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AUGUST 22-28, 2012
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INSIDE THIS ISSUE
ELSA contract
Committee, residents discuss
contract at meeting. PAGE 2
Special to The Sun
Butterfly costume parade participants spread their wings at the Stony Brook-Millstone Watershed 2012 Butterfly Festival held on
Saturday, Aug. 11, at the Watershed Reserve.
Spreading their wings
Township
adopts
Woodland
ordinance
BY HEATHER FIORE
The Hopewell Sun
In early July, the Hopewell
Township Committee adopted the
long-awaited Forest Management
and Tree Removal ordinance,
commonly referred to as the
Woodlands ordinance, after more
than a decade of revised drafts
and proposals.
Hopewell Townships Environ-
mental Commission (EC) started
working on the ordinance 12
years ago, with the help of town-
ship officials (particularly Town-
ship Administrator/Engineer
Paul Pogorzelski and committee
member Vanessa Sandom), other
township committees, as well as
the Stony Brook-Millstone Water-
shed Association.
Over the years, a subcommit-
tee was formed with EC members
and other township officials the
Woodlands Protection Ordinance
Subcommittee (WPOS) to fully
focus on the effort, according to
14-year member of the EC and
member of the WPOS Mike Au-
please see CHALLENGES, page 7
2 THE HOPEWELL SUN AUGUST 22-28, 2012
Richard Eakins, Reverse Mortgage Loan Officer NMLS#523001
908-672-3320 cell 888-519-7677 ext 5850
reakins@1stconstitution.com
86 East Broad Street Hopewell, NJ 08525
(609) 466-2100 www.1stconstitution.com
Branch Hours:
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Fri 8:30am-6pm
Sat 9am-1pm
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August 30
Established 1998
Member, American Montessori
Society
MONTGOMERY
609-252-9696 www.NHMontessori.org
BY HEATHER FIORE
The Hopewell Sun
On Aug. 13 at Hopewell Town-
ships committee meeting, the
current ELSA situation and the
water rate increase at Washing-
ton Crossing Park Estates became
the main topics of discussion.
Several residents mentioned
the current ELSA contract relat-
ing to the situation with The
Hamptons at Hopewell, which
seemed to raise several questions
and concerns as a resolution on
the budget.
Township attorney Steven
Goodell summarized the whole
situation between Hopewell
Township and ELSA to assure the
residents of the towns stance.
He explained that the current
situation transpired from a 2007
agreement between ELSA and
Brandon Farms the single-fami-
ly affordable housing units nes-
tled in the neighborhood near the
end of Denow Road in Penning-
ton which created a series of
lawsuits that the township is now
dealing with.
Goodell also explained the
point of the resolution, and reas-
sured residents that this wasnt
another agreement being made
with ELSA.
It acknowledges that there
was a semi-agreement between
The Hamptons and ELSA, and
says that the sewers that are
going to be constructed as a result
of not only that agreement but
also as a result of the prior ap-
provals, will be owned and main-
tained ultimately by Hopewell, al-
though theyll be filled by the
company, he said. And, anybody
whos going to tie in has to prove
theyve paid all of the ELSA fees
ELSA contract, water rate
increase discussed at meeting
please see SPECIAL, page 12
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Special to The Sun
Children from Pennington and Hopewell participated in Dance-
Works summer workshop the week of July 16 and put on the
show Ten Gallon Bart and the Wild West Show for family and
friends. Pictured above are: front row, from left, Erin Popik,
Kaitlyn Medley, Eve OLeary and Tea Linthorst; middle row,
from left, Ella Kopkash, Nadia Chasalow, Ava Salmon and Mag-
gie Compton; and back row, from left, Gabriella Gomez, Zoe
George-DeVito and Chloe Kopkash.
Wild West comes to Pennington
AUGUST 22-28, 2012 THE HOPEWELL SUN 5
Coupon must be presented at time of
purchase. *Additional parts & labor in
excess of one hour will be billed at our
scheduled rates. One coupon per cus-
tomer / per household. Expires 8/31/12.
Coupon must be presented at time of
purchase. Not accepted at time of instal-
lation. Not valid with any other discounts,
repairs or prior purchases. One coupon
per customer / per household. Coupon
has no cash value. Expires 8/31/12.
Coupon must be presented at time of
purchase. Not accepted at time of instal-
lation. Not valid with any other discounts,
repairs or prior purchases. One coupon
per customer / per household. Coupon
has no cash value. Expires 8/31/12.
This information was prepared
by Lieutenant Lance Maloney of
the Hopewell Township Police De-
partment.
On Aug. 8 at 1:24 p.m., officer
Lincoln Karnoff responded to a
Pennington Titusville Road ad-
dress for the report of a burglary.
Sometime between 7:45 a.m. and
1:20 p.m., someone entered the
home through an unlocked win-
dow and removed televisions,
cameras, jewelry, a DVD player
and a lap top computer. The loss
was estimated at more than
$3,000. Detective Kevin Zorn is as-
sisting with this investigation.
On Aug. 7 at 2:30 p.m., Officer
Louis Vastola responded to a Hart
Avenue address for the report of
a burglary in progress. Jewelry
and an iPod were taken from the
home with the loss being estimat-
ed at more than $1,000. The inves-
tigation led to arrest warrants
being issued for a 20-year-old
male and an 18-year-old female for
burglary and theft. The man and
woman were arrested on Aug. 8
by the Point Pleasant Police De-
partment on the outstanding war-
rants. They were both processed
at police headquarters and were
later lodged at the Mercer County
Correction Center in lieu of bail
($25,000 for the male and $10,000
for the female). This case will be
forwarded to the Mercer County
Prosecutors Office for review.
police report
Parents Anonymous/
Family Helpline
(800) 843-5437
PSA
6 THE HOPEWELL SUN AUGUST 22-28, 2012
20 Nassau Street, Suite 26A
Princeton, NJ 08542
609-751-0245
The Sun is published weekly by Elauwit
Media LLC, 20 Nassau Street, Suite 26A,
Princeton, NJ 08542. It is mailed weekly to
select addresses in the 08560, 08525 and
08534 ZIP codes. If you are not on the mail-
ing list, six-month subscriptions are avail-
able for $39.99. PDFs of the publication are
online, free of charge. For information,
please call 609-751-0245.
To submit a news release, please email
news@hopewellsun.com. For advertising
information, call 609-751-0245 or email
advertising@hopewellsun.com. The Sun
welcomes suggestions and comments from
readers including any information about
errors that may call for a correction to be
printed.
SPEAK UP
The Sun welcomes letters from readers. Brief
and to the point is best, so we look for letters
that are 300 words or fewer. Include your
name, address and phone number. We do not
print anonymous letters. Send letters to
news@hopewellsun.com, via fax at 609-751-
0245, or via the mail. Of course, you can drop
them off at our office, too. The Hopewell Sun
reserves the right to reprint your letter in any
medium including electronically.
PUBLISHER Steve Miller
GENERAL MANAGER & EDITOR Alan Bauer
VICE PRESIDENT OF SALES Joe Eisele
NEWS
MANAGING EDITOR Mary L. Serkalow
PRODUCTION EDITOR Kristen Dowd
HOPEWELL EDITOR Heather Fiore
OPERATIONS
DIGITAL MEDIA DIRECTOR Tim Ronaldson
ART DIRECTOR Tom Engle
CHAIRMAN OF THE BOARD Russell Cann
CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER Barry Rubens
VICE CHAIRMAN Michael LaCount, Ph.D.
ELAUWIT MEDIA GROUP
CHAIRMAN OF THE BOARD Dan McDonough, Jr.
VICE CHAIRMAN Alan Bauer
I
f you purchased your house before
2007, youve probably endured
about five years of misery. Your
home probably isnt worth as much as
it was back then. The housing market
has been kicked around, the news al-
ways seemed to be bad and getting
worse, and people had to wonder if the
downward spiral would ever end.
Well, maybe it has.
Zillow reported last month that the
second quarter was a good one for
home prices. They actually went up
year over year. Not a lot, but up is bet-
ter than down.
And, considering the economy has-
nt exactly been on fire, the news is es-
pecially promising.
If the trend continues, its great
news for the economy.
From a purely practical standpoint,
rising values can free up equity (al-
though it might take awhile to get peo-
ple right side up on their home val-
ues). Then, homeowners can begin to
tap that equity to make repairs, pay off
other bills, etc. And when people spend
money, jobs are created.
It also would be a boost to the nation-
al psyche. A homes worth long has
been a kind of security blanket for
families. Over the years, there had
been ups and downs in the market, but,
again, over time, home values steadily
increased. There was a confidence that
you could always rely on your biggest
investment: your home.
That, of course, all changed about
five years ago.
Thats not to say that all will be well
by next Tuesday. The glut of foreclosed
homes, the negative equity many
homeowners still have and the like will
continue to weigh on the market. Were
not seeing a dramatic, sudden turn of
fortune. But the kind of sustained
growth Zillow reported definitely beats
the alternative.
At the least, maybe homeowners
have seen the worst of the housing
storm. Maybe they begin to regain a
little confidence in the future of their
home. Maybe they can relax. A little.
in our opinion
Out of the basement?
After years of declining prices, housing market looks to be headed up
Housing prices are up
Homeowners have been waiting for five
years or more for the news that was
released late last month: Housing
prices are inching up. Maybe the worst
of the housing storm has passed.
Singers from the Princeton area and
Bucks County, Pa., are invited to join VOIC-
ES for an exciting new concert season!
Tenor and basses are especially needed,
but openings are available in all voice
parts, as well as in Sotto Voce, the chamber
chorus. Basic music reading skills are re-
quired, in addition to vocal talent (devel-
oped or yet to be developed) and a passion
for singing.
Auditions will be held on Wednesday,
Aug. 29, from 4:30 to 6:30 p.m. at Music To-
gether located at 225 Pennington-Hopewell
Road (Rte 654) in Hopewell. Other times are
available by appointment. Singers interest-
ed should contact the audition coordinator,
Sandy Duffy, at (609) 799-2211, or email au-
ditions@VOICESChorale.org.
VOICES 25th Anniversary Season in-
cludes O Magnum Mysterium: Christmas
Mysteries Expressed in Music, including
ninth century Gregorian chant, several
baroque pieces with chamber orchestra,
and Mendelssohns There Shall A Star
from Jacob Come Forth on Dec. 8 and 9;
The Year 1887 on March 9 and March 10,
with works by Brahms, Debussy, and
Gilbert and Sullivan premiered in that
year; Tempo Flux Time Passing, Time
Standing Still, with the Princeton Area
Homeschool Choir on May 18, with music
by Michael Tippett, John Farmer, Stephen
Chatman; and a 25th Anniversary Gala
event in June to close the season. Re-
hearsals are held on Monday evenings
from 7:30 p.m. to 9:45 p.m. at Music Togeth-
er, and will start again on Sept. 10.
VOICES provides outstanding perform-
ance opportunities at an unusually high
artistic level for community singers. Its
repertoire ranges from Renaissance to con-
temporary, from spirituals and show music
to the sacred and classic. In addition to
singing the worlds greatest choral music,
VOICES offers singers the opportunity to
develop an understanding of vocal tech-
nique, music history, and performance
style.
VOICES also offers two unique outreach
programs: interactive concerts at assisted
living facilities and an annual Song Writ-
ing Contest for Children ages 5 to 12. In ad-
dition, solo, duet, and ensemble opportuni-
ties are possible at the outreach concerts
and in VOICES special events, such as at
the Open Mic Night to be held at the end of
October, or at the 25th Anniversary Gala
event next June.
For further information on VOICES
Chorale, please visit www.VOIC-
ESChorale.org, or subscribe to VOICES
Newsletter at www.enewsarcdhive.com/
VOICES.
Join VOICES for anniversary concert season
AUGUST 22-28, 2012 THE HOPEWELL SUN 7
Come Dance With Us!
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cott.
Aucott explained why the ordi-
nance took so long to perfect, and
why Hopewell Township deemed
it necessary to implement a law
like this.
There were so many discus-
sions, and some of them related
to what should be exempted, what
shouldnt be, etc., and it seemed
like it was going to go on forever
at one point, he said. Theres
been a recognition on part of the
EC that there is value in trees,
and that they need to be protect-
ed, so weve been working on the
language for a long time. It hasnt
been constant work, but theres
been a steady effort to develop an
ordinance that would protect
trees, and at the same time, not
infringe on peoples right undu-
ly.
Aucott also detailed what ob-
stacles the WPOS faced while de-
veloping the language and word-
ing of the ordinance.
There were a lot of things that
people viewed as infringement on
their rights or it appeared as if
they were unenforceable, he
said. One of the things that we
struggled with was how to define
a tree. We also struggled with how
to define forest cover; we consid-
ered using aerial photos for a
while, but the trouble with those
is that they get devised all the
time and its not really clear
enough, and an ordinance has to
be pretty clear so theres no
vagueness. The ordinance tries to
minimize the fuzziness as to
whats covered and whats not.
Basically, the effort to get it
simple, clear, reasonable and de-
fensible is the thing that took the
Challenges in wording, language
of ordinance, says Aucott
CHALLENGES
Continued from page 1
please see ORDINANCE, page 11
WEDNESDAY AUG. 22
Thaumatrope Fans Craft: Ages 6
and older. 3 p.m. at Hopewell Pub-
lic Library. Sign up required. Visit
www.hopewellpublicilbrary.blogs
pot.com.
PJs Story Time: 7 p.m. at the
Hopewell Public Library.
LinkedIn: 7 to 8:15 p.m. at Hopewell
Branch of the Mercer County
Library System. Participants will
learn how the LinkedIn online
community can be used to create
a professional network, find leads
on jobs and enable collaborative
efforts. During this hands-on
workshop, attendees will create a
LinkedIn account and pick up
some quick management tips.
Participants are encouraged to
bring a laptop to follow along
using the librarys wireless net-
work. Limited number of laptops
can be reserved at time of sign
up. Registration required.
Story Time: Ages 2 to 5; siblings
welcome. 11 to 11:45 a.m. at
Hopewell Branch of the Mercer
County Library System. Action
rhymes, songs and felt board
activities. Age-appropriate craft
follows story time. Parental
supervision required.
THURSDAY AUG. 23
Story Time: Ages 2 to 5; siblings
welcome. 11 to 11:45 a.m. at
Hopewell Branch of the Mercer
County Library System. Action
rhymes, songs and felt board
activities. Age-appropriate craft
follows story time. Parental
supervision required.
Toddler Rock: Ages 18 months to 3.
10 to 10:30 a.m. at Hopewell
Branch of the Mercer County
Library System. Singing, dancing
ad rhymes. Play with musical
instruments, puppets, parachutes
and more.
Hopewell Township Planning Board
meeting: 7:30 p.m. the fourth
Thursday of the month in the
Municipal Auditorium. For more
information visit hopewelltwp.
org.
SUNDAY AUG. 26
Hopewell Presbyterian Church:
Worship service at 10:30 a.m.
Intergenerational Sunday School
from 9 to 10:15 a.m. Coffee fellow-
ship from 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.
80 West Broad St., Hopewell.
Hopewell United Methodist
Church: Worship service at 10
a.m. Teen/adult education from 9
to 9:45 a.m. Sunday school at 10
a.m. Youth group at 6:30 p.m. 20
Blackwell Ave., Hopewell.
St. Alphonsus Roman Catholic
Church: Mass at 7:30, 9 and 11:15
a.m. 54 East Prospect St.,
Hopewell.
Word Christian Fellowship Interna-
tional: Worship service at 10 a.m.
Sunday school at 10:30 a.m. 44
Van Dyke Road, Hopewell.
MONDAY AUG. 27
Yoga: 5:30 to 6:30 p.m. at Hopewell
Branch of the Mercer County
Library System. Bring yoga mat
or large towel. Registration
required; call (609) 737-2610.
Tai Chi: 7:30 to 8:30 p.m. at
Hopewell Branch of the Mercer
County Library System. Learn
this ancient art to promote good
health and relaxation. No regis-
tration required.
Kids Open Craft: Ages 3 to 8. 4 to
5:30 p.m. at Hopewell Branch of
the Mercer County Library Sys-
tem. Children can stop in to con-
struct the craft of the week. Staff
member will be present to help.
Hopewell Township Committee
regular meeting: 7 p.m. at the
Hopewell Municipal Building, 201
Washington Crossing-Pennington
Road. Open to the public. Visit
CALENDAR PAGE 8 AUGUST 22-28, 2012
WANT TO BE LISTED?
To have your meeting or affair listed in the Calendar or Meetings,
information must be received, in writing, two weeks prior to the
date of the event. Send information by mail to: Calendar, The Sun,
108 Kings Highway East, Haddonfield, NJ 08033. Or by email:
news@hopewellsun.com. Or you can submit a calendar listing
through our website (www.hopewellsun.com).
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Commercial
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Tire mounting on premises.
All major and minor brands.
Now Enrolling For Fall
please see CALENDAR, page 9
AUGUST 22-28, 2012 THE HOPEWELL SUN 9
2/1 SPECIAL
Bring in 2 Pieces Of Dry Cleaning,
Get 1 Shirt Laundered For FREE
With this coupon. Not valid with any other
offers or prior services. Exp. 8/31/12.
25% OFF
Household Items
With this coupon. Not valid with any other
offers or prior services. Exp. 8/31/12.
20% OFF
Repairs
With this coupon. Not valid with any other
offers or prior services. Exp. 8/31/12.
Theyre back!
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Shoe Repair
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CALL US 856.697.8222
Well answer your questions and help you develop a plan that works around your budget.
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www.hopewelltwp.org to confirm
time, for agenda or for more
information.
Story time: 10:30 a.m. at Hopewell
Public Library. For toddlers and
pre-schoolers. Stories, songs and
fingerplays. Registration is not
required.
TUESDAY AUG. 28
Knitters Group: 7:30 to 9 p.m. at
Hopewell Public Library. All knit-
ters welcome.
Mindful Living Book Club: 7 p.m. at
Hopewell Public Library. Visit
www.hopewellpubliclibrary.blogs
pot.com for more information.
Yoga: 5 to 6 p.m. at Hopewell Branch
of the Mercer County Library Sys-
tem. Bring yoga mat or large tow-
el. Registration required; call
(609) 737-2610.
New Jersey Writers Society Sup-
port Group: 6 to 8:30 p.m. at
Hopewell Branch of the Mercer
County Library System. All are
welcome to attend and enjoy the
challenges of becoming better
writers, defeating writers block
and perfecting the craft. No reg-
istration needed.
Baby Time: Ages birth to 2. 11 to
11:30 a.m. Adult supervision
required. This program is a great
way to introduce children to
library story times and reading.
Age appropriate books are
shared with the group. Songs,
nursery rhymes, puppets, and felt
board figures create a rich audio-
visual and social experience.
After about 20 minutes of struc-
tured group time, there is time
for play and for socializing.
Story Time: Ages 2 to 5; siblings
welcome. 2 to 3 p.m. at Hopewell
Branch of the Mercer County
Library System. Action rhymes,
songs and felt board activities.
Age-appropriate craft follows sto-
ry time. Parental supervision
required.
CALENDAR
CALENDAR
Continued from page 8
10 THE HOPEWELL SUN AUGUST 22-28, 2012
10 WOOSAMONSA RD. - PfNNlNGTON
WWW.]ACkSNURSfRYANDlANDSCAPlNG.COM
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46 Yard Road, Pennington, NJ 08534
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20%-50%
OFF
Pennington Shopping Center (Next to Pennington Market)
Call for hours 609-737-3775
Tuesday-Friday 10-6 Saturday 10-4 Closed Sunday & Monday
Established Over 70 Years
Visit us online at www.hopewellsun.com
When asked why they choose
to reside in the Valley, the com-
mon denominator for Hopewell
Valley residents seems to be the
rural character of the Valley as
evidenced by the abundant sup-
ply of open space. Living in a
community filled with plentiful
farms, forests, rolling hills, and
streams to enjoy is no accident.
Rural character is the result of
the concerted specific efforts of
volunteers, local officials and, in
particular, The Friends of
Hopewell Valley Open Space, oth-
erwise known locally as Fo-
HVOS.
FoHVOS is celebrating its 25th
anniversary of dedication to pre-
serving open space in Hopewell
Valley. FoHVOS started in 1987 in
the living rooms of energized res-
idents intent on fighting a major
roadway that was slated to inter-
sect a beautiful 116-acre plot of
land on the edge of Pennington
Borough that contained a mature
beech forest and a 17-acre lake.
Since then, FoHVOS has grown to
be a non-profit land trust preserv-
ing nearly 4,000 acres in the Val-
ley in addition to continuing to
protect and conserve land in the
valley. FoHVOS is an active land
steward, with a focus on not only
protecting biodiversity but also
committed to protecting public
access to open space.
To celebrate its 25th anniver-
sary, FoHVOS is hosting a variety
of events this year that appeal to
all ages and interests in the Val-
ley. As part of its initiative to en-
courage public use of open space
lands, FoHVOS has placed a num-
ber of geocaches and is hosting
guided hikes on the preserved
tracts of land. It has also
launched a Community Steward-
ship Plan, whereby private
landowners are encouraged to be
good stewards of their lands by
planting native species and dis-
couraging invasive species.
In recognition of the symbiotic
relationship between artists and
the natural beauty of the land,
FoHVOS is hosting an art contest
to celebrate the natural beauty of
Hopewell Valleys landscape. In
conjunction with Veridian
Gallery in Pennington, FoHVOS
is now accepting entries for a
community art competition. Chil-
dren ages 5 to adults are invited to
complete a photograph, draw-
ing/sketch, or painting of open
space or a favorite visual land-
scape in Hopewell Valley and sub-
mit it to Veridian Art Gallery lo-
cated at 43 South Main Street in
Pennington, along with a com-
pleted entry form.
Top entries will be featured in
FoHVOSs 2013 calendar and all
entries will be displayed at the
Veridian Gallery. Further infor-
mation is available on the
FoHVOS website at
www.fohvos.org.
The culminating event of the
year will be the Fall Gala sched-
uled for Oct. 6 at the Hopewell
Valley Vineyards located at 46
Yard Road in Hopewell.
This festive event will feature a
live and silent auction as well as
dinner featuring locally grown
wine and entertainment.
For more information on up-
coming events or to make a dona-
tion, please visit www.FoHVOS.
org.
On Aug. 18, The Pennington
Farmers Market celebrated great
news from vendor Jess Niederer
her Chickadee Creek Farm re-
cently received USDA Organic
Certification.
Many Pennington Farmers
Market vendors plan to offer their
congratulations by offering com-
plimentary items to market visi-
tors.
Chickadee Creek Farm is an
organic vegetable and flower
farm located on Titus Mill Road
in Hopewell Township. Niederer
talked about the intensive three-
year process it took to transition
her farm to be a Certified Organic
Farm.
It is very difficult for every
customer to know everything
about how a farmer produces the
food they buy, she said. So, the
Organic Certification is a way for
customers to know that the farm-
ing methods are actually healthy
for the land and the food as
claimed. This certification repre-
sents a lot of hard work involving
planning, field maps, soil enrich-
ment with organic compost,
recording everything we do to or-
ganically control pests and weeds,
and using all organic seeds and
plants.
Joann Held, Board Member of
the Pennington Farmers Market,
expressed her delight at this
achievement.
This is such great news to wel-
come another Certified Organic
Farm to our community, she
said. Jess Niederer has been in-
strumental from the outset in
helping the Pennington Farmers
Market become one of the most
vibrant farmers markets in our
area. What better reason is there
to celebrate? We applaud Chick-
adee Creek Farm and this
achievement.
The Pennington Farmers Mar-
ket will continue every Saturday
from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. through the
end of Oct. on Route 31 in front of
Rosedale Mills. Vendors at the
market sell locally produced veg-
etables, meat, dairy products,
wine, honey, flowers, mushrooms,
meals to go and baked products.
Visit Pennington Farmers Mar-
ket on Facebook, or at www.pen-
ningtonfarmersmarket.com. Visit
Chickadee Creek Farm on Face-
book, or at www.chickadeecreek-
farm.com.
Friends of Hopewell Valley
Open Space celebrate 25 years
Farmers market celebrates Chickadee
Creek Farms organic certification
AUGUST 22-28, 2012 THE HOPEWELL SUN 11
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time, he said.
To devise this ordinance, the
members of the WPOS and other
organizations looked at tree ordi-
nances in other towns and munic-
ipalities, and found examples as
to what they should include, how
they should word it, and what it
should encompass.
This one [ordinance] takes a
lot from an ordinance that was
passed and is enforced in Jackson
Township, Aucott said. It
seemed appropriate to use the
same general approach in this or-
dinance.
Executive Director of the
Stony Brook-Millstone Watershed
Association Jim Waltman ex-
plained how this process assured
members that the ordinance
would be safe against any future
lawsuits.
Theres a lot of litigation in
this state, so when townships get
ordinances like this, they often
get sued; we looked at statistics,
he said. We wanted to make sure
everyone had a great deal of con-
fidence that the ordinance was
upheld under the state laws.
Aucott explained the logistics
of the ordinance, reiterating it
shall be unlawful for any person
to remove trees above and beyond
a combined total of 150 inches of
DBH (diameter at breast height)
within a 10-year period unless a
tree removal permit has first
been obtained.
Aucott also defined the DBH of
a tree, which is measured 4.5 feet
from the ground.
So, say somebody wanted to
cut down 10, 10-inch trees; thats
100 inches of DBH, so theyd be al-
lowed to do that, Aucott said.
But, if they wanted to cut down
20, 10-inch trees or 10, 20-inch
trees, that would be covered by
the ordinance and then theyd
have to get permit to do that.
Once a resident obtains a per-
mit to remove the trees from their
property, theyll have one of two
choices to essentially replace the
trees that they cut down. Either
they will be required to replace
those trees on another area of
their property at some point in
time, or they will have to provide
money to the township Tree Es-
crow Fund a fund the township
will use for the administration
and promotion of tree and shrub-
bery resource sustainability proj-
ects and practices on public prop-
erty.
Although the ordinance may
seem slightly restrictive, it has a
variety of exclusions and excep-
tions, which include any and all
trees that are less than 10 inches
in DBH.
So, in regard to trees that are
nine inches in DBH and less, a
resident is permitted to cut down
as many trees as he or she wishes
without a permit.
The ordinance also doesnt
apply to a property where there
are no trees, trees that are re-
moved or cut within the forest re-
moval plan or removed for the
conservation plan, trees that are
grown for commercial purposes,
trees growing in a utility right-of-
way or areas that are supposed to
be clear for an airport (runway
safety), dead or diseased trees
that are hazardous, or activities
that fall under the right-to-farm
laws (farmer who has a reason to
remove trees).
Pierson also added how the or-
dinance protects certain species
of trees because of prior inci-
dents that occurred in the town-
ship.
There were incidences where
too many trees were being cut
down, and in some cases, where
street or special trees were re-
moved for no real reason, he
said. This ordinance has sec-
tions that protect trees with his-
torical significance and special,
large trees anything thats on
the New Jersey State Big Register
list for being the largest tree of
that species.
Before an applicant can receive
a permit, they will have to pay an
application fee of $25, submit a
Tree Preservation and Removal
plan that has to be approved by
the Administrative Officer (per-
son approving permits) within 10
business days of its issuance, and
have their site inspected (at a cost
of $50) by the Administrative Of-
ficer to enforce the permit condi-
tions.
If the resident inquires to re-
move a state record tree or speci-
men trees, it will require the ap-
proval of the township committee
with the recommendations of the
EC.
The permit will be valid for one
year from the date of issuance,
and an extension of up to three
months may be granted by the
Administrative Officer for a
good cause shown according to
the ordinance.
I think the concept of protect-
ing trees is a difficult one because
it sort of falls into an area where
people consider something like a
tree to be their own personal
property that they can do whatev-
er they want to, Aucott said.
The concept of this ordinance is,
Certainly, trees are present on
private property, but they are a
benefit to the community as a
whole, so it that sense, they are
not unlike water resources or air
resources that are a common
good in a way.
Ordinance restrictive, but has
variety of exclusions, exceptions
ORDINANCE
Continued from page 7
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before. So, were not authorizing
an agreement between them
[Hamptons] and ELSA, were sim-
ply saying that were not going to
issue a plumbing permit unless
you prove to us that you satisfied
ELSAs conditions.
Since many residents had a lot
of input about the situation,
Mayor Michael Markulec sched-
uled a special meeting, which will
be held in early September in
order to address several ELSA is-
sues separately.
Another issue that was of im-
portance was the discussion of
the Washington Crossing Park
Estates water rate increase,
which has been in the works for
two years now.
Township Administrator Paul
Pogorzelski detailed the situation
with the Estates, and explained
how the township partnered with
a group of concerned residents at
the Estates to create a subcom-
mittee to address the water facili-
ty issues.
We talked over all various
constraints and components of
their system and what needs to be
done, and what we have found is
that the system over time that has
fiddled out due to age, he said.
The township has done a poor
job in being proactive and main-
taining the system, with replace-
ments and extending useful life of
certain things, so we back ped-
dled, evaluated the system, looked
at all of the useful life, and evalu-
ated some of the more critical
components of the system.
Pogorzelski further explained
how it all boiled down to the pipes
that are a part of the water sys-
tem that constantly have to be re-
paired, and that will ultimately
need to be replaced, along with
one other material item.
We have 3-10,000 gallon water
tanks that distribute water to this
system that are in need of paint-
ing, he said.
However, there was one other
intangible item that surfaced
from the residents discussions,
which Pogorozelski explained.
The residents, that have some
great expertise, took current rate
structure of Estates and they
came back with a new rate struc-
ture, he said. We looked at that
rate structure, didnt have an is-
sues with it, and have hired a util-
ity rate consultant. He had some
suggestions, and all of that
brought us to where we are
today.
The subcommittee devised a
couple of revisions to the rate
plan, which would lower the base
rate amount, and alter the fees
based upon the amount of water
that each home uses.
Ultimately, the subcommittee
proposed that the original capaci-
ty 0-7,000 gallons per quarter at
$70 per household stay the same
price, but be reduced to 0-6,000
gallons, and that prices be deter-
mined upon the usage of water
beyond the base of 6,000 gallons.
So, essentially you have the
base rate, and once you use 6,000
gallons of water, incrementally
for every 3,000 gallons you use
more than that, theres another
rate tacked on to that amount, so
theres this whole graduated scale
that theyre proposing, Pogorzel-
ski said. The intention is that
this rate structure will help us
cover the cost for the tank paint-
ing, and if theres any surplus
during future budgets, that we
work with them on replacement
for the old cast-iron pipes that are
in system. Thats where were at.
12 THE HOPEWELL SUN AUGUST 22-28, 2012
NOT ENOUGH TIME
to watch your child play soccer and list your
baseball cards in an online auction?
We can help.
www.NoStressSales.com
(609) 792-0606
Skip the hassle. Just get paid.
Special meeting to discuss ELSA issues to be held in September
SPECIAL
Continued from page 2
DanceWorks re-opening
set for Aug. 25, Sept. 8
DanceWorks, invites you to its
grand re-opening celebration at
its new location in the Penning-
ton Shopping Center located at 25
Rt. 31 South in Pennington. The
grand re-opening is scheduled for
Saturdays, Aug. 25 and Sept. 8,
from 10 a.m. until 1 p.m. The day
will include free sample classes,
crafts, face painting, light refresh-
ments and giveaways!
The 30-minute sample classes
will include hip hop, lyrical, jazz,
future stars (pre-school) and tap-
ping tots (pre-school). Come spin
the prize wheel for a chance to
win discounted registration, a T-
shirt, dance bag and more!
Under the direction of Karen
Martin and Suzie Schnoor, Dance-
Works has been in business since
2004 catering to those looking to
dance as an outlet for fun and cre-
ative expression as well as for
those seeking more technical
training. Registration is current-
ly being accepted for the 2012-2013
school year. DanceWorks offers
classes in ballet/pointe, tap, jazz,
lyrical, hip hop, modern, tapping
tots and pre-school dance. Classes
are available for students ages 3
to adult.
Additional in-studio registra-
tion dates are Wednesday, Aug. 29,
and Friday, Sept. 7, from 6 until 8
p.m.
For a detailed schedule of sam-
ple classes, please visit Dance-
Works Facebook page at Dance-
Works of Mercer County, its web-
site at www.danceworksmercer.
com or call the studio at (609) 737-
7338.
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classified
T HE HO P E WE L L S U N
AUGUST 22-28, 2012 PAGE 14
W H A T Y O U N E E D T O K N O W
All ads are based on a 5 line ad, 15-18 characters per line. Additional lines: $9, Bold/Reverse Type: $9 Add color to any box ad for $20. Deadline: Wednesday - 5pm for the following week.
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H O W T O C O N T A C T U S
Call us: 609-751-0245 or email us: classifieds@elauwitmedia.com
Hopewell Sun Lawrence Sun
Montgomery Sun Princeton Sun
Robbinsville Sun West Windsor Sun
HeIp Wanted
BOX
ADS Only
$
25per week List a text-only ad for your yard
sale, job posting or merchandise.
Must present coupon at time of estimate.
Not valid with other offers or prior services.
Offer expires 8/31/12.
$1,000 OFF
UP TO
Any new
complete roofing
or siding job
Must present coupon at time of estimate.
Not valid with other offers or prior services.
Offer expires 8/31/12.
10% OFF
UP TO
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roofing
or siding job
Must present coupon at time of estimate.
Not valid with other offers or prior services.
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Must present coupon at time of estimate.
Not valid with other offers or prior services.
Offer expires 8/31/12.
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Virtual Home
Remodeler
www.tricountyexteriors.com
609-882-S800
BOOF LBAHINO?
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Call: 908-359-3000
Home Improvement
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$
I3/week
saving our planet, one pile at a time
856-665-6769
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Pet Care
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300 Lawrence Station Road
Lawrenceville, NJ 08648
609-584-1133
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CHECK OUT THE SUN CLASSIFIEDS!
Academic Success:
Tutoring
Certified K-12 Honors
Graduate
Over 25 years exp.
Caring,ndividualized
nstruction
SAT Reading, Writing,
Math, Subject Tests
ACT, All Standardized Tests
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609-924-2610
Tutoring
ACTIVITY AIDES
SENOR CARE MANAGE-
MENT is seeking effective
and energetic individuals to
assist our senior clients in
helping them remain active
and lead more stimulating
lifestyles through activities.
f you are looking for PART
TME work and have
FLEXBLE hours ALONG
WTH activity experience in
a facility setting, please call
(609)882-0322 for applica-
tion and interview appoint-
ment.
DRIVING LIVE-IN
CERTIFIED HOME
HEALTH AIDE
SENOR CARE MANAGE-
MENT, a private home care
agency is recruiting CHHAs
WTH A DRVER`S
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tions. YOUR OWN VEH-
CLE a PLUS with extra
compensation. References
and experience required.
Competitive pay rate and
benefits (health care, RA,
paid vacation). Please call
(609)882-0322 for applica-
tion and interview appoint-
ment.
Privately owned home care
company, SENOR CARE
MANAGEMENT, serving
Central New Jersey is
recruiting for a PART TIME
RN to assist full time RN.
Senior Care Management
is a home care and care
management agency. The
position is 25 hours per
week, 10am to 6pm - days
flexible. Salary commensu-
rate with experience. Must
have GERATRC and
HOME CARE experience
and be able to travel.
Please fax resume to
(609) 882-9400.
CLASSIFIED AUGUST 22-28, 2012 - THE HOPEWELL SUN 15
Ocean City New Jerseys #1 Real Estate Team!
The Team You Can Trust!
Matt Bader
Cell 609-992-4380
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Cell 609-548-1539
Let the Bader-Collins Associates make all of your Ocean City
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Office: 609-399-0076 email: bca@bergerrealty.com
ASBURY AVENUE - NEW CONSTRUCTION
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Triple insulation for superior
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Upgraded kitchen with granite
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$589,900
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UP TO $1100 CASH
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W|th or W|thout T|t|e

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Call
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for Advertising
Info.
960 Spruce Street Lawrence Township, NJ
609-695-2998
www.thetrentonfarmersmarket.com
AND LIKE US ON FACEBOOK!
OPEN
Tues-Sat 9-6
Sundays 10-4
PlNELAND FAHMS
Jersey Fresh Cantaloupes..........$2.00 each or $3 for $5.00
Jersey Fresh Peaches ................$3.00 3lb basket
Jersey Fresh Bell Peppers, Zucchini, Cucumbers and Eggplant
Mix-N-Match .............................4 for $1.00
89
/
lb
Jersey Fresh Tomatoes
Coupon good through
8/23/12-8/26/12.
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609-S99-4206
SPCIAL CRILLINC KILBASY $
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S9
/Ib (Reg. $5.49) With coupon.
10 DIscoumts Lor SemIors om WeBmesBysI
Open Wedneaday 12-6
Thuraday to 8aturday 9-6
8unday 10-4
FOR YOUR COOKOUT!
Jersey Fresh White & Yellow Corn ..3 for $1.00
Cabbage.......................................$1.00/head
Hot Peppers......................................$1.00 pt.
Cantaloupes .........................................From $2.00 each
Crimson Sweet Watermelons ......................From $4.00 each
Sugar Baby Watermelons............................From $4.00 each
Seedless Watermelons ...............................$6.00 each
Jersey Tomatoes..........................................$1.49/lb
FRUIT AND VEGETABLE FARM

PEACHES NECTARINES PEPPERS


KILBASY BURCRS
just heat and eat! NBWI
RUSSO

S
Orchard Lane Farm
PICKED FRESH DAILY!
Sweet Corn Tomatoes
Cukes Peaches Peppers
Zucchini Squash and More!
CEDARVILLE
FARMS
Main Aisle
and West Wing
JERSEY SWEET CORN
JERSEY TOMATOES
BEANS BEANS BEANS
Fresh Cut Flowers
$
3
99
/bunch
San Marzano Tomatoes
FULL TO THE BRIM
FRUIT WAGON!
CRANBERRY
HALL FARM
Come try our
pasture-raised
beef and pork!
GREAT VARIETIES!
Melons
and
Vegetables
West Wing
Cartlidges Quality Meats
Everything For Your Summer BBQ!
Fresh Pork Roll Veggie Burgers
Fresh Pork or Turkey Sausage
Handmade Patties Sirloin Turkey
(609) 396-3966
FHlDAY, AUGUST 2A 11AM
COOKING DEMONSTRATION
Grilled Jersey Veggies
Use as a side dish, in a sandwich, in a frittata or over pasta!
SLICES OF CHILLED MELONS
Saturday, August 25th from 10am(while supplies last)

GIANT PIG ROAST!


F
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!