburgh 10, L.A. Dodgers 6
N.Y. Mets 8, Cincinnati 4
Atlanta 6, San Diego 0
Colorado 5, Miami 3
Philadelphia at Milwaukee, late
Arizona at St. Louis, late
FridaysGames
N.Y.Mets (J.Santana6-8) atWashington(Detwiler 6-
5), 4:05 p.m.
Chicago Cubs (T.Wood 4-8) at Cincinnati (Arroyo
8-7), 4:10 p.m.
L.A. Dodgers (Capuano 11-8) at Atlanta (Hanson
12-5), 4:35 p.m.
Arizona (Miley 12-8) at Houston (Keuchel 1-4),5:05
p.m.
Philadelphia (Worley 6-7) at Milwaukee (Gallardo
11-8), 5:10 p.m.
Pittsburgh (Ja.McDonald 10-5) at St. Louis (West-
brook 12-8), 5:15 p.m.
Miami (LeBlanc 1-2) at Colorado (Francis 4-4), 5:40
p.m.
SanFrancisco(M.Cain11-5) at SanDiego(Ohlendorf
4-3), 7:05 p.m.
SaturdaysGames
Chicago Cubs at Cincinnati, 10:10 a.m., 1st game
Pittsburgh at St. Louis, 1:05 p.m.
Arizona at Houston, 4:05 p.m.
N.Y. Mets at Washington, 4:05 p.m.
Chicago Cubs at Cincinnati, 4:10 p.m., 2nd game
L.A. Dodgers at Atlanta, 4:10 p.m.
Philadelphia at Milwaukee, 4:10 p.m.
Miami at Colorado, 5:10 p.m.
San Francisco at San Diego, 5:35 p.m.
East Division
W L Pct GB
New York 70 48 .593
Baltimore 64 54 .542 6
Tampa Bay 63 54 .538 6 1/2
Boston 58 61 .487 12 1/2
Toronto 55 63 .466 15
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Chicago 65 52 .556
Detroit 63 55 .534 2 1/2
Cleveland 54 64 .458 11 1/2
Kansas City 51 66 .436 14
Minnesota 50 67 .427 15
West Division
W L Pct GB
Texas 68 49 .581
Oakland 62 55 .530 6
Los Angeles 62 56 .525 6 1/2
Seattle 55 64 .462 14
ThursdaysGames
Texas 10, N.Y.Yankees 6
Boston 6, Baltimore 3
Chicago White Sox 7,Toronto 2
Oakland 3, Kansas City 0
Tampa Bay at L.A. Angels, late
FridaysGames
Baltimore (Tom.Hunter 4-7) at Detroit (Verlander
12-7), 4:05 p.m.
Boston (F.Morales 3-3) at N.Y. Yankees (P.Hughes
11-10), 4:05 p.m.
Texas (Darvish 12-8) at Toronto (Happ 1-1), 4:07
p.m.
Chicago White Sox (Sale 14-3) at Kansas City (Men-
doza 6-8), 5:10 p.m.
Cleveland (McAllister 5-4) at Oakland (Milone 9-
9), 7:05 p.m.
Tampa Bay (Shields 10-7) at L.A. Angels (Weaver
15-2), 7:05 p.m.
Minnesota (Blackburn 4-8) at Seattle (Iwakuma 3-
3), 7:10 p.m.
SaturdaysGames
Texas at Toronto, 10:07 a.m.
Boston at N.Y.Yankees, 1:05 p.m.
Baltimore at Detroit, 4:05 p.m.
Chicago White Sox at Kansas City, 4:10 p.m.
Cleveland at Oakland, 6:05 p.m.
Tampa Bay at L.A. Angels, 6:05 p.m.
Minnesota at Seattle, 6:10 p.m.
SundaysGames
Baltimore at Detroit, 10:05 a.m.
Texas at Toronto, 10:07 a.m.
NL STANDINGS AL STANDINGS
EASTERN CONFERENCE
W L T Pts GF GA
Kansas City 13 7 4 43 30 22
New York 12 7 5 41 40 34
Houston 11 6 7 40 35 27
Chicago 11 7 5 38 28 25
D.C. 11 8 3 36 36 29
Montreal 10 13 3 33 36 43
Columbus 8 8 4 28 20 21
Philadelphia 7 12 2 23 23 27
New England 6 12 5 23 26 29
Toronto FC 5 13 4 19 25 40
WESTERN CONFERENCE
W L T Pts GF GA
San Jose 14 5 5 47 47 29
Real Salt Lake 13 9 3 42 36 30
Seattle 10 6 7 37 32 24
Vancouver 10 7 7 37 28 29
Los Angeles 10 11 3 33 39 39
FC Dallas 6 11 8 26 29 34
Chivas USA 7 8 5 26 14 21
Colorado 8 15 1 25 31 35
Portland 5 12 5 20 20 37
NOTE: Three points for victory, one point for tie.
MLS STANDINGS
AMERICAN CONFERENCE
East
W L T Pct PF PA
New England 1 0 0 1.000 7 6
Buffalo 0 1 0 .000 6 7
Miami 0 1 0 .000 7 20
N.Y. Jets 0 1 0 .000 6 17
South
W L T Pct PF PA
Houston 1 0 0 1.000 26 13
Indianapolis 1 0 0 1.000 38 3
Jacksonville 1 0 0 1.000 32 31
Tennessee 0 1 0 .000 17 27
North
W L T Pct PF PA
Cleveland 2 0 0 1.000 54 27
Cincinnati 2 0 0 1.000 41 25
Baltimore 1 0 0 1.000 31 17
Pittsburgh 0 1 0 .000 23 24
West
W L T Pct PF PA
Denver 1 0 0 1.000 31 3
Kansas City 1 0 0 1.000 27 17
San Diego 1 0 0 1.000 21 13
Oakland 0 1 0 .000 0 3
NATIONAL CONFERENCE
East
W L T Pct PF PA
Dallas 1 0 0 1.000 3 0
Philadelphia 1 0 0 1.000 24 23
Washington 1 0 0 1.000 7 6
N.Y. Giants 0 1 0 .000 31 32
South
W L T Pct PF PA
Tampa Bay 1 0 0 1.000 20 7
New Orleans 1 1 0 .500 23 17
Carolina 0 1 0 .000 13 26
Atlanta 0 2 0 .000 36 55
North
W L T Pct PF PA
Chicago 0 1 0 .000 3 31
Detroit 0 1 0 .000 17 19
Minnesota 0 1 0 .000 6 17
Green Bay 0 2 0 .000 23 56
West
W L T Pct PF PA
San Francisco 1 0 0 1.000 17 6
Seattle 1 0 0 1.000 27 17
St. Louis 0 1 0 .000 3 38
Arizona 0 2 0 .000 27 44
ThursdaysGames
Cleveland 35, Green Bay 10
Cincinnati 24, Atlanta, 19
FridaysGames
Tennessee at Tampa Bay, 4:30 p.m.
Buffalo at Minnesota, 5 p.m.
Jacksonville at New Orleans, 5 p.m.
Detroit at Baltimore, 5 p.m.
Oakland at Arizona, 7 p.m.
NFL PRESEASON
NFL
CLEVELANDBROWNSPlacedRBEddieWilliams
on injured reserve.
DALLASCOWBOYSSigned TE Harry Flaherty.
DETROIT LIONSPlaced CB Drew Coleman on
injured reserve. Claimed G Bill Nagy off waivers
from Dallas.
INDIANAPOLIS COLTSSigned RB Alvester
Alexander and LB Mike Balogun. Waived LB Scott
Lutrus and CB Buddy Jackson.
MIAMI DOLPHINSSigned LB Josh Linam.
NEWYORKGIANTSSigned DB/KR Laron Scott
and DT Bobby Skinner. Placed LB Clint Sintim on
the waived-failed physical list and DE Justin Trat-
tou on the waived-injured list.
OAKLANDRAIDERSSignedLBKoreyBosworth.
PITTSBURGH STEELERSPlaced RB John Clay
on injured reserve.
ST. LOUIS RAMSWaived TE Jamie Childers.
SignedWRBrandynHarveyandWRCharlesGilbert.
SANFRANCISCO49ERSWaivedTEGijonRobin-
son.Signed LB Ikaika Alama-Francis.Placed TE Nate
Byham on the waived-injured list.
TENNESSEETITANSSigned T Jonathan Palmer
and G Michael Jasper.
WASHINGTONREDSKINSSignedDLMarlonFa-
vorite.
BASEBALL
National League
COLORADO ROCKIESReinstated OF Michael
Cuddyer from the 15-day DL. Optioned INF Matt
McBridetoColoradoSprings(PCL).Agreedtoterms
with RHP Austin Bibens-Dirkx on a minor league
contract.
LOS ANGELES DODGERSSent RHP Ryan O-
SullivantoPhiladelphiatocompleteanearlier trade.
MIAMI MARLINSPlaced2BNickGreenonthe15-
dayDL,retroactivetoAug.13.TransferredOFLogan
Morrison to the 60-day DL.Selected the contract of
2B Gil Velazquez from New Orleans (PCL).
TRANSACTIONS
@Dodgers
7:10p.m.
NBC
8/22
vs.FCDallas
7:30p.m.
CSN-CAL
9/29
@Montreal
4:30p.m.
CSN-BAY
8/18
vs.Rapids
7:30p.m.
CSN-CAL
8/25
vs.Chivas
6p.m.
NBCSN
9/2
@Chivas
7:30p.m.
CSN+
9/15
vs.Timbers
7:30p.m.
CSN-CAL
9/19
@Dodgers
7:10p.m.
CSN-BAY
8/21
@Seattle
7p.m.
CSN-CAL
9/23
vs.Indians
1:05p.m.
CSN-CAL
8/19
vs. Twins
7:05p.m.
CSN-CAL
8/21
vs.Twins
7:05p.m.
CSN-CAL
8/20
vs.Braves
7:15p.m.
CSN-BAY
8/23
vs. Twins
12:35p.m.
CSN-CAL
8/22
@Royals
5:10p.m.
CSN-CAL
8/16
@Padres
7:05p.m.
CSN-BAY
8/17
@Padres
5:35p.m.
CSN-BAY
8/18
@Padres
1:05p.m.
CSN-BAY
8/19
vs. Indians
7:05p.m.
CSN-CAL
8/17
@Dodgers
7:10p.m.
CSN-BAY
8/20
vs.Indians
6:05p.m.
CSN-CAL
8/18
A small sampling, to be sure, but Kelly likes
what hes seen so far.
Its the rst time in nine years we ever
looked that good tackling in the rst game of
the preseason, Kelly said. So whatever
theyre doing must be working. We look a lot
better.
The Raiders play in Arizona on Friday, their
second preseason game in ve days, but will
be without starting free safety Michael Huff,
who will be attending the birth of his rst
child.
Oakland will also be minus outside line-
backer Aaron Curry, who has been in Los
Angeles for nearly a week undergoing treat-
ment on his knees. Curry has not practiced at
all this camp and remains on the active-phys-
ically unable to perform list.
Allen hasnt ruled out Curry returning in
time to play in the Raiders season opener
Sept. 10 but acknowledged time is starting to
run out.
All of Oaklands starters will take increased
reps against Arizona, a normal progression for
NFL teams in the preseason.
Kelly, for one, is looking forward to it.
After missing the offseason workouts last
season because of the lockout, the 31-year-old
spent the year battling a variety of nagging
injuries yet still had a career-high 7 1/2 sacks
and recorded his rst NFL interception.
It was always hurry-up mode, he said.
Going the whole offseason without any con-
tact I had more problems with my body last
year than I ever had in my career. But I made
it through the year, so thats all that matters.
Keeping Kelly healthy is critical for the
Raiders this season.
He hasnt missed a game since suffering a
season-ending knee injury midway through
the 2007 season and is the longest-tenured
player along Oaklands defensive line.
The numbers suggest Kelly is only getting
better. He has 14 1/2 sacks over the past two
seasons and has averaged nearly 53 tackles a
year since his injury-shortened season in 07.
In the Raiders new defensive system, Kelly
will be used at a variety of positions. He will
line up primarily at tackle in Oaklands 4-3
scheme but will also move up and down the
line.
Allen, a former Denver Broncos defensive
coordinator, believes Kelly can be even better
than he has been the past two years.
He can be one of the premier inside play-
ers in the league, Allen said. Hes working
on trying to develop a little bit more from a
fundamental standpoint, and if he does those
little things, hell begin to get recognized as
one of the top interior players like hes
played.
Notes: Allen said the quarterback rotation
will remain the same for Fridays game in
Arizona. ... The Raiders signed LB Korey
Bosworth, nephew of former NFL player
Brian Bosworth.
Continued from page 11
RAIDERS
16
Friday Aug. 17, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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By Ann M. Job
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Well-heeled car buyers who havent had
enough of all things British last years
royal wedding, this years queens jubilee and
the recent Olympics in London dont need
to be deprived.
The 2012 Land Rover Range Rover, which
is the quintessential, large British sport utility
vehicle that has chauffeured Queen Elizabeth
on occasion, remains a proper and luxurious
expression of British transport.
The Range Rovers boxy exterior, amazing-
ly adaptable suspension, tall perch for the
seats and British-avored interior make for a
unique road experience. And off-road, the
Range Rovers prowess is legendary.
While still headquartered in England and
with British factories, the corporation
now is owned by Tata Group
of India, which bought
Land Rover from Ford
Motor Co. in 2008.
A warning: The 2012
Range Rover, weigh-
ing more than 2 tons
and with V-8
engines and full-
time four-wheel
drive, gulps down
gasoline. U.S. govern-
ment fuel economy rat-
ings of 12 miles per gallon
in city driving and 18 mpg
on the highway for the base
Range Rover HSE are
among the lowest for a 2012
passenger vehicle.
The ve-seat, 2012 Range Rover is the ag-
ship of the Land Rover lineup and comes
well-equipped. Starting manufacturers sug-
gested retail price, including destination
charge, is $80,275 for a base HSE model with
standard four-wheel drive and 385-horsepow-
er, naturally aspirated V-8.
Starting retail price, including destination
charge, for a ve-seat, 2012 Cadillac Escalade
with all-wheel drive and 403-horsepower V-8
is $66,715, while a 2012
Infiniti QX56 with four-
wheel drive starts at $64,090
with seats for ve and 400-
horsepower V-8. The
2012 Porsche Cayenne
SUV has a starting
MSRP, including
destination charge, of $52,825 with all-wheel
drive, ve-passenger seating and 300-horse-
power V-6.
Clearly, the Range Rover commands a pre-
mium price.
Standard features on every model include
air suspension, heated steering wheel, power
sunroof, real leather and wood interior trim,
Xenon headlights with headlamp washers,
harman kardon surround sound audio system,
an electronical-
ly adaptable terrain system for off-road or
inclement ground conditions, electronically
controlled hill descent control, low-range
transfer box for rugged off-road terrain, navi-
gation system, rear camera and front and rear
parking sensors.
But these items and others are put together
and arranged in a way that makes a driver and
passengers feel comfortable and secure both
Range Rover: Luxurious and rugged
See ROVER, Page 17
AUTO 17
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By Brian Grabianowski
DAILY JOURNAL CORRESPONDENT
For 56 years, the Hillsborough Concours
DElegance has hosted one of the most
rened automobile event experience in the
world, but its age does not mean it has fallen
prey to routine. This year, many unique ele-
ments have been added to the show.
Just two years after he took over the
Concours event, Rob Fisher saw the amount
of money raised for charity increase three-
fold, while general attendance doubled. With
a focus on luxury cars seldom seen, much
like the Pebble Beach Concours, cars are
own in from all over the world, from some
30 to 50 countries. These cars and their own-
ers have come a long way to support the
Hillsborough Concours DElegance, which is
currently helping three different charities
Autism Speaks, 49er Foundation and the
Hillsborough School District Foundation,
which started the Hillsborough Concours.
In attendance at this years Hillsborough
Concours are more than 200 rare cars, as the
event planners make a concentrated effort to
keep each and every entry as particular as
possible. Among the more than 200 cars are
30 provided by corporate manufacturers that
have agreed to attend, including Cadillac.
The majority of the cars are privately owned,
classic cars dating back to the turn of the cen-
tury.
To differentiate themselves from other con-
cours taking place, Hillsborough Concours
has decided to have an auto seminar, where
Garth Hammers from Goodingco, one of the
worlds leading authority in buying, selling,
trading and appraising classic cars, will speak
about auctions and how to handle the setting.
Also speaking is Luke Rizzuto, owner of a
1918 Chevrolet V8, the second year that
Chevrolet ever produced a V8. Adam Martin
of Hagerty Collector Car Insurance will also
be on stage.
Not only classic cars, but modern cars as
well will be at the show as well. The new
Cadillac XTS, Jaguar XKR and the new
Series Hybrid Fisker Karma will be parked
there, with talk of a McLaren expected to
make an appearance. As if all those werent
enough, along with the additional 200 and
more cars, San Franciscos Academy of Art
University will be showing three of its cars as
well: a 1930 Cadillac Roadster, Town car and
a 1963 Rolls Royce convertible.
The day before the Sunday, Aug. 26 show,
there will be a Tour de Elegance, where 50 to
60 cars drive about 50 miles from
Burlingame along the coast before enjoying a
relaxing lunch and then heading back.
Do not miss this spectacular display of
automotive and American history.
For more information visit www.hillsbor-
oughconcours.org.
Hillsborough Concours features old and new
PHOTO COURTESY OF THE HILLSBOROUGH CONCOURS DELEGANCE
Luke Rizzuto, right, owner of 1918 Chevrolet, the rst the company made with a V8 engine,
stands with his son Ben Rizzuto. The car will be one of many to be featured at this years
Hillsborough Concours DElegance Aug. 26.
on the pavement and in the wilderness. It is no
easy feat to be rugged and ready for the stren-
uous Rubicon Trail while maintaining a quiet,
serene ride thats tting as a prelude to a can-
dlelight dinner at the country club.
And every now and then, a buyer will notice
a few compromises.
The high ride height with minimum ground
clearance of 9.1 inches, for example, forces
passengers to scramble up to get inside. Range
Rovers typically are not equipped with run-
ning boards, but the tester sure could have used
one to help smaller-stature passengers climb
inside. There are no grab handles at the Range
Rover windshield edges, either, as there are in
some other SUVs. So front-seat passengers
must use awkward handles up by the ceiling,
or grab hold of the steering wheel to help get
inside.
Once on the Range Rover seats its
tempting to call the two separate seats in front
chairs because of their ne appearance and
carefully stitched leather trim everyone sits
high above the ground and above most other
passenger vehicles.
The test Range Rover HSE provided the
driver with views way down the road, even
above six cars and smaller SUVs that were
ahead.
The Range Rover steering wheel is notice-
ably large and the leather-wrapped circle feels
silky smooth to the hands.
Its surprising how compactly the big Range
Rover can make U-turns.
Continued from page 16
ROVER
By Justin Lowe
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
LOS ANGELES Capping
off the summer box office
with explosive action, The
Expendables 2 offers the
send-off that adrenaline
junkies are seeking before the
more sedate pace of fall
releases. As he proved with
the original installment,
Sylvester Stallone grasps the
action-oriented DNA of the
lms badass cast of reprobate
mercenaries with an intuition
derived from dozens of genre
roles.
Without wasting any time on
setup, the sequel nds Barney
Ross (Stallone) and his team
Expendables 2 full of action
By Ryan Pearson
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
LOS ANGELES The vet-
eran action stars of The
Expendables 2 say a stunt-
mans on-set death served as a
reminder of the danger behind
building big-screen thrills.
Sylvester Stallone, Bruce
Willis and Arnold
Schwarzenegger star in the
lm, which plays as a throw-
back to their 1980s heyday.
The actors emerge unscathed
Film dedicated to memory of stuntman
See ACTION, Page 22
See STUNT, Page 20
WEEKEND JOURNAL 19
Friday Aug. 17, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
By Samantha Weigel
DAILY JOURNAL CORRESPONDENT
The soothing vibrations of
Hawaiian music, rich in sentiment,
bring a sense of calm and aloha to
listeners across the world.
References to the sounds of wind
blowing through the trees or the
pour of rain on the earth are themes
often represented in the customary
pacific-islander dance, the hula.
This Saturday, the public is invit-
ed to celebrate Hawaiian culture
with a commemorative hula per-
formance.
The ancient narration of the
islands and its people was tradi-
tionally passed down by oral
accounts. Hula embodies these
transcendental legends, timeless to
the Hawaiian people. Each hula
song and dance is a story within
itself, full of ones mana, loosely
translated as sacred spiritual ener-
gy. A method of imparting the his-
tory and beliefs of the culture to
future generations, hula continues
to engage and educate viewers of
all ethnicities.
Kawika Keikialii Alfiche, 39,
has established the Kaululehua
Hawaiian Cultural Center to foster
the continuance of his culture on a
local level.
The center, also known as a
halau, meaning house or school,
opened in 2003. It provides teach-
ings in Hawaiian culture, mytholo-
gy, music, dance, dress and instru-
ment construction and chant,
Alfiche said. In addition to the cur-
rent center in San Bruno, Alfiche
said he has been teaching in other
parts of Northern California, Utah,
the East Coast and Mexico since
1994. Alfiche has performed on
Broadway and was reviewed by the
New York Times, he said.
Alfiche has organized a perform-
ance this Saturday titled Hula
Pahu, the sacred dances. His stu-
dents, and seven other hula halaus,
or schools, from other Bay Area
cities, along with Hawaii and
Maui, will be performing, Alfiche
said. Based on the sacred shark-
skinned drum, the first act is in a
traditional style and the second is a
modern adaptation, part of which
he has choreographed and com-
posed, Alfiche said.
Its about the migrations that
came to Hawaii. One of the big
migrations that came in was with
that drum, and with that changed
everything; changed religion,
changed dance, changed what it
means to pray, Alfiche said.
The recital is a combination of
story, song, dance and visual pro-
jections, Alfiche said. The tradi-
tional costumes, instruments and
accessories worn by performers are
uniquely handmade, Alfiche said.
There will be Hawaiian snacks and
a silent auction including a three-
day trip to Mexico. Alfiche said
900 presale tickets have been sold
and he hopes more people will
attend.
Alfiche has grown to the status
of a kumu hula, or teacher of the
traditional music, chants and
dance. The song and chant paired
with formal hula is not found in
textbooks, but is passed down
through a lineage of kumus,
Alfiche said. His kumu lineage
dates back to Kumu George
Naope who founded the Merrie
Monarch Festival, the prestigious
hula competition, Alfiche said.
At the cultural center, Kumu
Alfiche said he provides work-
shops open to the public such as lei
making, drum making, intro dance
classes and summer childrens
camps. Although the center and the
halau are physically in the same
building, joining the halau is a
commitment to fall under the line-
age of ones teacher, Alfiche said.
When you join a halau, you
have to learn the language, the
chant, you have to learn what the
dance is about; otherwise you
shouldnt even dance it, Alfiche
said.
Halau dance classes of a dozen
students occur every day. His stu-
dent body has grown to approxi-
mately 100 dancers between ages 3
and 80. Their small monthly fees
help sustain the center, Alfiche
said.
Born in San Francisco to parents
of Hawaiian decent, Alfiche has
carved an outlet for cultural growth
in his Bay Area home. Traveling to
and from the Hawaiian islands was
commonplace, Alfiche said, as his
parents worked for United Airlines
and Pan American World Airways.
A singer, chanter, musician and
composer, Alfiche has recorded
two CDs; the proceeds have gone
to maintaining the center, Alfiche
said. Alfiche said his income is
made by frequently traveling to
teach and perform.
There are hula dancers through-
out different parts of the world,
including an estimated 1 million in
Japan and Mexico, Alfiche said. He
often visits Mexico to teach and
perform, Alfiche said.
Rosa Elena Lpez Arriaga, 42, is
a Mexican native who has been
hula dancing for 20 years. Alfiche
said he and Arriaga studied under
the same kumu, so she is his hula
sister. For Arriaga, hula is tran-
scendental.
I transform my body and I feel
like another person I dont see
anything in the moment, Arriaga
said.
Arriaga and Alfiche revere and
continue to feel the mana of their
kumus.
Alfiche is dedicated to learning
and teaching about his native cul-
ture and hula. He hopes to bring
the Hawaiian culture to those who
havent had the opportunities he
has. Although he longs for Hawaii,
he believes he is here for a noble
reason.
Im here because of my halau,
because of my love for what I have
to do, because of my responsibility
to my lineage and to my kumu,
Alfiche said.
Hula Pahu is this Saturday, Aug.
18, from 7 p.m.-9 p.m. at the South
San Francisco High School at 400
B St., South San Francisco. Tickets
are $30 at the door and $25 pre-
sale. To reserve presale tickets
email info@apop.net or call at
(650) 588-1091. For more informa-
tion about the center and upcoming
events visit www.apop.net.
The sacred dances
Hula performance brings the world of aloha to South San Francisco
MARTY SOHL
Kawika Keikialii Alche will be performing hula this Saturday at South San Francisco High School.
By Lou Kesten
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
We all know the apocalypse is nigh. Surely
youve heard about the Mayan calendar coming
to an end in December. Perhaps youve seen the
political ads promising Armageddon if you vote
for the wrong guy. Maybe youre stuck without
air conditioning in 100-degree heat and just
wish wed get it all over with.
In Darksiders II (THQ, for Xbox 360,
PlayStation 3, $59.99; PC, $49.99), humanity
has already been extinguished. The question is:
What next?
The protagonist is one of the Four Horsemen
of the Apocalypse specically, Death, who
youd think would be a little happier about all
the chaos thats been unleashed. But hes more
concerned with restoring the reputation of his
brother, War, who was unjustly blamed for the
global massacre in 2010s Darksiders.
Part of Deaths penance involves freeing mil-
lions of human souls from limbo. But there are
hundreds of demons standing in his way, as well
as one primal force, Corruption, whos wreak-
ing havoc across Heaven, Hell and a now zom-
bie-infested Earth.
Despite the Biblical underpinnings, you dont
need a religious studies degree to enjoy
Darksiders II, which unashamedly draws
inspiration from the Book of Revelation and gal-
lops away with it. (On a horse named Despair, no
less.) And despite the grim subject matter, its
almost gleeful, with vivid character design, live-
ly animation and a wicked sense of humor.
The rst Darksiders was unfairly dismissed
by some critics as a Legend of Zelda clone,
thanks to its emphasis on puzzle-lled dun-
geons. Theyre still a huge part of the sequel
if anything, developer Vigil Games has doubled
down on them and theyre still delightful.
Filled with devious traps and devices, these
three-dimensional mazes demand brains as well
as reexes to survive, and there are a few puz-
zles that will make you feel really smart when
you solve them.
So the Zelda inuence remains, but
Darksiders II incorporates elements of at least
a dozen other games, including Prince of
Persia, God of War, Shadow of the
Colossus, Portal, Ratchet & Clank and
even Call of Duty. Its like a greatest-hits
anthology of the last decade in video-game
design. And as a whole, its more rewarding
than the latest installments in most of the above-
mentioned franchises.
Vigil has also beefed up the role-playing ele-
ments, so every monster Death kills contributes
to the evolution of his powers. You can upgrade
skills in two categories: Harbinger, which
boosts Deaths offensive might, and
Necromancer, which lets him summon ghouls
and crows to peck away at his enemies. Every
kill also contributes to a meter; when that lls
up, Death can briey transform into an all-pow-
erful Reaper.
Death takes a holiday in Darksiders
WEEKEND JOURNAL 20
Friday Aug. 17, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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from massive, bloody shootouts to crack
wry one-liners, including some recycled
from their own decades-old block-
busters.
The lm was also distinctively old-
school in its approach to action, using
minimal computer effects in favor of
stunt work and real explosions.
Stuntman Kun Liu, 26, was killed during
one such sequence while lming at a
dam last year in Bulgaria.
Mixed martial arts ghter-turned-actor
Randy Couture said the death during the
second-unit shoot changed the mood on
the movie for a couple weeks, for sure.
Stallone, who also co-wrote the
script, told reporters this week in
London that there had been deaths dur-
ing two of his previous lms and its
never easy.
Co-star Dolph Lundgren said in an
interview that his stunt double was seri-
ously hurt in the same explosion, which
he called a major accident.
I could see like post-traumatic stress
for a month after. Because he was very
close to dying, Lundgren said of his
double, who was hit in the eye by a piece
of iron. It made us all realize that yeah,
it is a dangerous business. You have to
watch your steps.
Couture and actor Terry Crews said
there was no thought of closing down
the lm after the death.
Stuntmen take these wonderful risks
every day, like police ofcers, like re-
men. It would be a shame to not nish,
Crews said. And we kind of galvanized
around that. That was a big moment for
all of us, where we were like, Lets
go.
At the end of the credits, the lm is
dedicated to Kun Lius memory.
But the stuntmans parents have sued
Millennium Films and the movies stunt
coordinator, Chad Stahelski, claiming
they were reckless in the preparations,
training and execution of the stunt.
That is a nice and thoughtful gesture
to the decedent and his family, but cer-
tainly it does not absolve the responsible
parties of his death, said Bill Karns, an
attorney representing Zong Yu Liu and
Yan Mei Bai.
Stahelski and Elizabeth Wolfe, a
spokeswoman for Millennium Films,
have declined comment on the case.
Continued from page 18
STUNT
By Susan Cohn
DAILY JOURNAL
SENIOR CORRESPONDENT
Education is a core value for the
San Mateo County Legal
Secretaries Association
(SMCLSA), a group started in 1965
when three legal secretaries, one of
whom had been criticized for poor
spelling and punctuation, decided
to organize to further the education-
al needs of legal secretaries.
SMCLSA is now a 63-member
association that continues many of
the traditions established by its
founders: encouraging the network-
ing of persons engaged or interest-
ed in any phase of legal work, pro-
moting the interests of legal profes-
sionals and support staff and pro-
viding continuing education and
professional development.
Afliated with Legal Secretaries,
Incorporated (LSI), a nonprot cor-
poration of legal secretaries and law
ofce support staff in the state of
California, SMCLSA functions
independently through its own
elected and appointed ofcers and
committee chairs to accomplish its
own and LSIs objectives. In San
Mateo County, SMCLSA meetings
are held each month and represen-
tatives are sent to the quarterly and
annual meetings of LSI. Because of
the connections between SMCLSA
and LSI, SMCLSA members
receive discounts on publications
created by LSI and published
through The Rutter Group, in addi-
tion to other benefits available
through LSI, such as insurance,
credit union membership and on-
going educational workshops pre-
sented at quarterly conferences and
regional workshops.
Maria C. Morales-Hernandez, a
member of SMCLSA since 1993
and its current president, said, Ive
held chairmen and board positions
in the last 20 years and I feel hon-
ored and privileged to be part of this
wonderful organization. Our organi-
zation is about education and net-
working. We hold our meetings
once a month on the third Tuesday
from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Our meetings
consist of educational speakers,
with one hour of MCLE credits. We
will be having a membership drive
in September 2012, venue and time
to be announced. Morales-
Hernandez works at Carr, Yeley &
Associates in Redwood City for two
attorneys specializing in Family
Law.
Although times have changed in
the almost 50 years since SMCLSA
was founded, and the technological
workings of law offices have
changed as well, the role of the legal
secretary is still vital to the func-
tioning of the practice of law and
SMCLSA works diligently to
ensure that qualied personnel enter
the legal workplace fully prepared.
Each year SMCLSA, in conjunction
with LSI, offers scholarships to
individuals who would like to pur-
sue a career in the legal eld. A
career in the legal eld is dened
as a legal secretary (including
receptionist), legal assistant, parale-
gal, court reporter and law ofce
administrator. Scholarships are not
intended for students planning to
enter law school. The three cate-
gories for which scholarships are
awarded are: Plan A - College
Student; Plan B - High School
Senior; and Plan C - Re-Entry
Level. Scholarships are awarded
based on the applicants academic
achievements, nancial need and
his or her goals and desires for a
career or position in the legal eld.
Announcements of the scholarship
program and the application
requirements are sent each year by
the scholarship chair to local high
schools and colleges that offer legal
assistant, paralegal and court report-
ing programs. This year, SMCLSA
awarded $1,000 scholarships to two
exceptional candidates: Vanessa
Bufngton and Laura Lopez, both
of whom work full time while
attending paralegal studies pro-
grams at City College of San
Francisco and Skyline College,
respectively. Additionally, Lopez
application was submitted to LSI for
the Eula Mae Jett Scholarship Plan,
and she was one of eight people
selected statewide for an additional
$1,000 scholarship.
JoAnne Lein, who works at
Cotchett, Pitre & McCarthy, LLP, in
Burlingame, said, "This was my
rst year as SMCLSA Scholarship
Chair, and I found it to be very
rewarding. I have held other posi-
tions with SMCLSA as First Vice
President/Membership Chair and
Reservations Chair, and I wanted
something that would not be a huge
time commitment this year. And
while I found that to be the case, I
was not expecting how exciting it
would be to be able to tell two very
deserving people that they will be
receiving scholarships to help them
continue their studies in pursuit of a
career in the legal eld. Obviously, I
have decided to volunteer for this
position for a second term.
For information about San Mateo
County Legal Secretaries
Association scholarship require-
ments and deadlines, contact
JoAnne Lein at
jlein@cpmlegal.com or 697-6000.
For general information about the
San Mateo County Legal
Secretaries Association and Legal
Secretaries, Inc., visit smclsa.org
and lsi.org.
Susan E. Cohn is a member of the State
Bar of California. She may be contacted
at susan@smdailyjournal.com.
TOM JUNG/DAILY JOURNAL
In attendance at a recent meeting of the San Mateo County Legal
Secretaries Association were its committee chairs and ofcers (left to right)
Lisa Landa, Bonnie Stensler, Carol Karwatt, Gina Kundert,Tanya Tate, Maria
Morales-Hernandez, JoAnne Lein, Cynthia Woodman, Denise McNeil and
Shara Bajurin.
WEEKEND JOURNAL 21
Friday Aug. 17, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
F
irst lesson of Indian cooking not
all brown powders are curry pow-
der.
Second lesson dont confuse heat and
warmth. Especially in Indian cuisine, they
are wildly different con-
cepts.
Third lesson
Indian cooking is a deli-
ciously inexact science.
Embrace its freewheel-
ing approach and all of
your cooking, Indian
and otherwise, will be
better.
And all of that is why
I want to introduce you
to garam masala, a
widely available, yet lit-
tle used (in the U.S.) seasoning blend from
northern India. Like so many Indian spice
blends, there is no set recipe for garam
masala. The ingredients can vary tremen-
dously by region and cook. But in general, it
usually contains a mix of spices that are at
once sweet and warming coriander, car-
damom, cinnamon, cloves, cumin and black
pepper.
By warming, I mean the avor has a full-
ness without acidity or sharp avors. Think
spice cookies and gingerbread minus the
sugar. This is different than the spicy heat we
associate with chili peppers.
Thats a avor prole not common to
American cooking, but the wonders it works
on roasted meats and vegetables make it
worth changing that.
Garam masala differs from many spice
blends in that the whole spices are toasted
before being ground together. Why do you
care? Most spice blends, especially from
India, are intended to be heated before use to
draw out their avor. This means they need
to be added at the start of a recipe.
But because garam masala already is toast-
ed, it can be used as a condiment on meats,
cooked grains, even breads and yogurt dips.
For ideas for using garam masala, check out
the Off the Beaten Aisle column over on
Food Network: http://bit.ly/Nfg4dj
SMASHED AND ROASTED
GARAM MASALA POTATOES
Start to nish: 45 minutes
Servings: 6
3 pounds red or yellow new potatoes
1/4 cup olive oil
1 tablespoon garam masala
Kosher salt and ground black pepper
1 cup grated manchego cheese
Heat the oven to 400 F. Coat 2 baking
sheets with oil or cooking spray.
Place the potatoes in a large saucepan and
add enough cool water to cover by 1 inch.
Bring to a boil and cook until tender, about
15 to 20 minutes. Drain well.
Return the potatoes to the pot and set over
medium heat. Heat, shaking the pan fre-
quently to keep the potatoes moving, for 1
minute, or until dry.
Transfer the potatoes to the prepared bak-
ing sheets, leaving 2 inches around each.
One at a time, set a sturdy mug over each
and push down to lightly crush. They should
be lightly cracked and slightly attened, but
not falling apart. You also can use a potato
masher (but press only gently).
In a small liquid measuring cup, whisk
together the olive oil and garam masala.
Drizzle the oil over the potatoes, coating
each one well. Season the potatoes with salt
and pepper, then roast for 15 minutes, or
until lightly browned. Sprinkle the manchego
over each, then return to the oven for 5 to 7
minutes, or until the cheese begins to brown.
Garam masala: What it is and how to use it
J.M. HIRSCH
Garam masala usually contains a mix of spices that are at once sweet and warming coriander,
cardamom, cinnamon, cloves, cumin and black pepper.
By Alison Ladman
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Summer makes us long for the grill. But by
the end of the season, even our favorite burgers
and dogs can feel a bit tired.
So to keep your grilling interesting, we came
up with a speedy grilled tuna dish that packs
tons of big, bold avors. For our recipe, we
used tuna steaks, which are thick, meaty pieces
cut from the sh in the opposite direction than
a llet. You also could use salmon steaks, which
often include the bone (which helps the esh
hold together on the grill). Swordsh also
would work in this recipe.
We kept the prep simple with just a light coat-
ing of oil and a bit of salt and pepper. We want-
ed to let the avor of the tuna shine. But to
ensure we also could taste the fresh avors of
summer, we top the tuna with a cross between a
fruit salsa and an herby chimichurri.
GRILLED TUNA STEAKS
WITH MANGO HERB SALSA
Start to nish: 20 minutes
Servings: 4
1/2 cup packed fresh parsley leaves
1/4 cup packed fresh oregano leaves
1/4 cup fresh mint leaves
3 tablespoons olive oil, divided
3 tablespoons red wine vinegar
2 cloves garlic
1/2 teaspoon red pepper akes
Zest and juice of 1 lemon
2 mangos, peeled, pitted and diced
Salt and ground black pepper
Four 6-ounce tuna steaks
Heat the grill to high.
In a food processor, combine the parsley,
oregano, mint, 2 tablespoons of the olive oil, the
red wine vinegar, garlic, red pepper akes, and
the lemon zest and juice. Process until well
chopped, scraping down the bowl as needed.
Add the mango and pulse once or twice to com-
bine and lightly chop. Season with salt and pep-
per, then set aside. Rub the tuna steaks on all
sides with the remaining 1 tablespoon olive oil,
then season them with salt and pepper. Grill the
steaks for 2 to 3 minutes per side for medium-
rare. Serve topped with the salsa.
A simple grilled tuna steak with big, bold flavors
WEEKEND JOURNAL
22
Friday Aug. 17, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
of hard-bitten mercenaries on a clandestine
mission to extract a kidnapped Chinese bil-
lionaire in Nepal, where they discover that
someone has gotten there before them
Trench (Arnold Schwarzenegger), another
operative for their contractor, Mr. Church
(Bruce Willis). Freeing Trench and the bil-
lionaire from their captors, the team returns to
the States, where Church confronts Barney
with an unpleasant reminder: The
Expendables leader owes Church $5 million
in conscated cash from a previous job. But
he is prepared to make a deal if Barney takes
on a new assignment.
The catch is that he will need to place
Churchs operative on his team, Chinese tech
expert Maggie (Yu Nan). Since the
Expendables are an all-male crew, the addi-
tion of a woman almost immediately throws
group dynamics out of kilter. Their assign-
ment is to retrieve an undisclosed item from a
high-tech electronic safe aboard a downed
plane that has crashed in Albania. Although
new team member and Afghanistan vet Billy
(Liam Hemsworth), an expert sniper, reluc-
tantly tells Barney that this is his last outing,
the rest of the Expendables relish another mis-
sion, including second-in-command Lee
Christmas (Jason Statham) and team members
Gunner Jensen (Dolph Lundgren), Toll Road
(Randy Couture) and Hale Caesar (Terry
Crews).
As soon as Maggie has decoded the safe
aboard the crashed plane and extracted the
contents, the Expendables are ambushed by
an Eastern European crime cartel led by the
sadistic Vilain (Jean-Claude Van Damme),
who forces Barney to turn over the device
from the safe and then kills a key team mem-
ber. Maggie later reveals that the item stolen
by Vilain is a miniature computer containing
the location of a ve-ton cache of plutonium
that the Russians stashed in an abandoned
mine during the Cold War.
Motivated as much by revenge as their
realigned mission to prevent Vilain from sell-
ing the weapons-grade nuclear material to a
list of willing buyers, the Expendables take
off in pursuit of their adversaries, with
Barneys directive uppermost in their minds:
Track them, nd them, kill them.
While most of the original lms action
transpired in Latin America, Expendables 2
relocates to Bulgaria, which offers appropri-
ately expansive vistas and credible locations
for the Eastern European settings. Taking
over directing duties from Stallone, Simon
West preserves the hardboiled action and
wisecracking cast dynamics of the original,
channeling some of the B-movie tonal ele-
ments he might have picked up directing Con
Air. Managing the complexity of stunts, air-
craft and vehicle pileups and frequent
shootouts that comprise the majority of the
running time is a major challenge that West
executes with elan, even adding unexpected
grace notes to some otherwise routine scenes.
Abetted by cinematographer and action-
adventure specialist Shelly Johnson, whose
camera placement and movement are spot-on,
the action choreography never disappoints.
Numerous gunghts, combat set pieces and
ght scenes are muscularly staged and skill-
fully supported by Todd E. Millers editing,
though the sheer sound volume grows repeti-
tive and wearying.
With such an expansive cast, theres a risk
that the quality of performances might be
diluted by the quantity of recognizable actors.
But co-screenwriter Richard Wenk and
Stallone have generously given both major
players and cameo actors their own often
quite -humorous character traits and dialogue.
When Schwarzenegger is onscreen, much of
the banter is at the former California gover-
nors expense though, much as ever, he
gets some memorable lines himself.
Working with a fairly routine action-adven-
ture scenario, the lmmakers can leave the
cast to adequately ll out their roles. Since
many of the leads have well-known personas
from past lms and franchises, performances
are a blend of action-hero impassivity and
sendups of familiar characters. Stallone
anchors the cast with a sometimes nuanced
interpretation of Barneys mix of personal and
professional demons and plays it straight as a
foil to Stathams put-upon sidekick. A late
scene with Van Dammes suitably sadistic vil-
lain shows that Stallones still got the charis-
ma to carry an intimately staged fight
sequence. Lundgren gets great comic mileage
out of Gunners lunkheaded character, while
Couture and Crews hold down the stalwart
combat veterans shtick.
Despite key roles, Hemsworth and Yu dont
add much to the ensemble, and Chuck Norris
as Booker and Jet Li as Yin Yang appear too
briey to make much impact. Many might
wonder about Schwarzeneggers return to
action movies and might be pleased that the
brief role of Trench is a perfect t, adorned
with some of the best dialogue in the script.
While hes every bit as creaky as the other
vets his age, relying more on very large
weapons and cutting humor than unarmed
combat, Schwarzenegger still can steal a
scene, particularly in the nal set piece where
hes paired with Willis, who relies more on
smirking threats than decisive action until the
nal reel.
Pyrotechnic and special effects credits are
superior on a reasonable budget, and though
the soundtrack would have beneted from a
higher ratio of contemporary hits to familiar
classics, Brian Tylers score carries the action
without overwhelming it.
The Expendables 2, a Lionsgate release,
is rated R for strong bloody violence through-
out. Running time: 102 minutes. Motion
Picture Association of America rating deni-
tion for R: Restricted. Under 17 requires
accompanying parent or adult guardian.
Continued from page 18
ACTION
WEEKEND JOURNAL 23
Friday Aug. 17, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
FRIDAY, AUG. 17
Rummage Sale. 8 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Messiah Lutheran Church, 1835
Valota Road, Redwood City. For more
information call 369-5201.
16th Annual South San Francisco
Fire Department Senior Picnic. 11
a.m. to 1 p.m. Joseph Fernekes
Recreation Building, Orange
Memorial Park, 781 Tennis Drive,
South San Francisco. $10 for seniors
over 50. Live entertainment by the
Dave Crimen Duo. For more
information call 829-3820.
August Summer Fun Western
Party: Dance Lessons, Music by
California Cowboys and a
barbecue lunch. San Bruno Senior
Center, 1555 Crystal Springs Road.
Tickets available at the front desk. For
more information call 616-7150.
Free Wine and Beer Tastings Friday
Happy Hours. 3 p.m. to 5 p.m. New
Leaf Community Markets, 150 San
Mateo Road, Half Moon Bay. A
different selection will be offered
each week. We will feature local wines
and brews, wines that offer
exceptional value and limited-
quantity, hand-crafted wines. Meet
knowledgeable vendors and educate
your pallet. Must be 21 years of age or
older. No registration required. Free.
For more information email
www.newleaf.com.
Free Concert. 6 p.m., Rotary Pavilion,
San Bruno City Park, corner of Crystal
Springs and Oak Avenue, San Bruno.
Enjoy classic rock by Just for Kicks.
Wine and snacks available for
purchase. Free. For more information
call 616-7180.
Sun King: A Beatles Tribute Band.
6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Courthouse Square,
2200 Broadway, Redwood City. Free.
Marty Brounstein Service and Talk.
7:30 p.m. service and 8:30 p.m. talk.
Congregation Etz Chayim, 4161 Alma
St., Palo Alto. Marty Brounstein, author
of Two Among the Righteous Few: A
Story of Courage in the Holocaust,
provides an engaging presentation
on his true story of interfaith courage
and compassion. For more
information call 813-9094.
Monthly Milonga. 8 p.m. to
midnight. Boogie Woogie Ballroom,
551 Foster City Blvd., Suite G, Foster
City. There will be an all-level
Argentine Tango lesson until 9 p.m.
followed by a dance party. $12 for
lesson and dance. $10 for dance only.
For more information visit
boogiewoogieballroom.com.
NewGround Theatre Dance
Company presents Axiom. 8 p.m.
NDNU Theatre, 1500 Ralston Ave.,
Belmont. Theatre/dance
performance. $20 online. $25 at the
door. For more information visit
newgrounddance.com.
Movie in the Park. 8 p.m. to 10 p.m.
Baseball eld in Washington Park, 850
Burlingame Ave., Burlingame.
Screening Dolphin Tale. Access to
concession stand. Free. For more
information call 558-7300.
Movies in the Park. 8 p.m. to 10 p.m.
Washington Park, 850 Burlingame
Ave., Burlingame. Free Family Movie:
Despicable Me.
Salsa, Bachata, Merengue and Cha
Cha Cha. 9 p.m. Club Fox, 2209
Broadway, Redwood City. $10. For
more information call 369-7770 or
visit http://tickets.foxrwc.com.
SATURDAY, AUG. 18
Rummage Sale. 8 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Messiah Lutheran Church, 1835
Valota Road, Redwood City. For more
information call 369-5201.
NorCal Blitz Softball Tryouts. 9 a.m.
to 11:30 a.m. and 11:30 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Carlmont High School Varsity Softball
Diamond, 1400 Alameda de las
Pulgas, Belmont. Arrive a half hour
early to register and warm up. Bring
an official birth certificate, mitt and
bat. For more information call 518-
3058.
Project Reads Get Smart with
Money Financial Education Series.
10 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Westlake Library,
275 Southgate Ave., Daly City. Join us
for the first of four free Saturday
workshops on Basic Money
Management Skills. Free. For more
information call 829-3871.
Handcrafted and Through the
Lens: Nature Inspired Meet the
Artists. 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Filoli, 86
Caada Road, Woodside. Exhibit
continues through Oct. 21.This juried,
multi-media exhibit features two
dimensional drawings, paintings and
photographs inspired by nature. For
more information call 364-8300, ext.
509.
Back to School Bash. New Leaf
Community Markets, 150 San Mateo
Road, Half Moon Bay. Bring the family
for free haircuts, healthy snacks, kids
zumba, free prizes and more. For
more information visit
www.newleaf.com.
Guided Bird Walk. 1 p.m. to 3 p.m.
2560 Embarcadero Road, Palo Alto.
There will be a guided bird walk
through the Palo Alto Baylands
Nature Preserve with the
Environmental Volunteers. For more
information call 493-8000.
Amelias Anniversary Party. 5 pm.
to 7 p.m. 311 Broadway, Millbrae.
Spanish tapas, sangria and a
performance by flamenco guitarist
Rodrigo Teague. Amelias Antics is a
consignment boutique. For more
information visit
www.ameliasantics.com.
Hula Pahu: The Sacred Dances. 7
p.m. South San Francisco High School,
400 B St., South San Francisco.
Featuring Kumu Hula Kawika Alche
and Halau o Keikialii, along with
Kumu Hula from the Bay Area and
Hawaii. Special guest Kumu Hula
Hokulani Holt of Maui. Lobby opens
at 6 p.m., theatre opens at 6:30 p.m.
$25 in advance, $30 at the door. For
more information email
info@apop.net.
The Stars of Silicon Valley. 7 p.m.
Chas Conservatory and Production
Company, 200 Industrial Road No.
122, San Carlos. New Project for the
18-year-old local acting school to
create a pilot for reality TV
highlighting the real experiences of
hard-working, aspiring actors. See our
students perform scenes from your
favorite movies and stage shows
during the showcase and also view
our TV pilot Stars of Silicon Valley at
intermission. Seating limited.
Complimentary wine reception. $10.
To RSVP call 759-6389.
Houston Jones Live in Concert. 7:30
p.m. Half Moon Bay Odd Fellows Hall,
526 Main St., Half Moon Bay. Houston
Jones is a Bay Area based high octane
Americana quintet. This concert
benefits the Ocean View Lodge
Scholarship Fund. Every year this fund
provides financial assistance to
deserving local high school seniors
to continue their education in the
performing arts and creative writing.
Donations accepted. Free. For more
information visit houstonjones.com.
Shakespeare in the Park presents
Henry V. 7:30 p.m. Sequoia High
School, 1201 Brewster Ave., Redwood
City. Free. For more information call
780-7340.
Saturday Ballroom Dance Party. 8
p.m. to midnight. Boogie Woogie
Ballroom, 551 Foster City Blvd., Suite
G, Foster City. There will be a drop-in
Merengue lesson until 9 p.m.
followed by the dance party. $10 for
lesson and dance. $5 for dance only.
For more information visit
boogiewoogieballroom.com.
NewGround Theatre Dance
Company presents Axiom. 8 p.m.
NDNU Theatre, 1500 Ralston Ave.,
Belmont. Theatre/dance
performance. $20 online. $25 at the
door. For more information visit
newgrounddance.com
Allman Step Brothers, Pretending
SF and Blue Diamond Fillups. 9 p.m.
Club Fox, 2209 Broadway, Redwood
City. $12. For more information call
369-7770 or visit
http://tickets.foxrwc.com.
SUNDAY, AUG. 19
Food Addicts in Recovery. 8 a.m. to
9:30 a.m. Central Peninsula Church,
1005 Shell Blvd., Foster City. FA is a
free 12-step recovery program for
anyone suffering from food
obsession, overeating, under-eating
or bulimia. For more information call
(800) 600-6028.
NorCal Blitz Softball Tryouts. 9 a.m.
to 11:30 a.m. and 11:30 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Carlmont High School Varsity Softball
Diamond, 1400 Alameda de las
Pulgas, Belmont. Arrive a half hour
early to register and warm up. Bring
an official birth certificate, mitt and
bat. For more information call 518-
3058.
Handcrafted and Through the
Lens: Nature Inspired Meet the
Artists. 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Filoli, 86
Caada Road, Woodside. Exhibit
continues through Oct. 21.This juried,
multi-media exhibit features two
dimensional drawings, paintings and
photographs inspired by nature. This
varied exhibit showcases a broad
range of approaches, forms and
materials that artists employ to
uniquely interpret their world. For
more information call 364-8300, ext.
509.
North Fair Oaks Community
Festival. 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. 3121
Middlefield Road, Redwood City.
Enjoy a day of live entertainment, arts
and crafts, food and beverages, rides
and activities. Free. For more
information contact
tara@northfairoaksfestival.org.
Shakespeare in the Park presents
Henry V. 2 p.m. Sequoia High
School, 1201 Brewster Ave., Redwood
City. Free. For more information call
780-7340.
Calendar
For more events visit
smdailyjournal.com, click Calendar.
cash.
Wednesday night, police released
video footage and detailed images of
Caballero and were informed by several
callers that Caballero was the man in the
pictures and lived on William Avenue,
Schumaker said.
With tips from the public, police were
able to match the suspect in the video
surveillance footage to Caballeros dri-
vers license photo, he said.
It was an obvious match, he said.
Yesterday morning, police saw the
suspect exit the front of his home and
were able to verify it was his residence,
Schumaker said. He exited the back of
the house after about 30 minutes and
saw he was surrounded by police and
quickly went back into the home where
he stayed all day as police used crisis
negotiators to try and talk him out of the
house, Schumaker told the Daily Journal
on scene.
Police blocked off about three blocks
around the home as dozens of neighbors
watched the scene unfold.
SWAT team members had guns point-
ed at the home throughout the day as
police secured search and arrest warrants
for Caballero.
He was refusing to come out and the
goal was to try and talk him out of the
house, Schumaker said.
Caballero was considered armed and
dangerous and most homes in the area
were evacuated, Schumaker said.
It was unknown if anyone else was in
the home.
Caballero is the prime suspect in a
string of ve robberies that started Aug.
7 at the Willow Street Market. He is also
suspected of robbing the Panaderia
Michoacan Market on Middleeld Road
Aug. 8; El Paisano Carniceria and
Market on Middleeld Road Aug. 9; and
a gas station on Fifth Avenue, police
said.
Tuesday, the Mi Hacienda Taqueria on
Second Avenue was also robbed and
Caballero is considered the prime sus-
pect in that case, according to police.
Caballero pulled out a black semi-
automatic handgun and demanded cash,
police said.
The standoff occurred near the train
tracks and Caltrain service was briey
stalled.
Bill Silverfarb can be reached by email: sil-
verfarb@smdailyjournal.com or by phone:
(650) 344-5200 ext. 106
Continued from page 1
SWAT
San Mateo County sheriffs deputies
also responded to the scene and helped
set up a perimeter as they set out search-
ing for the man in the San Mateo
Highlands close to the Hillsborough bor-
der. Police used a bloodhound to search
for Chatman but, after 45 minutes, the
scent went cold, the CHP ofcial said.
While Charles Chatman III escaped
capture that morning, his wife Chardae,
26, was arrested on several charges
including driving without a license,
petty theft, possession of a controlled
substance, possessing less than an ounce
of marijuana and possessing a drug with-
out a prescription.
Four days later, Chatman III was
arrested in Contra Costa County on a
rearms-related charge, a spokesman for
the District Attorneys Ofce there told
the Daily Journal. There are several
Charles Chatmans, however, either in
custody or with criminal records in
Contra Costa County.
Yesterday, a spokesman with the San
Francisco District Attorneys Office,
Alex Bastien, told the Daily Journal that
a formal charging decision will be made
after prosecutors are done with Chatman
III in Contra Costa County.
Chatman III is being sought for a
rearms-related incident that occurred in
June in San Francisco, Bastien said.
The young couple are no strangers to
law enforcement. Chardae while
Chatman III was in jail in San Francisco
in 2008 on rearms charges allegedly
impersonated a parole ofcer and tried
to release her husbands parole hold,
according to court documents.
The plan failed, however, and
Chatman III was convicted by a jury of
conspiring to escape and attempted
escape, according to court documents.
In 2009, Chatman III was found hid-
ing under a bed in his wifes Antioch
home after police responded to a distur-
bance and found Chardae bruised and
dressed in a sheet, according to court
documents.
Chardae changed her story to Antioch
police several times, according to court
documents.
Bill Silverfarb can be reached by email: sil-
verfarb@smdailyjournal.com or by phone:
(650) 344-5200 ext. 106.
Continued from page 1
CHATMAN
should be held accountable, but they
should be held accountable in the context
that they are young people and they have
the capacity to change, Cedillo said.
California is one of only 38 states that
allow juvenile offenders to be sentenced
to life with no chance of freedom. There
are currently 309 offenders serving life-
without-parole sentences for crimes
committed when they were minors.
Democratic Sen. Leland Yee, a child
psychologist, wrote the bill and has
worked all session to gather the votes to
get it out of the Assembly.
SB9 is not a get-out-of-jail-free card;
it is an incredibly modest proposal that
respects victims, international law and
the fact that children have a greater
capacity for rehabilitation than adults,
the San Francisco lawmaker said in a
statement Thursday.
Several Republican Assembly mem-
bers spoke against the bill, which passed
without a single GOP vote. They argued
that it denies justice for victims, who
already have suffered as a result of the
offenders crime.
This bill has come back several
times. If we could bring the victims back
as easily, maybe we wouldnt have so
much opposition to this bill, said Don
Wagner, R-Irvine.
He said judges only give life-without-
parole sentences for the worst offenders.
We want them out of our communi-
ties because they deserve it, he said.
The bill by passed 41-34 and moves
back to the Senate for nal approval.
Continued from page 1
REPRIEVE
FRIDAY, AUGUST 17, 2012
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) -- If faced with opposition from
others, abide by what your inner feelings tell you is
the right thing to do. The important thing is not to
respond in a manner that is offensive.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) -- Sometimes its smart to
follow an intuition or a hunch, but if your logic and
common sense are telling you to do otherwise, follow
their lead.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) -- There is a strong chance
that you could place your trust in an acquaintance
whom you know from experience isnt too reliable. If
havoc results, youll have only yourself to blame.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) -- Should you come up
with a bright idea for an improvement, just be careful
that you dont destroy the good that was already
there in the process.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) -- Normally youre
a disciplined person who tries to be careful about
expressing yourself. If this caution is not in effect,
you could blurt out something offensive.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) -- If people youre
involved with lack vision and positive perspective,
dont let them override you. Go your own way.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) -- You might fnd a po-
lite way to terminate a relationship that is of dubious
value at best. Its an association youve been trying to
unwind for some time.
PISCES (Feb. 20-March 20) -- Unless you take your
duties and responsibilities seriously, chances are
theyll end up plaguing you well into next week. You
can hide, but you cant escape.
ARIES (March 21-April 19) -- Someone who is known
to be a gossiper might say something nasty and
unfounded about a mutual friend. Dont stand idly by
-- squelch the rumor with alacrity.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20) -- Dont be so quick to
invite someone home without frst checking with the
family to see if the welcome mat is out. Someone in
the household might need privacy.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20) -- An associate at work
might try to take credit for one of your ideas when
youre not looking. Be prepared to speak up and let
the truth be known the minute you hear about it.
CANCER (June 21-July 22) -- If you fnd yourself in-
volved in a joint endeavor that requires more funding
than anyone anticipated, dont think you have to stay
the course. Pull out as quickly as possible.
COPYRIGHT 2012 United Feature Syndicate, Inc.
COMICS/GAMES
8-17-12
ThURSDAYS PUZZLE SOLVED
PREVIOUS
SUDOkU
ANSwERS
Want More Fun
and Games?
Jumble Page 2 La Times Crossword Puzzle Classifeds
Tundra & Over the hedge Comics Classifeds
kids Across/Parents Down Puzzle Family Resource Guide


Each row and each column must contain the numbers 1
through 6 without repeating.

The numbers within the heavily outlined boxes, called
cages, must combine using the given operation (in any
order) to produce the target numbers in the top-left corners.

Freebies: Fill in single-box cages with the number in the
top-left corner.
K
e
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K
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is
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L
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. A
ll r
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h
ts
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8
-
1
7
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1
2
ACROSS
1 Snow veggie
4 IRA investments
7 Tummy muscles
10 Not delay
11 Jazz riff
13 Object on radar
14 Letter before sigma
15 Astronaut -- Shepard
16 In that case (2 wds.)
17 Serape go-with
19 Mob scene
20 Tasty tuber
21 Full of cargo
23 Rice wine
26 -- Vanilli
28 Sonnet kin
29 Hobby, slangily
30 Outscores
34 Eric Clapton classic
36 Dawn goddess
38 Tell a fb
39 Traffc no-no (hyph.)
41 -- mater
42 Explode
44 Formal attire, briefy
46 Attractive guy
47 Circus swings
52 Eye impolitely
53 To be, in Bordeaux
54 Source of iron
55 Glided smoothly
56 Harness part
57 Comics caveman
58 New Year in Hanoi
59 Instant lawn
60 Wyo. clock setting
DOwN
1 Averages
2 Canyon reply
3 Molecule component
4 Santa --, Calif.
5 Quandary
6 Injury memento
7 Caine role
8 Humped beast
9 Location
12 Small hill
13 Badminton target
18 So long!
22 White vestments
23 The nearest star
24 Oklahoma town
25 Pocket jangler
27 Disney CEO Bob --
29 Winged mammals
31 Once and for --
32 Youngest Cratchit
33 Ocean
35 Prowled
37 A Great Lake
40 Downright
41 Stone Age tool
42 Brass instrument
43 Dark
45 Overturn
46 Master of ceremonies
48 66 and I-80
49 Kind of lens
50 Psyches suitor
51 Fall mo.
DILBERT CROSSwORD PUZZLE
FUTURE ShOCk
PEARLS BEFORE SwINE
GET FUZZY
24 Friday Aug. 17, 2012
THE DAILY JOURNAL
25 Friday Aug. 17, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
104 Training
TERMS & CONDITIONS
The San Mateo Daily Journal Classi-
fieds will not be responsible for more
than one incorrect insertion, and its lia-
bility shall be limited to the price of one
insertion. No allowance will be made for
errors not materially affecting the value
of the ad. All error claims must be sub-
mitted within 30 days. For full advertis-
ing conditions, please ask for a Rate
Card.
105 Education/Instruction
CALVARY
PRESCHOOL
OPEN
ENROLLMENT
Little Learners: age 2.5-3.5
Big Explorers: age 3.5-5
calvarypreschoolmillbrae.com
(650)588-8030
106 Tutoring
TUTORING
Spanish, French,
Italian
Certificated Local
Teacher
All Ages!
(650)573-9718
110 Employment
RESTAURANT -
Cooks, Cashiers, Avanti Pizza. Menlo
Park. (650)854-1222
110 Employment
CHARACTER TECHNICAL DIRECTOR:
Pacific Data Images, Inc. in Redwood
City, CA: Dsgn, create, test & maintain
character set ups. Submit resumes and
reel to PDI, Attn: Recruiting, 1000 Flower
St., Glendale, CA 91201. (MUST REF-
ERENCE JOB CODE: CY12)
HOME CARE AIDES
Multiple shifts to meet your needs. Great
pay & benefits, Sign-on bonus, 1yr exp
required.
Matched Caregivers (650)839-2273,
(408)280-7039 or (888)340-2273
JEWELRY SALES
FUN! No Nights! Benefits & 401K!
(650)367-6500 FX:(650)367-6400
jobs@jewelryexchange.com
110 Employment
NEWSPAPER INTERNS
JOURNALISM
The Daily Journal is looking for in-
terns to do entry level reporting, re-
search, updates of our ongoing fea-
tures and interviews. Photo interns al-
so welcome.
We expect a commitment of four to
eight hours a week for at least four
months. The internship is unpaid, but
intelligent, aggressive and talented in-
terns have progressed in time into
paid correspondents and full-time re-
porters.
College students or recent graduates
are encouraged to apply. Newspaper
experience is preferred but not neces-
sarily required.
Please send a cover letter describing
your interest in newspapers, a resume
and three recent clips. Before you ap-
ply, you should familiarize yourself
with our publication. Our Web site:
www.smdailyjournal.com.
Send your information via e-mail to
news@smdailyjournal.com or by reg-
ular mail to 800 S. Claremont St #210,
San Mateo CA 94402.
OPENWAVE MOBILITY Inc., has open-
ings in Redwood City, CA for: Global
Customer Support Engineer (5822C):
Serve as the primary support contact and
a technical support liaison to specified
customers and monitor their email team-
lists (requires 5% travel); and Software
engineer (5181B): Create and execute
test plans on assigned projects, report
test results, analyze and verify bug fixes.
If interested, must ref job code and send
resume to: Openwave Mobility, Inc. Attn:
Shillean Abbot. 2100 Seaport Boulevard,
Redwood City, CA 94063. EOE.
RESTAURANT -
BROADWAY GRILL HIRING SERVERS
& BUSSERS. We are an upscale Ameri-
can wood fired grill restaurant looking for
the best people to grow with our very
successful concept. Flexible full schedul-
ing, top $$ potential & more!
BROADWAY GRILL BURLINGAME
1400 Broadway Burlingame, CA 94010
Apply in person Tues-Saturday between
3PM and 5PM.
Or e-mail resume to Jobs@BWGrill.com
SALES -
WellnessMatters Magazine is seeking
independent contractor/advertising
sales representatives to help grow
this new publication for the Peninsula
and Half Moon Bay. WellnessMatters
has the backing of the Daily Journal.
The perfect contractor will have a pas-
sion for wellness and for sharing our
message with potential advertisers,
supporters and sponsors. Please
send cover letter and resume to: in-
fo@wellnessmattersmagazine.com.
Positions are available immediately.
110 Employment
SALES/MARKETING
INTERNSHIPS
The San Mateo Daily Journal is looking
for ambitious interns who are eager to
jump into the business arena with both
feet and hands. Learn the ins and outs
of the newspaper and media industries.
This position will provide valuable
experience for your bright future.
Email resume
info@smdailyjournal.com
YOURE INVITED
Are you: Dependable
Friendly
Detail Oriented
Willing to learn new skills
Do you have: Good English skills
A Desire for steady employment
A desire for employment benefits
If the above items describe you,
please call (650)342-6978.
Immediate opening available in
Customer Service position.
Call for an appointment.
Crystal Cleaning Center
San Mateo, CA 94402
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #251297
The following person is doing business
as: Kelly Hampton Consulting, 512 Capi-
strano Way, SAN MATEO, CA 94402 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Kelly Hampton, same address. The busi-
ness is conducted by an Individual. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on 06/15/2012
/s/ Kelly Hampton /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 07/10/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
07/27/12, 08/03/12, 08/10/12, 08/17/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #251777
The following persons are doing busi-
ness as: Wes Liquors & Convenience, 16
W. 25th Ave., SAN MATEO, CA 94403 is
hereby registered by the following own-
ers: Kirsten Castle and Scott S. Castle,
25 W. Avondale Rd. Hillsborough, CA
94010. The business is conducted by a
General Partnership. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on.
/s/ Kirsten Castle /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 08/09/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
08/10/12, 08/17/12, 08/24/12, 08/31/12).
203 Public Notices
CASE# CIV 514571
ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR
CHANGE OF NAME
SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA,
COUNTY OF SAN MATEO,
400 COUNTY CENTER RD,
REDWOOD CITY CA 94063
PETITION OF
Anita Bazigian
TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS:
Petitioner, Anita Bazigian filed a petition
with this court for a decree changing
name as follows:
Present name: Anita Bazigian
Proposed name: Ani Kizirian Bazigian
THE COURT ORDERS that all persons
interested in this matter shall appear be-
fore this court at the hearing indicated
below to show cause, if any, why the pe-
tition for change of name should not be
granted. Any person objecting to the
name changes described above must file
a written objection that includes the rea-
sons for the objection at least two court
days before the matter is scheduled to
be heard and must appear at the hearing
to show cause why the petition should
not be granted. If no written objection is
timely filed, the court may grant the peti-
tion without a hearing. A HEARING on
the petition shall be held on August 24,
2012 at 9 a.m., Dept. PJ, Room 2E, at
400 County Center, Redwood City, CA
94063. A copy of this Order to Show
Cause shall be published at least once
each week for four successive weeks pri-
or to the date set for hearing on the peti-
tion in the following newspaper of gener-
al circulation: Daily Journal
Filed: 07/11/2012
/s/ Beth Freeman/
Judge of the Superior Court
Dated: 06/29/2012
(Published, 07/27/12, 08/03/12,
08/10/12, 08/17/12)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #251529
The following person is doing business
as:Peninsula Infiniti, 386 Convention
Way, REDWOOD CITY, CA 94063 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Peninsula Infiniti, LLC, CA. The business
is conducted by a Limited Liability Com-
pany. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on
05/01/2000
/s/ R. W. Ricks /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 07/24/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
07/27/12, 08/03/12, 08/10/12, 08/17/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #251494
The following persons are doing busi-
ness as: 786 Coleman Avenue Apart-
ments, 786 Coleman Ave., MENLO
PARK, CA 94025 is hereby registered by
the following owners: Richard Tod Spiek-
er and Catherine R. Spieker, 650 Mulber-
ry Ln., Atherton, CA 94027. The busi-
ness is conducted by Husband and Wife.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on 07/18/2012
/s/ Richard Tod Spieker /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 07/24/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
07/27/12, 08/03/12, 08/10/12, 08/17/12).
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #251551
The following person is doing business
as: Global Tours, 1435 Bellevue Ave
#308, BURLINGAME, CA 94010 is here-
by registered by the following owner: Pe-
ter Jhun and Sun Sook Jhun, same ad-
dress. The business is conducted by a
General Partnership. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on.
/s/ Peter Jhun /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 07/25/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
07/27/12, 08/03/12, 08/10/12, 08/17/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #251493
The following person is doing business
as: Brightlite Information Security, 1660
Gordon St. #39, REDWOOD CITY, CA
94061 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: Robert Cowles, same ad-
dress. The business is conducted by an
Individual. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on
/s/ Robert Cowles /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 07/24/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
07/27/12, 08/03/12, 08/10/12, 08/17/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #251637
The following person is doing business
as: Eric Kish, 32 Mansion Ct., MENLO
PARK, CA 94025 is hereby registered by
the following owner: Florin Eric Kish,
same address. The business is conduct-
ed by an Individual. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on 01/01/2012.
/s/ Florin Eric Kish /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 07/31/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
08/03/12, 08/10/12, 08/17/12, 08/24/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #251507
The following person is doing business
as: Sweets by Eunice, 533 Hazel Ave,
SAN BRUNO, CA 94066 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: Eunice
Heewon Moon, same address. The busi-
ness is conducted by an Individual. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on.
/s/ Eunice Heewon Moon /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 07/24/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
08/3/12, 08/10/12, 08/17/12, 08/24/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #251265
The following person is doing business
as: Patient Crossroads, 180 Warren
Road, SAN MATEO, CA 94401 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Inno-
lyst, Inc., CA. The business is conducted
by a Corporation. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on 1/1/11.
/s/ Kyle T. Brown /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 07/6/2012. (Publish-
ed in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
08/3/12, 08/10/12, 08/17/12, 08/24/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #251612
The following person is doing business
as: Cheap Biz Class Flights, INC., 901
Sneath Ln. Ste. 212, SAN BRUNO, CA
94066 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: Cheap Biz Class Flights,
INC., CA. The business is conducted by
a Corporation. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on.
/s/ Anthony Cherkas /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 07/30/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
08/03/12, 08/10/12, 08/17/12, 08/24/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #251765
The following persons are doing busi-
ness as: Motovations, 620 Taylor Way
#14, SAN CARLOS, CA 94070 is hereby
registered by the following owners: Philip
Jacobson, 477 Topaz St., Redwood City,
CA 94062. The business is conducted by
an Individual. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on N/A.
/s/ Philip Jacobson /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 08/08/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
08/10/12, 08/17/12, 08/24/12, 08/31/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #251465
The following persons are doing busi-
ness as: Irod MD, 706 S. El Dorado,
SAN MATEO, CA 94402 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owners: Isaac C.
Rodriguez and Amanda Pacia, samd ad-
dress. The business is conducted by a
General Partnership. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on 08/01/2012.
/s/ Amanda Pacia/
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 07/20/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
08/10/12, 08/17/12, 08/24/12, 08/31/12).
26 Friday Aug. 17, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Tundra Tundra Tundra
Over the Hedge Over the Hedge Over the Hedge
LEGAL NOTICES
Fictitious Business Name Statements, Trustee
Sale Notice, Alcohol Beverage License, Name
Change, Probate, Notice of Adoption, Divorce
Summons, Notice of Public Sales, and More.
Published in the Daily Journal for San Mateo County.
Fax your request to: 650-344-5290
Email them to: ads@smdailyjournal.com
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #251466
The following persons are doing busi-
ness as: AP Consulting, 706 S. El Dora-
do St., SAN MATEO, CA 94402 is here-
by registered by the following owners:
Amanda Pacia and Patricia Law, samd
address. The business is conducted by a
General Partnership. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on 12/15/2012.
/s/ Amanda Pacia/
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 07/20/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
08/10/12, 08/17/12, 08/24/12, 08/31/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #251359
The following persons are doing busi-
ness as: AG Transport, 120 W. 3rd St.,
Ste. 401, SAN MATEO, CA 94402 is
hereby registered by the following own-
ers: Ali Saberghalouri and Ashkan Sa-
berghalouri, samd address. The busi-
ness is conducted by a General Partner-
ship. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on N/A.
/s/ Ali Saberghalouri /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 07/13/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
08/10/12, 08/17/12, 08/24/12, 08/31/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #251687
The following persons are doing busi-
ness as: Trust Auto and Performance,
675 San Bruno Ave E, SAN BRUNO, CA
94066 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owners: Premier Automotive, Inc, CA.
The business is conducted by a corpora-
tion The registrants commenced to trans-
act business under the FBN on.
/s/ Emmanuel Crisostomo /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 08/02/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
08/10/12, 08/17/12, 08/24/12, 08/31/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #251613
The following persons are doing busi-
ness as: Pandora @ Hillsdale, 60 31st
Ave., SAN MATEO, CA 94403 is hereby
registered by the following owners: Laws
West, INC, CA. The business is conduct-
ed by a corporation The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on.
/s/ Lang Don Laws /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 07/30/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
08/10/12, 08/17/12, 08/24/12, 08/31/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #251601
The following person is doing business
as: MGM Tour, 1004A S. Claremont,
SAN MATEO, CA 94402 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: MGM Holi-
day INC, CA. The business is conducted
by a Corporation. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on 8-1-2012
/s/ Tianhong Zhao /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 07/30/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
08/17/12, 08/24/12, 08/31/12, 09/07/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #251772
The following person is doing business
as: Dependable Billing Service, 451 Ash-
ton Ave., MILLBRAE, CA 94030 is here-
by registered by the following owner:
Cynthia Berkovatz, same address. The
business is conducted by an Individual.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on 10/01/2012
/s/ Cynthia Berkovatz /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 08/09/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
08/17/12, 08/24/12, 08/31/12, 09/07/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #251794
The following persons are doing busi-
ness as: Trousdale Press, 1675 Rollins
Rd. Ste. B, BURLINGAME, CA 94010 is
hereby registered by the following own-
ers: Joe Gurkoff, 1565 Bellvue Ave., Hill-
sbororugh, CA 94010 and Anna Ranieri,
663 San Juan St., Stanford, CA 94305.
The business is conducted by a Co-Part-
ners. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on
/s/ Joe Gurkoff /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 08/10/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
08/17/12, 08/24/12, 08/31/12, 09/07/12).
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #251752
The following person is doing business
as: Inpowerfit, 1901 J Hart Cliton Dr.,
SAN MATEO, CA 94401 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: Laura Cas-
tro, 123 Dundee Dr., South San Franci-
so, CA 94080. The business is conduct-
ed by an Individual. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on
/s/ Laura Castro /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 08/07/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
08/17/12, 08/24/12, 08/31/12, 09/07/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #251825
The following person is doing business
as: EMC Insurance Services, 320 E. 3rd
Ave., SAN MATEO, CA 94401 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Victor
T. Elliott, 221 S. Fremont St Apt 403,
San Mateo CA 94401. The business is
conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on
/s/ Victor T. Elliott /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 08/13/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
08/17/12, 08/24/12, 08/31/12, 09/07/12).
STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT of
USE of FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT # M-247528
The following person has abandoned the
use of the fictitious business name: Your
Design Solution, 620 Taylor Way #14,
San Carlos, CA 94070. The fictitious
business name referred to above was
filed in County on 11/08/11. The busi-
ness was conducted by: Philip Jacob-
son, 477 Topaz St., San Carlos, CA
94070
/s/ Philip Jacobson/
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk-Recorder of San Mateo
County on 08/08/2012. (Published in the
San Mateo Daily Journal, 08/10/12,
08/17/12, 08/24/12, 08/31/12).
210 Lost & Found
FOUND - Evan - I found your iPod, call
(650)261-9656
LOST - SET OF KEYS, Has HONDA
CAR KEY. San Mateo. Reward. 650-
274-9892
LOST - 2 silver rings and silver watch,
May 7th in Burlingame between Park Rd.
& Walgreens, Sentimental value. Call
Gen @ (650)344-8790
LOST - Small Love Bird, birght green
with orange breast. Adeline Dr. & Bernal
Ave., Burlingame. Escaped Labor Day
weekend. REWARD! (650)343-6922
LOST SIAMESE CAT on 5/21 in
Belmont. Dark brown& tan, blue eyes.
FOUND!
LOST: SMALL diamond cross, silver
necklace with VERY sentimental
meaning. Lost in San Mateo 2/6/12
(650)578-0323.
294 Baby Stuff
B.O.B. DUALLIE STROLLER, for two.
Excellent condition. Blue. $300.
Call 650-303-8727.
BABY CAR SEAT AND CARRIER $20
(650)458-8280
295 Art
WALL ART, from Pier 1, indoor/outdoor,
$15. Very nice! (650)290-1960
296 Appliances
HAIR DRYER, Salon Master, $10.
(650)854-4109
HUNTER OSCILLATING FAN, excellent
condition. 3 speed. $35. (650)854-4109
MIROMATIC PRESSURE cooker flash
canner 4qt. $25. 415 333-8540
RADIATOR HEATER, oil filled, electric,
1500 watts $25. (650)504-3621
ROTISSERIE GE, US Made, IN-door or
out door, Holds large turkey 24 wide,
Like new, $80, OBO (650)344-8549
SHOP VACUUM rigid brand 3.5 horse
power 9 gal wet/dry $40. (650)591-2393
SMALL SLOW cooker. Used once, $12
(650)368-3037
SUNBEAM TOASTER -Automatic, ex-
cellent condition, $30., (415)346-6038
VACUUM CLEANER excellent condition
$45. (650)878-9542
WASHER AND Dryer, $200
(650)333-4400
WATER HEATER $75, (650)333-4400
297 Bicycles
BIKE RACK Roof mounted, holds up to
4 bikes, $65 (650)594-1494
298 Collectibles
"STROLLEE" WALKING Doll in Original
Box Brunette in Red/white/black dress,
1970s/1980s, SOLD!
1936 BERLIN OLYMPIC PIN, $99.,
SOLD!
1968 SILVER MEXICAN OLYMPIC
COIN - 25 pesos, $50., (650)365-1797
1982 PRINT 'A Tune Off The Top Of My
Head' 82/125 $80 (650) 204-0587
2 FIGURINES - 1 dancing couple, 1
clown face. both $15. (650)364-0902
67 OLD Used U.S. Postage Stamps.
Many issued before World War II. All
different. $4.00, (650)787-8600
AMISH QUILLOW, brand new, authen-
tic, $50. (650)589-8348
ANTIQUE TRAIN set, complete in the
box from the 50s, $80 obo
(650)589-8348
ARMY SHIRT, long sleeves, with pock-
ets. XL $15 each (408)249-3858
BAY MEADOWS bag - $30.each,
(650)345-1111
BEANIE BABIES in cases with TY tags
attached, good condition. $10 each or 12
for $100. (650) 588-1189
BEAUTIFUL RUSTIE doll Winter Bliss w/
stole & muffs, 23, $90. OBO, (650)754-
3597
COLLECTIBLE CHRISTMAS TREE
STAND with 8 colored lights at base / al-
so have extra lights, $50., SOLD!
COLLECTIBLES: RUSSELL Baze Bob-
bleheads Bay Meadows, $10 EA. brand
new in original box. (415)612-0156
COLORIZED TERRITORIAL Quarters
uncirculated with Holder $15/all,
(408)249-3858
COMIC BOOK Collection, Many Titles
from 60s, 70s, & 80s, $75 obo,
(650)271-0731
GAYLORD PERRY 8x10 signed photo
$10 (650)692-3260
GUMBY AUTOGRAPH Newsletter Art
and Gloria Clokey, $40., (650)873-8167
JIM BEAM decorative collectors bottles
(8), many sizes and shapes, $10. each,
(650)364-7777
JOE MONTANA signed authentic retire-
ment book, $39., (650)692-3260
MARK MCGUIRE hats, cards, beanie
babies, all for $98., (650)520-8558
ORIGINAL SMURF FIGURES - 1979-
1981, 18+ mushroom hut, 1 1/2 x 3 1/2,
all $40., (650)518-0813
POSTERS - Message in a Bottle Movie
Promo Sized Poster, Kevin Costner and
Paul Newman, New Kids On The Block
1980s, Framed JoeY McIntyre, Casper
Movie, $5-$10., call Maria,
(650)873-8167
RAT PACK framed picture with glass 24"
by 33" mint condition $60. SOLD!
SPORTS CARDS 50 Authentic Signa-
tures $60 all, (650)365-3987
STACKING MINI-KETTLES - 3
Pots/cover: ea. 6 diam; includes carry
handle for stacking transit. Unique.
Brown speckle enamelware, $20.,
(650)341-3288
TIME LIFE Art books collection. 28 Vols.
$75 all (650)701-0276
VINTAGE HOLLIE HOBBIE LUNCH-
BOX with Thermos, 1980s, $25., Call
Maria 650-873-8167
VINTAGE TEEN BEAT MAGAZINES
1980s $2 each, Call Maria 650-873-8167
WANTED:
OLDER PLASTIC MODEL KITS.
Aurora, Revell, Monogram.
Immediate cash.
Pat 650-759-0793.
YUGIOH CARD 2,000 some rare 1st
Edition, $60 all, (650)365-3987
299 Computers
HP PRINTER Deskjet 970c color printer.
Excellent condition. Software & accesso-
ries included. $30. 650-574-3865
300 Toys
BILINGUAL POWER lap top
6 actividaes $18 650 349-6059
302 Antiques
1912 COFFEE Percolator Urn. perfect
condition includes electric cord $85.
(415)565-6719
ANTIQUE BEVEL MIRROR - framed,
14 x 21, carved top, $45., (650)341-
7890
ANTIQUE ITALIAN lamp 18 high, $70
(650)387-4002
302 Antiques
ANTIQUE WASHING machine, some
rust on legs, rust free drum and ringer.
$45/obo, (650)574-4439
CHINA CABINET - Vintage, 6 foot,
solid mahogany. $300/obo.
(650)867-0379
J&J HOPKINSON 1890-1900's walnut
piano with daffodil inlay on the front. Ivo-
ries in great condition. Can be played as
is, but will benefit from a good tuning.
$600.00 includes stool. Email
frisz@comcast.net for photos
303 Electronics
3 SHELF SPEAKERS - 8 OM, $15.
each, (650)364-0902
32 TOSHIBA Flat screen TV like new,
bought 9/9/11 with box. $300 Firm.
(415)264-6605
46 MITSUBISHI Projector TV, great
condition. $400. (650)261-1541.
BIG SONY TV 37" - Excellent Condition
Worth $2300 will Sacrifice for only $95.,
(650)878-9542
FLIP CAMCORDER $50. (650)583-2767
H/P WINDOWS Desk Jet 840C Printer.
Like New. All hookups. $30.00
(650)344-7214
HOME THEATRE SYSTEM - 3 speak-
ers, woofer, DVD player, USB connec-
tion, $80., (714)818-8782
HP COLOR Scanner, Unopened box,
Scan, edit, organize photos/documents
480 x 9600 DPI, Restores colors,
brightness, $40.00 (650)578-9208
LEFT-HAND ERGONOMIC keyboard
with 'A-shape' key layout Num pad, $20
(650)204-0587
LSI SCSI Ultra320 Controller + (2) 10k
RPM 36GB SCSI II hard drives $40
(650)204-0587
NINTENDO NES plus 8 games,Works,
$30 (650)589-8348
304 Furniture
2 DINETTE Chairs both for $29
(650)692-3260
2 END Tables solid maple '60's era
$40/both. (650)670-7545
4 DRAWER metal file cabinet, black, no
lock model, like new $50 (650)204-0587
ARMOIRE CABINET - $90., Call
(415)375-1617
CAST AND metal headboard and foot-
board. white with brass bars, Queen size
$95 650-588-7005
CHAIR MODERN light wood made in Ita-
ly $99 (415)334-1980
CHANDELIER WITH 5 lights/ candela-
bre base with glass shades $20.
(650)504-3621
COFFEE TABLE - 30 x 58, light oak,
heavy, 1980s, $40., (650)348-5169
COMPUTER DESK from Ikea, $40
(650)348-5169
COUCH-FREE. OLD world pattern, soft
fabric. Some cat scratch damage-not too
noticeable. 650-303-6002
DESK SOLID wood 21/2' by 5' 3 leather
inlays manufactured by Sligh 35 years
old $100 (must pick up) (650)231-8009
DINING ROOM SET - table, four chairs,
lighted hutch, $500. all, (650)296-3189
304 Furniture
DISPLAY CASE wood & glass 31 x 19
inches $30. (650)873-4030
DRUM TABLE - brown, perfect condi-
tion, nice design, with storage, $45.,
(650)345-1111
END TABLES (2) - One for $5. hand
carved, other table is antique white mar-
ble top with drawer $40., (650)308-6381
END TABLES (2)- Cherry finish, still in
box, need to assemble, 26L x 21W x
21H, $100. for both, (650)592-2648
FOLDING PICNIC table - 8 x 30, 7 fold-
ing, padded chairs, $80. (650)364-0902
HAND MADE portable jewelry display
case wood and see through lid $45. 25 x
20 x 4 inches. (650)592-2648.
HAWAIIAN STYLE living room chair Re-
tton with split bamboo, blue and white
stripe cushion $99 (650)343-4461
KITCHEN TALE walnut with chrome
legs. 36x58 with one leaf 11 1/2. $50,
San Mateo (650)341-5347
LOUNGE CHAIRS - 2 new, with cover &
plastic carring case & headrest, $35.
each, (650)592-7483
MODULAR DESK/BOOKCASE/STOR-
AGE unit - Cherry veneer, white lami-
nate, $75., (650)888-0039
OFFICE LAMP, small. Black & white with
pen holder and paper holder. Brand new,
in the box. $10 (650)867-2720
PAPASAN CHAIRS (2) -with cushions
$45. each set, (650)347-8061
PEDESTAL DINETTE 36 Square Table
- $65., (650)347-8061
QUEEN SIZE white cast iron front head-
board and footboard, $40., (650)834-
4355.
RECLINER CHAIR very comfortable vi-
nyl medium brown $70, (650)368-3037
ROCKING CHAIR - excellent condition,
oak, with pads, $85.obo, (650)369-9762
ROCKING CHAIR - Traditional, full size
Rocking chair. Excellent condition $100.,
(650)504-3621
SMALL STORAGE/ Hutch, Stained
Green, pretty. $40, (650)290-1960
STEREO CABINET walnut w/3 black
shelves 16x 22x42. $30, 650-341-5347
STORAGE TABLE light brown lots of
storage good cond. $45. (650)867-2720
TEA CHEST , Bombay, burgundy, glass
top, perfect cond. $35 (650)345-1111
TRUNDLE BED - Single with wheels,
$40., (650)347-8061
VANITY ETHAN Allen maple w/drawer
and liftup mirror like new $95
(650)349-2195
VINTAGE UPHOLSTERED wooden
chairs, $25 each or both for $40. nice
set. (650)583-8069
VINTAGE WING back chair $75,
(650)583-8069
306 Housewares
"PRINCESS HOUSE decorator urn
"Vase" cream with blue flower 13 inch H
$25., (650)868-0436
28" by 15" by 1/4" thick glass shelves,
cost $35 each sell at $15 ea. Five availa-
ble, Call (650)345-5502
6 BOXES of Victorian lights ceiling & wall
$90., (650)340-9644
BEDSPREAD - queen size maroon &
pink bedspread - Fairly new, $50. obo,
(650)834-2583
CANDLEHOLDER - Gold, angel on it,
tall, purchased from Brueners, originally
$100., selling for $30.,(650)867-2720
CEILING FAN multi speed, brown and
bronze $45. SOLD!
COCKTAIL GLASSES - beautiful, rich,
smokey hue, oak tree design, wide base,
set of 12, $25., (650)341-8342
DINING ROOM Victorian Chandelier
seven light, $90., (650)340-9644
DRIVE MEDICAL design locking elevat-
ed toilet seat. New. $45. (650)343-4461
306 Housewares
IRONING BOARD $15 (650)347-8061
PERSIAN TEA set for 8. Including
spoon, candy dish, and tray. Gold Plated.
$100. (650) 867-2720
SOLID TEAK floor model 16 wine rack
with turntable $60. (650)592-7483
307 Jewelry & Clothing
BRACELET - Ladies authentic Murano
glass from Italy, vibrant colors, like new,
$100., (650)991-2353 Daly City
GALLON SIZE bag of costume jewelry -
various sizes, colors, $100. for bag,
(650)589-2893
LADIES GOLD Lame' elbow length-
gloves sz 7.5 $15 New. (650)868-0436
WE BUY GOLD
Highest Prices Paid on
Jewelry or Scrap
Michaels Jewelry
Since 1963
253 Park Road
Burlingame
(650)342-4461
308 Tools
3 ALUMINUM ladders 8', 16', & 28' good
condition all for $90 SOLD!
49 TOOLS Varity of tools all for $98,
SOLD!
AIR COMPRESSOR, 220 Volt 2hp
20gal Tank $60, SOLD!
CEMENT MIXER, Never used 3.5 Cu. Ft.
SOLD!
CIRCULAR SAW, Craftsman-brand, 10,
4 long x 20 wide. Comes w/ stand - $70.
(650)678-1018
CLICKER TORQUE Wrench, 20 - 150
pounds, new with lifetime warranty and
case, $39, 650-595-3933
CRAFTSMAN 3/4 horse power 3,450
RPM $60 (650)347-5373
CRAFTSMAN ARC-WELDER - 30-250
amp, and accessories, $275., (650)341-
0282
CRAFTSMAN GASLESS Wire feed
welder New in the box , SOLD!
CRAFTSMAN RADIO ARM SAW -
needs a switch, $20., SOLD!
DAYTON ELECTRIC 1 1/2 horse power
1,725 RPM $60 (650)347-5373
DEWALT COMBO 14.4v - Drill, saw,
charger, 2 batteries. $40.00 cash, firm.
SOLD through the Daily Journal!
ENGINE HOIST PROFESSIONAL - no
leaks, American made, $90., SOLD!
FLOOR JACK, American Made, no
leaks, $60 SOLD!
FMC TIRE changer Machine, $650
(650)333-4400
GENERATOR 13,000 WATTS Brand
New 20hp Honda $2800 (650)333-4400
LAWN MOWER reel type push with
height adjustments. Just sharpened $45
650-591-2144 San Carlos
MICRO METER Set, 0 to 12. 12 mikes
Total, $75, SOLD!
SCNCO TRIM Nail Gun, $100
(650) 521-3542
STADILA LEVEL 6ft, $60
(650) 521-3542
TABLE SAW 10", very good condition
$85. (650) 787-8219
TABLE SAW, Upright, craftsman 10
Blade, $20., SOLD!
TABLE SAW- Craftsman 10" saw. brand
new, never used $85. (650)591-6283
WOOD JOINTER, Craftsman Model
#113206931, 6 Blade 36 Table 36 tall,
$50., (650)697-1594
309 Office Equipment
ELECTRIC TYPEWRITER Smith Corona
$60. (650)878-9542
EPSON WORKFORCE 520 color printer,
scanner, copier, & fax machine, like new,
warranty, $30., SOLD!
27 Friday Aug. 17, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
ACROSS
1 Unlikely hits
7 Hiring may
accompany one
11 Classic Pontiac
14 Unkeyed
15 Lead-in to a
congratulatory
cry
16 Punch lines?
17 Berserk flutterer?
19 Pen name
20 Sacred carving,
perhaps
21 Place with pint-
size servings?
22 Source of silky
wool
24 Trans-Alaska
pipeline
repairer?
27 Central American
port named for an
explorer
30 Rhein tributary
31 Kwik-E-Mart
owner
32 Like most people
35 Skewed
39 Jacuzzi feature
40 Like one afflicted
with the added
elements in 17-,
24-, 53- and 65-
Across?
43 Wide size
44 Cousin of a toe
loop
46 Operative
47 Body wrap
offerer
48 This __ outrage!
51 Something that
matters
53 Alluring facial
feature?
58 Yay!
59 Community
property word
60 Campus
appointment
64 Dash sizes
65 Assembly
celebrating
digestion?
68 Imitate
69 Pound or pint
70 About 2% of the
Earths surface
71 Not likely to pipe
up
72 Family nickname
73 Surcease
DOWN
1 Indonesian resort
island
2 Body-piercing
choice
3 Prefix with sphere
4 Swab analysis
site
5 Dispose of a
course
6 Boxed-set box
7 Disney classic set
in a forest
8 Nebraska native
9 River separating
Ontario and
Quebec
10 Resurrection
Symphony
composer
11 Stink up the fridge
12 Doubly
13 Thespian honor
18 Sever
23 Defendants
response
25 Reddish equine
26 Where rocking is
not suggested
27 Mexicalis
peninsula
28 Top
29 Mandolin kin
33 Native of Shiraz
34 Diamond no.
36 1940 Fields
co-star
37 Certain seizure,
for short
38 Wine datum
41 Natural
42 Some stops: Abbr.
45 One who
embroiders to
excess
49 Grab
50 Aegis wielder
52 Chest sources
53 Large flightless
birds
54 Flair
55 Go casually
56 Literally, baked
57 Rapa __
61 Wells race
62 Brenner Pass
locale
63 Novgorod no
66 Doozy
67 Be penitent
By Chuck Deodene
(c)2012 Tribune Media Services, Inc.
08/17/12
08/17/12
ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE:
Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle
Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Nichols Lewis
xwordeditor@aol.com
310 Misc. For Sale
1 PAIR of matching outdoor planting pots
$20., (650)871-7200
10 PLANTS (assorted) for $3.00 each,
(650)349-6059
14 SEGA genius games 2 controllers
$20 (650)589-8348
20 TRAVEL books .50 cents ea
(650)755-8238
30 NOVEL books $1.00 ea,
(650)755-8238
3D MOVIE glasses, (12) unopened,
sealed plastic, Real 3D, Kids and adults.
Paid $3.75 each, selling $1.50 each
(650)578-9208
4 IN 1 STERO UNIT. CD player broken.
$20., (650)834-4926
40 ADULT VHS Tapes $100,
(650)361-1148
5 PHOTOGRAPHIC CIVIL WAR
BOOKS plus 4 volumes of Abraham Lin-
coln books, $90., (650)345-5502
6 BASKETS with handles, all various
colors and good sizes, great for many
uses, all in good condition. $15 all
(650)347-5104
7 UNDERBED STORAGE BINS - Vinyl
with metal frame, 42 X 18 X 6, zipper
closure, $5. ea., (650)364-0902
9 CARRY-ON bags (assorted) - extra
large, good condition, $10. each obo,
(650)349-6059
AMERICAN HERITAGE books 107 Vol-
umes Dec.'54-March '81 $99/all
(650)345-5502
ARTIFICIAL FICUS Tree 6 ft. life like, full
branches. in basket $55. (650)269-3712
ARTS & CRAFTS variety, $50
(650)368-3037
BARBIE BEACH vacation & Barbie prin-
cess bride computer games $15 each,
(650)367-8949
BEADS - Glass beads for jewelry mak-
ing, $75. all, (650)676-0732
BLUETOOTH WITH CHARGER - like
new, $20., (415)410-5937
310 Misc. For Sale
BEAUTIFUL LAMPSHADE - cone shap-
ed, neutral color beige, 11.5 long X 17
wide, matches any decor, never used,
excellent condition, Burl, $18.,
(650)347-5104
BOOK "LIFETIME" WW1 $12.,
(408)249-3858
BOOK NATIONAL Geographic Nation-
al Air Museums, $15 (408)249-3858
BOOK SELECTION, Mystery, Romance,
Biography, many authors, hard cover,
paperbacks, many authors, mint condi-
tion. 50 cents each (650) 578-9208.
BOOKS 20 HARDCOVER WW2 USMC
Korea, Europe. $50 (650)302-0976
BROADWAY by the Bay, Chorus Line
Sat 9/22; Broadway by Year Sat. 11/10
Section 4 main level $80.00 all.
(650)578-9208
CLEAN CAR Kit, unopened sealed box,
7 full size containers for leather, spots,
glass, interior, paint, chamois, $25.00
(650)578-9208
COSTUME JEWELRY, 200 Pieces,
Necklaces Bracelets and earnings,
SOLD!
DELONGHI-CONVENTION ROTISSER-
IE crome with glass door excellent condi-
tion $55 OBO (650)343-4461
DOOM (3) computer games $15/each 2
total, (650)367-8949
DVD'S TV programs 24 4 seasons $20
ea. (650)952-3466
ELECTRONIC TYPEWRITER good con-
dition $50., (650)878-9542
EXOTIC EROTIC Ball SF & Mardi gras 2
dvd's $25 ea. (415)971-7555
FREE DWARF orange tree
SOLD!
GAME "BEAT THE EXPERTS" never
used $8., (408)249-3858
GEORGE Magazines, 30, all intact
$50/all OBO. (650)574-3229, Foster City
310 Misc. For Sale
HARDCOVER MYSTERY BOOKS -
Current authors, $2. each (10), (650)364-
7777
HARLEY DAVIDSON black phone, per-
fect condition, $65., (650) 867-2720
HYPO ALERGETIC Pillows (2) Great for
those with alergies, easy to clean,
$10.00 both, (650)578-9208
ICE CHEST $15 (650)347-8061
JAMES PATTERSON BOOKS - 3 hard-
back @$3. each, 5 paperbacks @$1.
each, (650)341-1861
LIMITED QUANTITY VHS porno tapes,
$8. each, (650)871-7200
MASSAGER CHAIR - Homedics, Heat,
Timer, Remote, like new, $45.,
(650)344-7214
MENU FROM Steam Ship Lurline Aug.
20 1967 $10 (650)755-8238
MIRROR, ETHAN ALLEN - 57-in. high x
21-in. wide, maple frame and floor base,
like new, $95., (650)349-2195
NELSON DE MILLE -Hardback books 5
@ $3 each, (650)341-1861
NEW LIVING Yoga Tape for Beginners
$8. 650-578-8306
OBLONG SECURITY mirror 24" by 15"
$75 (650)341-7079
OLD 5 gal. glass water cooler bottle $20
(650) 521-3542
OUTDOOR SCREEN - New 4 Panel
Outdoor Screen, Retail $130 With Metal
Supports, $80/obo. (650)873-8167
PICTORIAL WORLD History Books
$80/all (650)345-5502
PLANT - Beautiful hybrodized dahlia tu-
bers, $3 to $8 each (12 available), while
supplies last, Bill (650)871-7200
QUEEN SIZE inflatable mattress with
built in battery air pump used twice $40,
(650)343-4461
QUEEN SIZE inflatable mattress with
built in battery air pump used twice $40,
(650)343-4461
310 Misc. For Sale
SESAME STREET toilet seat excellent
condition $12 650 349-6059
SF GREETING Cards (300 w/envelopes)
factory sealed $10. (650)365-3987
SHOWER DOOR custom made 48 x 69
$70 (650)692-3260
SPECIAL EDITION 3 DVD Set of The
Freeze. English Subtitles, new $18
(650)871-7200
STEP 2 sandbox Large with cover $25
(650)343-4329
STUART WOODS Hardback Books
2 @ $3.00 each. (650)341-1861
TABLECLOTH - Medium Blue color rec-
tangular tablecloth 70" long 52" wide with
12 napkins $15., SOLD!
TIRE CHAINS - brand new, in box, never
used, multiple tire sizes, $25., (650)594-
1494
TIRE CHAINS - used once includes rub-
ber tighteners plus carrying case. call for
corresponding tire size, $20.,
(650)345-5446
TOILET SINK - like new with all of the
accessories ready to be installed, $55.
obo, (650)369-9762
TOTE FULL of English novels - Cathrine
Cookson, $100., (650)493-8467
VAN ROOF rack 3 piece. clamp-on, $75
(650)948-4895
VASE WITH flowers 2 piece good for the
Holidays, $25., (650) 867-2720
VICTORIAN DAYS In The Park Wine
Glasses 6 count. Fifteenth Annual $10
obo (650)873-8167
VIDEO CENTER 38 inches H 21 inches
W still in box $45., (408)249-3858
VOLVO STATION Wagon car cover $50
650 888-9624
WALKER - brand new, $20., SSF,
(415)410-5937
WALKER - never used, $85.,
(415)239-9063
WALL LIGHT fixture - 2 lamp with frost-
ed fluted shades, gold metal, great for
bathroom vanity, never used, excellent
condition, $15., Burl, (650)347-5104
311 Musical Instruments
2 ORGANS, antique tramp, $100 each.
(650)376-3762
3 ACCORDIONS $110/ea. 1 Small
Accordion $82. (650)376-3762.
BONGO DRUM with instruction, SOLD!
HAMMOND B-3 Organ and 122 Leslie
Speaker. Excellent condition. $8,500. pri-
vate owner, (650)349-1172
HOHNER CUE stick guitar HW 300 G
Handcrafted $75 650 771-8513
JENCO VIBRAPHONE - Three Octave
Graduated Bars, vintage concert Model
near mint condition, SOLD. Call
(650)871-0824
PIANO ORGAN, good condition. $110.
(650)376-3762
312 Pets & Animals
HAMSTER HABITAT SYSTEM - 2 cage
system with interconnecting tunnels,
Large: 9 1/2 x 19 1/2; Small 9 1/2 x 9
1/2, with water bottles, food bowls, exer-
cise wheel, lots of tunnels & connectors
makes varied configurations, much more.
$40., (650)594-1494
PET CARRIER Excellent Condition
Large size 36L x 24W x 26H Firm $25
SOLD!
REPTILE CAGE - Medium size, $20.,
(650)348-0372
SMALL DOG wire cage; pink, two doors
with divider $50.00 (650) 743-9534.
315 Wanted to Buy
GO GREEN!
We Buy GOLD
You Get The
$ Green $
Millbrae Jewelers
Est. 1957
400 Broadway - Millbrae
650-697-2685
316 Clothes
2. WOMEN'S Pink & White Motocycle
Helmet KBC $50 (415)375-1617
A BAG of Summer ties $15 OBO
(650)245-3661
BATHROBE MENS navy blue plush-ter-
ry and belt. Maroon piping and trim, 2
pockets. Medium size. $10., (650)341-
3288
BLACK Leather pants Mrs. size made in
France size 40 $99. (650)558-1975
BLACK LEATHER tap shoes 9M great
condition $99. (650)558-1975
BLOUSES SWEATERS and tops. Many
different styles & colors, med. to lrg., ex-
cellent condition $5 ea., have 20,
(650)592-2648
BOOTS - purple leather, size 8, ankle
length, $50.obo, (650)592-9141
EUROPEAN STYLE nubek leather la-
dies winter coat - tan colored with green
lapel & hoodie, $100., (650)888-0129
HARDING PARK mens golf dress shirts
(new) asking $25 (650)871-7200
LADIES BOOTS, thigh high, fold down
brown, leather, and beige suede leather
pair, tassels on back excellent, Condition
$40 ea. (650)592-2648
LADIES COAT Medium, dark lavender
$25 (650)368-3037
316 Clothes
LADIES FAUX FUR COAT - Satin lining,
size M/L, $100. obo, (650)525-1990
LADIES JACKET size 3x 70% wool 30%
nylon never worn $50. (650)592-2648
LADIES PLUS Clothing - mint condition,
Fancy/plain sweaters, tops, dresses, out-
fits, summer and winter. $4.00 each,
(650)578-9208
LEATHER COAT medium size (snake
skin design) $25 (650)755-8238
LEATHER JACKETS (5) - used but not
abused. Like New, $100 each.
(650)670-2888
LEVIS MENS jeans - Size 42/30, well
faded, excellent condition, $10.,
(650)595-3933
MEN'S SUIT almost new $25.
650-573-6981
MENS DRESS SHOES - bostonian cas-
ual dress tie up, black upper leather, size
8.5, classic design, great condition,
$60.,Burl., (650)347-5104
MENS PANTS & SHORTS - Large box,
jeans, cargos, casual dress slacks,
34/32, 36/32, Burl, $85.all,
(650)347-5104
MENS SHIRTS - Brand names, Polos,
casual long sleeve dress, golf polo,
tshirts, sizes M/L, great condition, Burl,
$83., (650)347-5104
NEW BROWN LEATHER JACKET- XL
$25., 650-364-0902
REVERSIBLE, SOUVENIR JACKET
San Francisco: All-weather, zip-front,
hood. Weatherproof 2-tone tan.; Inner:
navy fleece, logos SF & GG bridge.
$15.00 (650)341-3288
SNOW BOOTS, MEN'S size 12. Brand
New, Thermolite brand,(with zippers),
black, $18. (510) 527-6602
TUXEDOS, FORMAL, 3, Black, White,
Maroon Silk brocade, Like new. Size 36,
$100 All OBO (650)344-8549
VINTAGE 1970S Grecian Made Size 6-7
Dresses $35 each, Royal Pink 1980s
Ruffled Dress size 7ish $30, 1880s Re-
production White Lace Gown $150 Size
6-7 Petite, (650)873-8167
VINTAGE CLOTHING 1930 Ermine fur
coat Black full length $35 650 755-9833
WOMENS SUMMER 3 pc.SUIT:
blue/white stripe seersucker, jacket,
slacks, shorts, size 12, $10., (650)341-
3288
317 Building Materials
50 NEW Gray brick, standard size,
8x4x2 $25 obo All, (650)345-5502
FLUORESCENT LIGHT Fixture, New in
Box, 24, $15 (650)341-8342
TILES, DARK Red clay, 6x6x1/2 6
Dozen at 50 ea (650)341-8342
WHITE STORM/SCREEN door. Size is
35 1/4" x 79 1/4". Asking $50.00. Call
(650)341-1861
318 Sports Equipment
"EVERLAST FOR HER" Machine to
help lose weight $40., (650)368-3037
13 ASSORTED GOLF CLUBS- Good
Quality $3.50 each. Call (650) 349-6059.
318 Sports Equipment
BASKETBALL RIM, net & backboard
$35/all 650-345-7132 Leave message.
BOOGIE BOARD, original Morey Boogie
Board #138, Exc condition, SOLD!
BOYS BICYCLE with Helmet. Triax,
Good Condition, $50, San Mateo
(650)341-5347
COLEMAN "GLO-MASTER" 1- burner
camp stove for boaters or camping. Mint
condition. $35.00 (650)341-3288
COMPLETE PORTABLE BASKET-
BALL SYSTEM - by Life Time, brand
new, $100., Pacific, (650)355-0236
DARTBOARD - New, regulation 18 di-
meter, Halex brand w/mounting hard-
ware, 6 brass darts, $16., (650)681-7358
EXERCISE MAT used once, lavender
$12, (650)368-3037
GIRLS BIKE, Pincess 16 wheels. $50
San Mateo (650)341-5347
GOLF CLUBS Driver, 7 wood, putter, 9
irons, bag, & pull cart. $99
(650)952-0620
ICE SKATES, Ladies English. Size 7-8
$50 Please call Maria (650)873-8167
NORDIC TRACK Treadmill, Model
ESP2000 Fold Up, space saver Perfect
condition $100, SOLD!
ONE BUCKET of golf balls - 250 total,
various brands, $25., SOLD!
ORBITREK LEG & arm workout ma-
chine - SOLD!
PING CRAZ-E Putter w/ cover. 35in.
Like New $75 call(650)208-5758
THULE BIKE RACK - Fits rectangular
load bars. Holds bike upright. $100.
(650)594-1494
TREADMILL PROFORM 75 EKG incline
an Staionery Bike, both $400. Or sepa-
rate: $150 for the bike, $350 for the
treadmill. Call (650)992-8757
TREK TRANSPORT BICYCLE CARRI-
ER - brand new, SOLD!
TWO YOGA Videos. Never used, one
with Patrisha Walden, one by Rebok with
booklet. Both $6 (650)755-8238
WATER SKI'S - Gold cup by AMFA Voit
$40., (650)574-4586
322 Garage Sales
FLEA MARKET
Saturday,
August 18th
8am to 2pm
San Mateo
American Legion #82
130 South Blvd.
San Mateo
Vintage, Collectibles,
Building Supplies, Tools,
Clothing and more!
28 Friday Aug. 17, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
322 Garage Sales
REDWOOD CITY
120 Orchard
(x-st. Woodside Rd)
Saturday Only
Aug. 18, 9am- 3pm
No Junk, Great Household items,
some furniture/ Pottery Barn dining ta-
ble, Great Womens, Kids, Mens
Clothes, Jewelry, Makeup and acces-
sories. Lots of kids items in great
condition. Don't Miss!
THE THRIFT SHOP
Closed during month of August
Reopening in September
Thanks for your support - see you
after Labor Day
Episcopal Church
1 S. El Camino Real
San Mateo 94401
(650)344-0921
GARAGE SALES
ESTATE SALES
Make money, make room!
List your upcoming garage
sale, moving sale, estate
sale, yard sale, rummage
sale, clearance sale, or
whatever sale you have...
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500 readers
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200
335 Garden Equipment
CRAFTSMAN 4 HP ROTARY LAWN-
MOWER - 20 rear discharge, excellent
condition, extra new grasscatcher, $85.,
(650)368-0748
340 Camera & Photo Equip.
HONEYWELL PENTAX 35mm excellent
lens, with case $65. (650)348-6428
SONY CYBERSHOT DSC-T-50 - 7.2 MP
digital camera (black) with case, $175.,
(650)208-5598
345 Medical Equipment
FOUR WHEEL walker with handbrakes,
fold down seat and basket, $50.
(650)867-6042
379 Open Houses
EMERALD HILLS
209 Lakeview Way
OPEN SUNDAY
1:30 - 4:30
Create your dream home in coveted
Emerald Hills! This lot was originally
three lots that have been combined to
create one superb home site at just
over 25,000 sq. ft. The property
boasts commanding views of the sur-
rounding hills, mature trees and easy
access to 280. Home plans for the
site, complete with separate guest
house, are available.
Joseph Hittinger
Vanguard Properties
(415)875-4710
OPEN HOUSE
LISTINGS
List your Open House
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500
potential home buyers &
renters a day,
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200
386 Mobile Homes for Sale
AFFORDABLE 3 Bed/2 Bath mobile
home, Moss Beach. $84,999. Seller fi-
nancing possible. Call agent Kristen
(650)504-1469
440 Apartments
BELMONT - prime, quiet location, view,
1 bedroom $1550. 2 bedroom $1900.,
New carpets, new granite counters, dish-
washer, balcony, covered carports, stor-
age, pool, no pets. (650) 591-4046
REDWOOD CITY- 1 Bedroom, all elec-
tric kitchen, close to downtown,
$1095./month, plus $700 deposit.
RENTED!
470 Rooms
HIP HOUSING
Non-Profit Home Sharing Program
San Mateo County
(650)348-6660
Rooms For Rent
Travel Inn, San Carlos
$49-59 daily + tax
$294-$322 weekly + tax
Clean Quiet Convenient
Cable TV, WiFi & Private Bathroom
Microwave and Refrigerator
950 El Camino Real San Carlos
(650) 593-3136
Mention Daily Journal
620 Automobiles
93 FLEETWOOD Chrome wheels Grey
leather interior 237k miles Sedan $ 2,500
or Trade, Good Condition (650)481-5296
96 JAGUAR XJ6 - Needs work, $3,500
or best offer, (650)678-3988
AUTO REVIEW
The San Mateo Daily Journals
weekly Automotive Section.
Every Friday
Look for it in todays paper to find
information on new cars,
used cars, services, and anything
else having to do
with vehicles.
Dont lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!
Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journals
Auto Classifieds.
Just $3 per day.
Reach 76,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
CHEVY HHR 08 - Grey, spunky car
loaded, even seat warmers, $9,500.
(408)807-6529.
HONDA 10 ACCORD LX - 4 door se-
dan, low miles, $19K, (650)573-6981
620 Automobiles
MERCEDES 06 C230 - 6 cylinder, navy
blue, 60K miles, 2 year warranty,
$18,000, (650)455-7461
TOYOTA 92 Celica GT, black. Pristine
in and out. New tires, brakes, battery
within last year.$3,450. (650)871-0824
625 Classic Cars
DATSUN 72 - 240Z with Chevy 350, au-
tomatic, custom, $3,600 or trade.
(415) 412-7030
635 Vans
NISSAN 01 Quest - GLE, leather seats,
sun roof, TV/DVR equipment. Looks
new, $15,500. (650)219-6008
640 Motorcycles/Scooters
BMW 03 F650 GS, $3899 OBO. Call
650-995-0003
HARLEY DAVIDSON 83 Shovelhead
special construction, 1340 ccs,
Awesome! $5,950/obo
Rob (415)602-4535.
VARIOUS MOTORCYCLE parts USED
call for what you want or need $99
(650)670-2888
645 Boats
BANSHEE SAILBOAT - 13 ft. with ex-
tras, $750., (650)343-6563
PROSPORT 97 - 17 ft. CC 80 Yamaha
Pacific, loaded, like new, $9,500 or trade
SOLD!.
650 RVs
73 Chevy Model 30 Van, Runs
good, Rebuilt Transmission, Fiber-
glass Bubble Top $1,795. Owner
financing.
Call for appointments. (650)364-1374.
94 COACHMAN Motor home 95k Miles,
$18,500 SOLD
670 Auto Service
MB GARAGE, INC.
Repair Restore Sales
Mercedes-Benz Specialists
2165 Palm Ave.
San Mateo
(650)349-2744
670 Auto Service
ON TRACK
AUTOMOTIVE
Complete Auto Repair
foreign & domestic
www.ontrackautomotive.com
1129 California Dr.
Burlingame
(650)343-4594
People you can trust;
service you can trust
NORDIC MOTORS, INC.
Specializing in Volvo, Saab,
Subaru
650 Winslow Road
Redwood City
(650) 595-0170
www.nordicmotors.com
SAN CARLOS AUTO
SERVICE & TUNE UP
A Full Service Auto Repair
Facility
760 El Camino Real
San Carlos
(650)593-8085
670 Auto Parts
2 RADIAL GT tires 205715 & 2356014
$10 each, (650)588-7005
2 SNOW/CABLE chains good condition
fits 13-15 inch rims $10/both San Bruno
650-588-1946
5 HUBCAPS for 1966 Alfa Romeo $50.,
(650)580-3316
67-68 CAMERO PARTS - $85.,
(650)592-3887
CAMPER/TRAILER/TRUCK OUTSIDE
backup mirror 8 diameter fixture. $30.
650-588-1946
CAR COVER / CAMRY, not used, in
box. $12. (650)494-1687
MAZDA 3 2010 CAR COVER - Cover-
kraft multibond inside & outside cover,
like new, $50., (650)678-3557
SHOP MANUALS 2 1955 Pontiac
manual, 4 1984 Ford/Lincoln manuals, &
1 gray marine diesel manual $40 or B/O
(650)583-5208
670 Auto Parts
TRUCK RADIATOR - fits older Ford,
never used, $100., (650)504-3621
672 Auto Stereos
MONNEY
CAR AUDIO
We Sell, Install and
Repair All Brands of
Car Stereos
iPod & iPhone Wired
to Any Car for Music
Quieter Car Ride
Sound Proof Your Car
31 Years Experience
2001 Middlefield Road
Redwood City
(650)299-9991
680 Autos Wanted
Dont lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!
Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journals
Auto Classifieds.
Just $3 per day.
Reach 82,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
DONATE YOUR CAR
Tax Deduction, We do the Paperwork,
Free Pickup, Running or Not - in most
cases. Help yourself and the Polly Klaas
Foundation. Call (800)380-5257.
Wanted 62-75 Chevrolets
Novas, running or not
Parts collection etc.
So clean out that garage
Give me a call
Joe 650 342-2483
ADVERTISE
YOUR SERVICE
in the
HOME & GARDEN SECTION
Offer your services to 76,500 readers a day, from
Palo Alto to South San Francisco
and all points between!
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
Cabinetry
Contractors
RISECON
NORTH AMERICA
General Contractors / Building
& Design
New construction, Kitchen-Bath Re-
models, Metal Fabrication, Painting
Call for free design consultation
(650) 274-4484 www.risecon.com
L#926933
Cleaning Cleaning
MORANAS
HOUSECLEANING
Homes and Apartments
Excellent Service
30 Years Experience
Great Rates
(650)375-8149
Concrete
POLY-AM
CONSTRUCTION
General Contractor
Free Estimate
Specializing in
Concrete Brickwork Stonewall
Interlocking Pavers Landscaping
Tile Retaining Wall
Bonded & Insured Lic. #685214
Ben: (650)375-1573
Cell: (650) 280-8617
Construction Construction
650 868 - 8492
PATRICK BRADY PATRICK BRADY
GENERAL CONTRACTOR
ADDITIONS WALL REMOVAL
BATHS KITCHENS AND MORE!
PATBRADY1957@SBCGLOBAL.NET
License # 479385
Frame
Structural
Foundation
Roots & ALL
I make your
life better!
LARGE OR SMALL
I do them all!
Decks & Fences
MARSH FENCE
& DECK CO.
State License #377047
Licensed Insured Bonded
Fences - Gates - Decks
Stairs - Retaining Walls
10-year guarantee
Quality work w/reasonable prices
Call for free estimate
(650)571-1500
Electricians
ALL ELECTRICAL
SERVICE
650-322-9288
for all your electrical needs
ELECTRIC SERVICE GROUP
Gardening
Servicing Hillsborough,
Burlingame, Millbrae,
and San Mateo
We are a full service
gardening company
650 218-0657
Quality
Gardening

Weekly Lawn Care
Hedges, Fertilizing,
Leaf Blowing
Rose Care
Get ready for
Fall planting

J.B. GARDENING SERVICE


Maintenance, New Lawns,
Sprinkler Systems, Clean Ups,
Fences, Tree Trimming,
Concrete work, Brick Work,
Pavers, and Retaining Walls.
Free Estimates
Cell: (650) 400- 5604
Flooring
DHA
WOODFLOORING
Wood Flooring
Installation & Refinishing
Lic.# 958104
(650)346-2707
29 Friday Aug. 17, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Tile
CUBIAS TILE
Marble, Stone & porcelain
Kitchens, bathrooms, floors,
fireplaces, entryways, decks,
tile, ceramic tile
repair, grout repair
Free Estimates Lic.# 955492
Mario Cubias
(650)784-3079
JZ TILE
Installation and Design
Portfolio and References,
Great Prices
Free Estimates
Lic. 670794
Call John Zerille
(650)245-8212
RUDOLPHS INTERIORS
Satisfying customers with world-
class service and products since
1952. Let us help you create the
home of your dreams. Please
phone for an appointment.
(650)685-1250
Window Washing
Flooring
SHOP
AT HOME
WE WILL
BRING THE
SAMPLES
TOYOU.
FLOORING
Call for a
FREE in-home
estimate
FLAMINGOS
FLOORING
CARPET
VINYL
LAMINATE
TILE
HARDWOOD
650-655-6600
Handy Help
CONTRERAS
HANDYMAN
Fences Decks Patios
Power Washes Concrete
Work Maintenance Clean
Ups Arbors
Free Estimates!
Call us Today!
(650)350-9968
contreras1270@yahoo.com
DISCOUNT HANDYMAN
& PLUMBING
Carpentry Plumbing Drain
Cleaning Kitchens Bathrooms
Dry Rot Decks
Priced for You! Call John
(650)296-0568
Free Estimates
Lic.#834170
FLORES HANDYMAN
Serving you is a privilege.
Painting-Interior & Exterior Roof Re-
pair Base Boards New Fence
Hardwood Floors Plumbing Tile
Mirrors Chain Link Fence Window
Glass Water Heater Installation
Bus Lic# 41942
Call today for free estimate.
(650)274-6133
HONEST HANDYMAN
Remodeling, Plumbing.
Electrical, Carpentry,
General Home Repair,
Maintenance,
New Construction
No Job Too Small
Lic.# 891766
(650)740-8602
HOUSE REPAIR & REMODELING
HANDYMAN
Plumbing, Electrical, Carpentry,
Kitchen & Bath Rem, Floor Tile,
Wood Fences,Painting Work
Free Estimates
PLEASE CALL
(650)504-4199
Hardwood Floors
KO-AM
HARDWOOD FLOORING
Hardwood & Laminate
Installation & Repair
Refinish
High Quality @ Low Prices
Call 24/7 for Free Estimate
800-300-3218
408-979-9665
Lic. #794899
Hauling
AM/PM HAULING
Haul Any Kind of Junk
Residential & Commercial
Free Estimates!
We recycle almost everything!
Go Green!
Call Joe
(650)722-3925
Hauling
CHEAP
HAULING!
Light moving!
Haul Debris!
650-583-6700
Interior Design
REBARTS INTERIORS
Hunter Douglas Gallery
Free Measuring & Install.
247 California Dr., Burl.
(650)348-1268
990 Industrial Blvd., #106
SC (800)570-7885
www.rebarts.com
Landscaping
Landscaping
LEAKPROFESSIONALS
LEAKS? SAME DAY SERVICE!
Valves Sprinklers
Wiring Broken Pipes
Retrofits
(800)770-778
CSL #585999
Moving
Bay Area
Relocation Services
Specializing in:
Homes, Apts., Storages
Professional, friendly, careful.
Peninsulas Personal Mover
Commercial/Residential
Fully Lic. & Bonded CAL -T190632
Call Armando (650) 630-0424
Painting
CRAIGS PAINTING
Interior & Exterior
Quality Work w/
Reasonable Rates
Free Estimates
(650)553-9653
Lic# 857741
GOLDEN WEST
PAINTING
Since 1975
Interior/Exterior,
Complete Preparation.
Will Beat any
Professional Estimate!
CSL#321586
(415)722-9281
JON LA MOTTE
PAINTING
Interior & Exterior
Pressure Washing
Free Estimates
(650)368-8861
Lic #514269
LEMUS PAINTING
650.271.3955
Interiors / Exteriors
Residential / Commercial
Free Estimates
Reasonable Rates
Lic#913961
MTP
Painting/Waterproofing
Drywall Repair/Tape/Texture
Power Washing-Decks, Fences
No Job Too Big or Small
Lic.# 896174
Call Mike the Painter
(650)271-1320
Plumbing
Remodeling
CORNERSTONE HOME DESIGN
Complete Kitchen & Bath Resource
Showroom: Countertops Cabinets
Plumbing Fixtures Fine Tile
Open M-F 8:30-5:30 SAT 10-4
168 Marco Way
South San Francisco, 94080
(650)866-3222
www.cornerstoneHD.com
CA License #94260
Remodeling
KITCHEN & BATH
REMODELING
50% off cabinets
(manufacturers list price)
CABINET WORLD
1501 Laurel St.
San Carlos
(650)592-8020
Home Improvement
CINNABAR HOME
Making Peninsula homes
more beautiful since 1996
* Home furnishings & accessories
* Drapery & window treatments:
blinds & shades
* Free in-home consultation
853 Industrial Rd. Ste E San Carlos
Wed Sat 12:00- 5:30pm, or by appt.
650-388-8836
www.cinnabarhome.com
Tile
CUBIAS TILE
Marble, Stone & porcelain
Kitchens, bathrooms, floors,
fireplaces, entryways, decks,
tile, ceramic tile
repair, grout repair
Free Estimates Lic.# 955492
Mario Cubias
(650)784-3079
JZ TILE
Installation and Design
Portfolio and References,
Great Prices
Free Estimates
Lic. 670794
Call John Zerille
(650)245-8212
Window Coverings
RUDOLPHS INTERIORS
Satisfying customers with world-
class service and products since
1952. Let us help you create the
home of your dreams. Please
phone for an appointment.
(650)685-1250
Window Washing
Notices
NOTICE TO READERS:
California law requires that contractors
taking jobs that total $500 or more (labor
or materials) be licensed by the Contrac-
tors State License Board. State law also
requires that contractors include their li-
cense number in their advertising. You
can check the status of your licensed
contractor at www.cslb.ca.gov or 800-
321-CSLB. Unlicensed contractors taking
jobs that total less than $500 must state
in their advertisements that they are not
licensed by the Contractors State Li-
cense Board.
30 Friday Aug. 17, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Attorneys
* BANKRUPTCY *
Huge credit card debt?
Job loss? Foreclosure?
Medical bills?
YOU HAVE OPTIONS
Call for a free consultation
(650)363-2600
This law firm is a debt relief agency
Law Office of Jason Honaker
BANKRUPTCY
Chapter 7 &13
Call us for a consultation
650-259-9200
www.honakerlegal.com
TRUSTS & ESTATE PLANNING
Top Attorney With Masters
In Tax Law Offers Reduced
Fees For New August Clients.
(650)342-3777
Ira Harris Zelnigher, Esq.
(Ira Harris)
1840 Gateway Dr., Ste. 200
San Mateo
Beauty
GRAND OPENING SPECIALS:
Facials , Eyebrow Waxing ,
Microdermabrasion
Full Body Salt Scrub &
Seaweed Wrap
Le Juin Day Spa & Clinic
155 E. 5th Avenue
Downtown San Mateo
(650) 347-6668
KAYS
HEALTH & BEAUTY
Facials, Waxing, Fitness
Body Fat Reduction
Pure Organic Facial $48.
1 Hillcrest Blvd, Millbrae
(650)697-6868
Dental Services
DR. SAMIR NANJAPA DDS
Family Dentistry &
Smile Restoration
UCSF Dentistry Faculty
Cantonese, Mandarin &
Hindi Spoken
650-477-6920
320 N. San Mateo Dr. Ste 2
San Mateo
Food
AYA SUSHI
The Best Sushi
& Ramen in Town
1070 Holly Street
San Carlos
(650)654-1212
BROADWAY GRILL
Express Lunch
Special $8.00
1400 Broadway
Burlingame
(650)343-9733
www.bwgrill.com
Food
FIND OUT!
What everybody is
talking about!
South Harbor
Restaurant & Bar
425 Marina Blvd., SSF
(650)589-1641
GOT BEER?
We Do!
Steelhead Brewing Co.
333 California Dr.
Burlingame
(650)344-6050
www.steelheadbrewery.com
GULLIVERS
RESTAURANT
Early Bird Special
Prime Rib Complete Dinner
Mon-Thu
1699 Old Bayshore Blvd. Burlingame
(650)692-6060
JACKS
RESTAURANT
Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner
1050 Admiral Ct., #A
San Bruno
(650)589-2222
JacksRestaurants.com
NEALS COFFEE
SHOP
Breakfast Lunch Dinner
Senior Meals, Kids Menu
www.nealscoffeeshop.com
1845 El Camino Real
Burlingame
(650)692-4281
SUNDAY CHAMPAGNE
BRUNCH
Crowne Plaza
1221 Chess Dr., Hwy. 92 at
Foster City Blvd. Exit
Foster City
(650)570-5700
SUNSHINE CAFE
Breakfast Lunch Dinner
1750 El Camino Real
San Mateo
(Borel Square)
(650)357-8383
THE AMERICAN BULL
BAR & GRILL
19 large screen HD TVs
Full Bar & Restaurant
www.theamericanbull.com
1819 El Camino, in
Burlingame Plaza
(650)652-4908
THE MELTING POT
Dinner for 2 - $98.
4 Course Fondue Feast &
Bottle of Wine
1 Transit Way San Mateo
(650)342-6358
www.melting pot.com
Financial
RELATIONSHIP BANKING
Partnership. Service. Trust.
UNITED AMERICAN BANK
Half Moon Bay, Redwood City,
Sunnyvale
unitedamericanbank.com
San Mateo
(650)579-1500
Fitness
DOJO USA
World Training Center
Martial Arts & Tae Bo Training
www.dojousa.net
731 Kains Ave, San Bruno
(650)589-9148
STAND UP &
TRAIN!
Train at Home & Reach your
Fitness Goals
Group Classes or
One On One
using TRX Suspension &
Kettlebell training ,
Custom Designed fitness
program
Call Chris Nash
(650)799-0608
alternativewayfitness@gmail.com
Furniture
Bedroom Express
Where Dreams Begin
2833 El Camino Real
San Mateo - (650)458-8881
184 El Camino Real
So. S. Francisco -(650)583-2221
www.bedroomexpress.com
Health & Medical
BACK, LEG PAIN OR
NUMBNESS?
Non-Surgical
Spinal Decompression
Dr. Thomas Ferrigno D.C.
650-231-4754
177 Bovet Rd. #150 San Mateo
BayAreaBackPain.com
General Dentistry
for Adults & Children
DR. ANNA P. LIVIZ, DDS
324 N. San Mateo Drive, #2
San Mateo 94401
(650)343-5555
SLEEP APNEA
We can treat it
without CPAP!
Call for a free
sleep apnea screening
650-583-5880
Millbrae Dental
Health & Medical
STRESSED OUT?
IN PAIN?
I CAN HELP YOU
Sessions start from $20
Call 650-235-6761
Will Chen ACUPUNCTURE
12220 6th Ave, Belmont
www. willchenacupuncture.com
TOENAIL FUNGUS?
FREE Consultation for
Laser Treatment
(650)347-0761
Dr. Richard Woo, DPM
400 S. El Camino Real
San Mateo
Home Care
CALIFORNIA HOARDING
REMEDIATION
Free Estimates
Whole House & Office
Cleanup Too!
Serving SF Bay Area
(650)762-8183
Call Karen Now!
Insurance
AARP AUTO
INSURANCE
Great insurance
Great price
Special rates for
drivers over 50
650-593-7601
ISU LOVERING
INSURANCE SERVICES
1121 Laurel St.,
San Carlos
BARRETT
INSURANCE
www.barrettinsuranceservices.net
Eric L. Barrett,
CLU, RHU, REBC, CLTC, LUTCF
President
Barrett Insurance Services
(650)513-5690
CA. Insurance License #0737226
HEALTH INSURANCE
Paying too much for COBRA?
No coverage?
.... Not good!
I can help.
John Bowman
(650)525-9180
CA Lic #0E08395
Jewelers
KUPFER JEWELRY
We Buy
Coins, Jewelry,
Watches, Platinum,
& Diamonds.
Expert fine watch
& jewelry repair.
Deal with experts.
1211 Burlingame Ave.
Burlingame
www.kupferjewelry.com
(650) 347-7007
Legal Services
LEGAL
DOCUMENTS PLUS
Non-Attorney document
preparation: Divorce,
Pre-Nup, Adoption, Living Trust,
Conservatorship, Probate,
Notary Public. Response to
Lawsuits: Credit Card
Issues,Breach of Contract
Jeri Blatt, LDA #11
Registered & Bonded
(650)574-2087
legaldocumentsplus.com
"I am not an attorney. I can only
provide self help services at your
specific direction."
Loans
REVERSE MORTGAGE
Are you age 62+ & own your
home?
Call for a free, easy to read
brochure or quote
650-453-3244
Carol Bertocchini, CPA
Marketing
GROW
YOUR SMALL BUSINESS
Get free help from
The Growth Coach
Go to
www.buildandbalance.com
Sign up for the free newsletter
Massage Therapy
ASIAN MASSAGE
$48 per Hour
New Customers Only
For First 20 Visits
Open 7 days, 10 am -10 pm
633 Veterans Blvd., #C
Redwood City
(650)556-9888
GRAND OPENING
ASIAN MASSAGE
$50 for 1 hour
Angel Spa
667 El Camino Real, Redwood City
(650)363-8806
7 days a week, 9:30am-9:30pm
GRAND OPENING!
CRYSTAL WAVE SPA
Body & Foot Massage
Facial Treatment
1205 Capuchino Ave.
Burlingame
(650)558-1199
HAPPY FEET
Massage
2608 S. El Camino Real
& 25th Ave., San Mateo
(650)638-9399
$30.00/Hr Foot Massage
$50.00/Hr Full Body Massage
HEALING MASSAGE
SPECIAL $10 OFF
SWEDISH MASSAGE
2305-A Carlos Street
Moss Beach
(On Hwy 1 next to Post office)
(650)563-9771
SUNFLOWER MASSAGE
Grand Opening!
$10. Off 1-Hour Session!
1482 Laurel St.
San Carlos
(Behind Trader Joes)
Open 7 Days/Week, 10am-10pm
(650)508-8758
TRANQUIL
MASSAGE
951 Old County Road
Suite 1
Belmont
650-654-2829
YOU HAVE IT-
WELL BUY IT
We buy and pawn:
Gold Jewelry
Art Watches
Musical Instrument
Paintings Diamonds
Silverware Electronics
Antique Furniture
Computers TVs Cars
Open 7 days
Buy *Sell*Loan
590 Veterans Blvd.
Redwood City
(650)368-6855
Needlework
LUV2
STITCH.COM
Needlepoint!
Fiesta Shopping Center
747 Bermuda Dr., San Mateo
(650)571-9999
Real Estate Loans
REAL ESTATE LOANS
We Fund Bank Turndowns!
Direct Private Lender
Homes Multi-family
Mixed-Use Commercial
WE BUY TRUST DEED NOTES
FICO Credit Score Not a Factor
PURCHASE, REFINANCE,
CASH OUT
Investors welcome
Loan servicing since 1979
650-348-7191
Wachter Investments, Inc.
Real Estate Broker #746683
Nationwide Mortgage
Licensing System ID #348268
CA Dept. of Real Estate
Real Estate Services
ODOWD ESTATES
Representing Buyers
& Sellers
Commission Negotiable
odowdestates.com
(650)794-9858
Seniors
AFFORDABLE
24-hour Assisted Living
Care located in
Burlingame
Mills Estate Villa
&
Burlingame Villa
- Short Term Stays
- Dementia & Alzheimers
Care
- Hospice Care
(650)692-0600
Lic.#4105088251/
415600633
LASTING IMPRESSIONS
ARE OUR FIRST PRIORITY
Cypress Lawn
1370 El Camino Real
Colma
(650)755-0580
www.cypresslawn.com
STERLING COURT
ACTIVE INDEPENDENT &
ASSISTED LIVING
Tours 10AM-4PM
2 BR,1BR & Studio
Luxury Rental
650-344-8200
850 N. El Camino Real San Mateo
sterlingcourt.com
WORLD 31
Friday Aug. 17, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
By Sinan Salahedin
and Adam Schreck
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
BAGHDAD Insurgents in Iraq
unleashed a relentless wave of
attacks from before dawn until late
at night Thursday, killing 59 people
and wounding many more in a
deadly show of force aimed at
undermining the governments
authority.
The bomb and shooting attacks
made for the countrys deadliest day
in more than three weeks, rattling
nerves as families prepared to gath-
er for a holiday weekend. More than
150 people have been killed in vio-
lence across the country since the
start of August, showing that insur-
gents led by al-Qaidas Iraqi fran-
chise remain a lethal force eight
months after the last U.S. troops left
the country.
Five of the attacks accounted for
more than half of the casualties.
A morning car bomb in Baghdads
northeastern and mostly Shiite
neighborhood of Husseiniyah killed
seven people and wounded 31.
Around midday, another car
bomb struck near the headquarters
of local security forces in the north-
ern city of Daqouq. As police
rushed to the scene, a roadside
bomb exploded, killing seven
policemen. Another 35 people were
hurt, police said.
Shortly before sunset, gunmen in
cars opened re on an Iraqi army
checkpoint near the town of
Mishada, killing seven soldiers and
wounding eight. Mishada is 30 kilo-
meters (20 miles) north of Baghdad.
Then, around 10 p.m., a suicide
bomber walked into a teashop and
blew himself up in Tal Afar, some
420 kilometers (260 miles) north-
west of the capital. Mayor Abdul-
Aal Abbas and local police said that
explosion killed seven and wounded
10.
And in Kut, a Shiite city southeast
of Baghdad, a parked car exploded
near a market and several restau-
rants late in the evening, killing 7
and wounding 25 people, police and
hospital ofcials said.
Iraqi ofcials are tightening secu-
rity ahead of the Eid al-Fitr holiday
that marks the end of the Muslim
holy month of Ramadan this week-
end. Authorities are seeking to
thwart a possible upsurge in vio-
lence as crowds gather in public
places such as parks, shrines and
mosques to mark the occasion.
Our security forces have
received intelligence that terrorist
groups are planning and preparing
for attacks during and after Eid,
said Abdul-Karim Tharib, head of
the Baghdad provincial council
security committee. We ... have
taken all necessary measures to foil
any terrorist activities during Eid.
An interior ministry ofcial said
security measures for the holiday
will include an increased number of
checkpoints and road closures near
government offices, parks and
shrines. He spoke on condition of
anonymity because he was not
authorized to release details of the
security preparations.
Thursdays carnage began when
militants planted four bombs
around the house of a military of-
cer near the northern city of Kirkuk,
according to the citys police com-
mander, Brig. Gen. Sarhad Qadir.
The ofcer escaped unharmed, but
his brother was killed and six other
family members were wounded.
Wave of attacks rumbles across Iraq
REUTERS
Security personnel inspect the site of a car bomb attack in Kirkuk, Iraq.
By Heidi Vogt
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
KABUL, Afghanistan A U.S.
military helicopter crashed during a
reght with insurgents in a remote
area of southern Afghanistan on
Thursday, killing seven Americans
and four Afghans in one of the dead-
liest air disasters of a war now into
its second decade. The Taliban
claimed they gunned down the Black
Hawk.
American service personnel in
Afghanistan are dying at a rate of
about one per day so far this year
despite a drawdown of troops. That
death rate has risen recently with the
summer ghting season in full gear
and a rash of attacks by Afghan secu-
rity forces on their foreign trainers
and partners.
NATO forces said they could not
confirm what caused Thursdays
crash and stressed that it was still
being investigated. The Black Hawk
was operating in support of an ongo-
ing assault on the ground but initial
indications were that it was not shot
down, according to U.S. ofcials
who spoke anonymously because the
investigation was continuing.
Taliban spokesman Qari Yousef
Ahmadi said insurgent fighters
struck the helicopter in Kandahar
province on Thursday morning. He
declined to give further details in a
phone call with the Associated
Press.
The Kandahar provincial govern-
ment backed the Taliban claim. It
said the helicopter was shot down in
Shah Wali Kot district, a rural area
north of Kandahar city where insur-
gents move freely and regularly
launch attacks. Provincial
spokesman Ahmad Jawed Faisal did
not provide details or say how the
province had conrmed the infor-
mation.
Kandahar is a traditional Taliban
stronghold and the spiritual birth-
place of the hardline Islamist move-
ment, which ruled Afghanistan
before being ousted in 2001 by the
U.S.-led alliance for sheltering al-
Qaidas leaders.
Thursdays crash came less than a
week after six American service
members were gunned down, appar-
ently by two members of the Afghan
security forces they were training to
take over the ght against the insur-
gency.
White House spokesman Jay
Carney said Thursday that the U.S. is
prioritizing efforts to prevent more of
these types of attacks. NATO says
that 34 international service members
have been killed in attacks by Afghan
security forces or militants wearing
their uniforms so far this year.
The international force is contin-
ually assessing and rening proce-
dures in force protection so that we
can both meet mission requirements
and ensure the safety of our forces,
Carney said.
The Taliban said Thursday that the
insider attacks are part of a strategy
to undercut the alliance between the
Afghan government and internation-
al forces.
Mujahideen have cleverly inl-
trated the ranks of the enemy accord-
ing to the plan given to them last
year, the militants said in their
annual statement ahead of the Eid al-
Fitr holiday marking the end of
Ramadan, the Muslim holy month.
Black Hawk crash kills seven Americans, four Afghans
32 Friday Aug. 17, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL