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Energy Efficient and Comfortable Floor Heating

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INDIVIDUAL TEMPERATURE REGULATION IN ROOMS WITH UNDERFLOOR HEATING BASIC ELEMENTS FOR REGULATION OF AN UNDERFLOOR HEATING SYSTEM FLOOR CONSTRUCTIONS COMBINED HEATING SYSTEMS REGULATION METHODS USING DANFOSS CONTROL SYSTEMS EXAMPLES OF USE PRODUCT CATALOGUE 18 22 26 8 12 16 4

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Preface
In recent years, underfloor heating has become increasingly popular. This is due to the fact that underfloor heating provides a range of opportunities not offered by traditional heating methods in both residential and commercial buildings. However, it is essential to regulate underfloor heating correctly in order to make the very most of the opportunities it provides. That is why Danfoss has developed a versatile range of controls that pave the way to energy savings and optimal comfort. This guide contains a general introduction to

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setting up underfloor heating systems. It also provides an explanation of why the option of regulating temperature individually in the separate rooms is so important to the optimal utilisation of underfloor heating. Finally, the last section of this guide contains a list of the products in the Danfoss range for regulating underfloor heating systems as well as a number of examples of use.

We hope you find this guide useful. Danfoss A/S

Individual temperature regulation in rooms with underfloor heating

Comfort The temperatures in the rooms in which we live and work play an important role in our wellbeing. It should not be too hot or too cold, and the temperature must be adjusted in relation to what we are wearing and what we are doing at the time. For example, office workers typically wear lighter clothes and have a lower body temperature than personnel packing products in the warehouse. The room temperature should therefore be higher in the areas where office workers carry out their tasks.

Room temperature can be regulated in a number of ways. One of the most commonly used methods involves regulating the supply temperature to the heat emitters such as underfloor heating systems, radiators and convection heaters. This can be done using self-acting regulation valves with fixed temperature settings. Electronic regulators, which take into account the temperature outside can also be used. These methods can be made even more efficient by the installaActivities and clothing vary from room to room, which is why the temperature should be adjusted accordingly. Typical room temperatures in a residential building Kitchen Living room Bathroom Bedroom Hall ~ 20 C ~ 20 C ~ 23 C ~ 17 C ~ 17 C

tion of a reference sensor in the room you wish to use as the basis for regulating the supply temperature. The use of such methods allows some degree of regulation, but it does not make it possible to regulate temperature precisely or individually in different rooms. Even if the same temperature is required in all rooms, these methods are still not the best options. This is because they do not allow for corrections to be made to accommodate the special conditions of the different rooms conditions such as user patterns, heat loss and heat supply from PCs and sunlight through windows, for example. This means that if regulation of the supply temperature is the only method used, a suitable temperature can be obtained in some rooms, but not in others. Some rooms will be too hot which is not only unpleasant, but also results in excessive energy consumption while others will be too cold.

In short, it is essential to be able to regulate the temperature individually in the separate rooms to make sure that they are all pleasant to be in, and to save energy.

By regulating the temperature individually in the separate rooms, it is possible to ensure that all areas of the building are pleasant to be in as the temperature suits the activities in each room. This applies to both private and commercial buildings and offers the dual benefits of optimal comfort and minimal energy consumption.

Individual room temperature regulation ensures optimal comfort in all rooms.

Energy consumption and energy savings


The ultimate goal of temperature regulation is to ensure maximum comfort combined with minimal energy consumption. This means that the heating system must constantly ensure that the temperature is always suitable in the different rooms, without noticeable variations. There are a range of factors that must be taken into account, such as the activities and clothing of the people in the room, heat loss and heat gain through windows, lights, computers and other sources of heat. As a minimum, the temperature must be regulated individually in the separate rooms or zones.
C temperature

Independent tests and simulations have been carried out with the purpose of establishing the importance of regulating temperature in individual rooms for people's comfort and for energy consumption. The results vary, depending on the house/apartment in question, its construction and user patterns, as well as on the test method used. However, the results are all clear on one point namely, they generally support the importance of individual room temperature regulation for both comfort and energy consumption. It has been shown that energy savings of 20-40% can be made without compromising on comfort.

Bathroom

23

Desired temperature

Living room

20

Desired temperature

Bedroom

17

Desired temperature

12

15

18

21

24

Hour (1 day) Temperature achieved with individual room temperature regulation. Temperature achieved without individual room temperature regulation.

20C
Temperature distribution in a room with underfloor heating.

Heat deviations In all rooms, the temperature will vary from floor to ceiling and from one end to the other. It is important to personal well-being that these temperature variations are minimal. In the worst cases, major variations can lead to draughts. By definition, underfloor heating has a large surface for radiating heat, and so heating requirements can be covered with only a very low surface temperature on the floor. Underfloor heating also makes it possible to achieve the same temperature in all areas of the room from the horizontal perspective. In addition, it is possible to make sure that the difference in temperature between floor and ceiling is typically only 1-2 C (see the illustration on the previous page).

Approximately 70% of the heat supplied by underfloor heating is radiated heat, a form of heating that suits people very well. The heating surface covers the entire floor, thus ensuring even distribution of the heat. Heat loss through windows, walls and ceilings is kept to a minimum because the underfloor heating ensures an uniform temperature throughout the room. Underfloor heating can be connected to a range of heating sources such as boilers, direct district heating, district heating with heat exchangers, solar heating and heat pumps.

Basic elements for regulation of an underfloor heating system

Underfloor heating systems can be built up in a range of ways. The illustrations below show four typical examples of underfloor heating systems. The systems and the components they contain are described in more detail on the following pages.

1
2
M1 DN15PN10KV 1

Heat sources In examples 1 and 3, the heat source consists of a boiler, while in examples 2 and 4, the heat source is direct district heating. The underfloor heating systems are low-temperature systems with a typical supply temperature of 30-45 C. This means that they can be supplied from other sources of heat such as solar heat, heat pumps and the like. The heat source and mixing loop can be controlled using various types of electronic and self-acting regulators. In examples 3 and 4, an electronic weather compensator (ECL) is used, while in examples 1 and 2 a self-acting flow temperature regulator (FTC) is used to control the supply temperature.

Mixing loop We recommend always using a mixing loop in connection with underfloor heating as today, this is the best way to ensure a correct and stable supply temperature, irrespective of the heat source used. In example 3, a weather compensator (ECL) is used. This regulates the supply temperature by changing the position of the 3-way valve in the mixing loop. This electronic regulator also controls the circulation pump and starts/stops the boiler according to heating requirements. There are benefits to be gained by replacing the 3-way valve with a 2-way valve on the return pipe as shown in example 4, where the supply comes simply from direct district heating. When using direct district heating, it is important to fit a differential pressure regulator p (AVPL) over the valve so that the valve works at a constant differential pressure within the regulation range. A number of different parameters can be chosen for regulation outdoor temperature, room temperature or return temperature, for example depending on the type of weather compensator (ECL) used. A weather compensator is a proportional-integral (PI) regulator. This means that it will always set itself to the desired supply temperature.

3
AMV 100

4
AMV 100

M1

DN15PN10KV 1

The illustrations refer to the overview on page 32.

In examples 1 and 2, a self-acting regulator (FTC) is used to regulate the supply temperature. A self-acting regulator is a proportional (P) regulator. This means that it will always regulate with a small deviation. The scale is divided into C to make it simple to set and adjust the regulator. In the same way as electronic regulators (ECL), self-acting regulators (FTC) ensure the correct mix so that the desired supply temperature to the underfloor heating system always remains constant, irrespective of load.

constant differential pressure. They maintain a constant differential pressure internally and thus also over the valves in the manifold (CFD) of the underfloor heating system irrespective of how many of the valves are open or closed. This is a considerable advantage because the individual pre-settings on the manifold valves which ensure the flow distribution between the different underfloor heating circuits are based precisely on a constant differential pressure. It is important to pre-set the manifold valves so

In example 2, a differential pressure regulator p (AVPL) has also been fitted. This makes sure that the differential pressure across the selfacting regulation valve (RA-C/RA-N) remains constant and within the regulation range. The choice of self-acting and electronic regulators depends on the user's needs and requirements to the system. Electronic regulators are very flexible regarding connections and settings, thus they are generally more expensive to buy and to install. Some countries have legal requirements concerning the use of weather compensators for the regulation of the supply temperature in heating installations. Mixing pumps (P2) are available as variable pressure pumps (example 4) and constant pressure pumps (examples 1, 2 and 3). The advantage of variable pressure pumps (example 4) is that they ensure optimal flow and

that the heat is distributed evenly to the different rooms with underfloor heating. Variable pressure pumps always deliver precisely the flow needed thus reducing power consumption, and, as a result, electricity costs. Constant pressure pumps (examples 1, 2 and 3) can also be used to ensure a constant differential pressure over the manifold valves to the circuits of the underfloor heating system if an automatic bypass valve (AVDO) is fitted. When the valves in the manifold (CFD) close, the automatic bypass valve (AVDO) will open more and more because the pressure rises when the flow through the system falls. The pump must always be able to cover the total flow, and therefore provides the same output irrespective of how many valves are open in the manifold (CFD). This means that power consumption remains constant when pumps of this kind are used.

Underfloor heating systems Danfoss has a wide range of functional and efficient products for regulating room temperatures in underfloor heating systems. These include both electronic and self-acting regulation systems. The electronic regulation systems are available as both wireless and hard-wired systems. Wireless regulation system: in wireless systems (CF-system) the thermal actuators (TWA) are connected to the outputs on what is known as a master regulator (CFM). Here, it is possible to choose which output or outputs are to be regulated by the different room thermostats (CFR). When a room thermostat (CFR) "calls for" heat, a radio signal is sent to the master regulator (CFM), which activates the appropriate output. A thermal actuator (TWA) then opens the associated manifold valve for the room in question. This allows the room temperatures in the separate rooms to be regulated individually. Hard-wired regulation system: in principle, traditional, hard-wired systems operate in the same way as wireless systems. The difference is that in these systems, the regulation is performed by room thermostats (FH-WT/S/P) that activate the thermal actuators (TWA) directly on the manifold valves. The wires from the room thermostats (FH-WT/S/P) and the thermal actuators (TWA) are connected in a connection box (FHWC) where it is also possible to connect a relay (FH-WR) to the boiler or pump control and a timer. It is also possible to use room thermostats (FH-WS/P) and a floor sensor (FH-WF) to regulate the surface temperature of the floor. Self-acting regulation system: self-acting

Manifold: the underfloor heating pipes, which are cast into the floor, are individually connected to a valve on the manifold or distributor (CFD), which regulates the water flow in each separate underfloor heating circuit. The size of the manifold chosen depends on the number of circuits used in the installation. The manifold typically consists of a return pipe with valves and a supply pipe. The pre-setting can be located on either the supply pipe or the return pipe, and both can be fitted with end sections including draining, filling, and air vent functions. For underfloor heating systems with a pipe diameter of 15-20 mm, it is recommended to lay a new pipe circuit connected to a separate manifold valve for every 25-30 m2 in large rooms. This is to prevent excessive pressure loss and cooling in the separate circuits. The pipes must be distributed evenly throughout the room, with each covering a similar share of the total area. For smaller pipe diameters, the area covered by each pipe will naturally decrease. Thermal actuator: a thermal actuator is fitted to each manifold valve. This opens and closes the valve according to the heating requirement. The actuator is controlled by a room thermostat (CFR or FH-WT/S/P) set to the desired room temperature. In principle, this works in the same way as a radiator thermostat, the only difference being that in this case, all the valves are collected together in the manifold (CFD) and the sensors in the separate rooms. If there are several underfloor heating circuits in a room, the room thermostat (CFR or FH-WT/S/P) can control several outputs with associated thermal actuators (TWA). Pre-setting and calculating flow: the pre-setting of the manifold (CFD), which takes care of distributing the flow between the underfloor heating circuits in the separate rooms, has an important role to play for both comfort and the efficiency of the regulation itself. The longest circuit demands the greatest flow, and its pre-set position must therefore be completely open.

systems (FHV), which are designed to be built into walls, are often used to regulate underfloor heating in a single room such as a bathroom or utility room. Regulation can be carried out on the basis of the room temperature or the return temperature from the underfloor heating circuit, depending on whether you would like a constant temperature in the room or a constant surface temperature on the floor.

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Calculation of the flow (Q) in underfloor heating circuits: Q= Heat demand: value that states how much energy that needs to be used in a room to maintain a specific temperature. The value also provides an indication of the ability of the room to retain the heat supplied. This depends on factors such as how well the room is insulated. This value is typically between 35 and 50 W/m2 for a well-insulated building. Room area: T: the size of the room in m2. cooling over the underfloor heating circuit typically 5 C in residential buildings. *1.16 Conversion factor.
System not in balance.

Heat demand x room area T x 1,16*

In the following section, we will examine an example involving an installation covering four rooms of 25, 18, 12 and 7 m2. The heating demand has been set at 40 W/m2 and cooling at 5C. The first step is to calculate the flow to the largest room (25 m2): Q25 = 40 x 25 5 x 1,16 = 172 l/h
System in balance.

Next, we calculate the flows to the other rooms: Q18 = 40 x 18 5 x 1,16 = 124 l/h,

Q12 =

40 x 12 5 x 1,16

= 83 l/h and

Q7 =

40 x 7 5 x 1,16

= 48 l/h

The calculated values for Q and the applicable differential pressure are then entered into the capacity diagram for the manifold (CFD) to find the pre-setting values.

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Floor constructions

When designing the floor, it is important to take into account a range of factors that affect the efficiency and comfort level of the underfloor heating system. These include level of insulation, layout pattern, pipe dimension, distance between the pipes, installation depth and cooling over the circuits. The surface temperature must be evenly distributed over the entire floor area to ensure optimal comfort. Layout patterns The choice of layout pattern depends on the chosen method of regulation electronic (On/Off or timed pulse modulation) or self-acting (P-regulator).

There are three typical layout patterns: The double parallel spiral pattern (figure a) can be laid from the middle outwards or from the point where the pipes enter the room. The supply and return pipes are laid at the same time. The supply pipe should be the one closest to the exterior wall. The pipes are laid parallel to the walls and with the same length proportions. This pattern provides optimal distribution of the heat across the floor as the supply and return pipes lie side by side. This pattern should always be used for systems with self-acting regulators, where the flow varies depending on the deviation in temperature. The pattern is also ideal for systems involving electronic regulation, but the other patterns can be used for such systems, too. When laying the double parallel pattern (figure b), the supply pipe is installed first, with double spacing. At the end of the pattern, the pipe is bent 180 and the return pipe is then laid in the gaps between the supply pipe so that every other section switches between a cold return area and a hot supply area. This double parallel pattern distributes the heat better than the single parallel pattern. The single parallel pattern (figure c) should only be used for installations with electronic regulators that control on the basis of On/Off or timed pulse modulation. It should never be used for systems with self-acting regulators.

a) Double parallel spiral pattern.

b) Double parallel pattern.

c) Single parallel pattern.

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Timed pulse modulation completely opens the manifold valve and then closes it completely after a period that depends on the deviation from the desired room temperature. On/Off regulation opens the manifold valve completely when the room temperature falls below the desired level, and then closes it again when the room temperature is as desired. The flow in the underfloor heating pipes is thus so great when heat is "called for" that the temperature drop across the pipes is minimal and therefore does not affect comfort. Cold zones It is a good idea to lay underfloor heating pipes closer together in those areas of the room that contain "cold zones". These are typically located near large window sections, sliding doors and the like. In such zones, the distance between pipes with a diameter of 15-20 mm should not be less than 50 mm and the total width of the layout pattern in the cold zone should not exceed 300-500 mm out of consideration for the overall pressure drop across the circuit. Pipe dimensions Underfloor heating pipes supply heat to the floor through their surfaces. The area of the surface, which is dependent on the pipe dimension, thus has an important role to play in underfloor heating systems. If the dimension is reduced, the supply temperature must be raised correspondingly to ensure the transfer of the same amount of energy. Another option, however, is to reduce the distance between the pipes, thus

increasing

the

total

length

of

the

pipe.

Remember that pressure drop increases in relation to the length of the pipe. Resistance in the pipes is affected by the pipe dimension, so pressure drop problems can occur if the diameter of the pipes is too small, or if the pipes themselves are too long. Today it is typical recommended using pipes with an exterior diameter of 15-20 mm and a maximum length of 100-120 m. This corresponds to an area of approximately 25-30 m2 per circuit. Distance between pipes and installation depth If the distance between the pipes is too great, the temperature will be unevenly distributed across the floor. This means that the floor will be warm right over the pipes but cold in between them. The same applies if the pipes are laid too close to the surface of the concrete. A pipe diameter of 15-20 mm, a distance of 250 or 300 mm and an installation depth of 30-90 mm (in concrete) will ensure an uniform surface temperature. For installations in concrete, the uniformity of the surface temperature increases in step with the installation depth, however, the reaction time of the floor is equally increased.

Excessive distance betweens pipes and insufficient installation depth.

Correct distance between pipes and correct installation depth.

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Wooden floors Wooden floors and heat emission panels/plates are normally sold with instructions stating the recommended pipe dimensions and distance between pipes for underfloor heating circuits. Pipes are installed directly beneath the wooden floor itself, and as wood is a very poor heat conductor, it is necessary to install heat emission panels/plates. Most of these panels/plates are supplied ready to fit with grooves for the underfloor heating pipes. They are generally made of aluminium, which spreads the heat evenly across the entire floor. Today, heat emission panels/ plates are very efficient, and underfloor heating pipes with a diameter of 15-20 mm can be laid with a distance of 250 or 300 mm between them. The thickness of wooden floor constructions can vary, so the supply temperature will have to be raised or lowered correspondingly. Here, it is important to follow any guidelines from the manufacturer of the wooden floor concerning maximum surface temperature. Otherwise, there is a risk of causing permanent damage to the wooden floor. The supply temperature will typically be 10-15 C higher than the maximum surface temperature, depending on construction dimensions and heating requirements. Wooden floors can be installed with underfloor heating in many different ways, so it is important to consult professional fitters for advice when dimensioning and installing the systems. It is also important to ensure that such floors are laid correctly and in accordance with all the applicable laws and regulations. It is especially impor-

tant to make sure that there is sufficient insulation under the pipes to ensure optimal comfort and energy efficiency. Concrete floors When installing underfloor heating in concrete constructions, there should be at least 30 mm of concrete above the underfloor heating pipes with a dimension of 15-20 mm. This will ensure an even distribution of heat throughout the floor. If the pipes with a distance between the pipes of 250-300 mm are not installed at sufficient depth, there is a risk of temperature variations in the floor surface. It is also important to make sure that there is a layer of concrete under the pipes. This can be done by laying a steel grid or similar and tying the pipes to it. It is then simply a matter of using spacer blocks or similar to raise the grid slightly to allow the concrete to flow under the pipes during the pouring process. The advantage of this method is that the pipes are completely enclosed in the concrete and therefore cannot expand when heated, as this may eventually result in leaks or burst pipes. At the same time, this method ensures the best possible transfer of heat to the concrete and thus to the floor. Concrete transfers heat better than wood, so it is not necessary to use any form of heat conductor. Generally speaking, concrete floors allow the application of a lower supply temperature. If the depth of concrete above the pipes is 30-90 mm, the supply temperature can generally be set to

Example of a wooden floor construction.

Example of a tiled concrete floor construction.

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30-35C for normal heating requirements. Concrete floors are normally finished with tiles, linoleum, wood or carpet, and the optimal surface temperature will be 19-29C (30-33C in bathrooms). Concrete constructions with underfloor heating can be built up in several ways (see the illustration below). Cooling across underfloor heating circuits Cooling is equivalent to the difference in temperature between the supply and return flow in the pipes and it influences a number of different factors. Underfloor heating in normal residential applications is typically dimensioned for cooling of 5C because this results in an uniform floor surface temperature and a pleasant indoor climate. Cooling is one of the reasons why it is necessary to use double parallel patterns for underfloor heating pipes, when using self-acting regulators to ensure that temperature differences are not transferred to the floor surface. However, this does not apply to the same extent for systems involving electronic regulation as the flow in such systems is more constant and temperature differences are not as noticeable. In warehouses, sports halls, production facilities and other rooms where the demand for comfort is not normally as high as in residential buildings, a higher level of cooling is acceptable. Doubling the cooling will halve the flow, thus cutting the necessary effect for the pump correspondingly. Insulation It is important to choose the right insulation as early as the construction stage. This will help to optimise the energy efficiency and comfort level of the underfloor heating. Choosing the right level of insulation will also reduce heating costs throughout the lifetime of the building. The relatively modest extra costs linked to using sufficient insulation in the building phase will be covered several times in the long term. The supply and return flows of the underfloor heating pipes must be insulated at the points where they are led through adjoining rooms to minimise heat loss and to ensure that these adjoining rooms are not heated. If they are not

insulated correctly, it will also be difficult to regulate the temperature of separate rooms individually, and thus to save energy. Pipes must always be laid within the weather screen to prevent unnecessary heat loss. It is also important to put plenty of insulation under the pipes and along the edges of the various rooms. Suitable insulation also has the advantage of allowing operation with the lowest possible supply temperature by reducing heat loss in the entire underfloor heating system. Reducing the supply temperature by just a few degrees will result in appreciable savings on heating costs without adversely affecting the level of comfort. Please note that all legal requirements on insulation, etc. must always be followed.
Heating demands (W/m2)
80 70

50 40 30 20 10

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ret

60

et rp ca or w flo or or en flo flo d n te et oo de re w arp o c hc m wo on wit m C r m loo 16 2 m nf 2 de oo w mm 22 ith

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Supply temperature (C) With different floor coverings, the underfloor heating system requires different supply temperatures to convey the same heat output to the room.

The level of insulation is of considerable importance to the efficiency of underfloor heating systems.

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Combined heating systems

During the past 5-10 years, underfloor heating has become the preferred form of heating for residential buildings in many countries. It is therefore important to be able to regulate the underfloor heating system considering the indoor climate and energy utilisation. Underfloor heating systems do not normally react as quickly to changes in temperature, so it is not possible to raise or lower the room temperature significantly within relatively short periods. After all, these systems have to heat large masses such as concrete floors rather than small radiators. The material used and the floor construction itself also have roles to play with regard to the amount of heat accumulated in the floor.

Today, it is common in homes to use systems that combine underfloor heating and radiators. This is an ideal solution as the heating of the different rooms in the home is subject to a range of different requirements. For example, it is desirable to be able to change the room temperature in hobby rooms, guest rooms and the like quickly to make sure that they are warm and comfortable whenever they need to be used. Radiators operate with a higher surface temperature (50-70C) than heated floors (19-29C), so radiators are often the best solution for rooms of this type. In addition, an increasing number of homes feature underfloor heating on the ground floor and radiators on the first floor. It is possible to combine heating systems by, for

In the past, underfloor heating was generally reserved exclusively for bathrooms and utility rooms because these rooms typically have tiled floors. In wet rooms, underfloor heating had two functions: to heat the floor and to keep the floor dry.

example, installing underfloor heating in the kitchen, bathrooms/toilets, utility room, living room and hallway and then using radiators in the other rooms hobby room, guest room, etc. This creates a set-up that has the high comfort level and architectural advantages of underfloor heating along with the rapid heat-up capability of the radiators.

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CFM

CFD TWA

p FTC

Underfloor heating The illustration above shows an example of an underfloor heating system built up according to the same principles as used in previous illustrations. The heat source is direct district heating, and the mixing loop is controlled by a self-acting supply flow temperatur regulator (FTC). The pressure across the valve (RA-N/FN/C) is kept constant by a differential pressure regulator p (AVPL). The values for setting the differential pressure are listed in the data sheet for the differential pressure regulator. These values are used as the basis for the dimensioning of both the p regulator (AVPL) and the flow temperature regulation valve (FTC + RA-N/FN/C). The supply temperature can also be controlled by an electronic weather compensator (ECL). In this case, a gear motor is fitted to the 2-way valve and a number of sensors are used.

The manifold (CFD) is connected to the separate underfloor heating pipes that supply the rooms according to the heat "called for" by the room thermostats (CFR). It is important to draw a sketch of which underfloor heating circuits are placed in which rooms when the pipes are installed. This sketch is to be used when subsequently fitting and setting the various self-acting heating controls, and when pre-setting the water flow for the separate circuits in relation to the sizes of the individual rooms. This sketch will also be very useful if, at a later stage, holes need to be drilled in the floor to secure furnishings or the like. Installations of this type can be room temperature regulated by electronic, wireless (CF system) or hard-wired (FH-Wx) control systems.
CFR

ECL CFM

CFD TWA
AMV 100

M1 DN15PN10KV 1

p FTC

Combining underfloor heating and radiators These two heating systems require different supply temperatures a factor that must be taken into consideration when planning the installation. In the example illustrated, an electronic weather compensator (ECL) is used to regulate the temperature of the supply flow to the radiators. This system is regulated on the basis of the outdoor temperature, and the supply temperature will typically be 40-70C depending on the season. The differential pressure regulator p (AVPL) makes sure that the dimensioned differential pressure across the motor valve on the supply side is kept constant. This is important to ensure the balance of the system and to make sure that the motor valve operates within the regulation

range. The underfloor heating system involves a separate mixing loop with a self-acting flow temperature regulator (FTC) because here, the supply temperature must be lower usually 30-40C depending on the floor construction, the level of insulation, floor covering, etc. The rooms in the underfloor heating system is regulated by an electronic control system (CF or FH-Wx) in order to ensure the best possible indoor climate in the separate rooms as well as optimal energy utilisation throughout the entire system. The radiators can be fitted with Danfoss' well-known radiator thermostats, as this part of the heating system operates independently of the underfloor heating system.
CFR

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Regulation methods using Danfoss control systems

The choice of regulation method for individual room temperature control depends on how many rooms the underfloor heating system is to cover, and on how large these rooms are. In addition, it is important to decide on the regulation method before starting work on the floor construction as, this may well be a defining factor in determining the optimal layout pattern for the underfloor heating pipes, for example. Electronic regulation systems Wireless system
CFM

ensure that all the underfloor heating circuits are pre-set for precisely the right volume of water (flow). The regulation valves for the underfloor heating circuits are located in the return side of the manifold, and every valve is equipped with a thermal actuator (TWA), which is controlled by the master regulator (CFM). If required, the system can also be fitted with a zone regulator (CFZ), which can divide the regulation of the different rooms into as many as six zones. The zone regulator (CFZ) is connected to the master regulator (CFM) via a bus cable. The zone regulator (CFZ) can send signals about, for example, running at a lower room temperature in the different zones at different times such as during holidays. The master regulator (CFM) has eight outputs and can therefore control eight separate room

CFR

CFZ

CFD TWA

temperatures at the same time. The room therCFS 2 CFZ CFM CFS 1

The illustration above shows Danfoss' wireless CF system. The master regulator (CFM) in the system makes sure that the radio signals from the room thermostats (CFR) are processed, and that the necessary regulations are implemented. A room thermostat is fitted in each room. If the room temperature deviates from the temperature setting of a given room thermostat (CFR) this thermostat sends a wireless radio signal to the master regulator (CFM), which, in turn, either opens or closes the flow to the underfloor heating circuit in the room in question. This regulation is carried out via a thermal actuator (TWA) fitted to the associated valve in the manifold (CFD). The wireless room thermostats (CFR) are easy to fit as they do not need to be connected via wires or cables. It is also possible to set back the temperature manually on the room thermostats (CFR).
1-8 CFD with TWA 9 - 16

17 - 24

CFR

mostats (CFR) can be assigned to multiple outputs in large rooms with more underfloor heating circuits. The system can be extended through one or two slave regulators (CFS) with eight outputs each. This means the system can comprise up to 24 outputs. In office environments, for example, where it may be necessary to use even more room thermostats (CFR), it is possible to fit additional master regulators (CFM) and thus to increase the number of outputs even further. The outputs of the slave regulators (CFS) are

The manifold (CFD) consists of a supply pipe and a return pipe. The flow to the separate underfloor heating circuits can be pre-set in the supply side of manifold. In this way, it is possible to
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equivalent to those of the master regulator (CFM), but the slave regulators do not contain radio receivers and therefore cannot be used on their own. The master and slave regulators

(CFM/S) are connected through a bus cable and all the room thermostats (CFR) are assigned to outputs via the master regulator (CFM). The system is easy to install as there is no need to run wires to every single room. All that is required is the installation of a wireless room thermostat (CFR) assigned to the master regulator (CFM). The costs associated with installing the wireless system (CF system) are significantly lower than the installation costs for hard-wired systems (FH-Wx). Hard-wired system Danfoss also supplies a 24V hard-wired electronic solution (FH-Wx) with an integrated transformer for direct connection to a 230V power supply (see illustration). In the hard-wired system, each individual room thermostat (FH-WT/S/P) is connected to the connection box (FH-WC) via wires. In the connection box (FH-WC), the wires from the thermal actuators (TWA) are connected to the associated wires from the room thermostats (FH-WT/S/P). It is possible to connect up to 12 room thermostats. A boiler or pump relay

(FH-WR) can also be fitted. This uses a potentialfree switch to start and stop the boiler or pump. Finally, a timer module/kit (FH-WN) can be fitted if required. This unit divides the rooms in the building into two zones and controls them on the basis of different user patterns such as temperature set back. The room thermostats (FH-WS/P) can be connected to an external floor sensor that can be used for regulation on the basis of the floor temperature, thus overriding the room temperature setting. This option is often used in bathrooms, etc. The cost price of a hard-wired system is often lower than for a wireless system, but the installation costs are higher due to the time needed to run the wires from room to room. All three patterns for laying out underfloor heating pipes mentioned in the "Floor constructions" section can be used for electronic regulation systems. However, there can be advantages in choosing the double parallel spiral pattern.

FH-WC

Connection box with 12 inputs/outputs and timer

FH-WT

FH-WS

FH-WP

Remote sensor (optional)

Remote sensor (optional)


19

Self-acting regulation systems Two models of the self-acting regulator (FHV) are available for building into walls. One model (FHV-A) regulates according to room temperature while the other (FHV-R) does so on the basis of the return temperature in the underfloor heating circuit and must therefore be fitted in the return pipe (see illustration). Choosing the model that regulates on the basis of the temperature of the return water (FHV-R), please note that in contrast to model FHV-A the regulator will never shut off the heat supply completely, even though there may be free heat in the room, as it is designed to keep the floor temperature constant. The regulators close as the temperature rises, which, in the case of the FHV-R model, means that when the water has transferred its heat to the floor and therefore has been cooled to below the pre-set temperature, the regulator will let the water pass. At the same time, new hot water will be let into the circuit from the supply side so the temperature begins to rise again, and when it reaches the FHV-R it will begin to close slightly once more. The whole process then starts again. If the self-acting regulator (FHV) is used without a recommended mixing loop because there is only underfloor heating connected to a

radiator in an utility room, for example it is important to make sure that you do not exceed the maximum allowable temperature for the floor. Self-acting regulators (FHV) reduce the flow in the circuit proportionally to the deviation from the set temperature. It is therefore important to take this into account when selecting the layout pattern which should ideally be of the double parallel spiral pattern type. It may be a good idea to lay the first metres of the underfloor heating supply pipe along an exterior wall, as it is in such areas that the radiant cooling is highest. Self-acting regulators (FHV) are particularly wellsuited to regulate underfloor heating temperature in single rooms, such as bathrooms and utility rooms.
FHV-R

IkPa/r
Min

M1 DN15PN10KV 1

p FTC

FHV-A

IkPa/r
Min

M1 DN15PN10KV 1

p FTC

20

21

Examples of use

ECL CFM CFZ

Wireless regulation system

CFD

TWA
AMV 100

M1 DN15PN10KV 1

CFR

Areas of use and description The wireless CF system is usually used in installations with individual room temperature regulation of several rooms that have underfloor heating. It is likewise commonly used in installations that combine underfloor heating and radiators, and it is ideal for renovation projects, as it is generally cheaper and easier to install than hard-wired systems. The battery-powered room thermostats are very sensitive and react via radio signals to very small deviations from the desired room temperature. The system has a simple, stylish and functional design that blends seamlessly into its surroundings. The system makes no specific requirements to the layout of the underfloor heating circuits as the flow is constant. The supply temperature is controlled via the motor valve by a weather compensator. When setting the supply temperature, remember to take into account the floor design and surface covering.

Components and functions CFM: Electronic master regulator with outputs for eight thermal actuators. The master regulator receives and processes the radio signals from the room thermostats. It can be extended with up to two slave regulators (CFS) with eight outputs each. CFR: Wireless room thermostat for fitting in each room where the room temperature is to be controlled by the regulation system. This regulation is done via radio signals to the master regulator. CFZ: Zone regulator (optional) is used for time and zone control (temperature reduction during pre-defined periods) of the underfloor heating system by dividing the rooms into zones. TWA: Thermal actuator connected by a wire to an output on the master regulator. When heat is "called for" the actuator opens the regulation valve in the manifold. CFD: Manifold connected to the underfloor heating pipes. Available in a range of sizes with various numbers of regulation valves.

Product CFM-24 CFR CFZ CFD 4+4 TWA-A

Item no. 088H0041 088H0203 088H0004 088H1004 088H3110

Description Master regulator, 24 V outputs Wireless room thermostat, battery-powered, calls for heat via radio signals Zone regulator Manifold with four regulation valves Thermal actuator, RA valve connection, 24 V, no-current closing (NC)

22

FH-WC

Hard-wired regulation system

CFD

TWA

p FTC

FH-WT/S/P

Areas of use and description The hard-wired FH-Wx system is typically used for individual room temperature regulation of underfloor heating in several different rooms. The system also makes it possible to regulate on the basis of floor temperature and to override room temperature control via a remote sensor in the floor (often used in bathrooms, for example). The system can be used in underfloor heating installations and in combined systems consisting of radiators and underfloor heating, for example. The system makes no specific requirements to the layout of the underfloor heating circuits as the flow is constant. The self-acting flow temperature regulator (FTC) can be set to the desired supply temperature when initially commissioning the installation. Remember that the supply temperature is subject to different requirements in combined heating systems.

Components and functions FH-WC: Electronic connection box in which room thermostats are connected with up to 12 thermal actuators. Available with or without a timer module that makes it possible to divide areas into two zones with different timing patterns. A relay for boiler or pump control is available as an accessory. FH-WT/S/P: Hard-wired thermostats. Available in a standard version and a featured version with a manual local night set-back feature and the option of connecting a floor sensor (a tamperproof model of the latter for institutions etc. is also available). TWA: Thermal actuator connected by a wire to an output on the connection box. When heat is "called for" the actuator opens the regulation valve in the manifold. CFD: Manifold connected to the underfloor heating pipes. Available in a range of sizes with various numbers of regulation valves.

Product FH-WC FH-WT FH-WP FH-WS FH-WF CFD 4+4 TWA-A

Item no. 088H0020 088H0022 088H0023 088H0024 088H0025 088H1004 088H3110

Description Connection box, 12 x 24 V outputs and integrated timer module Wired room thermostat, standard model Wired room thermostat, institution model Wired room thermostat, featured model Floor sensor Manifold with four regulation valves Thermal actuator, RA valve connection, 24 V, no-current closing (NC)

23

FHV-R

M1 DN15PN10KV 1

FTC

Self-acting regulation system

Areas of use and description This system is designed for controlling underfloor heating in individual rooms such as bathrooms and utility rooms, where a constant floor temperature is required. It is also often used in combined installations involving radiators and underfloor heating in one or more rooms, each with its own individual control. It is important to lay out the underfloor heating pipe in a double parallel pattern ideally a spiral. The self-acting return temperature regulator is fitted in the return flow as shown in the illustration.

Components and functions FHV-R: Used with a FJVR thermostat to regulate the temperature on the surface of the floor on the basis of the return temperature in the underfloor heating pipe.

Product FHV-R FJVR

Item no. 003L1000 003L1040

Description Underfloor heating valve for FJVR thermostat, for fitting in the return flow FJVR thermostat, 10-50 C, return temperature limiter

24

FHV-A

M1 DN15PN10KV 1

FTC

Self-acting regulation system

Areas of use and description This system is designed for underfloor heating in individual rooms where a constant room temperature is required. The regulation is self-acting and it is therefore important that the underfloor heating pipe is laid out in a double parallel pattern ideally a spiral. The self-acting room temperature regulator is fitted in the supply flow as shown in the illustration. Please note that the regulation will result in a decrease in floor temperature if the room receives free heat from the sun or other sources of heat.

Components and functions FHV-A: Used with a radiator thermostat to regulate the room temperature in a single room.

Product FHV-A RA 2000

Item no. 003L1001 Various versions

Description Underfloor heating valve for RA 2000 thermostats, for fitting in the supply flow RA 2000 radiator thermostat

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Product catalogue

Electronic regulators for controlling individual room temperatures in underfloor heating systems
CF system - wireless Is used for individual room temperature regulation in residential buildings with underfloor heating and can be adapted to installations of all sizes. The room thermostats send data via radio signals, which allow maximum freedom of choice for fitting and installation. This also makes the system ideal in connection with renovation and retrofit. The battery-powered room thermostats are very sensitive and react to even minor deviations from the desired room temperatures. As standard, the master regulator can be associated to a maximum of eight room thermostats and the system can be extended through the addition of up to two slave regulators (each with eight outputs). Also, a zone regulator can be added to provide the option of dividing the rooms up into time or temperature zones (for night set-back or reducing the temperature during holidays, etc.). The system is typically connected with a CFD manifold and TWA-A thermal actuators. The system has a simple, stylish and functional design that blends seamlessly into its surroundings.

Product CFM-24(1) CFS-24(1) CFM-230 CFS-230 CFR CFZ

Description Master regulator, 8 x 24V outputs incl. installation cable Slave regulator, 8 x 24V outputs incl. bus cable Master regulator, 8 x 230V outputs incl. installation cable Slave regulator, 8 x 230V outputs incl. bus cable Room thermostat, wireless (battery-powered) Zone regulator, incl. bus cable

Item no. 088H0041 088H0042 088H0001 088H0002 088H0203 088H0004

Accessories Bus cable Bus cable Installation cable External antenna External antenna External antenna
(1)

Description 1 m, used to connect CFM, CFS, CFZ 5 m, used to connect CFM, CFS, CFZ Used for assigning CFR to CFM 1.8 m 4.8 m 9.8 m

Item no. 088H0051 088H0055 088H0092 088H0093 088H0094 088H0095

CFM-24 & CFS-24 have integrated transformers and can be connected directly to a 230V power supply.

FH-Wx system - hard-wired Is typically used for individual room temperature regulation of underfloor heating in multiple rooms and can be connected to up to 12 room thermostats. Available with or without a timer module that makes it possible to divide areas into two zones with different timing patterns. A relay for boiler or pump control is available as an accessory. The system also makes it possible to regulate on the basis of floor temperature - with room temperature override - via a remote sensor in the floor (used in bathrooms, for example). The system is typically connected with a CFD manifold and TWA-A thermal actuators. Simple, stylish and functional design that blends seamlessly into its surroundings.

Product FH-WC FH-WC FH-WT FH-WS

Description Connection box, 12 x 24V outputs Connection box, 12 x 24V outputs, with integrated timer module Standard room thermostat, 24V Featured room thermostat, 24V, with manual local night set-back option and the possibility to connect a floor sensor, FH-WF

Item no. 088H0019 088H0020 088H0022 088H0024

FH-WP

Tamperproof version of FH-WS for institutions, etc.

088H0023

Accessories FH-WN FH-WF FH-WR

Description Timer module/kit for subsequent installation on FH-WC (088H0019) Floor sensor, 3 m, can be used with FH-WS and FH-WP Pump/boiler relay

Item no. 088H0021 088H0025 088H0026

26

FH-WT 230V room thermostat - hard-wired Danfoss also offers a hard-wired 230V thermostat that can be connected directly to TWA thermal actuators (230V) fitted to a CFD manifold or valve.

Product FH-WT 230

Description Room thermostat, 230V

Item no. 088H0127

TWA thermal actuator A range of versions of TWA thermal actuators which open and close the regulation valves are available for use with both Danfoss' CFD manifold and RA valves, as well as with other manifold and valve products. The thermal actuators all feature visual and touchable position indicators. Available with 24V or 230V supply voltage and in nocurrent closed (NC) and no-current open (NO) versions. The no-current closed (NC) versions are very easy to fit as a small locking split pin, which is easy to remove after installation, fixes the resistance of the spring force.

Product TWA-A TWA-A TWA-A TWA-A TWA-A TWA-K TWA-K TWA-K TWA-K

Description Thermal actuator, 24V, NC, Danfoss RA connection Thermal actuator, 24V, NC/S, end switch, Danfoss RA connection Thermal actuator, 24V, NO, Danfoss RA connection Thermal actuator, 230V, NC, Danfoss RA connection Thermal actuator, 230V, NO, Danfoss RA connection Thermal actuator, 24V, NC, connection to Heimeier/Oventrop/MNG valve types Thermal actuator, 24V, NO, connection to Heimeier/Oventrop/MNG valve types Thermal actuator, 230V, NC, connection to Heimeier/Oventrop/MNG valve types Thermal actuator, 230V, NO, connection to Heimeier/Oventrop/MNG valve types
(2) (2) (2) (2)

Item no. 088H3110 088H3114 088H3111 088H3112 088H3113 088H3140 088H3141 088H3142 088H3143

(2) M30x1.5 mm valve connection and similar closing measure.

CFD underfloor heating manifold The CFD manifold is used for regulating underfloor heating systems involving multiple underfloor heating circuits. Available with 2-12 circuits which can all be combined by connection pieces. Considering hydraulic balance, it is possible to pre-set the flow in the manifold supply side to the separate circuits. The regulation valves are fitted in the return flow, where TWA-A thermal actuators can be fitted and connected to one of Danfoss' electronic room temperature regulation systems a CF (wireless) or FH-Wx (hard-wired) system.

Product CFD 2+2 CFD 3+3 CFD 4+4 CFD 5+5 CFD 6+6 CFD 7+7 CFD 8+8 CFD 9+9 CFD 10+10 CFD 11+11 CFD 12+12 CFE Connection pieces
Reduction pieces

Description
Supply+return flow sections, pre-setting and regulation valves (RA connection), 2 circuits Supply+return flow sections, pre-setting and regulation valves (RA connection), 3 circuits Supply+return flow sections, pre-setting and regulation valves (RA connection), 4 circuits Supply+return flow sections, pre-setting and regulation valves (RA connection), 5 circuits Supply+return flow sections, pre-setting and regulation valves (RA connection), 6 circuits Supply+return flow sections, pre-setting and regulation valves (RA connection), 7 circuits Supply+return flow sections, pre-setting and regulation valves (RA connection), 8 circuits Supply+return flow sections, pre-setting and regulation valves (RA connection), 9 circuits Supply+return flow sections, pre-setting and regulation valves (RA connection), 10 circuits Supply+return flow sections, pre-setting and regulation valves (RA connection), 11 circuits Supply+return flow sections, pre-setting and regulation valves (RA connection), 12 circuits

Item no. 088H1002 088H1003 088H1004 088H1005 088H1006 088H1007 088H1008 088H1009 088H1010 088H1011 088H1012 088H1020 088H1021 088H1034 088H1044 088H1022

2 x end pieces with draining, filling, and automatic air vent functions 2 x connection pieces for assembling different manifold sizes 2 x reduction pieces, G 5/4" A x Rp 3/4" 2 x reduction pieces, G 5/4" A x Rp 1" 2 x assembly brackets for mounting the manifold on a wall

Reduction pieces Assembly brackets

27

Compression fittings for CFD manifold Compression fittings are important components in the context of assembling and installing underfloor heating pipes on CFD manifolds or other Danfoss RA valves. Danfoss supplies a comprehensive range of compression fittings for many different types of underfloor heating pipes such as PEX plastic pipes or ALU-PEX pipes.

Product Compression fittings Compression fittings Compression fittings Compression fittings Compression fittings Compression fittings Compression fittings Compression fittings Compression fittings Compression fittings Compression fittings Compression fittings Compression fittings

Description G 3/4", diameter 12 x 2 mm, for PEX plastic pipes G 3/4", diameter 14 x 2 mm, for PEX plastic pipes G 3/4", diameter 15 x 2.5 mm, for PEX plastic pipes G 3/4", diameter 16 x 2 mm, for PEX plastic pipes G 3/4", diameter 18 x 2 mm, for PEX plastic pipes G 3/4", diameter 18 x 2.5 mm, for PEX plastic pipes G 3/4", diameter 20 x 2 mm, for PEX plastic pipes G 3/4", diameter 20 x 2.5 mm, for PEX plastic pipes G 3/4", diameter 12 x 2 mm, for ALU-PEX pipes G 3/4", diameter 14 x 2 mm, for ALU-PEX pipes G 3/4", diameter 16 x 2 mm, for ALU-PEX pipes G 3/4", diameter 18 x 2 mm, for ALU-PEX pipes G 3/4", diameter 20 x 2 mm, for ALU-PEX pipes

Item no. 013G4152 013G4154 013G4155 013G4156 013G4158 013G4159 013G4160 013G4161 013G4182 013G4184 013G4186 013G4188 013G4190

Self-acting regulators for controlling individual room or floor temperatures in underfloor heating systems

FHV-R regulator (floor temperature regulation) The FHV-R self-acting regulator valve is a simple and elegant solution for building into walls. In combination with a FJVR thermostat, it controls the floor temperature by regulating the return flow temperature through the underfloor heating pipe. It is often used in systems that combine underfloor heating and radiators where, for example, a constant floor surface temperature is required in the bathroom or utility room. Available with a round or squared front cover.
Product FHV-R FHV-R FHV-R Description Underfloor heating valve for FJVR, 3/4" connection, round front cover, air vent Underfloor heating valve for FJVR, 3/4" connection, squared front cover, air vent Underfloor heating valve for FJVR, 3/4" connection, round front cover, air vent + draining and filling options FJVR Return temperature limiter, 10-50 C 003L1040 Item no. 003L1000 003L1006 003L1015

FHV-A regulator (room temperature regulation) The FHV-A self-acting regulator valve is a simple and elegant solution for building into walls. Used with conventional radiator thermostats to control room temperature and available with a round or square front cover.
Product FHV-A Description Underfloor heating valve for RA 2000 radiator thermostats, 3/4" connection, round front cover, air vent FHV-A Underfloor heating valve for RA 2000 radiator thermostats, 3/4" connection, squared front cover, air vent RA 2000 RA 2000 radiator thermostat Various versions 003L1007 Item no. 003L1001

28

Electronic regulators for supply temperature control


ECL Comfort Regulators that can be used both as weather compensators and constant temperature regulators. Available in a range of versions to suit all needs. The settings and parameters of the regulators can be remotely controlled via a panel with a bus port. The regulators can be used with 3-point gear motors (types AMV and AMB) and with On/Off thermal motors (type ABV). ECL is available in 24V and 230V models with PT1000/0 C sensors.

Product ECL Comfort 100 M regulator Analogue clock


Socket

Description
Weather compensator for boiler or district heating installation, incl. timer and socket, 230V Weather compensator for boiler or district heating installation, without timer, socket, 24V

Item no. 087B6828 087B1114 087B1147 087B1154 087B6868 087B1124 087B6869 087B1134 087B1149 087B1141 087B1164 084N1012 087B1165

Analogue clock for ECL Comfort 100 M


Socket for ECL 100

ECL Comfort 200


(Program package to be ordered separately)

Regulator including digital clock and socket, 230 V Regulator including digital clock, without socket, 24 V Regulator including digital clock and socket, 230 V Regulator including digital clock, without socket, 24 V Socket for ECL 200 and 300 Remote setting panel with built-in sensor for ECL Comfort Room temperature sensor Exterior temperature sensor Installation temperature sensor

ECL Comfort 300


(Program package to be ordered separately)

Socket ECA 61 ESM 10 ESM T ESM 11

Self-acting regulators for supply temperature control


FTC with attachable surface sensor Flow temperature regulator for underfloor heating system with two-way valves of type RA-N, RA-FN or RA-C. The choice of valve depends on flow requirements. The FTC is equipped with a surface sensor that is easy to fit on the supply pipe.

Product FTC Valves RA-C 15 RA-C 20 RA-N RA-FN

Description Self-acting flow temperature regulator, 15-50C

Item no. 013G5081

Straight valve with integrated pre-setting, Kv = 0.30-0.90 m3/h Straight valve with integrated pre-setting, Kv = 0.80-2.60 m3/h Straight valve with integrated pre-setting Straight valve without pre-setting

013G3094 013G3096 Various versions Various versions

For additional details, see data sheets for the individual products.

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RAVK with immersion sensor Supply temperature regulator that matches type RAV/VMT 2-way valves and type VMV 3-way valves.

Product RAVK Valves RAV 10/8 RAV 15/8 RAV 20/8 RAV 25/8 VMT 15/8 VMT 20/8 VMT 25/8 VMV 15 VMV 20

Description Self-acting flow temperature regulator, 25-65C

Item no. 013U8063

2-way valve for RAVK and type ABV thermal actuator, Kvs = 1.2 2-way valve for RAVK and type ABV thermal actuator, Kvs = 1.5 2-way valve for RAVK and type ABV thermal actuator, Kvs = 2.3 2-way valve for RAVK and type ABV thermal actuator, Kvs = 3.1 2-way valve for RAVK and type ABV thermal actuator, Kvs = 1.5 2-way valve for RAVK and type ABV thermal actuator, Kvs = 2.3 2-way valve for RAVK and type ABV thermal actuator, Kvs = 3.1 3-way valve for RAVK and type ABV thermal actuator, Kvs = 2.5 3-way valve for RAVK and type ABV thermal actuator, Kvs = 4.0

013U0012 013U0017 013U0022 013U0027 065F0115 065F0120 065F0125 065F0015 065F0020

For additional details, see data sheets for the individual products.

Accessories
AVDO Self-acting automatic bypass regulator that can be used in underfloor heating systems having a constant pressure pump. The AVDO shown here is a self-acting differential pressure regulator for fitting in a bypass.

Product AVDO 15 AVDO 20 AVDO 25 AVDO 15 AVDO 20 AVDO 25

Description Self-acting pressure regulator, G 3/4" A connection Self-acting pressure regulator, G 1" A connection Self-acting pressure regulator, G 5/4" A connection Self-acting pressure regulator, Rp 1/2" - R 1/2" connection Self-acting pressure regulator, Rp 3/4" - R 3/4" connection Self-acting pressure regulator, Rp 1" - R 1" connection

Item no. 003L6020 003L6025 003L6030 003L6018 003L6023 003L6028

ATC - safety thermostat Thermostat that can be fitted to pipes and set as required. Often used as a safety thermostat for disconnecting the boiler or pump in the event of errors in the installation.

Product ATC

Description Safety thermostat, electro-mechanical, surface sensor

Item no. 041E0010

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31

Basic elements for regulation of an underfloor heating system

1 2 3 4
P2 P2 CFD AVDO AVDO TWA
M1 DN15PN10KV 1

CFD TWA

FTC

FTC

ECL

ECL

AMV 100

CFD

CFD

P2

AVDO

TWA

P2

TWA

AMV 100

M1

DN15PN10KV 1

Heat source

Mixing loop

Underfloor heating system

Heat source

Mixing loop

Underfloor heating system

32

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