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uk A brief encounter in a New York subway train prompted a romantically inclined man to set up his own internet site just to find the woman he saw. Patrick Moberg, 21, said it was - for him at least - love at first sight when he exchanged glances with a rosy-cheeked young woman while taking the train from Manhattan to Brooklyn on Sunday. But just as he had plucked up the courage to talk to her, the train stopped and he lost her in the crowd. Undeterred, Mr Moberg, a web designer, set up a new site www.nygirlofmydreams.com - which was dedicated to finding her. He drew a picture of the girl, who was wearing blue shorts, blue tights, and a red flower in her hair. He added his mobile phone number, email address and an appeal for help in finding her. Amazingly, in a city of eight million people, it worked. Within hours, Mr Moberg's inbox had been inundated with emails and his phone was ringing continually. Some of the emails came from women who admitted they were not the girl, but asked him to pick them instead. On Tuesday night, a friend of the woman contacted him and sent him a picture so he could confirm her identity. Mr Moberg announced the breakthrough on his website with a notice entitled: "Found Her! Seriously!" The mysterious subway brunette was later named as Camille Hayton, a 22year-old Australian magazine intern. The internet listings site Craig's List carries a "missed connections" section in cities including London and New York, in which people can try to track down the other party. But Mr Moberg's decision to set up his own website takes the searcher's dedication to a new level. Yesterday, the pair appeared on Good Morning America, ABC's television breakfast show, having met for dinner the previous night. Mr Moberg claimed that he hadn't been nervous about meeting her, adding: "We totally clicked." Perhaps sounding a little more cautious, Miss Hayton said she "couldn't not meet" Mr Moberg after he went to so much trouble to find her.

Mr Moberg said he had spent the journey "psyching myself up to introduce myself" but now wonders what he would have said anyway. "I don't think anything I could have said would have been able to sanely convey how strongly I felt about her." He added: "As soon as she had disappeared, I felt an undeniable urge to reach out to find her. "The only way that seemed remotely possible, without seeming like a total creep, was to put up a totally straightforward recap of what happened, and hope it somehow made its way to her." Miss Hayton admitted that the encounter was a complete fluke as she had only been using the train to go to a friend's home because her own house had just burned down. Mr Moberg said he would be giving no more updates on his website. He said: "Unlike all the romantic comedies and bad pop songs, you'll have to make up your own ending for this."

Love at first site on the New York subway
A brief encounter in a New York subway train prompted a romantically inclined man to set up his own internet site just to find the woman he saw. Patrick Moberg, 21, said it was - for him at least - love at first sight when he exchanged glances with a rosy-cheeked young woman while taking the train from Manhattan to Brooklyn on Sunday. But just as he had plucked up the courage to talk to her, the train stopped and he lost her in the crowd. Undeterred, Mr Moberg, a web designer, set up a new site www.nygirlofmydreams.com - which was dedicated to finding her. http://www.telegraph.co.uk

Describe as full as possible when and where Patrick first saw the girl of his dreams

Write a full description of the girl

How could people contact Patrick?

Amazingly, in a city of eight million people, it worked. Within hours, Mr Moberg's inbox had been inundated with emails and his phone was ringing continually. Some of the emails came from women who admitted they were not the girl, but asked him to pick them instead. On Tuesday night, a friend of the woman contacted him and sent him a picture so he could confirm her identity. Mr Moberg announced the breakthrough on his website with a notice entitled: "Found Her! Seriously!" The mysterious subway brunette was later named as Camille Hayton, a 22year-old Australian magazine intern.

Amazingly, in a city of eight million people, it worked. Within hours, Mr Moberg's inbox had been inundated with emails and his phone was ringing continually. Some of the emails came from women who admitted they were not the girl, but asked him to pick them instead. On Tuesday night, a friend of the woman contacted him and sent him a picture so he could confirm her identity. Mr Moberg announced the breakthrough on his website with a notice entitled: "Found Her! Seriously!" The mysterious subway brunette was later named as Camille Hayton, a 22year-old Australian magazine intern.

Write true or false. It took a few days to get a response from people. Some people wrote to him to claim they were the girl. Patrick confirmed the girl´s identity thanks to a photograph sent by one of his friends. The girl was a young foreigner reading a magazine.

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