Inception report

RETA 6498: Pilot Demonstration Activity (PDA): Pilot Development of a Mechanism for Payment for Watershed Services in Chishui Watershed Prepared for Carey Yeager, Climate Change Specialist, ADB August 2012

The views expressed in this paper are the views of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the Asian Development Bank (ADB), or its Board of Directors, or the governments they represent. 0 ADB does not guaranteethe accuracy of the data included in this paper and accepts no responsibility for any consequences of their use.Terminology used may not necessarily be consistent with ADB official terms

Proposed PDA
The good quality and stable quantity of water in the Wuma River are crucial for the efficient and profitable operation of liquor-manufacturing enterprises located downstream. At present, about 57% of the total basin faces serious soil erosion. This represents approximately 80,000 tons of sediment flowing into Chishui River every year. Water contamination is another problem and is caused by unsustainable land uses by upstream farmers and untreated drainage of domestic wastes. The PDA is helping to  Improve understanding of the causes and impacts of unsustainable relationships between upstream and downstream stakeholders through hydrological and livelihood assessments  Identify and engage potential buyers and sellers of the watershed services in a business relationship  Increase awareness of the PWS scheme among relevant public and private stakeholders in the Chishui River Basin

Expected Results
Outcome Innovative market-oriented payment mechanism for watershed conservation and livelihood improvement established and replicated in other watersheds Outputs  Wuma pilot established with a lucid statement of Payment for Watershed Services as a finance mechanism  Research reports on hydrological conditions in the Wuma watershed, on livelihood in farming communities and on water quality/quantity issues face by the liquor industry in Wuma watershed  An hydrological analytical map to be used for scaling up interventions within the Chishui River basin or for planning PWS replicas in other watersheds along the Yangtze  A social economic profile of upstream poor farming communities showing the transition from subsistence agriculture to sustainable resource management  A workshop to share results of the intervention and define future steps to key stakeholders, including government agencies

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Table of Contents
Executive Summary.......................................................................................................1 Background................................................................................................................. 1 Planned Project Activities...........................................................................................3 Calendar of Activities.................................................................................................14 Responsibility Matrix.................................................................................................17 Program Monitoring Benchmarks.......................................................................... 20 Project Management and Reporting....................................................................... 21 Appendix Proposal Revisions....................................................................................22

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Executive Summary
This PDA was designed to set up a Payment for Watershed Services (PWS) mechanism in Chishui watershed to address the problem of deteriorating water quality and improve the livelihood of poor upstream farmers. The results will be further developed into practical guidelines for the development of Public-Private-Partnership as an important and innovative finance strategy to both PRC specialized agencies as well as to ADB’s planning specialists. The project will focus on the Wuma watershed, which is the main branch of Chishui River in Renhuai city. The good quality and stable quantity of water in the Wuma River are crucial for the efficient and profitable operation of liquor-manufacturing enterprises located downstream. This document provides general information on the background of the project, preliminary work conducted towards producing deliverables, and a detailed work plan, including progress to date.

Background
Among its nearly 50 major tributaries, Chishui River is one of the most important tributaries in the upper Yangtze River, because of its diverse landscapes, richness in biodiversity and abundance in water resources. It should also be noted that as the only major non-dam tributary it retains its free flowing status. The Problem In recent years, increasing population density, rapid socio-economic development and unsustainable agricultural practices have impacted the quality and quantity of Chishui River. It is estimated that the Chishui River sends about 7.8 million tones sediments annually to the Three-Gorge Reservoir. These problems have not been addressed adequately by existing water governance structures. Responsibilities of different departments are not clearly defined and information among them is limited. A coordinated approach to environment protection through an effective enactment of national and local laws and regulations are at times lacking. The Wuma River –our proposed site for intervention- originates at the town of Changgang -southeast of Renhuai city- flows through Tanchang, Wuma, Luban to the west, into Chishui River in the town of Maoba. The stable flow of quality water in the Wuma River is crucial for the efficient and profitable operation of liquor-manufacturing enterprises located downstream. At present Wuma River shows a serious problem of soil erosion. According to available statistics, about 57% of the total basin faces soil erosion problems. This represents approximately 80,000 ton/per year of sediment flowing into Chishui River. Water contamination is another problem caused by unsustainable land uses by upstream farmers and untreated drainage of domestic wastes.
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Initiatives to address the Problem The Guizhou government has developed initiatives to implement central government policies aimed at promoting an integrated Chishui basin management. These include: the development of cross-province coordination mechanisms, the Chishui Basin Master Plan and the Chishui Environment Protection Regulation. Both WWF-China and GEPD have developed plans to implement the aforementioned priorities applying a Payment for Watershed Services (PWS) mechanism. A plan to establish a PES pilot in the Central Chishui basin in Guizhou has been developed and a number of exploratory and preparatory activities such as stakeholder consultation and capacity building have been carried out by WWF since 2010. Expected contribution of proposed PDA This PDA provides an opportunity to turn existing plans into actions resulting in practical results, by using past experiences and scale them up in the context of a Payment for Ecosystem Services framework as an efficient approach for river basin conservation globally promoted by WWF among other relevant conservation agencies. The PDA will create conditions for replication in China and other countries in Asia-Pacific. It will produce valid knowledge and more importantly, it will establish a benchmark of financing watershed conservation through the Payment for Watershed Service (PWS) as a flexible, innovative and promising mechanism that effectively engages the private sector.

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Planned Project Activities
Methods to achieve objectives: tools to be applied for the collection of information required to reach objectives
Objective Objective 1 To improve understanding of the causes and impacts of unsustainable relationships between upstream and downstream stakeholders through hydrological and livelihood assessments. Methods/Activities Desk research: Before embarking upon expensive primary data collection the team should make maximum use of the existing information about Chishui river basin in general and Wuma sub-basin in particular to produce a Situational analysis profiling livelihood conditions among upstream farming communities as well as production levels among liquor producing corporations downstream. It will also include a general description of water quality/quantity variations in recent years (5;10;15 years). This information should be gathered through a review of existing literature; specialized government reports; academic publications and private sector statistics. Field Research: Organized to produce Base line data production on: hydrology; livelihood; cost-benefit analysis; legal institutional framework. Hydrology: Ideally we would use a methodology to understand the water requirements for land use types are the green water-blue water approach. This approach helps understand the land use impacts on the water that evaporates (green water) and on the remaining flows potentially available (blue water). It also provides a useful platform to explore the potential land use changes that can be introduced to alter the green water-blue water relation. This method can be combined with GIS-based models, such as the EXCLAIM model to provide a visual ‘feeling’ of economic and hydrological relationships.(From WWF Technical Guidelines: Guideline 3) Another possible option is to use a Rapid Hydrological Appraisal in the Context of Environmental Service Rewards The appraisal (with a focus on cost-effectiveness and a target budget below USD 10 000 is based on six components: 1. Search of the literature and web-based resources on the area and initial 'scoping' meeting with key stakeholders; 2. Spatial analysis of the landscape based on remotely-sensed imagery and available maps and digital data; 3. Exploration of local ecological knowledge of the landscape, water movement and consequences of land-use options; 4. Discussions with a wide range of stakeholders and policy makers on issues of land use and hydrological functions; 5. Modeling of the water balance and water use in the landscape to explore
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scenarios of plausible land-cover change and their likely impacts on key performance indicators; 6. Communication of results and appraisal of the opportunities for negotiated agreements. These methods will be complemented with field (water) sampling techniques conducted on a regular basis –preferably by trained local community personsto measure and monitor levels of turbidity. See Fig. 1 Livelihood it is essential to understand who the people (farmers upstream)involved are, how they use the land, how this land use is evolving, how this contributes to the core problem and what compensations might be required to change the current land use. Our aim is to understand trends rather than details. However, before embarking upon expensive primary data collection the team should make maximum use of the existing information on the area under study. The livelihood analysis has to determine how to define poverty, who the poor are and where they live in the target area. In addition, the team must gain insight into the forces that are causing households to be economically, socially or politically excluded. Finally, the livelihoods analysis should help the team to understand the current land use systems and the opportunities for land use changes by means of PWS. Data gathering should include interviews with selected focal groups and key informants. Even a small number of interviews may provide important information and strengthen the links with the key stakeholders, while enabling the team to triangulate the other sources of information collated. The team responsible for the livelihoods analysis needs to address the following issues with respect to the target area Households: number of households in the sub-basin, general occupation of economically active labor force, age and education levels by gender of the local people. Land use practices: average size of the land, location of agricultural land (in relation to slopes and riparian zone) crops produced, levels of productivity, livestock held, and methods of cultivation. Land ownership: land tenure (rented, titles, mortgage). Accessibility to basic services: what segment of the population has access to which basic services (health, education, water, electricity)? Accessibility to markets: Which proportion of the farmers’ output is marketed and how much is used for self-consumption? Off-farm income: What other forms of income do the households have? Which proportion of the total household income comes from off-farm activities? An estimate of the farmer’s income: What are the farmers’ main activities?
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What is the approximate gross and net income from each activity? Do the farmers receive any subsidies or incentives for these activities? Natural capital: What natural resources do the households use? What are the main natural assets available? How is the access to communal land? How is the access to water sources? Social capital (requires a previous identification of the main organizations and groups in the area): Are the households part of any of these groups? What is their role? What is the impact of these groups on the decisions made by the households? Should resources be insufficient to conduct household surveys, the analysis has to be based on existing information, which could be obtained from local government offices working in these areas. These secondary data sources will provide the team with ‘averages’, but will sometimes also indicate approximate upper and lower rates of these averages. See Fig. 2 Legal/Institutional Framework: Analyzing the Legal and Policy framework For this PDA ‘policy’ consists of those statements issued by the government that outline the objectives that it wants to achieve. ‘Legislation’ constitutes the laws passed by the government. Legislation is therefore the legal instrument to support the policy that has been developed. The purpose of this analysis is to determine the current opportunities for and constraints on implementing PWS. To do so the research team will pose the following questions:     Who sets the legal and policy framework for land and water use? What is the emphasis of the legal and policy framework in relation to land tenure, water rights, forest exploitation?

What legal and policy need to be assessed? How effective is the legal and policy framework relative to biodiversity conservation, and poverty alleviation? Answering these questions will provide an understanding of the key stakeholders’ interests and the general policy direction (incentives vs enforcement). In addition it is also useful to gain an insight into the effectiveness of the current legal and policy framework. The effectiveness of a country’s policy and legislation is contingent upon the area of application. In the context of this PDA it means their impact on the environment and people’s livelihoods. For example, it is possible to have legislation that is very good for the environment but very bad for the people. Policy and legislation are ineffective if they threaten people’s vested interests or if the government does not have the resources to enforce them. Attention should also be place upon gaps that policy and legislation fail to address. Finally consideration should be given –time and resources permitting- to prepare an initial organizational and institutional framework for PWS. This organizational framework could help to:
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  

Identify the key stakeholders involved in the provision and acquisition of the watershed services as defined. Identify the intermediary organizations (existing or future) required to ensure that payments by the buyers to the sellers are executed smoothly. Identify the organizations that are responsible for monitoring the payments and verifying the changes in land use.

Cost/Benefit Analysis Cost-benefit analysis (CBA) is a methodology that helps make investment decisions and facilitates an efficient allocation of resources. CBA is a method for comparing the costs and benefits of a particular project or option with the potential costs and benefits of alternatives. The analysis will be influenced by the nature of the costs and the type and timing of the benefits. For example, some of the benefits will be monetary, whereas others might be less tangible. In some cases there will be immediate benefits, whereas in other cases the benefits will be medium-term, for example improved land use resulting in higher yields. The impacts on the natural resources may take longer still to become visible, perhaps even a generation. The process and the results of the cost-benefit analysis will provide valuable information for the negotiations about potential payments for watershed services. For the proposed PDA it is necessary to answer questions about the viability of the changes proposed to the buyer and the provider of the service. Thus, two cost benefit-analyses are necessary. Most of the information for the CBA regarding the service providers is produced by the Livelihoods Assessment. In the particular context of watershed services as proposed in this PDA the CBA study should help the research team answer the following questions: * From the buyer’s (liquor companies)point of view: Are land use changes the most cost-efficient way of solving the core problem? * From the sellers’ (upstream farmers)point of view: Are the payments for watershed services an adequate compensation to change the current land use? The following main steps will be conducted to complete the cost-benefit analysis:  Select the scenarios or alternative projects.  Decide whose benefits and costs are relevant.  Quantify the impact on the water quantity or quality.  List all potential costs and benefits (monetary and non-monetary)  Attach, if possible, monetary values.  Identify the potential trade-offs See Fig.3

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Objective 2: To identify and engage potential buyers and sellers of the watershed services in a business relationship.

Activities:  Establishing criteria for inclusion and participation in a PWS mechanism as potential buyers and sellers of watershed services.  Using established criteria to identify potential service sellers of watershed services among poor farmers upstream as well as potential service buyers among water users (liquor companies) downstream. Using a battery of data gathering techniques (i.e. the surveys, FGDs, individual interviews, etc.)the research team will identify the most appropriate potential buyers and sellers.  Use of participatory Focal Group discussions with local stakeholders from the private sector, government and farming communities to share a common understanding on the nature, extent and anthropogenic causes of water quality/quantity problems faced by water users downstream.  Conducting interviews with top management level from liquor companies, leaders from farming communities and key government officials to assess their interest, capacity and willingness to engage in a pilot PWS project as potential buyers/sellers of watershed services.  To prepare and present an indicative business case to potential buyers and sellers in order to assess their interest in signing an MoU as an indication of their interest to participate in a PWS mechanism.

Objective 3: To increase awareness of the PWS scheme among relevant public and private stakeholders in Chishui River basin.

Activities  Consultation meetings and interviews with communities upstream, and conduct capacity building for potential seller and local government representatives in order to improve their understanding on linkage between water problem and their livelihood practices. Presentation and elaboration of socioeconomic and hydrological analysis to local stakeholders. Popularization of study reports and development of communication materials to promote better, adequate understanding of PWS as an innovative finance mechanism which can address conservation issues while improving livelihoods of poor farmers. Organize a series of meetings both in the upstream communities as well as in the cities of Wuma and Renhui to promote greater familiarity with PWS key concepts such as: watershed services, who are buyers and sellers, support needs, willingness/capacity to selling and buying, valuation of services, etc. Conduct of a joint workshop with ADB and key private and public stakeholders to present the results of this pilot demonstration activity. Approximately 30 individuals will be invited to participate. This will include stakeholders from the local community, CSOs, NGOs, local government, private sector, particularly potential buyers. A one day
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workshop will likely be held in Chishui. Attention will be paid to gender inclusiveness. Negotiation process between sellers and buyers for establishing a pilot with agreement on PWS in this PDA site. This will involve a series of meetings with stakeholders to agree on the nature, cause and impact of the water problem as well as on the exploration and implementation of PWS as an innovative finance mechanism which can address the water problem more effectively than other known options. An Expression of Interest or an MoU will be signed to signal the endorsement of PWS by buyers and sellers.

Figure 1. The hydrological assessment
Technical guideline 3
•Engineering

CORE PROBLEM
(for the users: who, how much)

OPTIONS

•Water Management/Storage •Stronger Legislation •Land Use

WHERE?

• Target area and define catchment • What are the main forms of land use

WATER BALANCE

Shows water flows (as inputs and outputs)

OPTIONS • What needs to be done?

• 2-3 realistic scenarios, highlighting potential costs

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Figure 2. Understanding the service providers (Upstream Farmers)
CORE PROBLEM
(for the users) Target areas

WHERE?

OPTIONS

Technical guideline 3

Technical guideline 4

WHO?

• Key stakeholders (people and institutions) • Relative poverty analysis • Livelihoods survey • How much do they currently make? • On-farm benefits

PRESENT LIVELIHOODS

OPTIONS

• How viable are these options? • What are people’s perceptions of problems and solutions? • (Willingness to engage analysis) • What is the business case for the farmers? • Potential incentives: cash, in-kind, one-off, ongoing, land claims, etc.

HOW?

Figure 3. Understanding the costs and benefits
COST BENEFIT AND MULTI -GOAL ANALYSIS
Technical guideline 5

SERVICE PROVIDERS OPTIONS WHO COUNTS? IMPACTS on Water COSTS and BENEFITS WHICH COST:BENEFIT? IDENTIFY TRADE -OFFS BUSINESS CASE?
“Plausible options” Direct, indirect, poor groups New management practices, etc Financial, natural and social capital Monetary values

SERVICE USERS
Best options for service delivery Those with ability to pay Impacts on production, etc Financial, natural and social capital Monetary values Identified in Guideline #3 and verified in Guideline #4 (includes Status Quo) Stay focus and start with direct impact groups. Consider threshold levels and targeting. Try to identify indicators and ways to monitor; Monetary, non -monetary, timing of C/B, total NPV Simple, discounted, payback period, internal rate of return, sensitivity analysis “Multi-goal” analysis useful Consider all non -monetary issues Make sure to include all transaction costs

Equity versus efficiency and effectiveness Covers opportunity or implementation costs?

Costs against other measures Best alternative?

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Detailed work-plan: Application of research tools and methods in the field A) Hydrological Assessment: 1. Desk Research 1.1 Review of Watershed hydrological data: 2000-2011( Sources: Gui Zhou Provincial Hydrology & Water Resources Bureau) 1.2 Review of watershed meteorological data: 2000-2011(Sources: Gui Zhou Province Meteorological Bureau). 1.3 Accessing and analyzing watershed remote sensing images and maps: remote sensing image and 1:250000 topographic map in 2010 (Gui Zhou Province bureau of surveying and mapping, Institute of Remote Sensing Applications Chinese Academy of Sciences) 2. Field data collection: Rapid Hydrological Assessment 2.1 Soil erosion data: establish runoff field of the slope cropland and abandoned land; observe the data of every precipitation, runoff formation and soil erosion; construct a simple simulation model about rainfall runoff and soil erosion process at selected slopes with varying degrees of steepness and different land use patterns. 2.2 Monitoring variations on water quantity and water quality: Select “hot spots” to gather water samples to monitor and analyze sediment concentration, PH value, water quantity and COD data. Using Xienong village, Wuma river town as referents to select the upper segment of coal mine, the lower segment of coal mine, the village next section and estuary as sources of water sample after every precipitation. 2.3 Measure variations in vegetation cover establish a sample baseline and observe/record variations on biomass, soil- water storage/filtering effect and succession cycle of natural forest, artificial forest, bushes and grass slope. 3. Hydrological Assessment Work Plan:
Work Plan 3.1 3.2 3.3 3.4 Data collection (desk and field) and stakeholder interviews and field surveys Preparation and circulation among experts of first draft of Hydrological report. Revise the draft report based on the comments of the experts. Submit the final draft both in English and Chinese Present Hydrological Report at PWS project workshop.

B) Livelihood Assessment 1. Desk Research 1.1 Searching for socio economic information on the population along Wuma River Basin. Consulting different materials and documents of
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Renhuai County and environmental protection works of Renhuai County. 1.2 Review statistics at the provincial and district level on levels of poverty. 1.3 Research economic practices with emphasis on agriculture by upstream communities. 2. Field Research. Includes a variety of data gathering techniques with various respondents. Collected information is then cross checked for accuracy, validity and reliability. 2.1 Field participatory observation: gather first-hand data through field research and site exploration to observe geomorphologic characteristics, forest cover, agriculture system, and community conditions. 2.2 Field Interviews.  Interviews with key informers
Informer Director of the Environmental Protection Department of Renhuai County He Jiguang, Chief of Ecology Section, Environmental Protection Department of Renhuai County Mayor Xian, the mayor of Wuma River Town Mu Shengjiang, Master of the Environmental protection Station of Wuma River Town Purpose of Interview To assess the strengths and weaknesses of the environmental protection plan of Wuma River Basin To assess the effectiveness of plans for the protection of the upper reaches of Chishui River and the Ecological Function Area To assess the community livelihood conditions and poverty situations in communities along Wuma River Basin To assess the status of pollution control of the Wuma River Basin To assess the the status of the s of mining industry in Wmahe River Basin ( Especially the Dazhu Coal Mine)in relation to biodiversity threats in general and water quality specifically.

Chief of the Office of Corporation of Wuma River Town

 Participatory Community Assessment (PCA): Plan and execute group interviews with a purposive sample of local villagers at Xienong Village and Longtang Dam. Develop interviews as guided information research including themes such as: Collective memories regarding f Wuma River Wuma River’s impact on local communities; the impact of economic development of local communities on the environment of of Wuma River basin; Selecting and Prioritizing forms of environmental protection for Wuma River. Interests, commitments and capacity of local communities to to protect the Wuma River; causes of poverty;  Questionnaire Survey: Select at random a representative number of typical families in Xienong Village and have intensive interviews to
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assess conditions of families with different economic background. Sampling criteria includes: levels of social and economic exclusion operationalized at three levels: high exclusion; average exclusion and low exclusion. Levels of exclusion are related to economic activities and environmental impact.  Forum Discussion: Organize working sessions with Wuma River Township and Xienong Village in order to assess government’s actions and plans for the protection of Wuma River Basin in the context of economic development plans. 2.3 Livelihood Assessment Process and Work-plan:
Activity Location Selected entry points at Wuma River Basin Renhuai County to Guiyang Renhuai County; Wuma River Town Wuma River Town, Xienong Village Wuma River Town, Xienong Village Wuma River Town, Xienong Village Purpose Investigate the basic environmental and socio economic situation: forest cover, farming area, returning land for farming to bamboo planting, and mining industry in river basin, etc. Decide and confirm the program pilot sites Interviews with the Environmental Protection Department of Renhuai County; Group discussion Session in Wuma River Town Group interviews with local community members Deliver door-to-door surveys to typical families to assess household livelihood and environmental impact Research Group meeting Interviews with community leaders and other members; Assess community’s expectations on future development; environmental impact of unsustainable agriculture, interest and capacity to enter into a PWS mechanisms. Reports and feed back to the Environmental Protection Department of Renhuai City and participating communities Data Analysis; Preparation and circulation of draft report for comments; Preparation of Final report

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Wuma River Town, Xienong Village

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Renhuai City; Renhuai County Renhuai City to Guiyang

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Wuma River

五马河

Wuma River

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Calendar of Activities
Project Element Activities August Result 1: Short listing 1.1 WWF internal planning meeting with research team September 1. To improve understanding of the causes and impacts of unsustainable relationships between upstream and downstream stakeholders through hydrological and livelihood assessments 2012 October November December

1.2.1 WWF, EPD, Community and Companies Inception Meeting 1.3.1 Field Research Plan Result 2: Ranked Short List 1.2.2 Agreements with stakeholders upstream and downstream to conduct research 1.3.2 Field Research   Rapid Hydrological Assessment Community livelihood study

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Calendar of Activities, cont.
Project Element Activities August Result 1: Short listing 2.1.1 2.2.1 2.3.1 Write Hydrological Report & Livelihood Report Identify buyers/sellers Draft final agreement among buyers/sellers September 2. To identify and engage potential buyers and sellers of the watershed services in a business relationship 2012 October November December

Result 2: Ranked Short List 2.1.2 Design PES publicity materials

2.2.2 Facilitate negotiation and develop agreement among buyers/sellers 2.3.2 Draft final report

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Calendar of Activities, cont.
Project Element Activities August Result 1: Short listing 3.1 Share relevant documentation to government sectors, private sectors, local communities, ADB and NGOS. 3.2 Negotiation process between sellers and buyers for establishing a pilot with agreement on PES in this PDA site. 3.3 Conduct of a joint workshop with ADB and key private and public stakeholders to present the results of this pilot demonstration activity. September 3. To increase awareness of the PWS scheme among relevant public and private stakeholders in Chishui River basin. 2012 October November December

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Responsibility Matrix
Project Element Activities EPD Result 1: Short listing 1.1 WWF internal planning meeting with research team Support Input/support Support Input/support Support Input/support lead lead lead 1. To improve understanding of the causes and impacts of unsustainable relationships between upstream and downstream stakeholders through hydrological and livelihood assessments Responsible Organization ADB WWF

1.2.1 WWF, EPD, Community and Companies Inception Meeting 1.3.1 Field Research Plan Result 2: Ranked Short List 1.2.2 Agreements with stakeholders upstream and downstream to conduct research 1.3.2 Field Research   Rapid Hydrological Assessment Community livelihood study

Support Support

Input/support Input/support

lead lead

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Responsibility Matrix, cont.
Project Element Activities EPD Result 1: Short listing 2.1.1 2.2.1 2.3.1 Write Hydrological Report & Livelihood Report Identify buyers/sellers Draft final agreement among buyers/sellers Support Input/support Input/support Support Support lead lead lead 2. To identify and engage potential buyers and sellers of the watershed services in a business relationship Responsible Organization ADB WWF

Result 2: Ranked Short List 2.1.2 Design PES publicity materials Support Support Support Input/support Support Support lead lead lead

2.2.2 Facilitate negotiation and develop agreement among buyers/sellers 2.3.2 Draft final report

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Responsibility Matrix, cont.

Project Element Activities

3. To increase awareness of the PWS scheme among relevant public and private stakeholders in Chishui River basin. Responsible Organization EPD ADB WWF

Result 1: Short listing 3.1 Share relevant documentation to government sectors, private sectors, local communities, ADB and NGOS. 3.2 Negotiation process between sellers and buyers for establishing a pilot with agreement on PES in this PDA site. 3.3 Conduct of a joint workshop with ADB and key private and public stakeholders to present the results of this pilot demonstration activity. Support Input/support Input/support Support Support Input/support Lead Lead Lead

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Program Monitoring Benchmarks
Benchmarks Agreement with stakeholders Rapid Hydrological Assessment Community livelihood Study Hydrological Report Livelihood Report Facilitate negotiation and develop agreement among buyers/sellers Community agreements concluded A workshop to share results of the intervention and define future steps to key stakeholders including government agencies. Print report and share relevant documentation to government sectors, private sectors, local communities, ADB and NGOs 30 Dec 2012 Target Date 30 Aug 2012 30 Sep 2012 30 Sep 2012 30 Oct 2012 30 Oct 2012 15 Nov 2012 30 Nov 2012 30 Dec 2012

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Project Management and Reporting
The PDA implementation will be managed by WWF Beijing Office, conducted by its Freshwater Programme with technical support from WWF-NL Global EPWS Coordinator Overall project management responsibility lies with Dr. Wang Lei of WWF China, who will serve as the lead liaison for this project and will be responsible for insuring that the work activities are executed as delineated in the Calendar and Responsibility Matrix above. Dr Wang Lei will report directly to Lei Gang, Freshwater Director. As a community consultant, Jiang Yong will also work in close consultation with Dr. Wang Lei, based in Changsha. In addition to the mid-term and end of programme reports stipulated in the ADB-WWF, Dr. Wang Lei will provide informal reporting to ADB on a monthly basis.
Project Team International Consultant on PES Julio Cesar Tresierra Ph.D Global Coordinator for the Equitable Payments for Watershed Services. Regional Advisor for LAC (WWF-US) on Deforestation and Degradation Issues. REDD Programmes. Various professional engagements with UNDP, ILO, UNICEF, UNV, World Bank, IDB, Governments in Central and South America in Latin America, USA, Canada, Europe, Asia, Africa, Middle East. Senior officer of Freshwater Programme, WWF China. Educated in Beijing Forest University, major on nature reserve management. 8 years working experience on wetland and freshwater ecosystem conservation. PES Programme focal point of WWF China. Ramsar CEPA Programme Focal Point in China. Acting head of Freshwater Programme, WWF China Has been working over 20 years on wetland protection and management, accumulating rich experience on wetland management and water bird protection. Leader of the Changsha field office, WWF china. Has been working over 18 years on wetland protection and community co-management, accumulating rich experience on community study.

Daily manager of the project Wang Lei Ph.D

Field office leader Lei Gang

Community Consultant Jiang Yong

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