2012-2015

Serving the towns of: Acworth, Alstead, Charlestown, Langdon, Walpole

2

TABLE OF CONTENTS
Introduction

Preface Technology Committee Members Fall Mountain Regional School District Demographics and Facts Fall Mountain Regional School District Mission Fall Mountain Regional School District Purpose Fall Mountain School to Career Vision
Goals

3 4 4 5 5 5 6 6 7
8

Information Technology Vision Systemic Transformation with Technology Technology Goals
Action Plan: Access to Technology Resources Action Plan: Professional Development

Technology-Related Professional Development Activities Action Steps Strategy for Professional Development Action Step Timelines for Professional Development Technology Skills List for Teachers: Operating and Understanding Technology: Legal Issues and Ethical Issues and Practices Technology: Teaching and Learning Data Collection and Evaluation for Professional Development Fall Mountain Professional Development Framework
Action Plan: ICT Literacy

10 11 12 13 14 14 14 16 18 18-20 20 38 51 53 54 54 55 55 9 9 56 57 9 9

Technology Integration Portfolio Recommendations to Teachers Portfolio Guidelines for Students ICT Benchmarks Information Technology and the Library Media Center K-8 Information Literacy and Technology in the High School Library Media Center
Data Collection

District Assessments Technology Evaluation
Action Plan: Community Collaboration

Community Collaboration
Budget

Budgeting
Needs Assessment: Connectivity and Infrastructure

Virtualization Servers Access Points Disaster Recovery School Computer Labs Servicing and Maintenance

3 Policies and Procedures Policies and Procedures Fall Mountain Schools and the Internet Student Access to the Internet – Guidelines Internet Permission Form for K-8 Internet Permission Form for High School Procedures – Access to the Internet Computer Use Regulations Email Use Policy ICT and Technology Integration Webpage Publishing Authorization and Compliance Agreement Appendices Appendix A: ICT Standards Appendix B: NETS for Students Appendix C: NETS for Teachers Appendix D: NETS for Administrators Appendix E: Curriculum References to Computers and Technology 58 58 59 60 61 62 63 66 68 70 72 73 74 76 78

Introduction

Preface
In September 2012, the Information Technology Planning Committee on plan revision undertook the challenge of revising the district’s technology plan. Committee members focused on ICT standards, professional development, media and library skills and information literacy, using technology, disaster recovery and preparing the network and infrastructure to meet all standards of a 21st century equipped educational environment. Professional Development is key in this plan in order to continue to advance skill levels and moving the district forward with a 21st century focus. The goal for technology training for teachers for the next 3 years is to not only to learn important skills but to also demonstrate technology embedded teaching and learning in the classroom. The Technology Planning Committee, along with input from the Staff Development Committee, has developed a new approach for delivering technology professional development. Beginning with summer 2012, technology training will consist of "tour packages" or three separate, leveled sessions on a particular topic or focus. Stipends will only be awarded after attending the three separate sessions with a resulting technology endeavor or "project.” The Technology Committee recognizes that staff development opportunities for all staff is essential in helping students secure the skills and knowledge needed to demonstrate ICT competency. Strategies to continue building upon our infrastructure to support a 1:1 and a BYOD model continues throughout all Attendance Areas, Schools and Buildings of the Fall Mountain Regional School District. Upon reviewing all key elements, the Technology Committee sets forth the revised District Plan for 2012-2015.

4 The Information Technology Planning Committee Members Include: Debra Livingston Lori Landry John Streeter Lynne Phillips Tom Ronning Heidi Gove Donna Bashaw-Benvie Karen Brown Carla Boyington Michelle Swift Megan Naso Brendan McKinley Dan Chapman Bret Fessenden Selena Garrison Kathy Olsen Nick Sintros ..……....…….…………………………………...…Superintendent of Schools ..……………...…..Assistant Superintendent of Schools/ Curriculum Director …..………………………………….Parent and School Board Representative .…………………………..……... Director, Information Technology Services ..……..…………………………………Principal, Fall Mountain High School .……...…………………..……….Vice-Principal, Fall Mountain High School ………….…..………………………. Charlestown Attendance Area, Teacher .………………………Charlestown, Vilas, and Walpole Technology Teacher ...……………………………………………… K-8 Library Media Generalist …….………………………………...………………... High School Librarian ……………………………..…………………………North Walpole Teacher ..….………….………..……Walpole Attendance Area, Computer Technician …...……….….………..Charlestown Attendance Area, Computer Technician .….………….….Fall Mountain Regional High School, Computer Technician …Fall Mountain Regional School District, Technology Integration Specialist ……………………………..Charlestown Primary School, 3rd Grade Teacher ……..……….……………....Alstead Attendance Area, Computer Technician

We especially want to thank Debra Livingston, Superintendent of Schools and the Fall Mountain School Board for their overall support and understanding of the principles, processes, and organizational issues that occur as technology is implemented.

Fall Mountain Regional School District Demographics and Facts
Founded in 1966 District size: 240 Square Miles Bus Miles Per Year: 385, 410 1640 Students 550- High School 442- Middle School 648- Elementary School 12 Schools including the Early Learning Center 180 School days per year/ Average daily attendance 94.5% Class of 2012: 148 Graduates

5

Fall Mountain Regional School District Mission
New Mission Statement for FMRSD One of the most important communication and vision tools of a school district is its mission. Developing a clear and concise mission statement serves three main purposes for a school district and its communities. It guides and inspires; it advertises strengths and virtues; and it distinguishes our district from other districts. Below is the revised mission that has been in development over the past 6 months. The FMRSD Mission Committee recently finalized the mission statement through a revision of the mission statement for the past four years. The mission of the Fall Mountain Regional School District is to maximize our children’s academic, technological, artistic, athletic, and social skills to be productive 21st century citizens.

Fall Mountain School to Career Vision
Fall Mountain School to Career provides an opportunity for all students to pursue an education that combines technology and liberal arts. The vision of Fall Mountain School to Career includes the following: • To challenge every student to realize full potential • To prepare every student to meet challenges in a rapidly changing technology-based society • To encourage every student to make choices that allow the individual to enter the work force or to pursue a post-secondary education, thus enabling every graduate of Fall Mountain Regional High School to become a productive citizen • To enable every student to combine theoretical and practical knowledge • To show every student the relationship between school studies and future career opportunities • To encourage every student to become a lifelong learner

6 Goals

Information Technology Vision
The Fall Mountain Regional School District is dedicated to the belief that computers and related technologies are powerful educational tools. We believe that putting such tools in the hands of students and staff members will ultimately enhance learning and productivity. We acknowledge that tools are only effective when used by people who have been trained to use them. For these reasons we are committed to using computers and other available technologies and technological tools pervasively throughout the curriculum. We believe this will improve all aspects of education, including K-12 curriculum, classroom instruction, distance learning, communication, assessment, information and data gathering/analysis, and school management. Technology pervades all of the disciplines and must be an integral part of the total picture. This commitment involves increasing both technological competence and confidence, and is consistent with the goals and Comprehensive Educational Outcomes put forth by Fall Mountain Regional School District and the New Hampshire State Department of Education. All students and staff members feel should feel comfortable using information technology as an integral, creative and dynamic part of everyday learning and teaching. Our efforts should ensure that technology is used to improve assessment, teaching, learning, and communication within the school district and community. We will prepare students to be self-directed learners in the information society of the 21st Century and will enable all students to both access and use information effectively in their personal lives, their educational pursuits and their careers.

Systemic Transformation with Technology
The Fall Mountain Regional School District has developed a comprehensive quality educational system that is driven by its vision, beliefs, mission, educational outcomes, and goals, which are evaluated annually. Technology planning and development are an integral part of these District goals. By becoming technologically literate our staff and students will become successful and productive workers in our system. They will use new technologies to communicate, make decisions, solve problems, analyze data, process information, and present their ideas and work in the globally competitive economy of the 21st century. Technology will facilitate the evolution of quality education by improving learning and educational performance of students, providing access to up-to-date information, helping students develop personal and workplace technology skills, speeding and improving communication, fostering organizational change, and supplying the structure for data and fact-based decision making. Technology will help us to achieve our vision of affordable high quality learning programs that are valued, recognized, and supported by all partners.

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Technology Goals
The Technology Goals for the Fall Mountain Regional School District are in alignment with the National Education Technology Standards, the Fall Mountain Professional Development Plan and the Information and Communication Technology Standards. INTEGRATION Goal I: Improve teaching and learning through the appropriate use of technology. Goal II: Ensure that technical staff will work with instructional staff to improve computer competency, utilize information technology, and develop strategies for effectively implementing technology into the classrooms. Goal III: Technical staff will be available to support current software being used in the district and to assist teachers in using technology tools to support the curriculum. PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT Goal I: Establish partnerships for identifying and delivering effective technology training to assist all instructional staff as they help students achieve high academic standards. Goal II: Administer grant programs, including Title IID, Title IIA, Title VI, and financial assistance initiatives that support implementation of educational technology integration. Goal III: Establish and maintain instructional technologists in the Fall Mountain Regional School District. CONNECTIVITY Goal I: Ensure that all schools have access to integrated instructional and administrative services across interoperable high-speed networks. Goal II: Ensure sufficient support for ongoing, reliable network operations. Goal III: Provide leadership and resources to promote efficient procurement of infrastructure, including the identifications and procurement of emerging technologies. Goal IV: Ensure that the Fall Mountain Regional School District has in place network security, filtering, and disaster recovery plans. EDUCATIONAL APPLICATIONS Goal I: Improve teaching and learning through the appropriate use of network-accessible educational applications. Goal II: Promote and develop web-based applications, services, and resources. Goal III: Offer more digital learning opportunities. ACCOUNTABILITY Goal I: Assess the value that information technology adds to teaching and learning environments. Goal II: Provide appropriate decision support capabilities for all stakeholders. Goal III: Assess information technology literacy. Goal IV: Ensure that level technology plans are consistent with the state technology plan. Goal VI: All students, teachers, staff and administrators will adhere to the District AUP.

8 Action Plan: Access to Technology Resources

To achieve these goals:
Provide every school with computers/laptops for whole classroom instruction. Provide every classroom with a minimum of one computer for classroom use. Instructional Technology Integrations Specialists continue to create positions for all 12 schools to help facilitate classroom technology instruction and comply with the Literacy Standards of the Information and Communication Technologies Program (ICT) for K - 12 Students. The ICT Standards require an integrated approach leading to each student creating an electronic portfolio, which will follow them through their academic career at Fall Mountain School District. Students will be evaluated upon their electronic portfolios submitted each year. Align ICT program to the core subject areas for a more integrated approach Provide professional development opportunities: The Technology Planning Committee, along with input from the Staff Development Committee, have developed a new approach for delivering technology professional development. Beginning with summer 2012, technology training will consist of "tour packages" or three separate, leveled sessions on a particular topic or focus. Stipends will only be awarded after attending the three separate sessions with a resulting technology endeavor or "project. The Technology Committee recognizes that staff development opportunities for all staff is essential in helping students secure the skills and knowledge needed to demonstrate ICT competency. Atomic Learning: Subscriptions for all teachers, staff, students and parents to Atomic Learning, an online resource and solution dedicated to teacher professional development, classroom technology integration and software support solution that empowers our teachers to utilize technology to engage students and positively impact achievement. Tech Leader Cohort (TLC) encourages Technology Mentors to work closely and assist their peers with technology related questions on an as-needed basis. In addition, the Technology Integration Specialist works with staff on understanding ICT, technology, exit level skills and professional development. Rubrics develop and implement a rubric for use as an assessment tool with digital portfolios, ICT Standards, and Technology Exit Level Skills. Provide the integration peripherals and tools needed to reinforce technology integration and instruction. Provide technology tubs to include flip videos, cameras and tools for whole classroom instruction. Google Apps in Education: Implement a district-wide plan and goal to Google Apps, docs and email solutions to enhance our goals in creating a Cloud Computing Infrastructure. Electronic Portfolio Management Software: Assess the use of various digital portfolio solutions and implement district-wide including Google Apps and eBackpacks.

9 Communication System Global Connect will be used to communicate with parents, students, and community member’s district-wide on important events, notifications, snow days, meetings, and emergency incidents. Expand the use of assistive and adaptive technologies for Special Needs Students. Continue to research replacement software with Director of Special Education that will suit the needs of the Department. Maintain recycling program for the Fall Mountain School District, which includes continuing with our current 4-5 year recycle plan, replacing older computers in all district schools. Virtualization and Aruba Wireless continued throughout the district to all schools. Additional benefits of virtualization include: saving time with setup and configuration, administration, troubleshooting, and saving energy, security, reliability and money. Fall Mountain High School, Vilas Middle School, Alstead Primary, and Central Office are now complete. The goal is to complete Walpole and Charlestown Middle School with Aruba wireless and upgraded systems by 2014. Primary Schools will be the focus in 2015. Computer Labs: School Computer Lab/Cart Alstead Primary 2 Vilas Middle 3 Sarah Porter 1 Acworth School 1 Fall Mountain High 6 Walpole Elementary 3 North Walpole 3 Walpole Primary 1 Charlestown Middle 2 Charlestown Primary 2 North Charlestown Community 2 Servicing and Maintenance: Reimage and clean all computers each summer. Continue to maintain the latest versions in operating systems and software, if the budget supports this. Maintain licenses for Microsoft Office, PowerSchool, NWEA, First Class, VMWare, Barracuda Filtering, SonicWall, IT Direct, ITAM, High School: 1:1 Device Model - Pilot netbooks and iPads at the High School in order to create a plan and model district wide – 1 device per every student. White Boards: Continue providing professional development. Continue with grant-writing endeavors encouraging the purchase of boards for classroom teachers. Whiteboard devices include the SMART Board, Mimio, and other Interactive electronic solutions. Distance Learning Lab: Distance Learning Lab at the Fall Mountain High School. Provide all HS students the opportunity to choose courses not offered or available using VLACS and other Online solutions. Staff 15 Computer Lab with a DLL Coordinator.

10 Action Plan: Professional Development

Goals: The Fall Mountain Regional School District is committed to having all staff and administrators integrate technology as it is essential to successful 21st century teaching and learning : Inspire Student Learning (Year 1, Year 2)- Teachers have the basic technology skills needed to facilitate and expand student-learning experiences in the digital age. They also understand digital-age issues and exhibit legal and ethical behavior when using technology. Model for Digital-Age Learning (Year 2, Year 3)- Teachers can demonstrate skills and create activities to help students be able to participate in a global and digital society. Develop Digital-Age Learning (Year 2, Year 3)- Teachers design or develop learning experiences that incorporate technology tools and resources that maximize student learning. Engage in Professional Growth and Leadership (Year 3+)- Teachers continuously improve their professional practice, model lifelong learning, and exhibit leadership in their school and professional community by promoting and demonstrating the effective use of digital tools and resources. Technology-Related Professional Development Activities The Fall Mountain Regional School District provides extensive technology-related professional development in a variety of settings Technology-related professional development is for the classroom and beyond: All school district staff: teachers, administrators, office staff and support staff participate in technology- related trainings so that they can become more efficient and effective. Technology-related professional development offers a variety of settings and approaches: Technology-related professional development activities are offered to all district personnel: teachers, administrators, library media specialists, support staff and office staff. Activities include workshops on utilizing computers and related software, operating and managing digital equipment, and using the Internet (including Web 2.0 tools and resources). Other activities are technology-related seminars, conferences and courses.

11 Action Steps: Strategy for Professional Development The Fall Mountain Regional School District has a pro-active plan with strategies to ensure that teachers and instructional staff know how to use technology and how to incorporate technology to create effective learning outcomes. Professional development needs are identified by: 1. District and school improvement plan goals 2. Student performance and assessment 3. Beginning of the year survey to assess current technology skill level Technology-related professional development will be targeted and individualized using the results of the survey as well as improvement plan goals and student assessment data. Examples include: • Individual and small group training during the school day and within the school building • • Tech Leaders should identify teachers who need training and offer assistance More technology training will be made available during the school day. Substitute teachers and/or support staff will provide release time during the school day for teacher training. Teachers are encouraged to receive training during non-instructional time such as when students go to “specials.” Technicians are available for computer lab support. A goal is to have support staff trained as computer lab support specialists who can then assist teachers. In order to best meet the needs of staff, the results of the beginning of the year survey will be used to suggest applicable workshops and other professional development opportunities. (See Appendix- Minimum Technology Skills List for Instructional and Administrative Staff).

• • •

In order for the goals of this technology plan to be attained, a variety of actions steps need to be taken: Provide sufficient equipment The district will maintain adequate funding to provide necessary equipment for teachers, in sufficient quantity in order to produce demonstrable, positive progress in meeting the district’s technology goals. Provide sufficient time to develop and practice integration The technology mentors work closely to assist their peers with technology related questions on an asneeded basis. There are also summer training days available to all staff. In addition, early release time should continue to be used for technology integration at some point throughout the year. Provide collaborative opportunities Technology lends itself to support among peers and collaboration between instructors and students. When adequate common planning time is provided, it becomes possible for educators to consult with peers, technology mentors, and librarians to develop highly effective integrated lessons that support all learners.

12 Another advantage of this type of collaboration is that it can potentially reduce replication of efforts and result in working “smarter” not “harder”. Participation in professional networks offer opportunities for co-development of curriculum materials, online collegial interactions and the development of other online staff development options. Provide adequate staffing There is one Technology Integration Specialist, one Technology Director, one Director of Instruction, building-level technology mentors throughout the district, and Media Specialists. The district will maintain funding to provide adequate staffing in order to meet the district’s technology goals.

Action Step Timeline for Professional Development The Fall Mountain Regional School District provides technology-related training to all staff throughout the year. Teachers are encouraged to participate in conferences, professional networks, workshops and online courses. Funds and release time are provided for these endeavors. In-house tech support and skilled teachers provide technology support to their colleagues. All staff members also attend annual training sessions on technology protocols and policies. In year one of our plan we will implement the survey and strive to have 90% of our staff performing at level 1, 70% at level 2, 50% at level 3, and 30% at level 4. Our goal is to attain 10% growth or more. We will use data from our staff survey in order to measure yearly growth. Minimum Technology Skills for Instructional and Administrative Staff The following list represents the very lowest common denominator or the “bare bone” basic skills that all staff that instruct, guide, or work with or for students should know and do. These are the essential skills necessary to effectively use and manage technology equipment, resources, and tools. Staff not skilled in these areas will need level 1 technology training. A description and explanation of the technology levels will follow this list on the next page.

13 Minimum Technology Skills for Instructional and Administrative Staff
OPERATING AND UNDERSTANDING TECHNOLOGY
BASIC OPERATION ☐Demonstrates basic skills for using hardware and applications (find and start an application) ☐Navigates using scroll bars, arrow keys, or special keys, and can comfortably use a mouse or trackpad. ☐Uses appropriate terms when describing an issue such as (application, operating system, window). ☐Saves or backs up data to an external hard drive or online program (e.g. Dropbox) ☐Saves files to the appropriate computer or laptop location and can later retrieve these files ☐Selects the correct printer and prints a document with appropriate portrait or landscape page orientation ☐Burn a CD of music or files ☐Creates folders and organizes files NETWORK ☐Connects the cables and cords correctly ☐Distinguishes between a local and a network account and can explain the basics of how they each work ☐Is able to locate and access the student portfolio folders on the network ☐Can save or backup to a network folder. WORD PROCESSING ☐Align text- left, center, right, justify ☐Format font- style, color and size ☐Copy, cut and paste ☐Find formatting toolbar ☐Bullet lists and numbered lists ☐Grammar and spelling checks ☐Insert pictures and clip art onto a document ☐Can set the document or page setup ☐Add a page border ☐Add Word Art and horizontal lines ☐Add and format a table SPREADSHEET ☐Can find a cell, a row and a column ☐Create a list on a spreadsheet ☐Sort a list ☐Format text on a spreadsheet ☐Open a spreadsheet, enter or modify data, preview and print, and save changes. ☐Plan for and create a spreadsheet for organizing data. ☐Apply text formats such as style, size, and fonts. ☐Select data to create appropriate charts ☐Create a simple function and/or formula ☐Able to re-size cells, columns and rows DIGITAL DEVICES ☐Use a digital camera and transfer images to a computer. ☐Connect a laptop to a projector and fix display settings, if necessary. ☐Use an iPad or iPod EMAIL ☐Add an attachment ☐Create a mail list ☐Set up an extra folder for storing email ☐Locate and set preferences ☐Sort inbox mail by name and last modified ☐Exercises care in sending and opening e-mails ☐Send email only to the appropriate people ☐Uses email mailing lists for school appropriate purposes only ☐Gets proper permission before sending email to all staff within school and/or the district

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LEGAL/ETHICAL ISSUES AND PRACTICES
GENERAL RULES AND ETHICS ☐Practices the responsible use of technology in the computer lab and in the classroom ☐Adheres to the Computer/Network/Internet Use Policy ☐Ensures student compliance with the Student Computer/Network/Internet Use Policy ☐Respects privacy and confidentiality issues as they relate to the use of technology ☐Models and teaches legal, safe and ethical technology use ☐Takes proper care of the school-issued laptop and classroom equipment COPYRIGHT AND FAIR USE ☐Can explain copyrights as they are applied to technology use in education, the workplace and society. ☐Understands and practices “Fair Use” as it applies to educators. INFORMATION LITERACY ☐Can explain how media and technology can be misused to distort or exaggerate information. ☐Uses correct terminology in speaking about Internet communications (browser, search engine, online). ☐Is able to add a bookmark for a website ☐Is able to organize bookmarks and can distinguish between the Bookmarks toolbar and the Bookmarks Menu ☐Identifies the URL of a website and can type in a URL in a browser address bar ☐Is able to use the navigation features of browser ( “go,” “back,” “refresh,” “forward”) ☐Finds appropriate websites with valid information ☐Reviews websites at school before using them with a class

TEACHING WITH TECHNOLOGY
PLANNING AND DEVELOPMENT

☐Uses technology to gather curriculum-specific information or activities ☐Is able to integrate technology into the curriculum with assistance from another staff member ☐Can identify personal technology professional development needs. ☐Regularly participates in technology professional development activities offered by the district, online or elsewhere.
References Used: ISTE NETS for Teachers, Massachusetts Technology Self-Assessment Tool

Levels of Technology Skills and Training for Staff

Rationale: Technology should add value to classroom instruction and student learning. Teachers, instructional staff and administrators must have the basic knowledge and understanding of technology to know how it can be integrated effectively into instruction. Teachers, staff, and administrators need the right incentives to learn and implement technology, at times that are convenient to them, and in a supportive atmosphere along with continual guidance for using technology in the classroom. In addition to focusing on individual programs, it is important that staff understand core technology concepts so they can adapt to the inevitable and rapid changes in technology. Technology Skills Surveys will be administered each year to measure improvement.

15 For 2013-2016, technology training will use a tiered-structure based on four skill levels below.
LEVEL 1Unsatisfactory
Learning the Basics

LEVEL 2Satisfactory
Using Pre-built Templates

LEVEL 3Proficient
Creating Activities

LEVEL 4Distinguished
Guiding Students / Staff
Optimizing technology to engage students in individual and collaborative learning activities.

Starting point for growing the Developing technology skills Perfecting the use of basic skills necessary to for increased productivity on technology for creating rich, effectively use technology the job. multimedia learning activities. equipment, resources, and tools.

Classroom examples: Classroom examples: Classroom examples: Classroom examples:
Teacher currently does not use · Teacher can find instructional technology in the classroom. resources on the Internet. · Teacher can produce, store, and retrieve learning materials electronically (Google Docs) · Teacher keeps and organizes student information (PowerTeacher, Excel) · Teacher conducts computer station learning centers · Teacher communicates with parents and students using controlled classroom websites or blogs · Teacher delivers presentations with graphics and sound (PowerPoint, Keynote) · Students create and use online resources to answer questions or solve problems · Students engage in inquirybased projects driven by essential questions

· Teacher facilitates students in · Students engage in individual using technology for online or collaborative project-based assessment. learning · Teacher leads interactive group · Students write, develop and discussions and lessons using publish individual and SMART Boards or Mimeo Boards collaborative products that can be reviewed by parents or peers. · Teachers create scaffolding for · Students direct their own use student projects such as writing of technology with Web 2.0 tools prompts or project templates such as RSS feeds and social using technology. bookmarking. · Teacher has students completing their assignments using technology (Google Docs, Moodle) · Students Invent products through programming or production such as how-to videos to share with others. · Students initiate self-directed communication with parents, teachers, community members, or other students using tools such as blogs.

· Teacher can efficiently use email

Trainings include:
· · · · · · · · · Tech In The Classroom Word Basics Excel Basics PowerPoint Basics FirstClass Email Internet Resources Digital Citizenship Operating System Basics ICT Basics

Trainings include:
· · · · · · · Intermediate Word Intermediate Excel Intermediate PowerPoint Intro to Google Docs Web 2.0 iPad ICT Portfolios

Trainings include:
· Advanced Word · Advanced Excel · iPhoto · Google Apps · Blogger · Creating Internet Resources · Online Assessments · ICT Portfolio Development

Trainings include:
· Photoshop · iMovie · Windows Live Movie Maker · GarageBand · The Flipped Classroom · ICT Portfolio Assessment

Evidence of completion
Must demonstrate the skills on the Minimum Technology Skills for Instructional and Administrative Staff.
(see previous section)

Evidence of completion
Increased personal and professional productivity, as well as an understanding of how technology can be used in the classroom

Evidence of completion
A technology integrated curriculum unit with effective instruction and engaging learning activities

Evidence of completion
Student learning and the use of technology are seamless and ubiquitous. Level 4 masters share their professional expertise.

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The Fall Mountain Professional Development Committee
The Professional Development Committee maintains files for all professional staff members. Teachers follow the process outlined in the Professional Development Master Plan and are responsible for submitting professional development hours to the committee for approval. This process includes the gathering of specific data on activities, needs, and hours completed. The Master Plan allows for professional development that improves the learning of all students: • • • Requires skillful school and district leaders who guide continuous instructional improvement Applies knowledge about human learning and change Deepens educator’s content knowledge, provides them with research-based instructional strategies to assist students in meeting rigorous academic standards, and prepares them to use various types of classroom assessments appropriately. Prepares educators to understand and appreciate all students, create safe, orderly and supportive learning environments and hold high expectations for their academic achievement. Uses learning strategies appropriate to the intended goal. Provides educators with the knowledge and skills to collaborate Organize adults into learning communities whose goals are aligned with those of the school and district. Requires resources to support adult learning and collaboration

• • • • •

On the following page, is a chart detailing the Fall Mountain Professional Development Master Plan’s schedule of activities

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Fall Mountain Professional Development Framework
DATA/INFO USED NECAP State Testing HOW DATA IS ACCESSED Online DATA/INFO SCHEDULE February RESPONSIBLE FOR DATA AVAILABILITY State Department of Ed Measured Progress Guidance, Administration, Teachers PROCEDURES FOR USING DATA/INFO Action Research, Instruction, Professional Learning Communities, Mentors, grade level meetings RESPONSIBLE FOR USING DATA Administration, Guidance, Teachers, Reading Specialists, Title I, Special Ed., Data Teams Teachers, Reading Specialists, Title I, Special Ed, Data Teams

Gates Reading

Online

Beginning and end Reading Specialists, Title I, Structuring reading of the school year Teachers program. As needed Reading Specialists, Teachers Content Area Committee Teachers

Other Reading Assessments District Benchmarks Writing, Science Math Soc. Studies MAP Testing

Paper

Classroom reading program, Reading Specialists, Action Research, Teaching Teachers, Special Ed. Practices. Action Research, Instruction, Teaching Practices Content Area Committee Teachers

paper

Immediately

Computerized

Periodically throughout the year, Online

Teachers, Assistant Superintendent

Action Research, Instruction, Teaching Practices. Action Research, Instruction, Teaching Practices. Action Research, Instruction, Teaching Practices. Action Research, Instruction, Teaching Practices. Action Research, Instruction, Teaching Practices. IEP Goals, Instruction, Action Research. Informal and Ongoing

Teachers, Title I, Reading specialists, Special Education Teachers, Title I, Reading specialists, Special Education Teachers, Title I, Reading specialists, Special Education Teachers

Performance Pathways Individual Classroom Assessments Portfolio

Computerized

February---Online Teacher, Assistant Superintendent Immediately Periodically Teachers

observations, assessments, interviews, benchmarks, compilation of student work (paper, online) notes, records

Immediately Yearly Immediate As Needed

Teachers

Student Observation Logs

Teacher Guidance/Specialists Administration

Teacher Guidance/Specialists Administration Teachers, Special Education, Specialists, Guidance, Paras Teacher Guidance Administration

Special Education Online documents Coded students - 3 Special Education and Evaluations and written reports year cycle—within Evaluators 45 days of testing Teacher/Parent Communications Newsletters, Assign. books, homework, Conferences, Surveys NEASC Accredit. Process STAR Phone conversation, e-mail, Notes, meetings Immediate Weekly Teacher Guidance Administration

online, paper online

18 month process Administration Ten Year Cycle Accreditation Team Immediate Periodically Teacher Reading Specialist Administrators

Long Term and ongoing Action Research, Instruction, Teaching Practices.

Total building usage Teacher Reading Specialist

18 Action Plan: ICT Literacy Expanding Our Options: Goals for the Future • Providing more lab and classroom support: having staff present at specific times to assist teachers • Different delivery options: not just the traditional workshop- online options, project-based classroom work • Multiple trainers: teachers teaching other teachers • School-centered: technology training focused on what teachers in each school truly need. Needed is a comprehensive approach focusing on skills needed for using technology with students. ICT Instructional Recommendations The Fall Mountain Regional School District, in accordance with the state of New Hampshire, requires a comprehensive approach to the use of 21st century technologies, including, but not limited to computer technology. Technology will be integrated within all curriculum areas through the adoption of the Information and Communication Technologies Literacy (ICT) program. The ICT program provides developmentally appropriate technology learning opportunities for students in grades K-12. Students will learn to be successful in accessing, managing, evaluating, and creating information in order to make ethical and responsible decisions. Therefore, all students need to be proficient in the use of 21st century technologies within the context of the core subjects Reading, Mathematics, Language Arts, Science, Social Studies, and the Arts. Students will create an electronic portfolio that will represent cumulative work. Teachers will review the portfolios, using a locally developed assessment rubric, in order to determine competency. While the portfolio is being constructed, it is considered part of a student's record. As we move forward in the portfolio process in the Fall Mountain School District, please refer to the instructional recommendations below to help you and your students in creating a successful portfolio initiative.

Electronic Portfolio Artifacts can include:
Standardized tests; Observation; Student work; Comments describing a student’s reflection on his/her work

Goals:
Each student in grades K-12 at Fall Mountain must begin and complete an electronic portfolio that will demonstrate competency and learning and their use of 21st century technology tools. Portfolios need to be assessed using rubrics that help provide an outline of expectations and guideline for accomplishing success.

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The Purpose of the Portfolio Requirement:
The New Hampshire Department of Education’s website discusses in detail the ICT standards which took effect in 2005. http://www.nheon.org/ictliteracy/index.htm Portfolios can support learning and play an assessment role in a child’s educational career. Dr. Helen Barrett, a leader in the e-portfolio process has written many articles on the development and successes of portfolios. See: http://www.educationworld.com/a_tech/tech/tech111.shtml

Teacher’s Role:
Teachers play a key role in the success of the portfolio process and must support and provide various lessons that allow for the creation of artifacts that demonstrate learning within the curriculum. Do not reinvent the wheel, as the portfolio is not an add-on to your curriculum. Think about your content area and activities that you are already doing. Using the Exit Level Skills as a guide, develop activities and lessons that will help in the creation of digital artifacts. These, many times, are activities that you are already doing with your class. A good example reading in the understanding of today’s youth, the Internet, and 21st century technology: Levin, D. & Arafeh, S. (2002). The digital disconnect: The widening gap between Internet-savvy students and their schools. Washington, DC: Pew Internet & American Life Project. http://www.pewinternet.org/PPF/r/67/report_display.asp

Student’s Role:
Students need to take ownership in the development of their electronic portfolio throughout their education at Fall Mountain. Students should understand and sign the ICT Guidelines and Agreement for Electronic Portfolios. Portfolios should contain authentic project outcomes and real-world examples. The student’s role should be to: create > collect > select > reflect > present

NETS / Exit Level Skills:
In creating lessons and assignments within your curriculum, be sure to refer to the Fall Mountain Regional School District Technology Exit Level Skills and Performance Indicators. These are based on the NETS located on ISTE’s website: http://www.iste.org/Content/NavigationMenu/NETS/ForStudents/NETS_for_Students.htm. These standards will align and map well to the NH ICT standards where digital portfolios are referenced.

Storing the Portfolio:
Each student has an electronic portfolio folder located on his or her desktop within the network account. Students currently have unlimited storage space within their portfolio to allow for growth and creativity. This is not the ideal storage scenario. The district is investigating various digital portfolio management options. The future of the Portfolio Interface will soon be determined pending Title IID grant monies.

20 INTEGRATION OF TECHNOLOGY IN THE CURRICULUM The Fall Mountain Regional School District’s plan for an integrated approach to technology describes the steps needed to improve technology literacy for all students in grades K through 12. In order to reach this goal, the Fall Mountain Regional School District incorporates the ideals outlined in the NH ICT Literacy Standards for K-12 Students (Ed 306.42) into it’s technology program and goals.

Information and Communication Technologies Program - ICT
In order to meet the ICT standards the Fall Mountain School District will: • Adopt the national technology standards that provide a conceptual framework and broad guidelines for weaving these essential skills into all content areas at all grade levels for the 21st Century Skills. (Appendix C) • Revise the Information/technology standards of the district to be implemented by 2013. • Explore the use of 1:1 computing in selected classrooms in the high school utilizing a variety of technologies including but not limited to notebooks and iPads. • Increase the availability and integration of projectors, interactive whiteboards, document cameras, and other 21st century tools in K-12 classrooms. • Continue to use an ePortfolio solution to store digital artifacts for students K-12. Make a standard for the types of artifacts included in the portfolios, district wide over three years. Digital portfolio templates and assessment rubrics for K-8 and 9-12 digital portfolios as required by NHDOE School Approval Standard Ed 306.42. Those core subject areas are: Reading, Mathematics, English and Language Arts, Science, Social Studies, arts, and world languages. • Continue to increase the number of collaborative projects inside and outside our school. Digital Portfolio Guidelines: The Fall Mountain Regional School District is committed to working together to engage every learner. To this end, we promote and support the creation of a digital portfolio for each child. A digital portfolio is a purposeful collection of student work that demonstrates progress over time, illustrates effort, and demonstrates that the student has met specific learning goals and requirements. For students, the goal of the portfolio centers on self-assessment and reflection on work accomplished. Portfolios are considered a means for students and teachers to better understand each child as an individual learner. Goals: • To help students become more reflective about themselves as learners • To demonstrate evidence of student growth and achievement • To inform instruction, influence practice, and set goals • To help teachers learn about their students • To help students see technology as a tool to be used for a multiple purposes rather than an end to itself. Portfolio Artifacts Artifacts and programs used to create artifacts have been provided with very general guidelines in the past. The goals for the 2011-2014 plan are to have more specific guidelines to be used across the district for more consistency in student learning. Students are to put at least one teacher selected artifact per grade level in grades K-5 as described below. Grades 6-8 will be required to have one artifact per core class.

21 Artifact Requirements: Two artifacts and a reflection paper Additional artifacts can be chosen to add based on student selection Kindergarten - Second Grade K – Tux Paint- (math equations, spelling, story telling) 1 – Word processing (poetry, sentences, stories, writing samples); 2 – Graphic Organizers and/graphs (using MS word to organize information) Third Grade - Fourth Grade 3 – Power point (organizing information into slides and formatting information) 4 – Exploring operating systems (cut and paste, multi-tasking, taking screenshots, etc.…) Fifth Grade - Eighth Grade- Minimum of one artifact per core class 5 – 8 Using the previous years’ foundations, students will create a portfolio artifact for each core class: math, language arts, social studies, science, technology, and cultural studies. Teachers may choose the program and project for artifacts.

High School Student ePortfolio Plan Students are required to complete a digital portfolio by their senior year. Students will meet with their advisors regularly throughout the school year in order to ensure that benchmarks and indicators are being met within the student’s ePortfolio. High School staff will provide the opportunity for the creation of at least one ePortfolio artifact per semester. The student shall have the primary responsibility for making sure the artifact is placed in the ePortfolio. The advisor will assist students with checking to see that the necessary artifacts have been included and benchmarks and indicators have been met. Through collaboration with the student, in which the student takes the lead and is merely guided by the advisor, the advisor will keep a four-year, cumulative checklist of the benchmarks for each of their students. Upon completion of the student’s senior year, the advisor will certify that all requirements of the ePortfolio have been met. Self -reflection is a vital part of the ePortfolio process. Teachers will strive to incorporate selfreflection related to the indicators addressed by the assignment in each artifact included in the ePortfolios. Furthermore, in advisory, each student will write a yearly self-reflection that summarizes how he or she have used technology to meet the indicators represented in the artifacts they included for that year. Advisors will assist students by making descriptions of the benchmarks and indicators available to students. Advisors will look over the self-reflection prior to its inclusion to ensure quality work by the student, but the student shall have the responsibility of including the piece in the ePortfolio.

22 K-8 Digital Portfolio Rubric
 ICT  STANDARD  &   INDICATORS       No  evidence     0       1   Novice   Partially   Proficient   2   Proficient     3   Proficient  with   Distinction   4  

Creativity  &  Innovation:    
As  a  student,  I  have  demonstrated  creative  thinking,  constructed  knowledge,  and  developed  innovative  products   and  processes  using  technology  in  support  of  content.    There  is  evidence  in  the  portfolio  (artifacts  and  reflections)   that  shows  that…   a.)  I  applied  existing  knowledge  The  portfolio   The  portfolio   The  portfolio   The  portfolio   The  portfolio   by  determining  that  technology  shows  no   shows  efforts   shows  some   shows  clear   shows   should  be  used  in  a  project  or   evidence  of   at  meeting   evidence  of  this  evidence  of  this   outstanding   task  and  that  I  selected  an   evidence  of  this   this  standard.   this  standard.   standard.   standard.   appropriate  tool  or  resource  to       standard.   complete  the  assigned  task.       b.)  I  created  quality  original   The  portfolio   works  (artwork,  animation,   shows  no   podcast  etc.)  using  a  variety  of   evidence  of   software  and  used  these  original  this  standard.   works  to  express  an  idea  in  an   authentic  project.   c.)  I  demonstrated  sound   The  portfolio   critical  thinking  when  using  a   shows  no   digital  model  or  graphic   evidence  of   organizer  to  explore  a  complex   this  standard.   system  or  a  complex  issue.   d.)  I  effectively  interpreted   data  from  any  of  a  variety  of   sources  such  as  charts,  graphs,   databases,  spreadsheets  and   analyzed  the  effects  of  change   of  the  data.   The  portfolio   shows  no   evidence  of   this  standard.   The  portfolio   The  portfolio   The  portfolio   The  portfolio   shows  efforts   shows  some   shows  clear   shows   at  meeting   evidence  of  this  evidence  of  this   outstanding   evidence  of  this   this  standard.   standard.   standard.   standard.           The  portfolio   The  portfolio   The  portfolio   The  portfolio   shows  efforts   shows  some   shows  clear   shows   at  meeting   evidence  of  this  evidence  of  this   outstanding   evidence  of  this   this  standard.   standard.   standard.             standard.         The  portfolio   The  portfolio   The  portfolio   The  portfolio   shows  efforts   shows  some   shows  clear   shows   at  meeting   evidence  of  this  evidence  of  this   outstanding   evidence  of  this   this  standard.   standard.   standard.     standard.              

Communication  &  Collaboration:    
As  a  student,  I  have  used  digital  media  and  environments  to  communicate  and  work  collaboratively,  including  at  a   distance,  to  support  individual  learning  and  contribute  to  the  learning  of  others.      There  is  evidence  in  the  portfolio   (artifacts  and  reflections)…  that  shows  that…   a.)  I  effectively  interacted,   The  portfolio   The  portfolio   The  portfolio   The  portfolio   The  portfolio   collaborated  and  published   shows  no   shows  efforts   shows  some   shows  clear   shows   using  a  variety  of  digital  media   evidence  of   at  meeting   evidence  of  this  evidence  of  this   outstanding   evidence  of  this   for  an  authentic  task.   this  standard.   this  standard.   standard.   standard.     standard.         b)  I  communicated  information  The  portfolio   and/or  ideas  effectively  to   shows  no   multiple  audiences  using  a   evidence  of   variety  of  formats.   this  standard.   The  portfolio   The  portfolio   The  portfolio   The  portfolio   shows  efforts   shows  some   shows  clear   shows   at  meeting   evidence  of  this  evidence  of  this   outstanding   evidence  of  this   this  standard.   standard.   standard.   standard.    

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c.)  I  developed  global   awareness  by  engaging  with   learners  of  other  cultures.   The  portfolio   The  portfolio   The  portfolio   The  portfolio   The  portfolio   shows  no   shows  efforts   shows  some   shows  clear   shows   evidence  of   at  meeting   evidence  of  this  evidence  of  this   outstanding   this  standard.     this  standard.   standard.   evidence  of  this   standard.           standard.       The  portfolio   The  portfolio   The  portfolio   The  portfolio   The  portfolio   shows  no   shows  efforts   shows  some   shows  clear   shows   evidence  of   at  meeting   evidence  of  this  evidence  of  this   outstanding   this  standard.     this  standard.   standard.   evidence  of  this   standard.           standard.      

d.)  I  effectively  contributed  to   a  project  team  to  produce   original  works  or  solve   problems.  

Research  &  Information  Fluency:      
As  a  student,  I  apply  digital  tools  and  strategies  to  gather,  evaluate,  and  use  information  to  support  my  learning  in   the  content  areas.    There  is  evidence  in  the  portfolio  (artifacts  and  reflections)…  that  shows  that…   a.)  I  effectively  mapped  out   steps  of  what  resources  to  use   and  effectively  used  them  when   preparing  to  do  research.   b)  I  effectively  located,   organized,  analyzed,   evaluated,  synthesized  and   ethically  used  information   from  a  variety  of  sources  and   media.   c.)  I  effectively  evaluated  and   selected  information  sources   and  digital  tools  based  on  the   appropriateness  to  specific   tasks.   The  portfolio   The  portfolio   The  portfolio   The  portfolio   The  portfolio   shows  no   shows  efforts   shows  some   shows  clear   shows   evidence  of   at  meeting  this  evidence  of  this  evidence  of  this   outstanding   evidence  of  this   this  standard.     standard.   standard.   standard.       standard.   The  portfolio   The  portfolio   The  portfolio   The  portfolio   The  portfolio   shows   shows  no   shows  efforts   shows  some   shows  clear   evidence  of   at  meeting  this  evidence  of  this  evidence  of  this   outstanding   evidence  of  this   this  standard.   standard.   standard.   standard.     standard.   The  portfolio   shows  no   evidence  of   this  standard.   The  portfolio   The  portfolio   The  portfolio   The  portfolio   shows  efforts   shows  some   shows  clear   shows   at  meeting  this  evidence  of  this  evidence  of  this   outstanding   evidence  of  this   standard.   standard.   standard.   standard.  

24 High School Student Portfolio Rubric Students are required to complete a digital portfolio by their senior year. Students will start on their portfolios during one of their required courses freshman year and continue to add to their portfolio throughout their high school career. All students are required to upload all artifacts to their FMRSD ePortfolio . Students will use the school wide template for their portfolio to demonstrate competencies. However, students are encouraged to share their portfolio views with employers and/or universities. All portfolios will be assessed prior to graduating to ensure they have met the criteria established in the rubric that follows. All portfolios will be deleted from the Fall Mountain Regional network three months after graduation.

Goal I: Overall Portfolio Design & Technology Requirements: Criteria Exemplary Proficient Partially Proficient All artifacts have a Most of the artifacts There are several Technology well-written reflection have a well-written artifacts that do not have Artifacts & and are saved and reflection and are saved a reflection written or Reflections linked in an appropriate and linked in an the student has written
format. There are no or appropriate format. a few spelling or There may be a few grammatical errors. spelling and grammatical errors.

Incomplete

There are artifacts without a reflection and the reflections that are submitted are very one for each artifact, but poorly written. they are written poorly. Artifacts are not saved Some of the links are properly and/or many broken or the files are links are broken. saved in the wrong format.

Creativity and Innovation

Technology artifacts show a clear level of growth in the area of creativity and innovation in technology. Student’s work is from a span of time in several different core content areas.

Technology artifacts show some growth in the area of creativity and innovation. Student’s work is from a span of time, but does not include several different core content areas.

Technology artifacts show little growth in the area of creativity and innovation. Student’s work is from the same time-period and does not include different core content areas.

Technology artifacts do not show growth in the area of creativity and innovation. Student’s work is from the same time-period and/or is limited to one or two core content areas.

Communication and Collaboration

Artifacts show a clear level of growth in the area of communication and collaboration in technology. Student’s work is from a span of time in several different core content areas.

Artifacts show some growth in the area of communication and collaboration. Student’s work is from a span of time, but does not include several different core content areas.

Artifacts show little growth in the area of communication and collaboration. Student’s work is from the same time period and does not include different core content areas.

Artifacts do not show growth in the area of communication and collaboration. Student’s work is from the same time period and/or is limited to one or two core content areas.

25 Goal I: Overall Portfolio Design & Technology Requirements: (continued) Artifacts show a clear Artifacts show some Artifacts show little Research and level of growth in the growth in the area of growth in the area of Information area of research and research and research and information Fluency information fluency in information fluency. fluency.
technology. Student’s work is from a span of time in several different core content areas. Student’s work is from a span of time, but does not include several different core content areas. Artifacts show some growth in the area of critical thinking, problem solving, and decision-making. Student’s work is from a span of time, but does not include several different core content areas. Artifacts show some growth in the area of digital citizenship. Student’s work is from a span of time, but does not include several different core content areas. Artifacts show some growth in the area of technology operations and concepts. Student’s work is from a span of time, but does not include several different core content areas. Student’s work is from the same time period and does not include different core content areas. Artifacts show little growth in the area of critical thinking, problem solving, and decision-making. Student’s work is from the same time period and does not include different core content areas. Artifacts show little growth in the area of digital citizenship. Student’s work is from the same time period and does not include different core content areas. Artifacts show little growth in the area of technology operations and concepts. Student’s work is from the same time period and does not include different core content areas. Student’s work is from the same time period and/or is limited to one or two core content areas. Artifacts do not show growth in the area of critical thinking, problem solving, and decision-making. Student’s work is from the same time period and/or is limited to one or two core content areas. Artifacts do not show growth in the area of digital citizenship. Student’s work is from the same time period and/or is limited to one or two core content areas. Artifacts do not show growth in the area of technology operations and concepts. Student’s work is from the same time period and/or is limited to one or two core content areas. Artifacts do not show growth in the area of research and information fluency.

Critical thinking, problem solving, and decision making

Artifacts show a clear level of growth in the area of critical thinking, problem solving, and decision-making. Student’s work is from a span of time in several different core content areas.

Digital Citizenship

Artifacts show a clear level of growth in the area of digital citizenship. Student’s work is from a span of time in several different core content areas.

Technology Operations and Concepts

Artifacts show a clear level of growth in the area of technology operations and concepts. Student’s work is from a span of time in several different core content areas.

Growth

Artifacts show significant growth and span the student’s time at FMRSD

Artifacts show some growth and span the student’s time at FMRSD.

Artifacts show minimal growth and/or do not span the student’s time at FMRSD.

Artifacts do not show growth or span the student’s time at FMRSD.

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*All criteria are based on the NETS-S Standards as stated in the NH Department of Education ICT Standards and which is recommended the International Society for Technology in Education (ISTE). Artifact Examples for Technology: Creativity and Innovation Communication and Collaboration

Digital photography, use of technology to design something new. Projects in Adobe, Animator, Movie Maker, and CAD etc. are all great examples. Student participated in and/or created a blog. Student participated in and/or created a Wiki. Student created an interactive application by writing a program for the computer. Student creates a podcast that allows user to comment on the subject matter. Student uses a multimedia presentation to communicate with an audience. Student uses other technology tools to collaborate with others and communicate with an audience (one or more people) in writing, audio or video. Google Docs and Zoo are online examples of collaboration tools.

Research and Information Fluency Critical thinking, problem solving, and decision making Digital Citizenship Technology Operations and Concepts

Research paper with bibliography created in MS Word or using NoodleBib. Projects created with 21st Century technology tools to solve a complex problem. A program written for Video Game Development or Advanced Programming; a CAD project created for Computer Integrated Math; the use of technology when compiling information to solve problems in any class. Responsible use of a wiki, blog, podcast and/or other online tool. Any use of 21st Century skills will apply here. Use of technology to create a product using any productivity tool will demonstrate that student has gained knowledge in this area. Excel, PowerPoint, Publisher, Movie Maker, podcasts, wikis, websites, blogs, Access, CAD, Animator, Adobe, MS Word, Audacity, Google Docs are all good examples of using 21st Century technology tools.

27 Goal II: Working Together to Engage Every Learner: Student provides a minimum of two artifacts that addresses how they have been engaged in their learning. This should go above an individual grade, rather it should show how the student has had choice in their learning and has been engaged to go above and beyond the projects expectations. Examples should span the students four years at Fall Mountain Regional High School and show growth: Criteria Engagement Example 1 Exemplary
Artifact clearly illustrates engagement through which the student exceeded expectations. Student chooses work that clearly shows that they have been engaged and through this engagement has exceeded expectations Student chooses work that clearly shows that they have been engaged and through this engagement has exceeded expectations.

Proficient
Artifacts illustrate engagement through which the student has met expectations.

Partially Proficient

Incomplete

Artifact illustrates Artifact does not some engagement. illustrate engagement in learning, or example is missing.

Engagement Example 2

Student chooses work that shows that they have been engaged and through this engagement has met expectations

Student chooses work that shows that they have been engaged.

Student chooses work that shows that they have not been engaged in their learning or examples are missing.

Engagement Example 3

Student chooses work that shows that they have been engaged and through this engagement has met expectations

Student chooses work that shows that they have been engaged.

Student chooses work that shows that they have not been engaged in their learning or examples are missing.

28 Goal III: Academic Students choose two artifacts in each of the following categories to show how they have developed skills across content areas: literacy, communication, critical thinking, problem solving and technology to the best of their abilities. Examples should span the students four years at Fall Mountain Regional High School and show growth: Criteria Literacy: Example 1 Exemplary
Artifact demonstrates a high level of comprehension of print and/or non-print texts on both the surface and at a deeper level.

Proficient
Artifact demonstrates a good level of comprehension of print and/or non-print texts with attention to the surface and some deeper level of meaning. Artifact demonstrates a good level of comprehension of print and/or non-print texts with attention to the surface and some deeper level of meaning.

Partially Proficient
Artifact demonstrates some comprehension of print and/or nonprint texts and/or does not dig beneath the surface to examine broader themes and ideas. Artifact demonstrates some comprehension of print and/or nonprint texts and/or does not dig beneath the surface to examine broader themes and ideas.

Incomplete
Artifact does not demonstrate comprehension of print or non-print texts.

Literacy Example 2

Artifact demonstrates a high level of comprehension of print and/or non-print texts on both the surface and at a deeper level.

Artifact does not demonstrate comprehension of print or non-print texts.

Communication Student chooses work Student chooses work Student chooses that clearly that demonstrates they work that Example 1
exemplifies advanced communication abilities through oral, written, musical, visual or kinesthetic mediums. Students choose artifacts that show growth and ones that span their time at FMRSD. met the expectations in the areas of oral, written, musical, visual or kinesthetic communication.

Student’s chosen work does not demonstrate demonstrates they a clear ability to have begun to meet communicate through, the expectations in oral, written, musical, the area of oral, visual or kinesthetic written, musical, mediums, or examples visual or kinesthetic are missing communication. Artifacts partially show growth and span the student’s time at FMRSD. Artifacts do not show growth and do not span their time at FMRSD.

Students choose artifacts that show growth and ones that span their time at FMRSD.

29

Communication Student chooses work Student chooses work Student chooses that clearly that demonstrates they work that Example 2
exemplifies advanced communication abilities through oral, written, musical, visual or kinesthetic mediums. met the expectations in the areas of oral, written, musical, visual or kinesthetic communication.

Student’s chosen work does not demonstrate demonstrates they a clear ability to have begun to meet communicate through the expectations in oral, written, musical, the area of oral, visual or kinesthetic written, musical, mediums, or examples visual or kinesthetic are missing. communication. Artifact demonstrates partial understanding of information in artifact and can make obvious inferences. Student interprets some information to identify patterns and meaning, analyze arguments, draw conclusions, and formulate original thought. Artifact demonstrates partial understanding of information in artifact and can make obvious inferences. Student interprets some information to identify patterns and meaning, analyze arguments, draw conclusions, and formulate original thought. Artifact does not demonstrate understanding of information in artifact and/or does not show evidence to support statements or conclusions. Student does not interpret information to identify patterns and meaning, analyze arguments, draw conclusions, and formulate original thought. Artifact does not demonstrate understanding of information in artifact and/or does not show evidence to support statements or conclusions. Student does not interpret information to identify patterns and meaning, analyze arguments, draw conclusions, and formulate original thought

Critical Thinking Example 1

Artifact demonstrates comprehensive understanding of information in artifact and shows evidence of highly original thinking. Student insightfully interprets all information to identify patterns and meaning, analyze arguments, draw conclusions, and formulate original thought.

Artifact demonstrates adequate understanding of information in artifact and draws original conclusions.

Student interprets information to identify patterns and meaning, analyze arguments, draw conclusions, and formulate original thought.

Critical Thinking Example 2

Artifact demonstrates comprehensive understanding of information in artifact and shows evidence of highly original thinking. Student insightfully interprets all information to identify patterns and meaning, analyze arguments, draw conclusions, and formulate original thought.

Artifact demonstrates adequate understanding of information in artifact and draws original conclusions.

Student interprets information to identify patterns and meaning, analyze arguments, draw conclusions, and formulate original thought.

30 Problem Solving Example 1
Artifact illustrates the use of a variety of techniques and methods to successfully solve a complex problem. Student used sound reasoning and worked in a clear and logical manner. Artifact illustrates use of a few different techniques and methods to successfully solve a problem. Student used good reasoning and worked in a fairly clear and logical manner. Artifact illustrates use of a few different techniques and methods to successfully solve a problem. Student used good reasoning and worked in a fairly clear and logical manner. Artifacts show some growth and span the student’s time at FMRSD. Artifact illustrates the use of a single technique or method to successfully solve a problem. Student used some reasoning with some work being clear and logical. Artifact illustrates the use of a single technique or method to successfully solve a problem. Student used some reasoning with some work being clear and logical. Artifacts show minimal growth and/or do not span the student’s time at FMRSD. Artifact illustrates the solution of a problem using a single technique or method.

Student used little reasoning and work was not clear and logical. Artifact illustrates the solution of a problem using a single technique or method.

Problem Solving Example 2

Artifact illustrates the use of a variety of techniques and methods to successfully solve a complex problem. Student used sound reasoning and worked in a clear and logical manner.

Student used little reasoning and work was not clear and logical. Artifacts do not show growth or span the student’s time at FMRSD.

Growth

Artifacts show significant growth and span the student’s time at FMRSD.

31 Goal IV: Civic Student provides a minimum of two artifacts that address their preparation to assume active roles as responsible citizens who contribute to local, state, national, and global communities. Examples should span the students four years at Fall Mountain Regional High School and show growth: Criteria Civic Example 1 Exemplary
Artifact demonstrates that the student is a contributing member of their local, state, national and global communities. It shows that he/she has participated in events and has accomplished curriculum that will help them to be an outstanding citizen.

Proficient
Artifact demonstrates that the student is a member to their local, state, national and global communities.

Partially Proficient
Artifact demonstrates that the student is a developing member to their local, state, national and global communities. It shows that he/she has participated in events and has accomplished curriculum that will help him/her to be a participating citizen. Artifact demonstrates that the student is a developing member to their local, state, national and global communities. It shows that he/she has participated in events and has accomplished curriculum that will help him/her to be a participating citizen. Artifacts show minimal growth and/or do not span the student’s time at FMRSD.

Incomplete
Artifact does not demonstrate how the student has contributed to the local, state, national and global communities. It does not show that he/she has accomplished curriculum that will help him/her to be a participating citizen. Artifact does not demonstrate how the student has contributed to the local, state, national and global communities. It does not show that he/she has accomplished curriculum that will help him/her to be a participating citizen. Artifacts do not show growth or span the student’s time at FMRSD.

It shows that he/she has participated in events and have accomplished curriculum that will help them to be a contributing citizen. Artifact demonstrates that the student is a member to their local, state, national and global communities.

Civic Example 2

Artifact demonstrates that the student is a contributing member of their local, state, national and global communities. It shows that he/she has participated in events and has accomplished curriculum that will help them to be an outstanding citizen.

It shows that he/she has participated in events and have accomplished curriculum that will help them to be a contributing citizen. Artifacts show some growth and span the student’s time at FMRSD.

Growth

Artifacts show significant growth and span the student’s time at FMRSD.

32 Goal V: Social Students provide a minimum of two artifacts that address that they have learned to demonstrate respect for themselves, others, and the environment so that every member feels accepted and valued. Students show examples of skills and attitudes that will enable them to adopt a healthy lifestyle. Examples should span the students four years at Fall Mountain Regional High School and show growth. Criteria Exemplary Proficient Artifact is exceptional Artifact clearly Social in demonstrating respect demonstrates respect Growth and appreciation for Example 1 and appreciation for
self, others and the environment. self, others and the environment.

Partially Proficient
Artifact demonstrates some respect and appreciation for self, others and the environment. Artifact demonstrates some respect and appreciation for self, others and the environment. Artifacts show minimal growth and/or do not span the student’s time at FMRSD.

Incomplete
Artifact does not demonstrate appreciation for self, others and the environment. Artifact does not demonstrate appreciation for self, others and the environment. Artifacts do not show growth or span the student’s time at FMRSD.

Artifact is exceptional Artifact clearly Social in demonstrating respect demonstrates respect Growth and appreciation for Example 2 and appreciation for self, others and the environment. self, others and the environment.

Growth

Artifacts show significant growth and span the student’s time at FMRHD.

Artifacts show some growth and span the student’s time at FMRSD.

33 Goal VI: Rationale Each artifact is accompanied by a rational that provides a detailed explanation of the choice, why it was chosen, and how it meets the standard in which the student is attaching it. Criteria Exemplary There are no errors in Writing Mechanics spelling or grammar Proficient Partially Proficient Incomplete

Errors in spelling and Errors in spelling and Spelling and grammar grammar do not detract grammar are noticeable make it difficulty to from the overall product and problematic ascertain meaning and purpose Rationale is clear. Rationale is unclear and Rationale is unclear The reader is able to the reader needs to and there is little to no ascertain both why the work to ascertain why connection to the student chose the artifact the student chose the standard and it has some artifact and it’s connection to the connection to the standard standard

Clarity

Rationale is clear and easy to understand. The reader is able to ascertain both why the student chose the artifact and how it connects to the standard.

Significance Explanation of why the Explanation of why the Explanation of why the Explanation of why the
artifact was chosen and how it stands out amongst the work the student accomplished during their time at FMRSD is clear, indepth and concise artifact was chosen and how it stands out amongst the work the student accomplished during their time at FMRSD is could use more depth and clarity artifact was chosen and how it stands out amongst the work the student accomplished during their time at FMRSD is unclear to the reader artifact was chosen and how it stands out amongst the work the student accomplished during their time at FMRSD is missing

Growth

Rationales contain Rationales contain good significant discussion of discussions of growth in growth in the the designated areas designated area over the over the student’s four student’s four years at years at FMRSD. FMRSD.

Rationales contain limited discussions of growth in the designated areas over the student’s four years at FMRSD.

Rationales do not contain discussions of growth in the designated areas over the student’s four years at FMRSD.

34 High School Digital Portfolio Artifact Suggestions Goal I: Technology Creativity and Innovation Communication and Collaboration Research and Information Fluency

• World Language video projects • PowerPoint presentation for Drug Project (Health/PE) • PowerPoint and/or Video for Two-Person Project Presentation in American Studies II • Power Point presentations on variety of French and Spanish cultural topics • Stock Market Game from Economics • Human Research Project from Mass Media • Research for debates in Debate and Persuasion • House Design using AutoCAD from CIM • Data Analysis Project from Finite Math • Photos/video of student-based projects for French or Spanish • Web quests for research on French/Spanish speaking countries • Intro to Adobe Final Project • Stock Market Game from Economics

Critical Thinking and Decision Making Digital Citizenship Technology Operations and Concepts

Goal II: Working Together to Engage Every Learner
• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

A DVD of or pictures from World Language Festival Recordings of dialogues and speech samples in Spanish or French Video of performance in PE to show examples of helping others in class Tessellation Project from Geometry Any project from an English course with a self-chosen topic of personal interest (Essentials, Expository Writing, Debate and Persuasion, Women’s Literature, etc.) Power of One Ladakh Debate Road Trip (Europe/Australia) Newscast from the Past Ecuador debate Field trip to jail Q & A on Constitution Declaration town meeting Immigration project This I Believe Philosophy Cafe Independent research project Paper on identity  

35 Goal III: Academic Literacy
• • • • • • • • • •

An essay from any English class Photo essay from Journalism I Media artifact reflection from Women’s Literature Poetry analysis, poems, or reflection from Poetry and Fiction Creative writing from Expository Writing or Advanced Writing Survivors of flight 227 Bread Givers Crucible Peoples History of the United States (Zinn) Lies My Teacher Told Me (Loewen)
Sociology

• • • • •


• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Article on Japanese internment camps Questions from the chapters in the text they are asked to read The Things They Carried Question Period in Kalamazoo Rising on Setting sun Death Penalty Issue Paper

Communication
Writing samples from any class Recordings of dialogues and speech samples in French or Spanish Stock Market Game from Economics Problem Demonstration from Introduction to Math American Studies I Culminating Interview (video and/or rubric) Nonfiction Memory Collection from interviews Shakespeare Dramatic Monologue Lincoln-Douglas Debate from Debate and Persuasion Creative Response Project from any English class Power of One presentations Newscast From the Past Apartheid Project presentation Citizenship Education final: presentations of obligations of a citizen Citizenship video project Quarter research project Various projects Culminating interview Rome Day project Silk Road project This I Believe Philosophy Cafe

36 Critical Thinking
• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • Graphs Portfolio from Introduction to Math Linear Equation Project from Algebra I Finance Project from Finite Math Normal Curve Project from Finite Math Data Analysis Project from Finite Math Position papers/analytical essays from American Literature, British Literature, or Advanced Seminar in Literature Power of One Graded discussion on Hotel Rwanda Ladakh debate Ecuador debate 9/11 memorial project Declaration town meeting Could the Civil War have been avoided? Final Portfolio Graded discussion on Amazing Grace Paper on identity Advanced WC debate Advanced WC colloquium

Problem Solving
• • • • • • • • • • • • • PowerPoints on French or Spanish cultural topics Video projects for French or Spanish Unit test from Geometry Linear Programming from Algebra II Chapter 4 Test on Matrices from Algebra II Layouts from Journalism II or Advanced Publications Human Research Project from Mass Media Action Research Project from Issues in Literature Power of One Ladakh debate Ecuador debate Drop the Atomic Bomb or not? Could the Civil War have been avoided? Is Columbus a Hero, Villain or a Saint?

37 Goal IV: Civic
• • • • • • • • • • • • • • Community service component of Costa Rica trip A video or picture of in-class community service in WL Pictures of work for CPR card and/or a scan of the card A video or picture of yourself working in teams to solve problems and perform tasks in PE Action Plan from American Studies II Thematic Collection Land Study Project from Literature and the Land Power of One Graveyard project What does it mean to be a citizen Political figures-visits & Q + A Local government interview project Video project 9/11 memorial project Current Events Do something meaningful project

Goal V: Social
• • • • • • • • • • • • • • Evidence of quality listening to fellow students presentations in WL Pictures from trips to French and Spanish speaking countries Action Research Project from Issues in Literature Land Journal Entries from Literature and the Land Land Use Philosophy Essay from Literature and the Land Personal Peace Philosophy from Peace Studies Power of One Final project Class reflection: what have you learned about yourself Final portfolio This I Believe Philosophy Café Do something meaningful project Identity paper Advanced WC colloquium

38

Fall Mountain Regional School District ICT Benchmarks Grades K-8
Adapted With permission from Londonderry School District

ICT Benchmarks- Grade K
District Benchmark  
Frame simple questions related to a topic of interest or assignment.

Skills Included  
Use a variety of technology resources for directed and independent learning activities.

ICT Standards  
Standard 1- Creativity and Innovation Standard 3- Research information fluency Standard 1-Creativity and Innovation Standard 6-Technology and Concepts Standard 1-Creativity and Innovation Standard 6-Technology and Concepts Standard 2 Communication and Collaboration

Use a drawing program such as Tux Paint Use kindergarten appropriate software to demonstrate knowledge of core resources. concepts.

Understand how to use classroom technology.

Launch and quit a software program. Use computer devices e.g., a mouse, keyboard, SMART Board.

Observe the gathering of information and communicating with others using telecommunications.

Work together with others in the classroom using technology.

ICT Benchmarks- Grade 1
District Benchmark  
Frame simple questions related to a topic of interest or assignment. Observe the gathering of information and communicating with others using telecommunications.

Skills Included  

ICT Standards  

With assistance, ask “I wonder” questions about Standard 3   a topic (teacher and/or librarian directed) Research information fluency Use a variety of media and technology Standard 2   resources for directed and independent learning Communication and activities. Collaboration   Work cooperatively and collaboratively with peers and teachers when using technology in the classroom.

Use word processing program to type simple words and sentences and print the document. Understand how to navigate a variety of With assistance, use multimedia resources resources in order to use them effectively. (interactive books, educational software, multimedia encyclopedias, and websites) Use a word processing program to demonstrate knowledge of core subject matter.

Standard 6   Technology and Concepts

Use input devices and output devices (mice, and Standard 6   keyboards) to operate computers, and other Technology and Concepts technologies   Demonstrate the proper handling of hardware and software Select, launch and quit a software program.

39

ICT Benchmarks- Grade 2
District Benchmark Skills Included ICT Standards
Standard 3   Research and information fluency With assistance, identify questions needed With assistance, develop questions based on to solve and information problem background knowledge • Ask “I wonder” questions about a topic • With assistance, identify keywords about the topic, problem or question Demonstrate the ethical use of information Write and/or state a simple citation (author and title) to indicate an information source With assistance, gather information and Create a basic presentation using either communicate with others using software, such as PowerPoint, or an online telecommunications application. Understand how to navigate a variety of With assistance, use multimedia resources multimedia resources in order to use them (interactive books, educational software, effectively multimedia encyclopedias, and websites) Understand how to use a graphic organizer Use input and output devices (mice and to organize ideas and information. keyboards) to operate computers and other technologies Demonstrate the proper handling of hardware and software Insert media such as text, pictures, sound and graphics • Edit multimedia presentations

Standard 5   Digital citizenship Standard 2   Communication and collaboration Standard 6   Technology and concepts Standard 6   Technology and concepts Standard 1 Creativity and innovation

ICT Benchmarks- Grade 3
District Benchmark
With assistance, identify questions needed to solve an information problem

Skills Included  
With assistance develop questions and follow-up questions   • With assistance identify key-words about the topic, problem or question

ICT Standards  
Standard 3   Research and Information Fluency

With assistance locate, evaluate and Identify a variety of information sources- books, Standard 3   select appropriate information sources to periodicals, electronic resources, Internet   Research and Information answer questions • Demonstrate the use of an atlas, dictionary, and Fluency encyclopedia • Determine the appropriate source for the information question • With assistance locate and retrieve print materials in the library Understand the basic organizational structure of a book for accessing information Demonstrate the ethical use of information Demonstrate the use of the table of contents   • With assistance, use alphabetical indices or menus to access print and electronic resources Standard 3   Research and Information Fluency

With assistance, complete a bibliography citation   Standard 5   With assistance, identify keywords and phrases to Digital Citizenship record information (note-taking) Define plagiarism Demonstrate basic knowledge of a computer keyboard   Identify basic components of a computer Demonstrate proper handling and use of computers and software Demonstrate use of (word processing, graphic organizers, and multimedia software) Save documents to the appropriate place Create, edit, save, and print a word processing document   Demonstrate appropriate use of formatting tools (Font, size, color, margins) Insert media such as text, pictures, sound and graphics Edit multimedia presentations Play multimedia presentations Begin to search an on-line catalog to locate materials Understand how to use call numbers to locate   materials With assistance use search engines and data bases to locate appropriate web sites Begin to understand filters and why certain sites are blocked Standard 6   Technology and Concepts

Use classroom technology effectively

Use word processing to create a written product

Standard 1   Creativity and Innovation Standard 6 Technology and Concepts Standard 1   Creativity and Innovation Standard 6 Technology and Concepts

With assistance, create a multimedia presentation using slideshow presentation software such as Power Point. Identify and locate the appropriate sources of information

With assistance, identify questions needed to solve an information problem

Standard 3 Research and Information Fluency   Standard 1 Creativity and Innovation Standard 5 Digital Citizenship Standard 6 Technology and Concepts With assistance develop questions and follow-up Standard 3 questions Research and Information With assistance identify key-words about the topic, Fluency problem or question

41

ICT Benchmarks- Grade 3 continued
With assistance locate, evaluate and Identify a variety of information sources- books, Standard 3 select appropriate information sources to periodicals, electronic resources, Internet Research and Information answer questions • Demonstrate the use of an atlas, dictionary, and Fluency encyclopedia • Determine the appropriate source for the information question • With assistance locate and retrieve print materials in the library Understand the basic organizational structure of a book for accessing information Demonstrate the ethical use of information Demonstrate the use of the table of contents • With assistance, use alphabetical indices or menus to access print and electronic resources With assistance, complete a bibliography citation • With assistance, identify keywords and phrases to record information (note-taking) • Define plagiarism • Demonstrate basic knowledge of a computer keyboard • Identify basic components of a computer • Demonstrate proper handling and use of computers and software • Demonstrate use of (word processing, graphic organizers, and multimedia software) Save documents to the appropriate place Create, edit, save, and print a word processing document • Demonstrate appropriate use of formatting tools (Font, size, color, margins) Insert media such as text, pictures, sound and graphics • Edit Multimedia presentations • Play multimedia presentations Begin to search an on-line catalog to locate materials • Understand how to use call numbers to locate materials • With assistance use search engines and data bases to locate appropriate web sites Begin to understand filters and why certain sites are blocked Standard 3 Research and Information Fluency Standard 5 Digital Citizenship

Use classroom technology effectively

Standard 6 Technology and Concepts

Use word processing to create a written product

Standard 1 Creativity and Innovation Standard 6 Technology and Concepts Standard 1 Creativity and Innovation Standard 6 Technology and Concepts

With assistance, create a multimedia presentation using slideshow presentation software such as Power Point. Identify and locate the appropriate sources of information

With assistance, identify questions needed to solve an information problem

Standard 3 Research and Information Fluency Standard 1 Creativity and Innovation Standard 5 Digital Citizenship Standard 6 Technology and Concepts Brainstorm to develop a set of questions, which are Standard 3 carefully aligned and focused on a main idea or Research and information essential question fluency Standard 4 Critical thinking, problem solving, and decision making

ICT Benchmarks- Grade 4
District Benchmark Skills Included   ICT Standards  
Standard 3   Research and information fluency Standard 4 Critical thinking, problem solving, and decision making Standard 3 Research and Information Fluency   With assistance, identify questions Brainstorm to develop a set of questions, needed to solve an information which are carefully aligned and focused on a problem main idea or essential question

Identify and locate the appropriate Search an on-line catalog to locate materials   sources of information • Understand how to use call numbers to locate materials • With assistance use search engines and Standard 4 data bases to locate appropriate web sites Critical thinking, problem solving, and Use proper internet terms, such as URL, decision making domain, and browser… Use appropriate search strategies to locate information on the internet. Use and understand difference between the WWW and subscription databases such as World book Encyclopedia online.

Demonstrate the ability to access specific information from within a variety of resources

With assistance identify keywords for locating information   • With assistance demonstrate the use of an index and the table of contents within print resources • With assistance navigate within a web site to locate specific information • Determine the appropriate source for the information question

Standard 3 Research and Information Fluency   Standard 4 Critical thinking, problem solving, and decision making

Extract and organize appropriate With assistance, identify keywords and information about a problem, topic phrases to record information (note-taking)   or question • Organize notes and ideas to support the topic or question Demonstrate the ethical use of information With assistance, complete a bibliography citation   • With assistance, identify keywords and phrases to record information (note-taking) • Define plagiarism

Standard 3 Research and Information Fluency   Standard 4 Critical thinking, problem solving, and decision making Standard 1   Creativity and Innovation Standard 4 Critical thinking, problem solving, and decision making␣

Present information from multiple sources to answer an information problem (synthesis)

Demonstrate proper keyboarding techniques

Identify facts which support main idea   Standard 6   • Draw conclusions based on facts Technology and Concepts • Create new knowledge and understandings to complete the information task Standard 4 Critical thinking, problem solving, and decision making Use both hands when keyboarding   Standard 1 • Hands are in the home row position Creativity and innovation   Continue to develop proper keyboarding skills Standard 6 Technology and Concepts

43

ICT Benchmarks- Grade 4 continued
Electronically edit and revise wordprocessing Demonstrate appropriate use of formatting Standard 6   tools (Font, size, color, margins)   Technology and Concepts • Appropriately use the on-line dictionary and thesaurus • Uses the edit functions appropriately (copy, paste, cut) Save and locate files • Name files appropriately   • Use “end task” or “forced quit” when appropriate Enter data   • Format charts/graphs Standard 1   Creativity and innovation Standard 6 Technology and Concepts Standard 6   Technology and Concepts

Demonstrate and understanding of technology systems, concepts and operations

Use spreadsheets to organize data and to produce charts/graphs Create a simple multimedia presentation that includes text, graphics, and sound

Insert media such as text, pictures, sound, and Standard 1   graphics   Creativity and innovation • Edit multimedia presentations • Present multimedia presentations Standard 6 Technology and Concepts

44

ICT Benchmarks Grade 5
District Benchmark Skills Included   ICT Standards  
Identify questions needed to solve an Brainstorm to develop a set of questions, which Standard 3 information problem are carefully aligned and focused on a main idea Research and Information or essential question Fluency Standard 4 Critical Thinking, Problem Solving, and Decision Making Identify and locate the appropriate Search an on-line catalog to locate materials Standard 3 sources of information • Understand how to use call numbers to locate Research and Information materials Fluency • Use search engines and data bases to locate appropriate web sites Demonstrate the ability to access specific information from within a variety of resources Identify keywords for locating information • Demonstrate the use of an index, table of contents, and glossary within print resources • Navigate within a web site to locate specific information Standard 3 Research and Information Fluency

Extract and organize appropriate Identify keywords and phrases to record information about a problem, topic, or information (note-taking) question • Organize notes and ideas to support the topic or question Demonstrate the ethical use of information Independently complete bibliography citations • Identify keywords and phrases to record information (note taking) • Be able to define plagiarism

Standard 3 Research and Information Fluency Standard 3 Research and Information Fluency Standard 5 Digital Citizenship Standard 1 Creativity and  innovation  

Present information from multiple sources to answer an information problem (synthesis)

Standard 4 Critical Thinking, Problem Solving, and Decision Making Demonstrate proper keyboarding Use both hands when keyboarding Hands are in Standard 6 techniques the home row position Technology and Concepts Use spreadsheets to organize data Enter data • Format chart/graph Standard 6 and to produce charts/graphs Technology and Concepts Use a database to access and Explain what a “field” is • Enter data • Sort data Standard 6 organize information Technology and Concepts Identify peripheral devices and • Use appropriate settings Standard 6 demonstrate their uses (including but • Transfer image to computer Technology and Concepts not limited to printer, scanners, and digital cameras)

Identify facts which support main idea • Draw conclusions based on facts • Create new knowledge and understandings to complete the information task

45

ICT Benchmarks Grade 5 continued
Demonstrate an understanding of technology systems, concepts, and operations Independently… Continue to develop proper keyboarding skills Open files or applications correctly Use pull-down menus: File, Edit, View, Format, etc. Recognize and use desktop/dock icons Align text left, center and right Spell-check a document Copy, cut and paste text and graphics Explain basic network terms such as server, account, login terms, etc. Use bullets and numbering With Assistance... Recognize basic file name extensions (.ppt, .doc, .xls, etc.) Save files to a specified folder on the server correctly • Use “end task” or “forced quit” when Print to different locations Create folders for saving and organizing work Standard 6 Technology and Concepts

Create a multimedia presentation that Insert media such as text, pictures, sound and includes text, graphics, and sound graphics • Edit multimedia presentations • Present multimedia presentations

Standard 1 Creativity and  innovation   Standard 6 Technology and Concepts

ICT Benchmarks Grade 6
District Benchmark
Locate and use a variety of information resources to fulfill the research task.

Skills Included  
Find, evaluate and select appropriate print and /or digital resources to complete the research task. Evaluate information for accuracy and validity.   Search the online library catalog to locate resources in the Library Media Center. Use online databases such as EBSCO Develop and refine questions that are relevant to the topic. Develop questions that promote deeper understanding of topic.

ICT Standards  
Standard 4   Critical thinking, problem solving, and decision making Standard 3 Research and information fluency Standard 4   Critical thinking, problem solving, and decision-making Standard 3 Research and information fluency

With guidance, develop essential and open-ended questions pertaining to topic.

Identify key words to locate Use background knowledge as a context for new relevant information from a variety learning of information resources. Extract information that is relevant to the specific question or topic. Record information using keywords and phrases (note taking).

Organize knowledge so it is useful to the research task. Standard 1 Demonstrate knowledge of graphic organizer. Creativity and  innovation   Standard 3 Research and information fluency. Create a complete works cited page that acknowledges Standard 5:   the use of a variety of resources using the proper Digital citizenship bibliographic format. Standard 2   Communication and collaboration

Use the appropriate bibliography format for all resources used including quotations, images, and sound.

Utilize the basic features of a word Use the writing process to express thoughts and ideas processing program in order to effectively. communicate new knowledge in a related content area. Create and present a multimedia Use technology as a tool to research, organize and product to convey new knowledge communicate information.   in a related content area. Use technology to create products which express thoughts and ideas effectively.

Standard 2   Communication and collaboration Standard 4 Critical thinking, problem solving, and decisionmaking. Standard 1 Creativity and  innovation  

Use a spreadsheet to create and manipulate data to convey new knowledge in a related content area.

Use technology as a tool to research, organize and communicate information.   Use technology to create products which express thoughts and ideas effectively.

Use digital tools to communicate Use technology and other information tools to analyze and work collaboratively to support and organize information.   content area learning. Use technology, writing or speaking skills to express thoughts and ideas effectively. Use tools such as wikis, blogs, forums, surveys, video conferencing, etc. Post completed work on the Internet such as when using Moodle Demonstrate ethical use of creative works and information when creating new products or communicating new knowledge Use information and technology ethically and responsibly.   Demonstrate knowledge of intellectual property and copyright restrictions for a variety of resources.

Standard 2   Communication and collaboration

Standard 5   Digital citizenship

ICT Benchmarks Grade 7
District Benchmark
Develop essential and open-ended questions pertaining to topic.

Skills Included  
Develop a range of questions that are relevant to the topic.

ICT Standards  
Standard 3 Research and information fluency

Develop and refine research questions in response to information gathered.

Standard 4 Critical thinking, problem solving, and decision-making. Refine questions so they are aligned with Standard 3 the main focus of the research topic. Research and information fluency Standard 4 Critical thinking, problem solving, and decision-making. Refine questions so they are aligned with Standard 3 the main focus of the research topic. Research and information fluency Standard 4 Critical thinking, problem solving, and decision-making. Standard 2 Communication and collaboration

Use advanced search tools in digital information resources.

Create and present a multimedia product to convey new knowledge in a related content area.

Use a spreadsheet to create and manipulate data to convey new knowledge in a related content area.

Use technology as a tool to research, organize and communicate information. Use technology to create products which express thoughts and ideas effectively. Standard 4 Critical thinking, problem solving, and decision-making. Use technology as a tool to research, Standard 1 organize and communicate information. Creativity and innovation Use technology to create products which express thoughts and ideas effectively. Use information and technology ethically Standard 5 and responsibly. Digital Citizenship Demonstrate knowledge of intellectual property and copyright restrictions in a variety of resources.

Demonstrate ethical use of creative works and information when creating new products or communicating new knowledge.

ICT Benchmarks Grade 8
District Benchmark
Identify misconceptions, conflicting information, and point of view or bias from information resources.

Skills Included  
Engage in inquiry based research by applying critical thinking skills.

ICT Standards  
Standard 3:   Research and information fluency Standard 4: Critical thinking, problem solving, and decision making Standard 3:   Research and information fluency. Standard 4 Critical thinking, problem solving, and decision-making. Standard 1:   Creativity and innovation Standard 3: Research and information fluency

Select the most useful information resources to fulfill specific research needs.

Find, evaluate and select appropriate resources to fulfill research task. Evaluate information for accuracy and validity. Utilize appropriate format to organize knowledge so that it is useful to the completion of the research task. Draw conclusions and develop solutions based on information

Use a variety of note taking strategies.

Create and present a multimedia product to convey new knowledge in a related content area.

Use technology as a tool to research, organize and communicate information.   Use technology to create products which express thoughts and ideas effectively. Use technology as a tool to research, organize and communicate information.   Use technology to create products which express thoughts and ideas effectively.

Standard 2:   Communication and Collaboration Standard 4: Critical thinking, problem solving, and decision-making. Standard 1: Creativity and innovation

Use a spreadsheet to create and manipulate data to convey new knowledge in a related content area.

Use digital tools to communicate and work collaboratively to support content area learning.

Use technology and other information tools Standard 2:   to analyze and organize information.   Communication and collaboration. Use technology, writing or speaking skills to express thoughts and ideas effectively Standard 6: Technology operations and concepts.

49 Technology Skill Levels for Grades K-8
Below are technology skills for the appropriate grade levels. Technology Skill Levels B= Beginner- a technology skill is introduced and is new to the student. I = In progress or Intermediate- student is allow to practice through classroom activities to reinforce skill. M = Mastery- skill is initiated and completed independently and with 100% accuracy. BASIC COMPUTER AND TECHNOLOGY OPERATION 1 2 3 4 5 Identify parts of the computer and their functions Locate and access software applications Turn hardware on and off Open and close a program Navigating with a mouse, recognizing and using keys (E.g., letters, numbers, and space bar). 6 Create a new file 7 Navigate through a file 8 Highlight or select text 9 Use pull-down menus: File, Edit, View, Format, etc. 10 Cutting, copying, and pasting within a document. 11 Practice safe and proper handling of hardware 12 Find and open a saved file 13 Name and save a file to the appropriate location 14 Differentiate between hardware and software 15 Print a file to a designated printer 16 Delete a file 17 Modify page setup: portrait or landscape view 18 Explain when to use the Desktop: (Ex. Saving a document in progress.) 19 Rename a file 20 Compare & contrast various operating systems, programs, and computers 21 Creating, naming, and renaming folders. 22 Creating folders within folders (nested folders) USING A SCHOOL NETWORK 1 Log on to a network using a password 2 Save to a personal folder on a network 3 Finding network folders such as student share and portfolio 4 Keeping personal account and password private and safe KEYBOARDING 1 Practice using both left and right hands on the keyboard 2 Practice touch typing skills to improve accuracy 3 Practice proper posture/ergonomics 4 Keyboarding is used for real classroom activities and not just for typing practice CREATING DOCUMENTS 1 Create a simple document 2 Enter, edit and delete text 3 Modify text size and style 4 Align text 5 Bulleting and numbering 6 Line spacing and page spacing K 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 B B B B B I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I M M M I I M M M I I M M M I I M M M I I M M M

B I I M M M M M B I I M M M M M B I I M M M M M B I I I B I I I B I I I B I I B I I B I I B I B I I M M M I M M M I M M M I M M M I M M M I M M M I M M M I I M M I M I M I M I M I M I M B I B I B I B I B I B I

K 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 B I B I B I B I I I I I I I I I I I I

K 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 B I B I B I B I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I

K 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 B I I M M M M M B I I M M M M M B I I M M M M M B I M M M M M B I I B I I I M M M I M M M

50
CREATING DOCUMENTS (continued) 7 Formatting fonts 8 Inserting Word Art, pictures and clip art 9 Cut, copy, paste, and undo using keyboard shortcuts 10 Knowing when to save and when to save as 11 Adding standard/ formatting toolbars 12 Document or page setup 13 Grammar and spelling checks 14 Move, copy and delete blocks of text 15 Set margins and tabs 16 Adding tables 17 Insert page numbers 18 Use the Find…/Replace command CREATING AND USING SPREADSHEETS 1 Explain the concept of a spreadsheet 2 Enter data on a pre-constructed spreadsheet 3 Move the cursor between cells/fields or categories 4 Create a spreadsheet 5 Create a chart or graph from a spreadsheet 6 Adjust column width and row height 7 Sort data on a spreadsheet 8 Find data on a spreadsheet 9 Use a formula to make a calculation CREATING A PRESENTATION 1 Create a basic presentation 2 Add new slides 3 Slide layout and slide design 4 View show 5 Slide transition 6 Insert a picture for a background 7 Adding sound and video; as appropriate for presentation USING GRAPHICS AND PICTURES 1 Select and move a graphic object such as a picture 2 Import a graphic file 3 Resize, reshape, and/or format a graphic SEARCHING AND USING THE INTERNET 1 Search for and find appropriate information 2 Use EBSCO and other subscription databases 3 Understands Internet security issues and can demonstrate safe practices 4 Using other sites for images: (not using Google images) 5 Evaluate the validity, appropriateness and authenticity of online information 6 Saving an image to the desktop 7 Understand how content filtering works-why certain sites are blocked 8 Understanding Web 2.0 concepts: blogs, social networks, RSS, podcasts 9 Organizing bookmarks or favorites 10 Conduct an advanced Google search using keywords and Boolean operators (and, or, not) K 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 B I I I M M M B I I I M M M B I I B I B I B I B I I M M I M M I M M I M M I M M I I I I I

B I M M B I B I

B I

B I K 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 B I B I B I B I B I B I I I I I I I I M I M I M I M I M I M I I

B I B I

B I K 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 B I I I B I I I B I I I B I I I B I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I

B I

B I

K 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 B I I M M M M B I I I B I I I I M M I M M

K 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 B I I I B I I I B I I I B I I I B I I I B I I I B I B I B I B I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I

51
SOCIAL AND ETHICAL ISSUES 1 Discuss the role of technology in society 2 Demonstrate respect for the work of others 3 Practice privacy and confidentiality 4 Adhere to copyright laws and citing sources correctly 5 Comply with the Student Acceptable Use Policy K 1 B B 2 I I B 3 I I I B B 4 I I I I I 5 I I I I I 6 I I I I I 7 I I I I I 8 I I I I I

Fall Mountain Regional School District K-8 Library Media Program Five-Year Plan

2011 – 2016
The mission of the Fall Mountain Regional School District is to maximize our children’s academic, technological, artistic, athletic, and social skills to be productive 21st century citizens. Fall Mountain Core Values: Respect, Responsibility, Integrity, and Citizenship FMRSD Library Media Program Mission Statement and Goals: It is the mission of the Fall Mountain Regional High School Library Media Center: • To ensure that students and staff are effective users of ideas and information. • To create an environment in which collaborative strategies with classroom teachers are developed to support authentic student learning. • To enhance the curricular and educational goals of the school through the on-going development of print and non-print materials collection • To achieve an atmosphere in which students feel comfortable taking intellectual risks while pursuing educational goals and informational needs.

Fall Mountain Regional K-8 Library Objectives and Strategies 2011-2016
Goal #1: To ensure that students and staff are effective users of ideas and information. Objective #1: Review the K-8 information literacy curriculum to reflect the four Standards for the 21st Century Learner and the Common Core Standards. In so doing, also align the curriculum with ICT standards and make it competency based. (Target date 2013) Standard for the 21st Century Learner • Inquire, think critically, and gain knowledge • Draw conclusions, make informed decisions, apply knowledge to new situations, and create new knowledge • Share knowledge and participate ethically and productively as members of our democratic society • Pursue personal and aesthetic growth (Standards for the 21st-Century Learner 2007). Objective #2: Work closely with the District Technology Integration Specialist to provide staff with opportunities to apply growing technology skills in the classroom and in the library (In progress and ongoing) Objective #3: Encourage students to become millennial learners who are information literate, independent thinkers, and socially responsible by integrating library and research skills in to the classroom content. (In progress and ongoing)

52 Objective #4: Continue building regular library lessons conducted by the library assistants in each building. (In progress and ongoing) Objective #5: Work with the high school library media specialist to create common K-12 Library Media program goals and objectives for the school district. (Target date 2014)

Goal #2: To create an environment in which collaborative strategies with classroom teachers are developed to support authentic student learning. Objective #1: Attend staff meetings and meet with teachers during their planning time to consult with teachers and encourage projects that allow students to work creatively, think critically, and reflect regularly. (in progress and ongoing) Objective #2: Continue discussion and communication between library assistants and teachers and staff in each building so regular library visits support classroom content. (in progress and ongoing)

Goal #3: To enhance the curricular and educational goals of the school through the on-going development of print and non-print materials collection. Objective #1: Implement transition from Follett Circulation/Catalog to Follett Destiny (In progress and ongoing) Objective #2: Explore best possible medium for providing access to necessary information. Some print materials will transition to electronic format. (Target date 2013) Objective #3: Continue to review subscription databases for both relevancy and usage. (In progress and ongoing) Objective #4: Work with the high school media specialist to review school district policies relating to the media centers. (Target date 2014)

Goal #4: To achieve an atmosphere in which students feel comfortable taking intellectual risks while pursuing educational goals and informational needs. Objective #1: Offer student oriented media center that displays their work and is visually stimulating. (In progress and ongoing) Objective #2: Offer materials for students based on academic needs and personal interest. (In progress and ongoing)

53 Information Literacy and Technology in the High School Library Media Center At the high school level, information literacy is taught on both a formal and informal basis through classroom, small group, and individual instruction. Formal instruction takes place with all freshman English classes at Fall Mountain Regional High School. Currently, these classes come to the media center for a three-day project, which is intended to introduce the students to a research process. This is done using the Big6 Skills. Depending on the needs of the teachers, this process is delivered either as an integrated part of a project already underway with the class or as a completely separate project under the direction of the media specialist. The project involves concepts such as brainstorming, location, prioritizing, selection, organization and presentation of information, research strategies, and self-reflection. Further, every attempt is made to provide a practical application for the finished product. Informal instruction takes place daily as we assist other classes, small groups and individual students with meeting their information needs. We have come a long way with the delivery of information literacy skills at the high school. The staff has been very receptive to the instruction we offer here and how well it supports their curricular goals. We have wonderful technology at our disposal with a solid staff backing it up. There is no shortage of ideas or people with whom to exchange them. Everyone wants to make what we have to offer our students and staff the best that it can possibly be. That being said, we still have a very long way to go. The information literacy instruction that is currently offered at the high school would fall around early middle school in most districts. Because of staffing shortages and scheduling problems at the K-8 level, our students are being seriously shortchanged. They are not being challenged to think critically when they are younger. Critical thinking, higher order thinking skills are the emphasis of any information literacy program. Research proves that students who are able to think critically perform better academically and on standardized tests. These students are able to take charge of their own education and become independent learners. There is a broad spectrum of valuable instruction that could be accomplished at the high school level if the groundwork could be laid during the K-8 years. These types of projects cannot be taught, however, if the basic understanding of the research process and the information literacy skills that accompany it, are lacking. It would be highly advisable to staff the K-8 schools with at least one full-time certified media generalist per attendance area. The job of a media generalist is often misunderstood and undervalued. They can do so much to enhance the academic life of the students and staff they serve. They must have the opportunity to do so.

54 Action Plan: Data Collection

District Data Collection and Data Analysis
NWEA and NECAP data • Performance Pathways at the administrative and teacher level • Data teams at every building • TeachScape • PowerSchool • Read 180 • Accelerated Reader • Accelerated Math • Common ICT Rubrics for Digital portfolios • Easy IEP • DIBELS • PALS Reading Assessment • Kindergarten Literacy Assessment - primary Map Testing • BudgetSense Accounting Software • Technology Integration Surveys on access, software and training needs

Technology Evaluation
Evaluation will take place on an annual basis. Staff surveys regarding software, hardware, and professional development will be administered in June of each school year. LoTi surveys are taken by every teacher in the district each year. The revised student exit level skills are included in the Appendix. These revisions were influenced by the National Education Technology Standards (NETS). Information and Communication Technologies Program (ICT) – Digital Portfolio Evaluations: as students begin creating an electronic portfolio in grades K - 12. These digital portfolios will address the following components: • Basic operations and concepts • Social, ethical, and human issues • Technology productivity tools

55 Action Plan: Community Collaboration

Community Collaboration
• Community Connections will be based on communication between the classroom and the home, building a relationship that is a true partnership between parents and teachers centering on the needs of each student. • Inform and train parents in the use of PowerSchool to access student progress and communicate with teachers. • Allow students access to their own information so they can monitor progress and remedy problems. • Open Information flow from the district to the community. • Publish district information and calendars on the web. • Homework help and support via the internet and PowerSchool’s Parent Portal • Sponsor community programs that train parents to use technology to monitor and improve their children’s education. • Offer training to parents and community members on technology use. • Offer joint training to teachers and community members. • Train district and school personnel to effectively use student information for evaluation and reporting. • Expand parent access to student progress and community access to district resources. • Expand the availability of district data on the Web. • Implement district-wide telephone communication system to inform parents of emergency incidents, school events, snow days, and other school notification needs.

Budgeting
Fall Mountain Regional School District has been very successful in obtaining and securing grants.

2012 – 2015 Budget Proposal
Account
Equipment (new computers3-5 year replacement cycle)

2012-2013
$57,800.00 $12,000.00 $171,236.00 $8,900.00 Grant 2,000.00 $4,500.00

2013-2014
62,500.00 $12,000.00 $178,436.00 $9,000 $3600 $48,551.00 2,000.00 5,000.00

2014-2015
67,500.00 $12,000.00 $178,436.00 $9,100 $3600 $48,551.00 2,000.00 6,000.00

Supplies Voice and Data PowerSchool License Global Connect Integration/Computer Lab Teacher Contracted Services System Software

56

Grants
The Fall Mountain Regional School District has received Title IID, Enhancing Education through Technology Grant, Title IIA, Highly Qualified Teachers and Principals Grant, and Title VI, Rural Education Achievement Program.

eRate
The Fall Mountain Regional School District has qualified and received e-Rate, a program under the direction of the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) that assists schools with discounts in telecommunication services, Internet access, and internal connections, which has also improved our network and Internet Connectivity. Connectivity and Infrastructure Connectivity- Over the course of the past few years, our goal has been met to increase the 512 bandwidth to full T1’s and over in all schools enabling greater speeds and connectivity. Currently, we have a fiber connection in our High School and Alstead Schools. All schools will have an alternate connection with Comcast enabling Internet choice. Alstead Primary/Vilas: Acworth: Sarah Porter: Fall Mountain High School: North Charlestown: Charlestown Primary: Charlestown Middle: Walpole Middle/Primary: North Walpole: Central Office: Fiber - 44 Mbps - T3/DS3 1 < 2 Mbps - ADSL/T1/DS1 <2 Mbps - ADSL/T1/DS1 Fiber - 44 Mbps - T3/DS3 <2 Mbps - ADSL/T1/DS1 <2 Mbps - ADSL/T1/DS1 <2 Mbps - ADSL/T1/DS1 <2 Mbps - ADSL/T1/DS1 <2 Mbps - ADSL/T1/DS1 <2 Mbps - ADSL/T1/DS1

Current Connectivity Infrastructure Current connectivity capabilities and plans support the District Education Improvement Plan’s goals centered on communication, curriculum, professional development, and facilities by providing the connections necessary to make technology access available for all users. Wireless: Replacing all DLink routers in schools and upgrading wireless routers to Aruba appliances throughout the district and schools. Global Connect Communication System: Strategic Voice Messaging System for Staff, Students and Parents enabling communication via telephone for emergency and informational voice broadcasting. Fiber between schools: Work with government town officials, fire departments, ISP, grants and federal monies to help find a solution to connect our schools and local buildings with high-speed fiber. This is extremely beneficial in the aid of disaster recovery, offsite backups, and improved management.

57

Current Backups/Disaster Recovery
North Walpole School: Total image is completed manually, every 1 or 2 weeks. Incremental file backups done nightly via network Walpole Middle/Primary: Total image is completed manually every 1 or 2 weeks. Incremental file backup done nightly via network North Charlestown: 2nd hard drive for local backup. Network offsite backup to the high school. Charlestown Primary: 2nd hard drive for local backup. Sync to the high school Charlestown Middle: 2nd hard drive ordered and installed summer 2009. Offsite backup to the high school Vilas/Alstead Primary: disk to disk backup in the server and Rsync offsite to the high school. Acworth: disk to disk backup in the server and rsync offsite to the high school. Sarah Porter: disk to disk backup in the server and rsync offsite to the high school. Fall Mountain High School: Servers along with other PC servers at the HS - to disk and tape, using Backup Exec. First Class Email: Backed up to a second disk and also archived to a separate server BudgetSense: Local backups to the RAID 5 array 3 times a day. Nightly backups to tape PowerSchool: Backup to RAID 5 on a different server and backed up off site over the network nightly Web Server: Backup to RAID 5 on a different server nightly Read180: Backed up to RAID 5 on a different server and tape nightly Filtering Solution: Dan’s Guardian, Barracuda and SonicWall

58 Policies and Procedures EHAA COMPUTER USE POLICY: STUDENTS AND EMPLOYEES The purposes of computer use in Fall Mountain Regional School District are to support learning and student outcomes as well as various administrative activities. When accessing computers and the networks, each individual’s activity must be consistent with the educational goals and objectives of FMRSD, and follow School Board regulations. All data that is transmitted and/or received on or through a computer owned by, or using the connectivity of Fall Mountain Regional School District, is the property of the District in its entirety. The use of school computers is a privilege and may be revoked at any time for any infraction of the policy and procedures set forth by the School Board.

Fall Mountain Schools and the Internet
The Internet is a vast global network linking computers at universities, high schools, science labs, businesses, libraries, and homes worldwide. Through the Internet, countless files are available, many of which are of tremendous educational value. Because of its enormous size, the Internet’s potential is boundless. The benefit of being connected to the Internet is that it expands classroom teaching dramatically by making the resources from all over the world available to students and staff. It brings text, data, sound, and images into the classroom from places around the globe and it does this within minutes. Access to the Internet gives Fall Mountain students the benefit of individual or group projects involving cross-cultural collaborations and idea sharing not found in schools that lack Internet connections. Computer networks can be a great motivator for students. Their use encourages the kind of independence and autonomy, which many educators agree, is important for students to achieve in their learning process. Because the Internet is blind to class, race, gender, age, and ability, it is a valuable means for addressing the needs of ALL students. However, with such great educational potential also comes the potential for abuse. It is with this concern that the Fall Mountain Regional School Board has approved a district policy for student access to the Internet. Along with the district policy the schools have established a set of guidelines as well as a written usage agreement. The schools have also subscribed to a screening service that assists educators in identifying sites that could be inappropriate for educational projects. This screening service is updated thus giving the schools the ability to address new concerns as quickly as possible. The most important prerequisite for someone to receive permission to use the Internet is that he or she take full responsibility for his or her own actions when using the Internet. The Fall Mountain Regional School District and the Fall Mountain schools will not be liable for the actions of anyone connecting to the Internet through the schools’ networks or dial-up connections. All users shall assume full liability, legal, financial, or otherwise, for their actions.

59 STUDENT ACCESS TO THE INTERNET- GUIDELINES EHAA

The sole purpose of the computer information services is to support research, education, and administrative activities by providing access to unique resources and an opportunity for collaborative work. Each individual’s activity on the network must be in support of educational and academic research, must be consistent with the educational objectives of the Fall Mountain Regional School District, and follow Board policy. Fall Mountain Regional School District staff: • Will be the sole arbiter of what constitutes obscene, or objectionable language or images. • Reserves the right to add to or change network guidelines for safety and educational reasons without notice. • Make no warranties (expressed or implied) with respect to network services or the content of any advice or information received from the network system. • Students and staff must understand and practice the guidelines outlined below. These guidelines will be reviewed with staff and students prior to any access to the network. The following guidelines are goals that will be implemented and reviewed by the Fall Mountain Regional School District. Guidelines: The following activities are unacceptable and are strictly forbidden: • Misusing copyrighted materials, software, sound recordings, or images; • Harassing of any sort; • Plagiarism; • Accessing sexually explicit or objectionable materials; • Disseminating destructive/disruptive materials; • Advertising or other commercial activities (bidding); • Downloading non-educational files to the hard drive; • Installing software; running or the use of unauthorized software; • Violating the privacy of other users; • Unauthorized use of the school’s name; • Using or giving personal information such as name, address, telephone or picture of anyone (including user); • Damaging computer equipment, software, or network data; • Using obscene or inappropriate language, messages, or pictures in any format; • Inappropriate use of limited resources; • Instant messaging; non-school sanctioned instant messaging; • Personal laptops should not be brought into school; personal laptops and devices should not be connected to the school network* (*exceptions may be granted by administration)
Note consequences for misuse: The use of Fall Mountain Regional School District computers is a privilege, which may be revoked at any time for abusive conduct. The consequences for misusing school district computers may also include suspension from school. All users must behave in a legal and ethical manner at all times. Any costs, liability, or damage caused by the way the user chooses to use his or her network access is the sole responsibility of the user.
Adopted: 1/10/00

60

Internet Permission Form for K-8
In consideration for the use of the Fall Mountain Regional School District network system and in consideration for having access to the information contained on it, I hereby release Fall Mountain Regional School District and its personnel from any and all claims of any nature arising from my use or inability to use the school’s network system. I understand that individuals and families will be held liable for violations of the service or the equipment. I understand that some materials on the Internet may be objectionable and the use of protection software does not relinquish legal responsibility for proper use of the Internet. I accept responsibility for the guidance of my student on the standard to follow when selecting, sharing, publishing, participating in an online project or exploring information in text, image, movie, or sound recording on the Internet. I understand that my child may pursue Internet research independent of staff supervision only if they have been granted parental permission via this form. Permission is not transferable and may not be shared. I grant permission to ____________________________________ to access the Internet. I have read all of the Rules and Guidelines and consequences for Internet misuse. ______________________________ Student Name Printed ______________________________ Signature of Parent/Guardian _____________________________ Student Signature Date _____________________________ Relationship Date

61

Internet Permission Form for High School
In consideration for the use of the Fall Mountain Regional School District network system and in consideration for having access to the information contained on it, I hereby release Fall Mountain Regional School District and its personnel from any and all claims of any nature arising from my use or inability to use the school’s network system. I understand that individuals and families will be held liable for violations of the service or the equipment. I understand that some materials on the Internet may be objectionable and the use of protection software does not relinquish legal responsibility for proper use of the Internet. I accept responsibility for the guidance of my student on the standard to follow when selecting, sharing, publishing, participating in an online project or exploring information in text, image, movie, or sound recording on the Internet. I understand that my child may pursue Internet research independent of staff supervision only if they have been granted parental permission via this form. Permission is not transferable and may not be shared. I grant permission to ____________________________________ to access the Internet. I have read all of the Rules and Guidelines and consequences for Internet misuse. This form will be valid for ___ one year or, (for high school students) ____ my child’s high school career. I understand that I may revoke this privilege for my child at any time by notifying the school’s principal in writing. (Please initial one of the above) ______________________________ Student Name Printed ______________________________ Signature of Parent/Guardian _____________________________ Student Signature Date _____________________________ Relationship Date

62

EHAA PROCEDURES STUDENT ACCESS TO THE INTERNET 1. Program Development In order to match Internet resources as closely as possible to the approved district curriculum, district personnel will review and evaluate resources in order to offer “web pages” and menus of materials, which comply with Board guidelines governing the selection of instructional materials. In this manner, staff will provide developmentally appropriate guidance to students as they make use of Internet and electronic information resources to conduct research and other studies related to the district curriculum. All students will be informed by staff of their rights and responsibilities as users of the district network prior to gaining access to that network, either as an individual user or as a member of a class or group. Students may pursue Internet research independent of staff supervision only if they have been granted parental permission and have submitted all required forms. Permission is not transferable and may not be shared. 2. Internet Rules Students are responsible for good behavior on school computers and computer networks such as the Internet just as they are in a classroom or a school hallway. Communications on the network are often public in nature. General school rules for behavior and communications apply. The Internet is provided for students to conduct research. Independent access to the Internet may be provided to students who agree to act in a considerate manner. Parental permission must be granted before individual access to the Internet is permitted. It is presumed that users will comply with district standards and will honor the agreements they have signed. Access is a privilege, not a right. Access entails responsibility. Network storage areas may be treated like school lockers. Network administrators may review files and communications to maintain system integrity and insure that users are using the system responsibly. Users should not expect that files stored on district servers would always be private. During school, teachers of younger students will guide them toward appropriate materials. Outside of school, families bear responsibility for such guidance, as they must also exercise with information sources such as television, telephones, movies, radio, and other potentially offensive media.

FMRSD Adopted: 1/10/00

63

EHAA

Computer Use- Regulations User Access to District Electronic Resources
I. INTRODUCTION The Fall Mountain Regional School District offers students and staff access to electronic resources including but not limited to; computers, networks and the internet, cameras, data files, e-mail and file servers which enables individual users in our school community to explore thousands of libraries, databases, and other resources while exchanging messages with people throughout the world. In an academic environment this will provide for educational research and an opportunity for collaborative work experiences. However, on a global network it is impossible to control all materials. Ultimately, school district staff, parents, and guardians of minors are responsible for setting and conveying the standards that students shall follow when using these electronic resources and access to the Internet. The school district expects that students will blend thoughtful use of the school district’s electronic resources throughout the curriculum. The school district will provide guidance and instruction to students in the appropriate use of electronic resources. It should be understood that the school district does not verify or guarantee the accuracy of information found on the Internet. This policy complies with the statutory requirements of the Children’s Internet Protection Act (CIPA) and promotes the safe, ethical, responsible, and legal use of the district electronic resources, including the Internet, to support the effective use of these resources for educational purposes. CIPA requires the installation and use of filtering software or services on all computers with access to the Internet to prevent access to visual depictions of obscenity, child pornography or other materials harmful to minors. II. USE OF SYSTEM The use of electronic resources and access to use of the Internet is a privilege, not a right. Access to electronic resources is given to those who agree to act in a considerate and responsible manner. General school rules for behavior and communications shall apply to network use, and each school in the Fall Mountain Regional School District shall provide building based guidelines that follow the district policy for acceptable use of electronic resources. All users are expected to know and follow the district’s policies and rules as well as any building level rules set by building administrators. Teachers may set and enforce even more rules on student users with the counsel, consent, and approval of the building administrator. All building level Administrator rules shall be with the counsel, consent, and approval of the Superintendent. All users must behave in a legal and ethical manner using Electronic Resources at ALL times. Any costs, liability or damage caused by negligent use, unethical use, or illegal use of electronic resources will be the responsibility of the user. All computers, with access to the Internet, will have filtering for inappropriate websites and they may be electronically monitored at the discretion and under the direction of Superintendent of Schools for the Fall Mountain Regional School District. We currently use Dan’s Guardian and SonicWall as our filtering solutions. Users who fail to comply with the established policies, procedures, and rules for computer and

64 electronic resources will be disciplined. Student use of computers and electronic resources including access to the Internet will be permitted only upon submission of a signed permission form, including a parent/guardian acknowledgement of their responsibilities. These forms for these student users must be submitted for each school year. These forms shall serve and indicate as the student’s and jointly with the parent/guardian’s acceptance of the conditions, responsibilities, and privilege for the student’s use of any electronic resource. All employees of the school district use of computers and electronic resources including access to the Internet will be permitted only upon submission of a signed acknowledgement of this policy and other related policies. This acknowledgment form need only be signed once initially and then resigned only as often as needed due to policy changes and revisions. Ultimately, it is the employee’s responsibility to know at all times what the effective policies, procedures and rules regarding acceptable use of electronic resources are, regardless of any signed or un-signed acknowledgements. The Fall Mountain School Board authorizes the Superintendent of Schools to prepare the appropriate procedures, rules and forms for implementing this policy and regulations and for reviewing and evaluating the effect on instruction and student achievement as it relates to this policy and regulations. The Superintendent shall at his/her discretion report to the Board any concerns related to this policy and regulations.

Rules and Responsibilities
1) Responsible use of Electronic Resources The following rules should be abided by when using the Fall Mountain Regional School District’s electronic resources: • Users will be polite. • Users will not use vulgar or obscene language. • Users will not transmit, receive, upload, download, store, print, post or distribute pornographic, obscene, sexually explicit, or educationally inappropriate material or messages. • Users will use caution and discretion revealing any names, addresses, emails, or phone numbers. • Users will abide by generally accepted rules of network etiquette and will not recklessly post false or defamatory information about a person or organization, harass another person, nor engage in personal attacks, including prejudicial or discriminatory attacks. • Other unacceptable use will be identified at the building level. 2) Copyright Users of the Fall Mountain Regional School District electronic resources will not engage in copyright infringement. For example: • Users will make a standard practice of requesting permission from the holder of the copyright or the author of the work if the use of the material has the potential of being considered an infringement • Users will not plagiarize work(s) found on the Internet. • Users will cite authors of work(s) found on the Internet when using their ideas when creating reports or other communications. 3) Security • Users will notify a system administrator if a security problem (i.e. User that attempts to gain unauthorized access to the network) is identified. • Users will not reveal any account password or allow other persons to use their account. • Users may be occasionally required to update registration, password and account information in order to continue accessing electronic resources • Any user identified as a security risk may be denied access to the district electronic resources

65 • Users will comply with any requests from any Systems Administrators, Network Technicians, or Building Administrators (Superintendent and Principals) • Users will not connect to the internal district network (“Jacking-in”) without appropriate prior permissions 4) Limited Expectation of Privacy The Fall Mountain Regional School District owns and operates all hardware, software, and data on the network and equipment, including items issued for use at home. Network files and communication may be subject to review by network administrators to maintain system integrity and ensure that users are accessing and utilizing electronic resources responsibly. Users should not expect that files stored on district servers and computers will be private. Electronic mail is not guaranteed to be private. The school district will cooperate fully with local, state and federal authorities in any investigation concerning or related to any illegal activities and activities not in compliance with school district policies conducted through the school district network. Users should be aware that data and other materials in files maintained on the school district digital network might be subject to review, disclosure or discovery. • Routine maintenance and monitoring of the school district system may lead to a discovery that a user has violated this policy, another school district policy, or the law. • An individual investigation or search of digital files and the district’s electronic resources will be conducted if school authorities have a reasonable suspicion that the search will uncover a violation of law or school district policy. 5) Limitation of Liability The District makes no guarantee that the functions or services provided by or through the District’s electronic resources will be error-free or without defect. • The District is not responsible for any damage the user may suffer, including but not limited to, loss of data or interruptions of service. • The District is not responsible for the accuracy or quality of the information obtained through, or stored on any electronic resources. • The District will not be responsible for financial obligations resulting from the use of the district’s electronic resources. 6) Vandalism/Harassment • Vandalism is defined as any malicious attempt to harm or destroy electronic resources or data. This includes, but is not limited to, deliberate attempts to degrade or disrupt equipment, software or system performance or to create or spread viruses. • Electronic harassment is defined as the persistent annoyance of another user or the interference in another user's work. This includes, but is not limited to, the sending of unwanted email. 7) Consequences Individuals violating this policy or regulations shall be subject to the consequences and appropriate discipline that includes but is not limited to: • Use of electronic resources only under direct supervision; • Suspension of electronic resources privileges for a period of time to be determined; • Revocation of electronic resources privileges; • Suspension from school; • Expulsion from school; • Termination of employment; • Referral to legal authorities as required; • Restitution for damages

66 Determination of unacceptable use and the application of disciplinary consequences will be made by the school and district administration.

Fall Mountain Regional School District / SAU 60

Staff iPad Use and Guidelines
• Never leave an iPad unattended. When not in your personal possession, the iPad should be in a secure, locked environment. • Updating and downloading apps should be performed before school, after school or at home to avoid excessive bandwidth use. See ITS for help. • ITS staff will setup your iPad, including serial number management and wireless access. • Never expose an iPad to long-term temperature extremes or direct sunlight. An automobile is not a good place to store an iPad. • iPads do not respond well to liquids. Avoid applying liquids to the iPad. The iPad can be cleaned with a soft, slightly water-dampened, lint-free cloth. Avoid getting moisture in the openings. Do not use window cleaners, household cleaners, aerosol sprays, solvents, alcohol, ammonia, or abrasives to clean the iPad. Use of unapproved cleaners may remove the protective film covering the face of the iPad. • While the iPad is scratch resistant, the iPad will scratch. Avoid using any sharp object(s) on the iPad. • Do not attempt to gain access to the internal electronics or repair your iPad. If your iPad fails to work or is damaged, report the problem to ITS. • Avoid placing weight on the iPad. • Your iPad comes with ports for charging and other accessories. Care must be exercised when plugging and unplugging accessories. FMRSD issued iPad accessories are the responsibility of the staff member. • Each iPad has a unique identification number and at no time should the numbers or labels be modified or removed. • Do not lend your iPad to another person. Each iPad is assigned to an individual and the responsibility for the care of the iPad solely rests with that individual.

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Fall Mountain Regional School District / SAU 60 EMAIL USE POLICY

Authorization and Compliance Form
• • • • All email messages or data composed, stored, sent, or received using the FMRSD email system are and remain the private property of the District. They are not the property of the employee. The electronic mail system may not be used to solicit or proselytize for commercial ventures, religious or political causes, outside organizations, or other non-job-related solicitations. The District will keep an archive of email for up to one year. The confidentiality of any message or data should not be assumed. Even when a message is erased, it is still possible to retrieve and read that message. The use of passwords for security does not guarantee confidentiality, or that the District will not retrieve it. All mass email and using Listservs are for educational purposes only. Non-school related mass emailing is not allowed without the prior approval of a supervisor. FMRSD Email should NOT be used for personal communications unless of an educational nature. Staff must sign out of email accounts when finished as an open account can allow for student access. Notwithstanding the District’s right to retrieve and monitor any E-mail messages, such messages should be treated as confidential by other employees and accessed only by the intended recipient. Employees are not authorized to retrieve or read any E-mail that is not sent to them. Any exception to this policy must receive prior approval by the Superintendent. Applied to all email messages: This message may contain information that is confidential and/or protected under the Family Rights and Privacy Act or other lawfully recognized privilege. If you received this message in error or through inappropriate means, please reply to this message to notify the Sender that the message was received by you in error, and then permanently delete this message from all storage media, without forwarding or retaining a copy. Virus warnings: Virus emails can be from a familiar sender and contained an attachment that was not in the typical file format we would be expecting such as .doc for a Word file, .xls for an Excel file or .pdf for an adobe acrobat file. Some examples of attachment endings that could contain viruses: .exe, .pif, .src, .bat, .vbs.

• • • •

Always look at the LAST extension. You need to NOT OPEN any email and attachments you are not expecting and CALL the sender to confirm that it was a valid attachment. Virus programs will only catch viruses that are currently in their lists. Notify the ITS Department of any suspicious attachments before opening. • All staff must sign this Email Use Agreement Form before receiving and using an FMRSD District email account.

I have been informed of this policy and will abide by its stipulations for electronic mail use.

68 Staff Signature: ___________________________________ Date: _______________ Email Account Approved: Administrator’s Signature ____________________________ Date: _______________ Fall Mountain Regional School District / SAU 60 TECHNOLOGY INTEGRATION The Fall Mountain Regional School District requires an integrated approach to the use of 21st century tools, including, but not limited to digital technology and communication tools, within all curriculum areas through the adoption of information and communication technologies literacy (ICT) program in grades K - 12 that provides opportunities at developmentally appropriate levels for students to: 1. Develop knowledge of ethical, responsible use of technology tools in a society that relies heavily on knowledge of information in its decision-making; 2. Become proficient in the use of 21st century tools to access, manage, integrate, evaluate, and create information within the context of the core subjects of: 2.1 Reading; 2.2 Mathematics; 2.3 English and language arts; 2.4 Science; 2.5 Social studies, including civics, government, economics, history, and geography; 2.6 Arts; and 2.7 World languages; 3. Use 21st century tools to develop cognitive proficiency in: 3.1 Literacy; 3.2 Numeracy; 3.3 Problem solving; 3.4 Decision making; and 3.5 Spatial / visual literacy; 4. Use 21st century tools to develop technical proficiency at a foundational knowledge level in: 4.1 Hardware; 4.2 Software applications; 4.3 Networks; and 4.4 Elements of digital technology; and 5. Create digital portfolios which: 5.1 Address the following components: 5.2 Basic operations and concepts; 5.3 Social, ethical, and human issues; 5.4 Technology productivity tools; 5.5 Technology communications tools; 5.6 Technology research tools; and 5.7 Technology problem solving and decision-making tools;

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Digital Portfolio
Portfolio requirements
Digital portfolio artifacts will include: ■ Standardized tests; ■ Observation; ■ Student work; ■ Comments describing a student’s reflection on his/her work • Portfolios represent cumulative work. • Teachers will review the portfolios, using a locally developed assessment rubric, in order to determine competency. • While the portfolio is being constructed, it is considered part of a student's record. • When competency has been achieved using a portfolio and the resulting grade(s) appear on a student’s transcript, the digital artifacts within a portfolio will be copied to digital media (e.g., CDROM or DVD) and be given to the student. • Once a student has received a digital copy of his/her portfolio, all associated files will be removed from district servers.

Grades K-8 Portfolios
Students must complete a digital portfolio that demonstrates their competency in the use of 21st Century Learning Tools in the context of core subject areas. Portfolios will be assessed using a rubric designed to meet state ICT standards. A successfully completed 8th grade portfolio assures the student that they do not have to take a beginning ICT course in high school and provides them the prerequisite for more advanced ICT high school work.

Grades 9-12 Portfolios
Students must complete a digital portfolio that demonstrates their competency in the use of 21st Century Learning Tools in the context of core subject areas. Portfolios will be assessed using a rubric designed to meet state ICT standards. High school students may submit their high school level portfolio as evidence of competency, or, instead may complete a half credit course in which the culminating experience is to create a digital portfolio. Topics addressed by an advanced high school course: ■ Use of productivity and web-based software ■ Use of multimedia software and equipment ■ Configuring computers and networks

70 ■ Programming concepts

Fall Mountain Regional School District

Web Page Publishing
Authorization and Compliance Form
Anyone wishing to create pages for the Internet which represent any entity of the Fall Mountain Regional School District, and which will be served at the District’s website, must complete this application and receive administrator approval. Name ________________________________________________________________ School/Department/Program ______________________________________________ Purpose of the Webpage(s): _____________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________ I agree to the following: I am responsible for any and all pages that I am developing on behalf of the school district. I agree to maintain the page I develop to ensure information accuracy, relevance, and timeliness. I will be responsible for correct spelling, punctuation, and formatting of the page. I understand that all files stored in my Web directory will be served to the Internet and thus, are open to inspection by the district. All documents developed comply and will continue to comply with the intent of all school board policies. Applicant Signature: ________________________ Date: _______________ Approved: ______ Declined: _______ Website Manager_________________________ Date: __________ Administrator’s Signature: __________________ Date: __________

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APPENDICES

Appendix A
Information and Communication Technologies Program Literacy Standards

Appendix B
NETS- for Students Chart

Appendix C
NETS- for Teachers

Appendix D
NETS- for Administrators

Appendix E:
Curriculum References to Computers and Technology

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Appendix A: ICT Literacy Standards

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Appendix B: National Educational Technology Standards (NETS•S) for Students
1. Creativity and Innovation- Students demonstrate creative thinking, construct knowledge, and develop innovative products and processes using technology. Students:
a. apply existing knowledge to generate new ideas, products, or processes. b. create original works as a means of personal or group expression. c. use models and simulations to explore complex systems and issues. d. identify trends and forecast possibilities.

2. Communication and Collaboration- Students use digital media and environments to communicate and work collaboratively, including at a distance, to support individual learning and contribute to the learning of others. Students:
a. interact, collaborate, and publish with peers, experts, or others employing a variety of digital environments and media. b. communicate information and ideas effectively to multiple audiences using a variety of media and formats. c. develop cultural understanding and global awareness by engaging with learners of other cultures. d. contribute to project teams to produce original works or solve problems.

3. Research and Information Fluency- Students apply digital tools to gather, evaluate, and use information. Students:
a. plan strategies to guide inquiry. b. locate, organize, analyze, evaluate, synthesize, and ethically use information from a variety of sources and media. c. evaluate and select information sources and digital tools based on the appropriateness to specific tasks. d. process data and report results

4. Critical Thinking, Problem Solving, and Decision Making Students use critical thinking skills to plan and conduct research, manage projects, solve problems, and make informed decisions using appropriate digital tools and resources. Students:
a. identify and define authentic problems and significant questions for investigation. b. plan and manage activities to develop a solution or complete a project. c. collect and analyze data to identify solutions and/or make informed decisions. d. use multiple processes and diverse perspectives to explore alternative solutions.

5. Digital Citizenship- Students understand human, cultural, and societal issues related to technology and practice legal and ethical behavior. Students:
a. advocate and practice safe, legal, and responsible use of information and technology. b. exhibit a positive attitude toward using technology that supports collaboration, learning, and productivity. c. demonstrate personal responsibility for lifelong learning. d. exhibit leadership for digital citizenship.

6. Technology Operations and Concepts- Students demonstrate a sound understanding of technology concepts, systems, and operations.

74 Students:
a. understand and use technology systems. b. select and use applications effectively and productively. c. troubleshoot systems and applications. d. transfer current knowledge to learning of new technologies.

Appendix C: NETS- for Teachers 2008
Effective teachers model and apply the National Educational Technology Standards for Students (NETS•S) as they design, implement, and assess learning experiences to engage students and improve learning; enrich professional practice; and provide positive models for students, colleagues, and the community. All teachers should meet the following standards and performance indicators. 1. Facilitate and Inspire Student Learning and Creativity Teachers use their knowledge of subject matter, teaching and learning, and technology to facilitate experiences that advance student learning, creativity, and innovation in both face-to-face and virtual environments. Teachers: a. promote, support, and model creative and innovative thinking and inventiveness b. engage students in exploring real-world issues and solving authentic problems using digital tools and resources c. promote student reflection using collaborative tools to reveal and clarify students’ conceptual understanding and thinking, planning, and creative processes d. model collaborative knowledge construction by engaging in learning with students, colleagues, and others in face-to-face and virtual environments 2. Design and Develop Digital-Age Learning Experiences and Assessments Teachers design, develop, and evaluate authentic learning experiences and assessments incorporating contemporary tools and resources to maximize content learning in context and to develop the knowledge, skills, and attitudes identified in the NETS•S. Teachers: a. design or adapt relevant learning experiences that incorporate digital tools and resources to promote student learning and creativity b. develop technology-enriched learning environments that enable all students to pursue their individual curiosities and become active participants in setting their own educational goals, managing their own learning, and assessing their own progress c. customize and personalize learning activities to address students’ diverse learning styles, working strategies, and abilities using digital tools and resources d. provide students with multiple and varied formative and summative assessments aligned with content and technology standards and use resulting data to inform learning and teaching 3. Model Digital-Age Work and Learning Teachers exhibit knowledge, skills, and work processes representative of an innovative professional in a global and digital society. Teachers: a. demonstrate fluency in technology systems and the transfer of current knowledge to new technologies and situations b. collaborate with students, peers, parents, and community members using digital tools and resources

75 to support student success and innovation c. communicate relevant information and ideas effectively to students, parents, and peers using a variety of digital-age media and formats d. model and facilitate effective use of current and emerging digital tools to locate, analyze, evaluate, and use information resources to support research and learning 4. Promote and Model Digital Citizenship and Responsibility Teachers understand local and global societal issues and responsibilities in an evolving digital culture and exhibit legal and ethical behavior in their professional practices. Teachers: a. advocate, model, and teach safe, legal, and ethical use of digital information and technology, including respect for copyright, intellectual property, and the appropriate documentation of sources b. address the diverse needs of all learners by using learner-centered strategies and providing equitable access to appropriate digital tools and resources c. promote and model digital etiquette and responsible social interactions related to the use of technology and information d. develop and model cultural understanding and global awareness by engaging with colleagues and students of other cultures using digital-age communication and collaboration tools 5. Engage in Professional Growth and Leadership Teachers continuously improve their professional practice, model lifelong learning, and exhibit leadership in their school and professional community by promoting and demonstrating the effective use of digital tools and resources. Teachers: a. participate in local and global learning communities to explore creative applications of technology to improve student learning b. exhibit leadership by demonstrating a vision of technology infusion, participating in shared decision making and community building, and developing the leadership and technology skills of others c. evaluate and reflect on current research and professional practice on a regular basis to make effective use of existing and emerging digital tools and resources in support of student learning d. contribute to the effectiveness, vitality, and self-renewal of the teaching profession and of their school and community

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Appendix D: NETS- for Administrators
1. Visionary Leadership Educational Administrators inspire and lead development and implementation of a shared vision for comprehensive integration of technology to promote excellence and support transformation throughout the organization. Administrators: a. Inspire and facilitate among all stakeholders a shared vision of purposeful change that maximizes use of digital-age resources to meet and exceed learning goals, support effective instructional practice, and maximize performance of district and school leaders b. Engage in an ongoing process to develop, implement, and communicate technology-infused strategic plans aligned with a shared vision c. Advocate on local, state and national levels for policies, programs, and funding to support implementation of a technology-infused vision and strategic plan 2. Digital Age Learning Culture Educational Administrators create, promote, and sustain a dynamic, digital-age learning culture that provides a rigorous, relevant, and engaging education for all students. Administrators: a. Ensure instructional innovation focused on continuous improvement of digital-age learning b. Model and promote the frequent and effective use of technology for learning c. Provide learner-centered environments equipped with technology and learning resources to meet the individual, diverse needs of all learners d. Ensure effective practice in the study of technology and its infusion across the curriculum e. Promote and participate in local, national, and global learning communities that stimulate innovation, creativity, and digital age collaboration 3. Excellence in Professional Practice Educational Administrators promote an environment of professional learning and innovation that empowers educators to enhance student learning through the infusion of contemporary technologies and digital resources. Administrators: a. Allocate time, resources, and access to ensure ongoing professional growth in technology fluency and integration b. Facilitate and participate in learning communities that stimulate, nurture and support administrators, faculty, and staff in the study and use of technology c. Promote and model effective communication and collaboration among stakeholders using digital age tools d. Stay abreast of educational research and emerging trends regarding effective use of technology and

77 encourage evaluation of new technologies for their potential to improve student learning

4. Systemic Improvement Educational Administrators provide digital age leadership and management to continuously improve the organization through the effective use of information and technology resources. Administrators: a. Lead purposeful change to maximize the achievement of learning goals through the appropriate use of technology and media-rich resources b. Collaborate to establish metrics, collect and analyze data, interpret results, and share findings to improve staff performance and student learning c. Recruit and retain highly competent personnel who use technology creatively and proficiently to advance academic and operational goals d. Establish and leverage strategic partnerships to support systemic improvement e. Establish and maintain a robust infrastructure for technology including integrated, interoperable technology systems to support management, operations, teaching, and learning 5. Digital Citizenship Educational Administrators model and facilitate understanding of social, ethical and legal issues and responsibilities related to an evolving digital culture. Administrators: a. Ensure equitable access to appropriate digital tools and resources to meet the needs of all learners b. Promote, model and establish policies for safe, legal, and ethical use of digital information and technology c. Promote and model responsible social interactions related to the use of technology and information d. Model and facilitate the development of a shared cultural understanding and involvement in global issues through the use of contemporary communication and collaboration tools

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Appendix E: References to Computers and Technology In the New Hampshire Career Development Curriculum Framework
Core Educational Learning
Curriculum Standard 1- Students will demonstrate a firm grounding in the interactive language processes of reading, writing, speaking, listening, and viewing, as well as the ability to use those skills to communicate effectively. End of Grade 8 Proficiency Standards • Demonstrate the capacity to use a variety of tools, such as libraries, museums, technology, etc., to enhance learning. • Demonstrate the capacity to compare, contrast, and use information presented in written, oral, audio-visual, and graphic forms. End of Grade 10 Proficiency Standards • Access information from multiple sources and information-retrieval systems • Demonstrate the ability to use a variety of organizational structures such as cause and effect patterns, paraphrasing, and charts and graphs, to communicate ideas and information. Curriculum Standard 2- Students will demonstrate a firm grounding in essential computational skills as well as strong problem-solving and reasoning abilities. End of Grade 12 Proficiency Standards • Gather and use appropriate materials and resources in making individual and career decisions, including printed materials, human resources, and information accessed through technology. Curriculum Standard 3- Students will take an active role in their individual learning. End of Grade 8 Proficiency Standards • Devise a system, such as a flow chart or log, for keeping track of progress and goals, and adjust priorities to meet deadlines and manage time, according to this system. Individual and Social Learning • No specific references to computers or technology

Career Development
Curriculum Standard 6- Students will acquire the knowledge, attitudes, and skills to make a successful transition from school to the world of work and adult life. End of Grade 4 Proficiency Standards • Use media and technology to identify a variety of occupations.

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References to Computers and Technology in the New Hampshire English Language Arts Curriculum Framework
Reading
Curriculum Standard 6- Students will demonstrate competence in using the interactive language processes of reading, writing, speaking, listening, and viewing to communicate effectively End of Grade 3 (Primary) Proficiency Standards Use the tools of information technology to enhance written and spoken messages.

Writing
Curriculum Standard 2- Students will demonstrate the interest and ability to write effectively for a variety of purposes and audiences. End of Grade 3 (Primary) Proficiency Standards Recognize that the presentation of written works, including legible handwriting and properly formatted, computer-generated text, is necessary for effective communication. Employ available print and computer resources to assist with editing.

English Language Uses
Curriculum Standard 7- Students will demonstrate competence in applying the interactive language processes of reading, writing, speaking, listening, and viewing to succeed in educational, occupational, civic, social, and everyday settings. End-of-Grade 6 (Intermediate) Proficiency Standards • Understand that word processing packages, computer games, business inventory databases, and other software applications result from a series of messages written according to the rules of a computer-programming language.

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References to Computers and Technology in the New Hampshire Mathematics Curriculum Framework Problem Solving and Reasoning
1a. K-12 Broad Goal: Students will use problem-solving strategies to investigate and understand increasingly complex mathematical content. Curriculum Standards 1a, Building upon the K- 6 experiences, in grades 7-12: • Use technology whenever appropriate to solve real-world problems that require strategies previously learned. • Use technology whenever appropriate to solve problems related to basic living skills including, but not limited to, personal finance, wages, banking and credit, home improvement problems, measurement, taxes, business situations, purchasing, and transportation. Proficiency Standards 1a, End of Grade 10: • Choose the appropriate technology needed to solve a real-world problem. • Use technology to solve a problem from science, social science, or mathematics.

Communication and Connections
2a. K-12 Broad Goal: Students will communicate their understanding of mathematics. Curriculum Standards (2a), Building upon the K-3 experiences, in grades 4-6: • Use a variety of technologies (for example: computers, calculators, video, CD-ROM, or laser disc, to represent and communicate mathematical ideas). Curriculum Standards (2a), Building upon the K-6 experiences, in grades 7-12: • Use a variety of technologies to represent and communicate mathematical ideas and determine the appropriateness of their use. Proficiency Standards (2a), End of Grade 10: • Describe orally and/or in writing how various technologies can be used to communicate about a specific situation. 2b. K-12 Broad Goal: Students will recognize, develop, and explore mathematical connections. Curriculum Standards (2b), Building upon the K-6 experiences, in grades 7-12: • Use models and calculators or other technologies to develop equivalent representations of the same mathematical concept. Proficiency Standards (2b), End of Grade 6:

81 • Use mathematical skills, concepts, and applications in other disciplines (for example: graphs in social studies, patterns in art, or music and geometry in technology education). Proficiency Standards (2b), End of Grade 10: • Explain in oral or written form how mathematics connects to other areas (for example: geometry in art and architecture, data analysis in social studies and exponential growth in finance).

Numbers, Numeration, Operations, and Number Theory:
3c. K-12 Broad Goal: Students will compute. PURPOSE: The purpose of computation is to solve problems. While computation remains important in mathematics and in everyday life, advances of technology require us to rethink how computation is done today. Students must recognize that estimation, mental computation, use of calculators, and paper and pencil calculation are all appropriate ways to compute solutions to problems. Basic fact memorization should be incorporated into a rich curriculum rather than be its primary focus. Curriculum Standards (3c), Grades K-3: • Use calculators in appropriate computational situations. Curriculum Standards (3c), Building upon the K-3 experiences, in grades 4-6: • Use calculators in appropriate computational situations. Proficiency Standards (3c), End of Grade 3: • Use a calculator to extend addition to include 4-digit numbers and subtraction to include 3-and 4digit numbers. Proficiency Standards (3c), End of Grade 6: • Use calculators in appropriate problem solving situations. • Using physical models, illustrations, and calculators, determine the sum or difference of decimals. Proficiency Standards (3c), End of Grade 10: • Simplify expressions containing rational numbers, integer exponents, and grouping symbols using conventional methods and technology.

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APPENDIX E: Technology Use and Responsibilities for Fall Mountain Regional School District

Curriculum, Instruction and Assessment
The district and school board support the implementation of curricular programs which promote instructional strategies that enhance learning, the professional growth of staff to enhance instruction, and the analysis of student assessment data using appropriate, available hardware and software supported by the district for these purposes. Staff Responsibilities: • Staff will know how to independently use technology tools needed to implement these strategies, including general use of computer operating systems and the software programs necessary to successfully fulfill these duties. • Staff will perform independent troubleshooting and training, and work with their colleagues to increase their skills and resolve basic technology issues. • Staff will use these tools to demonstrate skills and growth of their students to parents and administration. • Use technology to support learner-centered strategies that address the diverse needs of students. Administration Responsibilities: • Administration will know how to independently use the tools needed to implement these strategies and will model good use. • Administration will organize and promote training for staff related to these skills. • Administration will use these tools to assess their school's status and growth. • Administration will evaluate staff on their use of these tools and require further training where necessary. Technology Leader Responsibilities: • Technology leaders will support the use of these tools by having training opportunities available for use by school staff. • Technology leaders will manage funds to best allow for consistent availability of tools within the district. • Technology leaders will keep abreast of new technologies that will enhance staff and administrators' use of technology to perform these functions. • Technology leaders will meet with staff and administration to discuss current status, needs and future growth. IT Specialists Responsibilities: • Maintain functionality of hardware, software and networking to support these functions. Manage configurations as required by changes in district needs and security needs as required from both external and internal threats.

83 • Configure infrastructure and server environment for optimum performance and growth. Analyze and modify the features and preferences of major operating systems and/or productivity tool products to solve problems and provide an environment for learning. • Keep abreast of new technologies and recommend those that would enhance staff and administrators' use of technology to perform these functions. • Keep a backup of all information maintained in these tools. Provide a disaster recovery plan (DR). Document the configuration of tools.

Communication
The district will provide means of communication within the schools and community to enhance learning, engage the community, share ideas, access information and support professional growth for staff. Tools will include email for all staff, a website where all staff have access to page(s) as required, online assessment and reporting tools, and a learning management system (LMS). For students: The district will provide web-based systems for students to gain access to homework assignments, handouts, lunch menus, class notes and school handbook. The resources should also extend the classroom to the outside world, via web 2.0 tools-blogs, wiki, etc. Staff Responsibilities: • Staff will use district resources to communicate via email and the web with co-workers, community members, and with other professionals around the world. • Use web-based tools to inform community about their classroom structure and status as the school term progresses. • Use web-based tools to inform students about classroom progress and student responsibilities. • Manage Web 2.0 tools independently for use by students. • Understand AUP for students and enforce the terms. Admin Responsibilities: • Technology will assist administration with communication within the SAU, schools, employees, and the Fall Mountain Regional community. This will be through email communications, internal websites, shared file folders, and external websites. • Admin will use email as a main communication tool with staff, colleagues and community, modeling use of specialized tools like groups, shared calendars and event invitations. • Manage information in a web-based tool to inform community about their school, report on special events with images and/or video to enhance the information, and encourage participation in future events. • Encourage staff use of web-based tools and evaluate staff on their use to enhance their classes, school and district. Tech Leader Responsibilities • Use email as a main communication tool, including the dissemination information on how to use technology tools and available training. Model use of tools to extend use of email as a collaboration tool. • Maintain framework for web-based tools that creates path that teachers and administrators can follow that emphasizes ease of use for both creator and viewer.

84 • Keep abreast of new technologies that would allow for better use of the web as a communication tool. • Technology leaders will meet with staff and administration to discuss current status, needs and future growth. • Secure funding for these communication tools. IT Specialist Responsibilities

Productivity
The District will use technology to maximize productivity, enhance skill development, and improve student performance. For students: The district will provide access to basic productivity tools like word processing, spreadsheets, databases, electronic presentations, image editing, video creation and graphic organizing software to enable students to enrich their curriculum. District will provide Learning Management System with the ability to maintain a digital workflow. Staff • Staff will perform daily tasks like attendance and grade book (when district provides this capability.) • Staff will enrich their own professional development via access to on-line courses. • Staff will enrich the curriculum and create challenging and exciting lessons. • Staff will use a variety of tools, including network drives, the Internet, a variety of applications including locally and remotely (cloud) installed applications, and collaborative document environments to promote the understanding of digital workflow. Administration • Administration will use the productivity tools provided to perform daily tasks from data collection to staff evaluation. Focus on tools to allow for scheduling of events, facilities and personnel. • Administration will model use of technology tools for staff development and training. • Administration will provide training opportunities for using productivity tools and integration into the curriculum. Tech Leaders • Tech leaders will identify resources and participate in professional development activities and professional technology organizations to support ongoing professional growth related to technology • Tech leaders will disseminate information on district-wide policies for the professional growth opportunities for staff, faculty, and administrators. • Tech leaders will model good use of productivity tools by locating, selecting, capturing, and integrating video and digital images in various formats for use in presentations, publications, and/or other products. • Tech leaders will plan and implement policies that support district-wide professional growth opportunities for staff, faculty, and administrators.

85 IT Specialists • Maintain functionality of hardware, software and networking to support these functions. Manage configurations as required by changes in district needs and security needs as required from both external and internal threats. • Configure infrastructure and server environment for optimum performance and growth. Analyze and modify the features and preferences of major operating systems and/or productivity tool products to solve problems and provide an environment for learning. • Keep abreast of new technologies and recommend those that would enhance staff and administrators' use of technology to perform these functions. • Keep a backup of all information maintained in these tools. Provide a disaster recovery plan (DR). Document the configuration of tools.

Assessment/Data Driven Decision Making
Provide tools for the acquisition, analysis and dissemination of information necessary to make academic and management decisions. For students: The district will provide server space for students to securely store documents and files and electronic portfolios. Staff • Staff will provide students with multiple and varied formative and summative assessments aligned with content and technology standards and use resulting data to inform learning and teaching • Staff will use technology to collect and analyze data, interpret results, and communicate findings to improve instructional practice and student learning. Administration • Administration will use technology to collect and analyze data, interpret results, and communicate findings to improve instructional practice and student learning. • Using products like Performance Tracker or similar the administration will be able to observe and analyze and track changes in student achievement and learning allowing for modifications to curriculum, instruction and assessment • Administration will assess staff knowledge, skills, and performance in using technology and use results to facilitate high-quality professional development and to inform personnel decisions. Tech Leaders • Tech leaders will use technology to collect and analyze data, interpret results, and communicate findings to improve instructional practice and student learning. • Tech leaders will assist teachers in using recommended evaluation strategies for improving students' use of technology resources for learning, communication, and productivity. • Tech leaders will examine and apply the results of a research project that includes evaluating the use of a specific technology in a PK-12 environment. • Tech leaders will identify and procure technology resources to aid in the analysis and interpretation of data. IT Specialists

86 • Maintain functionality of hardware, software and networking to support these functions. Manage configurations as required by changes in district needs and security needs as required from both external and internal threats. • Configure infrastructure and server environment for optimum performance and growth. Analyze and modify the features and preferences of major operating systems and/or productivity tool products to solve problems and provide an environment for learning. • Keep abreast of new technologies and recommend those that would enhance staff and administrators' use of technology to perform these functions. • Keep a backup of all information maintained in these tools. Provide a disaster recovery plan (DR). Document the configuration of tools.

Student Achievement
Implementation of tools, software programs, curriculum integration that support student achievement and is compliant with State Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) Program. The district will provide instruction and resources in a differentiated manner, with a focus on maximizing the achievement of all students' at all academic levels. Staff • Staff will ensure that through the use of technology integrated into the curriculum and the teaching of 21st century literacy skills, students will be able to achieve state, district, and classroom mandated curriculum goals. • Staff will use their knowledge of subject matter, teaching and learning, and technology to facilitate experiences that advance student learning, creativity, and innovation in both face-to-face and virtual environments. • Staff will design or adapt relevant learning experiences that incorporate digital tools and resources to promote student learning and creativity. • Staff will develop technology-enriched learning environments that enable all students to pursue their individual curiosities and become active participants in setting their own educational goals, managing their own learning, and assessing their own progress. Administration • Using technology, administration will be better able to track and report student achievement to students, staff and community members, and subsequently will work with staff to adjust curriculum and instruction that will impact student achievement. • Administration will identify, use, evaluate, and promote appropriate technologies to enhance and support instruction and standards-based curriculum leading to high levels of student achievement • Administration will provide for learner-centered environments that use technology to meet the individual and diverse needs of learners. • Administration will provide for and ensure that faculty and staff will take advantage of high-quality professional learning opportunities for improved learning and teaching with technology. Tech Leaders

87 • Tech leaders will stay abreast of current technology resources and strategies to support the diverse needs of learners including adaptive and assistive technologies and disseminate information to teachers. • Tech leaders will identify and locate technology resources and evaluate them for accuracy and suitability. • Tech leaders will continually evaluate a variety of strategies to manage student learning in a technology-enhanced environment and disseminate through professional development activities, district web-based resources, and other technologies.

IT Specialists • Maintain functionality of hardware, software and networking to support these functions. Manage configurations as required by changes in district needs and security needs as required from both external and internal threats. • Configure infrastructure and server environment for optimum performance and growth. Analyze and modify the features and preferences of major operating systems and/or productivity tool products to solve problems and provide an environment for learning. • Keep abreast of new technologies and recommend those that would enhance staff and administrators' use of technology to perform these functions. • Keep a backup of all information maintained in these tools. Provide a disaster recovery plan (DR). Document the configuration of tools.

Evaluation of Technology
Use tools to evaluate the impact of technology integration (LoTi, student achievement, district survey, state questionnaires) on an ongoing basis and be able to adjust the technology plan as tools and needs change. For students: The district will involve students on the technology committee and solicit feedback on the technology plan. Staff • Through surveys and analysis tools, teachers will be able to assess their own technology skills and determine strengths and weaknesses that can drive professional development opportunities. • Through exploration of available technology tools, teachers will be provided with alternatives to evaluate of their students. This could be through the creation of a rubric or using an online assessment tool. Administration • With the use of handheld computers and laptops, administration will be able to better evaluate elements of the school from teacher evaluation to building safety. • Administrators will report on trends within their schools and by their teachers on technology use in Tech Leaders • Coordinate development and direct implementation of technology infrastructure procedures, policies, plans, and budgets for PK-12 schools.

88 • Analyze needs for technology support personnel to manage school/district technology resources and maximize use by administrators, teachers, and students to improve student learning IT Specialists • Follow procedures and guidelines used in planning and purchasing technology resources • Assist with state technology surveys for reporting inventory, and software, network equipment

How these goals relate to the community
Communication: Through the use of voice mail, email and the school website, parents and community members will better know what is going on at the Fall Mountain Regional schools. Productivity: Information Processing and Information management: The district is currently researching a district calendar solution for the web site that will enable authorized users to submit dates and have the results show up in real time on the school calendar. This will help avoid conflicts with sports tryouts and other school related events. Student Achievement: As we partner with local business through using donated equipment, we can better help our students achieve by providing them access to technology. Through job study and workstudy programs in our community, students will have a better understanding of how technology relates to the every day work place. Evaluation: Community members through the use of the school web site can be better informed of school statistical information like number of students enrolled, and educational testing results. Social Networking Guidelines for Teachers New technologies, such as social networking tools, provide exciting new ways to collaborate and communicate. Nevertheless, we must exercise care to be sure we use such tools with students in ways that are both age-appropriate and consistent with the mission of the school. School faculty and staff are expected to behave honorably in both real and virtual (online) spaces. Activities which are improper, unethical, illegal, or which cause undue discomfort for students, employees, parents, or other members of the school community should be judiciously avoided in both physical space and cyberspace. To that end, we offer the following guidelines for school employees who use online social networking applications used by current or former students.

89 COURSE USE OF SOCIAL NETWORKING: In order to provide equal, age-appropriate access for students to course materials, faculty should limit class activities to school-sanctioned online tools. New social networking tools and features are being continually introduced which may or may not be appropriate for course use. The same care must be taken in choosing such tools as other tools and support materials. MODEL APPROPRIATE BEHAVIOR: Exercise appropriate discretion when using social networks for personal communications (friends, colleagues, parents, former students, etc.) with the knowledge that adult behavior on social networks may be used as a model by our students FRIENDING ALUMNI: Accept social network friend requests only with alumni over the age of 18. Do not initiate friend contacts with alumni. UNEQUAL RELATIONSHIPS: Understand that the uneven power dynamics of the school, in which adults have authority over former students, continues to shape those relationships. OTHER FRIENDS: Remind all other members of your network of your position as an educator whose profile may be accessed by current or former students, and to monitor their posts to your network accordingly. Conversely, be judicious in your postings to all friends’ sites, and act immediately to remove any material that may be inappropriate from your site whether posted by you or someone else. GROUPS IN YOUR SOCIAL NETWORK: Associate with social networking groups consistent with healthy, pro-social activities and the mission and reputation of the school, acting with sensitivity within context of a diverse educational environment in which both students and adults practice tolerance and accept competing views. PRIVACY SETTINGS AND CONTENT: Exercise care with privacy settings and profile content. Content should be placed thoughtfully and periodically reviewed to maintain this standard. MISREPRESENTATION: Faculty who use social networks should do so using their own name, not a pseudonym or nickname. PUBLIC INFORMATION: Recognize that many former students have online connections with current students, and that information shared between school adults and former students is likely to be seen by current students as well.

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iPad and Netbook Student/Parent Handbook

Fall Mountain Regional High School School iPad / Netbook Initiative

The Fall Mountain High School has initiated a program to investigate the use of mobile learning devices in and around the school. This initiative involves the use of the Apple iPad / Netbook. During this initial program, the school will have designated faculty members and students issued iPad / Netbooks with predetermined applications installed. Through the course of the school year there will be data gathered on the actual and potential uses of this device on a larger scale across the school.

Goals for Student Use
• To increase student’s productivity in and outside of the classroom when completing assignments, projects and other activities assigned in all classes. • To capitalize on the convergence of academic resources such as textbooks, scholarly sources, content rich media, and best practices. • To facilitate mobile learning across the school campus and beyond • To promote leadership in one's own learning by establishing access to educational resources and providing a host of tools to craft information in ways that support specific curricular areas.

General Information
Student use of the iPad / Netbook in school falls under the guidelines of the school's Acceptable Use Policy for technology. Access to the Internet is monitored through our school's content filtering

91 software during school hours. All rules and expectations are applied to the use of the iPad / Netbook during and after school hours. All applications, activity and documents stored on the iPad / Netbook are the property of Fall Mountain High School and subject to regular review and monitoring. Students Must Not: • Modify the iPad / Netbook in any way other than instructed by the administrator or other school personnel. • Exchange iPad / Netbooks with another student. • Allow other students to retain or remove the iPad / Netbook from their presence. • Apply any permanent marks, decorations, or modifications to the iPad / Netbook. • Synchronize the iPad / Netbook with another computer outside of the school. • Clear or disable browsing history or set password protection on the device. • Disable the iPad / Netbook or its applications. Failure to comply with these guidelines will be treated as failure to comply with the school’s Acceptable Use Policy and will be dealt with as specified in the school's discipline code.

Using the iPad / Netbook
Use of the iPad / Netbook will require a few necessary tasks to keep the device performing well. Clean the screen often with approved cleaning towels. Make sure hands are clean before using. Keep away from food and drink. Carry the iPad / Netbook in the case provided. Charge the iPad / Netbook only with the included charger and using a standard wall outlet as the power source. • Charge the iPad / Netbook each night. • Document any software/hardware issues to your teacher as soon as possible. • Keep the iPad / Netbook in a well-protected temperature controlled environment when not in use. Do not leave the iPad / Netbook in a vehicle or location that is not temperature controlled, such as a very hot car without air conditioning or an unheated room or vehicle. • • • • •

Apps
The Fall Mountain High School has researched key applications, which will be preinstalled on each iPad / Netbook. Through the course of the initiative, additional applications may be reviewed and added to facilitate academic situations. Purchasing and installing these applications is the responsibility of the school. The student user is not to install any applications not approved by The Fall Mountain High School. There will be a procedure reviewed in the classroom on how to recommend an application to be added by the school.

Saving Documents
Saving documents with your IPAD / NETBOOK is done using "cloud" document sharing capabilities. This requires you to have an account with Dropbox or Google Docs. Using this account, you can save and export your documents in a couple different formats for later use. This allows you to access your documents from other computers via the Internet. You can also share your documents with others in

92 your class or your instructor.

Reporting Technical Issues
Any errors or problems with the iPad / Netbook / Netbook should be reported, as soon as practical. This can be done by informing the teacher or the librarian about the issue so it can be addressed in a timely manner. All syncing of the device will be handled through the school to ensure like applications and configurations are found on every device to maximize the potential of the device. Damage due to a determined accidental cause will be addressed by the school through normal procedures. Damage due to negligence may result in the student assuming the financial responsibility of replacement of the iPad / Netbook. Students taking the iPad / Netbook from school property must sign and submit the Parent-Student iPad / Netbook Use Agreement Form. Student use of the iPad / Netbook off school grounds may be revoked at anytime by the administration.

Student:
I understand and will abide by the above Internet Use Agreement. I further understand that any violation of the regulations above is unethical and may constitute a criminal offense. Should I commit any violation, my access privileges may be revoked, school disciplinary action may be taken, and/or appropriate legal action. User's Full Name: ______________________________________ Date: _______________ User’s Signature: ______________________________________

Parent:
I give my child permission to have a school email account. I give my child permission to use the Internet for class assignments. I give permission for my child’s picture to be used in association with the school website as part of postings from athletic, organizational, or other academic areas. Parent or Guardian's Name (please print): _________________________________________ Parent or Guardian's Signature: _____________________________ Date: _______________

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GBEDB EMPLOYEE USE OF EDUCATIONAL WEBSITES/ SOCIAL NETWORKING WEBSITES Social Networking via the Internet are services that focus on building online communities of people who share common Interests and/or activities. This includes all web 2.0 tools and services i.e.: Social Sites, Blogs, Wikis, Social Book-Marking, Email, Course Management (CMS)/Learning Management Systems (LMS), Video Download/Upload Sites and Audio/Visual Virtual Meeting Sites. The Fall Mountain Regional School District and School Board recognizes the great potential social networking services may provide to schools for educational purposes, however, certain expectations for professional conduct by district employees extend into the personal online world of social networking, blogs, and other communications tools, especially regarding the mention of the Fall Mountain Regional School District or members of the District community. Employees are encouraged to utilize district technology resources for social networking and encouraged to attend professional development opportunities about social networking offered by the district. The district re-affirms that employees follow professional guidelines, and be accountable for all online interactions. Employees should exercise appropriate discretion when using social networks for personal communication. Employees should exercise appropriate discretion when using social networks for personal communications and should limit this activity to off hours.

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IMBA Distance Education

The Fall Mountain Regional School District recognizes and encourages students to take full advantage of distance education opportunities as a means of enhancing and supporting their education. Distance education means correspondence, video-based, Internet/online-based or other similar media that provides educational courses as a means to fulfill curriculum requirements. Such opportunities will be implemented under the provisions set forth in Policy IHBH, Extended Learning Opportunities and Policy IHBI, Alternative Learning Plans. If the course is to be taken for credit, then Policy IMBC, Alternative Credit Options, will apply. Students must have distance education courses approved by the school principals ahead of time in order to receive credit. The written approval of the building principal is required before a Fall Mountain District student enrolls in an online or virtual course that is intended to become part of their educational program. Students applying for permission to take an online course must complete prerequisites and provide teacher/counselor recommendations to confirm the student possesses the maturity level needed to function effectively in a distance education learning environment. Approved distance education courses must satisfy both state and local standards; be

95 delivered by staff licensed in the state where the course originates; and contain provisions for feedback and monitoring of student progress. The district requires that a syllabus, including prerequisites, specific learning goals/activities, student evaluation criteria, and teacher responsibilities be submitted for review before the course is approved. Students taking approved online courses must be enrolled in the Fall Mountain Regional School District and must take the courses during the regular school day at the school site, unless the administration has granted approval for remote access based on special circumstances. Online courses may be taken in the summer under the same conditions as during the school year. The principal will assign a teacher to monitor student progress, grading assignments, and testing. One teacher may supervise no more than ten students participating in distance education courses. Approved distance education courses must comply with all federal and state statutes pertaining to student privacy and to public broadcasting of audio and video. Confidentiality of student record information will be maintained throughout the process. This includes information shared between Fall Mountain School District representatives and the virtual school or online teacher, information shared between the school district or online teacher with students and parents, and information shared between Fall Mountain District representatives, the virtual school and or online teacher and others. The Fall Mountain Regional School District will provide safeguards for students participating in online instruction activities at the school, and Policy EGA, Internet Access for Students, will apply. Students earning credit for distance education courses shall participate in all assessments required by the statewide education improvement and assessment program. Credit courses will require students to meet similar academic standards as required by the District. Credit for the course is not recognized until an official record of the final grade has been submitted to the principal or designee with feedback from the online teacher. Students who violate any part of the policy or engage in any other activity that school authorities consider inappropriate are subject to disciplinary action consistent with Board policies and the student handbook.

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EGAA CYBERBULLYING This District is committed to providing a positive and productive learning and working environment. Any form of harassment using electronic devices, commonly known as “cyberbullying,” by students, staff or third parties is prohibited and will not be tolerated in the district. Cyberbullying is the use of any electronic communication device to convey a message in any form (text, image, audio, or video) that defames, intimidates, harasses or is otherwise intended to harm, insult or humiliate another in a deliberate, repeated or hostile and unwanted manner. In addition, any communication of this form which disrupts or prevents a safe and positive educational or working environment may also be considered cyberbullying. Students and staff will refrain from using personal communication devices or district property to harass or stalk another. The district will take any report of cyberbullying seriously and will investigate reports promptly. Students are encouraged to report an incident immediately to a teacher or principal, who will take appropriate action. Students who make a report should also preserve evidence of the cyberbullying. For example a student may save or bring a copy of an email, text message, picture or other electronic transmission that the student believes was intended to harm, insult, or humiliate. Students whose behavior is found to be in violation of this policy will be subject to loss of privileges, discipline, up to and including expulsion. Staff whose behavior is found to be in violation of this policy will be subject to discipline, up to and including dismissal. Third parties whose behavior is found to be in violation of this policy shall be subject to appropriate sanctions as determined and imposed by the superintendent or Board. Any perceived criminal conduct will be reported immediately to local law enforcement.

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FMRSD Adopted 12/8/2008

EHB

DATA AND ELECTRONIC RECORDS RETENTION

The Fall Mountain Regional School District will ensure that necessary records and documents are adequately protected and stored as required by Ed 306.04 and in accordance with RSA 189:29-a. The District will keep an archive of email for up to one year, after which time electronic files will be permanently deleted The Fall Mountain Regional School District shall maintain, review and revise procedures as needed to comply with the federal “Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act,” 20 U.S.C. & 1232g, and RSA 91-A, Access to Public Records.

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