2 AMERICAN PRESS ADVERTISING SECTION THURSDAY, JUNE 7, 2012

HURRICANE WATCH 2012 • AMERICANPRESS.COM
By The Associated Press
MIAMI — U.S. forecasters
predicted May 24 that this
year’s Atlantic hurricane
season would produce a
normal number of about nine
to 15 tropical storms, with as
many as four to eight of those
becoming hurricanes.
The National Oceanic and
Atmospheric Administration
released its initial outlook
for the six-month storm sea-
son that officially began June
1. One to three storms could
become major hurricanes
with top winds of 111 mph or
higher.
Though this season isn’t
expected to be as busy as last
year’s above-average season,
federal officials warned
coastal residents to start
stocking up on hurricane
supplies and forming evacua-
tion plans anyway.
“That’s still a lot of activ-
ity. So just because we’re pre-
dicting a near-normal season
doesn’t mean anybody’s off
the hook at all,” said Gerry
Bell, the lead seasonal fore-
caster at NOAA’s Climate
Prediction Center.
Atmospheric and marine
conditions indicating a high-
activity era that began in
1995 for Atlantic hurricanes
continue, Bell said.
However, the weather
phenomenon known as El
Nino, which warms Pacific
waters near the equator and
increases wind shear over
the Atlantic, may develop
by the late summer or early
fall and help suppress storm
development.
“Our range (of expected
storms) is a bit wider this
year because of this inherent
uncertainty right now based
on the best guidance we have
as to whether El Nino will
form or not,” Bell said.
This season got an early
start when Tropical Storm
Alberto formed off the coast
of South Carolina. Alberto
dissipated over the Atlantic.
Alberto was unusual for
being a small storm that
formed in a small area favor-
able for storm development,
but the weather conditions
as spring transitions into
summer sometimes produce
tropical systems, said Bill
Read, director of the Nation-
al Hurricane Center.
Forecasters name tropical
storms when their top winds
reach 39 mph; hurricanes
have maximum winds of at
least 74 mph. The next named
storm will be named Chris.
No major hurricane has
made a U.S. landfall in the
last six years, since Hurri-
cane Wilma cut across South
Florida in 2005. This August
will mark the 20th anniver-
sary of Hurricane Andrew’s
catastrophic landfall in
South Florida as a Category
5 storm. The season that
spawned Andrew started late
and produced a total of just
six named storms.
“It takes one storm to
come ashore, regardless of
the intensity of the season,
to create a disaster,” said
Federal Emergency Man-
agement Agency’s deputy
administrator for protection
and national preparedness,
Tim Manning.
The seasonal average is 11
named storms, six hurricanes
and two major hurricanes.
The 2011 hurricane season,
one of the busiest on record
with 19 named storms, pro-
duced Irene, one of the costli-
est storms in U.S. history.
Irene killed at least 47 in
the U.S. and at least eight
more in the Caribbean and
Canada as it followed a rare
path up the Eastern sea-
board from North Carolina,
across the Mid-Atlantic and
near New York City.
Flooding from the storm
was the most destructive
event to hit Vermont in
almost a century, killing six
people and leaving hundreds
homeless while damaging or
destroying hundreds of miles
of roads, scores of bridges
and hundreds of homes.
Hurricane season ends Nov.
30, and the peak period for
hurricane activity runs from
August through October.
l
Online: NOAA’s National Hurricane
Center: http://www.hurricanes.gov
Forecasters predict 9 to 15 storms this hurricane season
Alberto
Beryl
Chris
Debby
Ernesto
Florence
Gordon
Helene
Isaac
Joyce
Kirk
Leslie
Michael
Nadine
Oscar
Patty
Rafael
Sandy
Tony
Valerie
William
2012 Names
“... Just because
we’re predicting a
near-normal season
doesn’t mean
anybody’s off the
hook at all.”
Gerry Bell
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Thursday, June 7, 2012 adverTising secTion aMerican Press 3
HURRICANE WATCH 2012
Photo courtesy of Mgn-online
No matter where a subscriber evacuates to, as long as the location is in the
United States, CalcaShout will be able to keep them informed.
Nothing is more important during
an emergency situation than get-
ting accurate information out to the
affected public in a timely manner.
The CalcaShout Emergency Alert
System is a free service of the Police
Jury that sends emergency informa-
tion quickly to subscribers through
phones, email and text messages.
The program is managed by the
Office of Homeland Security and
Emergency Preparedness.
CalcaShout was first initiated in
2008, shortly before Calcasieu Parish
was affected by Hurricanes Gustav
and Ike. The emergency alert system
sent important messages via text
and email messages to about 20,000
subscribers throughout both weather
events. No matter where a subscriber
had evacuated to, as long as the
location was in the United States,
CalcaShout was able to keep them
informed.
While the service is free, resi-
dents do have to sign up for it. Also,
residents who are already subscrib-
ers of the service are asked to update
any contact information that may
have changed recently to ensure that
alerts are being sent to the appropri-
ate place.
The system is only activated in
emergency situations where there is
a harmful risk to the public. Calca-
Shout is also designed to be used
for any type of emergency, not just
weather events.
Residents can sign-up or change
their existing subscription informa-
tion at www.calcashout.com. If a resi-
dent cannot access the Internet they
can sign-up by calling the Office of
Homeland Security and Emergency
Preparedness at 337-721-3800.
Emergency contact information
given to CalcaShout is strictly used
for emergencies and is not shared
with any other agency or the public.
The CalcaShout system is powered
by FirstCall systems.
l
For more information, contact the Offce of
Homeland Security and Emergency Prepared-
ness at 337-721-3800.
Receive emergency alerts
with ‘CalcaShout’
l Listen to local television or radio
stations for offcial bulletins and shelter
announcements.
l Act immediately and in daylight if
possible.
l Wrap or store items subject to water
damage in watertight containers.
l Pack enough clothing for fve days.
Empty your freezer and refrigerator and
remove all perishable food items.
l Take your portable emergency kit
with you. Tape a note inside your home
(maybe on the refrigerator) saying you
evacuated and listing your contact infor-
mation in case emergency offcials need
to enter while you are away.
l Turn off utilities.
l Lock home securely.
l Travel with care, avoid low-lying areas
and use recommended routes if they
have been given.
l Carry your transistor radio, fashlight
and valuables (unless stored in a safe
deposit box) with you.
If you leave
00752456
4 AMERICAN PRESS ADVERTISING SECTION THURSDAY, JUNE 7, 2012
HURRICANE WATCH 2012 • AMERICANPRESS.COM
By Dan Gill
LSU AgCenter Horticulturist
Violent thunderstorms can
occur across the state during
the summer, and in South
Louisiana high winds from
hurricanes are a concern in
summer and fall.
Although trees add im-
measurably to our home
grounds, trees with problems
can be a liability during
storms or hurricanes.
So now is an excellent time
to take a look at trees in your
landscape and determine
if they’re ready to face such
conditions.
Here are some tips on
what to look for.
First, check for trees that
have large dead branches or
are completely dead. These
should be dealt with as soon
as possible. Dead branches
should be pruned off, and
dead trees removed entirely.
Look at the overall condi-
tion of your trees. A tree that
is sickly, low in vigor and
shows significant signs of
rotten or decayed areas in
the trunk may need to be re-
moved if it poses a threat to
buildings. Trees with trunks
that have large cavities with
extensive decay should be
considered for removal, be-
cause rot weakens the trunk
and reduces a tree’s ability to
withstand strong winds.
After the extreme rain as-
sociated with hurricanes or
other storms that drop huge
amounts of rain, the soil may
be so soft that trees topple
over if the weight is not
properly proportioned. So
trees that are very one sided
or leaning significantly also
may need attention. Selec-
tive pruning can relieve the
weight on the heavier side
— balancing out the weight
distribution of the canopy.
Also, look for branches
that hang over the house
near the roof. Although the
branches may not be touch-
ing the roof under normal
conditions, the high winds of
violent storms or hurricanes
can cause trees to bend and
branches to flail around con-
siderably. These branches
can cause extensive damage
to the roof.
Normally, it is best to have
this kind of work done by a
professional — a licensed
arborist. Selecting the right
arborist to do the work is an
important decision. Here are
some tips to help you make a
selection:
l Check in the Yellow
Pages under “Trees” for local
companies that do tree-care
work. Having an ad in the
phone book indicates the
company has some degree of
permanence.
l Beware of “door-knock-
ers,” the people who simply
appear and offer to work on
your trees.
l Never let yourself be
rushed by bargains such as,
“If you sign an agreement
today, I can take 10 percent
off the price.”
l Ask to see a state arbor-
ist’s license. All practicing
arborists in this state must
be licensed by the Louisiana
Department of Agriculture
and Forestry.
l Ask to see certificates of
insurance, including proof
of liability for personal and
property damage and work-
er’s compensation. Call the
insurance company to make
certain the policy is current.
l Have more than one
arborist look at the job and
give you estimates to ensure
you get a fair price. This
also allows you to get other
opinions on what work needs
to be done.
l A good arborist will
never recommend — or agree
to — topping a tree except
under rare circumstances
(such as to save the tree after
severe physical damage to
the crown).
l Unless you simply need a
tree removed, choose a com-
pany that offers a wide range
of services (such as pruning,
fertilizing, cabling/bracing,
pest control and so forth).
l Do not allow an arbor-
ist to use climbing spikes to
climb a tree, unless the tree
is being removed.
Check trees before summer storms, hurricanes
Photo courtesy of MGN-Online
A tree that is sickly, low in vigor and shows signifcant signs of
rotten or decayed areas in the trunk may need to be removed
if it poses a threat to buildings and automobiles.
Rob Cameron
226 W. Prien Lake Road, Suite 2
Lake Charles, LA 70601
Bus. 337-477-7555
rob.cameron.midx@statefarm.com
Christopher J. Gaudet
1528 E Prien Lake Road
Lake Charles, LA 70601
Bus. 337-475-2740
chris.gaudet.midv@statefarm.com
00752992
It’s not too early to
PREPARE FOR
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help before as well as after it strikes. Contact
one of these State Farm agents to learn how to
prepare or visit statefarm.com®.
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00754166
Thursday, June 7, 2012 adverTising secTion aMerican Press 5
HURRICANE WATCH 2012 • AMERICANPRESS.COM
In addition to the typical aspects
of a family disaster plan, caregivers
must take those extra steps neces-
sary to ensure the safety and well
being of the elderly, as well as those
with medical conditions or other spe-
cial needs, according to Dr. Dennis
Fletcher, a family medicine special-
ist associated with Women and Chil-
dren’s Hospital.
To prepare for a hurricane or
other disaster, Fletcher recommends
these precautions:
BE INFORMED
l Ask about special assistance
programs offered through the local
chapter of the American Red Cross,
emergency management office, or
fire and police departments. If pos-
sible, register so that help can be
provided quickly in an emergency.
l Register with your local utility
company if medical equipment is
electricity dependent.
l Know the location and availabil-
ity of more than one shelter that can
accommodate the elderly, those with
special medical needs, and service
animals, if necessary.
l Check on available hospitals that
may provide shelter and medical as-
sistance for those with critical needs.
l Learn about your care providers’
disaster plans, how to contact them
in an emergency and how to identify
back-up providers. Make sure nurs-
ing homes or hospitals have the fam-
ily’s communication plan and contact
numbers in case of an evacuation.
l Develop a list that includes:
phone numbers for doctors, contract-
ed health services, and insurance
agents; regular medical treatments
such as dialysis; and the schedule
for medicines, monitoring and other
routine procedures.
l Gather copies of birth certifi-
cates or other government-issued
forms of identification, as well as
medical insurance, Medicaid or
Medicare cards.
BE PREPARED
“Consider the daily needs of those
with medical conditions or other
special needs when preparing your
disaster plan,” Fletcher said. Re-
member to:
l Plan emergency evacuation pro-
cedures with other family members,
nursing home or hospital personnel,
if necessary.
l Learn how to manage routine
tasks, such as blood pressure, pulse
and sugar monitoring, that care pro-
viders typically handle.
l Label all medical equipment and
supplies.
l Create a backup plan for elec-
tricity-dependent equipment.
l Keep appropriate licenses and
vaccination records for service ani-
mals updated in the event you use an
emergency public shelter.
l Communicate your plans with
your family, and include members
that require assistance.
ASSEMBLE ESSENTIAL SUPPLIES
A disaster supplies kit is a collec-
tion of basic items you would proba-
bly need to stay safe and comfortable
during and after a disaster, includ-
ing non-perishable food and bottled
water. Family members with special
needs may require more specific sup-
plies, such as:
l Special foods to meet dietary
requirements.
l Special equipment for feeding,
respiration, heart or blood pressure
monitoring, or personal care.
l Communications equipment such
as adaptive hearing or sight devices.
l Mobility aids such as wheelchair,
walker, braces or crutches.
l Denture supplies, contact lenses
and supplies, eyeglasses, hearing-
aid batteries, and personal hygiene
supplies.
l Oxygen.
l Medical alert tags or bracelets to
help identify disabilities or special
needs.
l Prescription medications for a
minimum of two weeks. (When medi-
cine is kept on hand in the event of
an emergency, rotate them out of the
supply kit periodically to account for
expiration dates.) If possible, keep a
physical copy of the doctor’s pre-
scriptions.
l Personal items for comfort.
Some — no matter how capable they
are under normal situations — can
become disoriented in an emergency.
Tucking a few small personal items,
such as family photos, in an emergen-
cy kit, can often provide comfort.
l Crates or leashes for service
Customize disaster plans for those with special needs
American Sign Language (ASL) group has
prepared hurricane videos for deaf.
Log on to: http://emergency.cdc.gov/
disasters/hurricanes/psa.asp
For the deaf
See SPECIAL NEEDS, 6
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6 AMERICAN PRESS ADVERTISING SECTION ThuRSDAy, JuNE 7, 2012
animals to prevent them from becom-
ing frightened or disoriented during
a disaster.
MAINTAIN YOUR PLAN
Once your emergency plans are
complete, continue to review your
needs and the needs of those who
require your care. Make adjustments
as needed. Also:
l Periodically review your emer-
gency plan with care attendants and
those in your care, revising it to meet
your family’s needs.
l Maintain your CPR and first aid
skills.
l Ensure that you know how to op-
erate any additional medical equip-
ment you may need.
l Rotate food, water, batteries
and medical supplies to account for
expiration dates.
SPECIAL NEEDS
Continued from page 5
HURRICANE WATCH 2012 • AMERICANPRESS.COM
By The LSU Ag Center
To help Louisiana residents
determine if they’re ready for a
hurricane, LSU AgCenter housing
specialist Claudette Reichel devel-
oped a 20-question quiz.
“The answers you give can help
you evaluate whether you’re well-
prepared or whether you need to
take some action now,” Reichel
says. The quiz covers everything
from whether your family has a
written emergency plan to supplies
you have on hand.
As hurricane season kicks off,
Reichel and other experts say it’s a
perfect time to evaluate where you
stand and what you can do to be
better-prepared if a storm heads
your way.
“Even if you’ve been through a
hurricane before, it’s easy to forget
some of the preparations that can
protect your property and family,
so it’s a good idea to review your
plans and make sure you haven’t
left anything off,” Reichel says.
“Taking the right precautions
before a storm has the potential to
save time, money, hassles and even
lives if a hurricane strikes.”
LSU AgCenter experts say the fol-
lowing hurricane quiz can help you
gauge whether you’re prepared. They
recommend you take action if you
answer “No” or “I don’t know” to any
of these 20 questions:
l Do you have a disaster survival
plan?
l Have you planned an evacuation
route and destination?
l Do you have an emergency com-
munication plan for staying in touch
with or getting messages to friends
and family?
l Is your homeowner’s and flood
insurance coverage up-to-date and
sufficient to replace your home and
belongings if they are damaged or
destroyed?
l Do you have an inventory of your
property and belongings?
l Do you have copies of your in-
surance policies, household inven-
tory and other important papers,
as well as other valuables, in a safe
place — one that’s waterproof and
fireproof?
l Do you know how to turn off
your utilities (electricity, gas and
water)?
l Do you have a plan and sup-
plies on hand to protect and secure
your home and outdoor items (and
your boat and pool, too, if you have
them)?
l Has your roof been inspected
within the past six months?
l Have you trimmed the trees
and shrubs around your house?
l Has your car been maintained,
and are the tires, including the
spare, in good condition?
l Do you have a plan of what to
do with food in your refrigerator
and freezer in the event of a pos-
sible power outage?
l Is your emergency phone list
up-to-date and handy?
l Do you have emergency sur-
vival supplies such as batteries,
a battery-operated radio, flash-
lights, lanterns, fuel, nonperish-
able food for three days, water/
water jugs, manual can opener,
medicines, traveler’s checks or
cash, and other necessary items
on hand?
l Do you have an emergency sup-
ply kit for your car?
l Do you have a plan of how to take
care of family members with special
needs (those with disabilities, infants
or the elderly)?
l Have you decided what you will
do with your animals if you must
evacuate?
l Have you budgeted for the added
expenses to protect your home, buy
supplies, evacuate, clean up and
recover?
l Have you discussed your emer-
gency plans, duties and rules with
your family?
l Do you know the LSU AgCenter
offers publications and other free
information on disaster cleanup and
recovery on its website (www.lsuag
center.com) and through its parish
offices across the state?
20 questions to find out if you are prepared
Photo courtesy of FEMA
Taking the right precautions before a hurricane has the potential to save time,
money, hassles and even lives. It’s a common site to see windows boarded up
at gas stations and convenient stores as well as homes.
00752769
Thursday, June 7, 2012 adverTising secTion aMerican Press 7
HURRICANE WATCH 2012
Know where to go, what
to do when storm is close
When the National Weather Ser-
vice announces a hurricane warning
for Louisiana, a storm with winds
over 74 mph will strike within 24
hours.
Remember, hurricane warnings
are almost always accompanied by
tornado warnings, thunderstorm and
gale warnings, and coastal or inland
flood warnings. Prepare for those
threats as well.
Twenty-four hours prior to the
storm, take the final steps necessary
to keep yourself and your family safe.
Check your personal emergency
kit, then get ready for the storm.
Always listen to local officials for
evacuation orders. In the coastal par-
ishes, remember an evacuation order
may come 51 hours before landfall.
If you live in a travel trailer or
mobile home in the path of the storm,
you should already have evacuated
by the time the storm is this close.
Do not attempt to ride out a hurri-
cane in temporary housing or a home
damaged from an earlier storm that
is not yet repaired.
Hurricane safety tips:
l Minimize the distance you must
travel to reach a safe location; the
further you drive, the higher the
likelihood of encountering traffic
congestion and other problems on
the roadways.
l Select the nearest possible evac-
uation destination, preferably within
your local area, and map out your
route. Do not get on the road without
a planned route or a place to go.
l Choose the home of the closest
friend or relative outside a designat-
ed evacuation zone and discuss your
plan with them before hurricane sea-
son. You may also choose a hotel or
motel outside of the vulnerable area.
If neither of these options is avail-
able, consider the closest possible
public shelter, preferably within your
local area.
l Use the evacuation routes desig-
nated by authorities and, if possible,
become familiar with your route by
driving it before an evacuation order
is issued.
l Contact your local emergency
management office to register or get
information regarding anyone in your
household whom may require special
assistance in order to evacuate.
l Prepare a separate pet plan,
most public shelters do not accept
pets.
l Prepare your home prior to
leaving by boarding up doors and
windows, securing or moving indoors
all yard objects and turning off all
utilities.
l Before leaving, fill your car with
gas and withdraw extra money from
the ATM.
l Take all prescription medicines
and special medical items, such as
glasses and diapers.
l If your family evacuation plan
includes an RV, boat or trailer, leave
early. Do not wait until the evacua-
tion order or exodus is well under
way to start your trip.
l Expect traffic congestion and
listen for any advisories or specific
instructions from local officials.
The following is a list of disaster public
education websites recommended by the
Federal Emergency Management Agency:
Louisiana Emergency Preparedness
www.ohsep.louisiana.gov
Agency for Toxic Substances and
Disease Registry
www.atsdr.cdc.gov
American Red Cross
www.redcross.org
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
www.cdc.gov
Department of Commerce
www.doc.gov
Department of Education
www.ed.gov
Department of Energy
www.energy.gov
Department of Health and Human
Services
www.hhs.gov/disasters
Department of Homeland Security
www.dhs.gov
Department of Interior
www.doi.gov
Department of Justice
www.justice.gov
Environmental Protection Agency
www.epa.gov
Federal Emergency Management Agency
www.fema.gov
Food and Drug Administration
www.fda.gov
National Oceanic and Atmospheric
Administration
www.noaa.gov
National Weather Service
www.nws.noaa.gov
U.S. Postal Service
www.usps.gov
For local news and information:
visit www.americanpress.com
Websites
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8 AMERICAN PRESS ADVERTISING SECTION ThuRSDAy, JuNE 7, 2012 ThuRSDAy, JuNE 7, 2012 ADVERTISING SECTION AMERICAN PRESS 9
10 AMERICAN PRESS ADVERTISING SECTION ThuRSDAy, JuNE 7, 2012
HURRICANE WATCH 2012 • AMERICANPRESS.COM
TROPICAL STORM
This type of storm is your first
warning that a hurricane may be
on the way. A tropical storm is an
organized group of spinning thunder-
storms with sustained winds between
39 and 73 mph.
The National Weather Service
will issue a tropical storm warning if
one is headed toward your area. This
level of storm is dangerous for people
in temporary housing and homes that
have not been repaired since the last
hurricane season. If a tropical storm
is slow-moving, the levels of rain pro-
duced can cause dangerous inland
flooding. Residents should evacuate
all temporary housing before tropi-
cal storm winds arrive.
CATEGORY 1 HURRICANE
Once sustained winds reach 74
mph, the storm becomes a Category 1
hurricane, the lowest on the Saffir-
Simpson scale. Unanchored mobile
homes and weak permanent struc-
tures can be damaged or destroyed
and homes in flood areas may be
vulnerable. Pay attention to local
officials and evacuate as directed.
Never assume a Category 1 storm
is weak or safe. Louisianians may
recall damage caused by Hurricane
Lili in 2002, a Category 1 storm that
killed 16 people and created $415
million worth of damage.
CATEGORY 2 HURRICANE
As a storm intensifies, a Category
2 hurricane is declared when sus-
tained winds reach 96 mph. This
type of storm will destroy temporary
housing, damage roofs, windows and
doors on permanent structures and
blow down trees. The storm surge
from this level of storm is typically
six to eight feet high and flooding is
dangerous from the coast to inland
rivers and streams.
Louisianians may remember Hur-
ricane Georges that blew across the
Caribbean and into the Gulf as a Cat-
egory 2 storm in 1998. Georges dam-
aged six countries, killed 603 people —
two in Louisiana — and caused nearly
$6 billion dollars worth of damage. In
New Orleans during the height of the
storm, 14,000 people took shelter in the
Superdome, the levees were topped
by nine feet of water and hundreds of
thousands lost power.
CATEGORY 3 HURRICANE
Hurricane Katrina landed as
a Category 3 storm. Storms reach
this level with sustained winds of
111 mph. Typical damage includes
destruction of all temporary housing,
large trees blown down and serious
structural damage to permanent
buildings. Louisianans should take
every precaution advised by local
officials during a Category 3 hurri-
cane and evacuate safely and calmly
from all coastal areas in advance of
landfall.
CATEGORY 4 HURRICANE
As winds reach 131 mph, a storm
becomes a Category 4 hurricane.
This level of storm destroys perma-
nent structures in its path, erodes
waterfront areas with storm surges
up to 18 feet and can cause severe
inland flooding of small streams and
rivers far from the coast. This is a
storm level where all Louisianans
must listen to evacuation procedures
advised by local officials and evacu-
ate calmly and safely in advance of
the storm.
Those old enough to remember
Audrey in 1957 will recall that Cat-
egory 4 hurricane as the deadliest
storm in Louisiana before Katrina,
with an estimated 500 people killed.
That storm began the practice of
naming hurricanes and led to en-
hanced forecasting.
CATEGORY 5 HURRICANE
A Category 5 is the highest level
hurricane, with sustained winds of
156 mph or higher. No one is likely to
survive in the direct path of this level
of storm. Permanent structures are
likely to be destroyed or blown away,
all trees destroyed, and all coastal
areas flooded.
The last Category 5 storm to hit the
United States was Hurricane Andrew
in 1992, but Louisianians are likely
to remember Hurricane Camille in
1969. Camille was a smaller, more in-
tense storm than Katrina, with winds
that caused a 24-foot storm surge
that made the Mississippi River run
backwards for 125 miles.
Storm Categories
Satellite image courtesy of NASA
Ah EA8Y wAY T0 PREPARE F0R A HURRlCAhE

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(337) 474 2020
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3100 Ryan St, Suite C
Lake Charles, LA 70601-8576
3337..4333.122566
00753261
Thursday, June 7, 2012 adverTising secTion aMerican Press 11
HURRICANE WATCH 2012
By The LSU AgCenter
After a major storm or flood, you
must assume all water sources are
contaminated until they are proved
safe. Purify all water used for drink-
ing, cooking and for washing eating
and cooking utensils. Also purify the
water used for washing hands, body
and kitchen and bathroom surfaces.
Do not try to use or purify water that
has a dark color, an odor or contains
floating material. Note that the pu-
rification procedures outlined here
reduce biological contamination
only; if you suspect chemical contam-
ination, do not use the water.
Choose one of these methods
to purify water that has biological
contamination. Boiling is the most ef-
fective method of disinfecting water,
particularly for people who have
severely weakened immune systems
(infected with HIV/AIDS or cancer,
transplant patients taking immuno-
suppressive drugs or people born
with a weakened immune system)
and for infants and elderly who wish
to take extra precautions.
l Boil water for one full minute in
a clean container. The one-minute
boil time begins after the water has
been brought to a rolling boil. (The
flat taste can be eliminated by shak-
ing the water in a bottle or pouring it
from one container to another.)
l If the water is clear, mix
1
⁄8 tea-
spoon or 16 drops of unscented, liq-
uid chlorine laundry bleach with one
gallon of water and let it stand for at
least 30 minutes prior to consump-
tion. If the water is cloudy or colored,
use
1
⁄4 teaspoon per gallon of water.
Be sure to mix thoroughly. If the
treated water has a chlorine taste,
pour it from one clean container to
another several times.
l Other treatments such as iodine
or purification tablets are not recom-
mended.
l Do not eat any food that may
have come into contact with flood-
water.
l Discard all food that came in
contact with floodwaters including
canned goods. It is impossible to
know if the containers were damaged
and the seals compromised.
l Discard wooden cutting boards,
wooden spoons, plastic utensils, baby
bottle nipples and pacifiers. There
is no way to safely clean them if they
have come in contact with contami-
nated floodwaters.
l Thoroughly wash metal pans,
ceramic dishes and utensils with hot
soapy water and sanitize by boiling
them in clean water or by immers-
ing them for 15 minutes in a solution
of 1 teaspoon of chlorine bleach per
quart of water.
l Clean and sanitize all kitchen
surfaces, especially those that may
have been contaminated by floodwa-
ters.
l Wash and sanitize your dishes,
utensils and kitchen appliances be-
fore using them.
Safety first when handling
food, water after a flood
special to the american Press
A disruption or contamination of the
water supply can threaten a person’s
health.
If your house is secure, on
high ground, and your area has
not been advised to evacuate:
l Bring pets inside.
l Secure and brace external doors and
close all interior doors.
l Stay indoors and away from windows,
even if they are covered. A small interior
room on the frst foor is usually the
safest place for your family and your
disaster kit supplies.
l Store drinking water in clean bathtubs,
sinks, bottles, and cooking pots.
l If power goes out, turn off major ap-
pliances to avoid a power surge when
electricity is restored.
l Be aware that the calm ‘‘eye’’ is
deceptive; winds will soon reappear from
the other direction.
l Prepare for tornadoes by seeking
shelter below ground, if possible.
l Stay calm and listen to your radio for
announcements from offcials and the
all clear.
If you stay
This material is based upon work supported by the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s National Institute of Food and
Agriculture. All opinions, findings, conclusions or recommendations expressed in this publication are those of the author(s)
and do not necessarily reflect the view of the U. S. Department of Agriculture.
Chainsaws are popular
tools for both homeowners
and professionals because
they have so many uses
– tree trimming, cutting
�rewood, cleaning up
after storms, etc. Although
chainsaws are handy, they
are potentially dangerous
and must be used carefully
to avoid serious injury.
Personal Protective Equipment
You need protection both from the saw and from what
you are cutting. Your clothing should be well �tting and not
have any loose pieces that could be caught in the chain.
Protective chaps, leggings and pants are available.
Protective chaps have multiple layers of Kevlar (bal-
listic nylon similar to bullet-proof vests) that are easily
drawn into the saw by the saw teeth. Once the material is
drawn into the saw, it stops the chain from running. Many
loggers will tell you that saw chaps are hot in summer, but
still worth wearing because of the protection they give. The
$70 cost of these chaps is cheaper than a trip to the emer-
gency room. If protective gear is damaged by saw contact,
don’t reuse it – replace it.
A hard hat is important. When you start cutting a tree
or limb, loose or dead limbs may fall. Also, improper use
of the saw could allow the bar and chain to contact your
head.
Safety goggles or a full face shield is critical. Never
operate a chainsaw without one or the other! Eye protec-
tion comes in many forms and keeps sawdust out of the
eyes.
Ear protection is important. When you combine the
engine noise with the chain noise, a modern chainsaw
can exceed 90 dBA, which is a level that requires hearing
protection. Operating a properly functioning chainsaw for
more than two hours without hearing protection will begin
permanent hearing loss. If the muf�er is removed, perma-
nent hearing loss will start in 15 minutes!
Hearing protection comes in two forms – ear plugs and
ear muffs. Muffs are slightly more effective than plugs and
do not aggravate earwax buildup. Earplugs are more com-
fortable in hot weather. Either kind works well with normal
chainsaw use.
Gloves help protect your hands and also provide some
cushioning from vibration. Finally, you should wear sub-
stantial shoes – preferably steel-toe work boots.
Personal protective clothing is available from most
dealers who sell chainsaws, although you may have to ask
them to special order it. It also is available from catalog
stores.
Operating a Chainsaw Safely
Kickback
Kickback occurs when the saw chain grabs the wood
or is pinched, causing the bar and chain to kick back
toward the operator. Low-kickback chains are required on
all small homeowner saws (those less than 3.8 cu. in.).
Larger saws used by professionals may or may not have
low-kickback chains, but they are available and recom-
mended. You also can minimize kickback by not letting the
chain at the tip of your bar contact anything. Kickback can
cause the bar and chain to pivot back toward the operator
abruptly. Always stand to the side; never have any part of
your body directly behind or above the bar and chain!
Fuel Safety
Gasoline engines on chain saws are two-stroke, which
means they require oil to be mixed with the gasoline.
Never fuel a hot engine; allow it to cool �rst. Be careful not
to spill fuel on the engine or saw. Refuel the saw at a site
at least 10-20 feet away from where you will be running
the saw. Be sure to clean the �ller cap on the saw and the
top of the fuel container before refueling to avoid fuel con-
tamination. You should add bar and chain oil every time
you �ll the fuel tank.
Cutting
Avoid cutting overhead. Do not climb a tree or ladder
with a chainsaw; leave that to a professional who will
climb and then pull the saw up on a rope. Plan your cuts
based on how the tree or limb will try to fall naturally to
avoid pinching the saw
chain or being injured. On
anything other than small
trees (less than about 3
inches in diameter) you
should make a preliminary
cut or notch on the side
where you want the tree to
fall, then make the felling
cut from the backside a
couple of inches above the
�rst cut or notch.
It is often good insur-
ance to fasten a rope or
cable to the tree and pull it in the direction you want it to
land, because it is dif�cult for an amateur to predict the
direction in which the tree will fall. If you do use a rope
or cable, be sure it is at least 50 percent longer than the
height of the tree. When cutting limbs, be aware of any
load on the limbs, and cut carefully. Limbs can spring when
cut. When cutting limbs from downed trees, stand on the
side of the trunk opposite the limb(s) you are cutting. It is
dangerous to cut dead trees; branches may be loosened
by the saw vibration and fall on you.
F
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e
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LCHurricane0612
Call your LSU AgCenter Extension Service office:
For the latest research-based information on just about anything,
visit our website:
LSUAgCenter.com
Reliable
information is key to
protecting your
family and property
before, during and
after a disaster.
Research-based
information from LSU AgCenter
experts can help you prepare for and recover
from the problems created by storms, floods or other
catastrophic events.
The LSU AgCenter offers a series of guides, fact sheets,
workshops and other useful information that’s available on the
Web or by contacting your local LSU AgCenter Extension Service
office.
There's one in every parish.
Cameron......... (337) 905-1318
Jeff Davis ...... (337) 824-1773
Vermilion......... (337) 898-4335
Vernon............ (337) 239-3231
Acadia ............ (337) 788-8821
Allen ............... (337) 639-4376
Beauregard ... (337) 463-7006
Calcasieu ...... (337) 475-8812


00752424
12 AMERICAN PRESS ADVERTISING SECTION ThuRSDAy, JuNE 7, 2012
By The LSU AgCenter
Many snakes, like other residents
in the path of a major storm, have
been displaced and left homeless. As
a result, it is commonplace to find
these animals seeking shelter and
food in areas close to people. These
areas include inside houses, storage
sheds, barns and other buildings.
Damaged structures have a higher
probability of attracting snakes be-
cause of the many accessible entranc-
es. In addition, displaced snakes may
also be found under debris scattered
by the storm or in debris piles cre-
ated during cleanup.
If you are bitten by a poisonous
snake, don’t try to treat the bite your-
self. Go immediately to the nearest
hospital for treatment.
The South has many more species
of nonpoisonous snakes than poison-
ous snakes. It’s important to realize
that both poisonous and nonpoison-
ous snakes are beneficial by keep-
ing rodent populations down. Since
rodents are also displaced by storms,
this is especially important.
Avoiding SnAkeS oUTdoorS
l Watch where you place your
hands and feet when removing or
cleaning debris. If possible, don’t
place your fingers under debris you
intend to move.
l Wear snake-proof boots at least
10 inches high or snake leggings in
heavy debris areas.
l Never step over logs or other ob-
stacles unless you can see the other
side.
l If you encounter a snake, step
back and allow it to proceed on its
way. Snakes are usually not fast-mov-
ing animals, and a person can easily
retreat from the snake’s path.
enCoUnTering SnAkeS indoorS
l If you find a snake in your house,
try to isolate the snake within a small
area of the house.
l Nonpoisonous snakes can be
captured by pinning the snake down
with a long stick or pole, preferably
forked at one end, and then removed
by scooping up with flat-blade shovel.
l If you are uncomfortable about
removing the snake yourself, seek
someone within the community who
has experience handling snakes to
do it for you. A good starting point is
an animal control shelter or sheriff’s
department.
generAL TipS
As a last resort, you may need to
kill a poisonous snake. Club it with
a long stick, rod or other tool such
as a garden hoe. Never try to kill a
poisonous snake with an instrument
that brings you within the snake’s
striking range (usually estimated at
less than one-half the total length of
the snake).
Remove debris from around
the house as soon as possible. This
attracts rodents that snakes feed
on and also provides shelter. Keep
vegetation around the house closely
mowed.
Don’t rely on repellents. No legal
toxicants or fumigants are registered
to kill snakes.
Watch out for snakes after storms, hurricanes
HUrriCAne WATCH 2012 • AMeriCAnpreSS.CoM
Photo courtesy of Center for Disease Control
damaged structures have a higher probability of attracting snakes because of
the many accessible entrances.
Visit our website at:
www.targaresources.com
Targa Resources and its subsidiaries operate several facilities
along the Louisiana Gulf Coast.
Underground Storage Facilities: Fractionation Facilities:
Hackberry Storage Facility Targa La. Field Services
Easton Storage Facility Targa Downstream LLC
Natural Gas Processing Facilities:
Lowry Gas Plant
Barracuda Gas Plant
Stingray Gas Plant
TLFS Gillis Gas Processing Plant
Over 1,000 miles of Gas Gathering, Gas Transmission
and Natural Gas Liquids Pipelines.
This is an area rich with heritage and culture, abundant
opportunities for hunting and fishing, great festivals
and even greater food.
And, oh yeah - THE BEST PEOPLE IN THE WORLD.
We are proud to call south Louisiana -- HOME.
Laissez les bon temps rouler -
it’s not just a phrase, it’s a way of life.
00754164
State Farm • Bloomington, IL
st at ef ar m. com
®
P077166 7/07
Hurricane season is upon us. State Farm
®
can help before
as well as after it strikes. Contact me today to learn how to prepare
or visit statefarm.com
®
.
It’s not too early to
PREPARE FOR
THE SEASON.
Melanie Perry, Agent
108A Executive Drive
Moss Bluff, LA 70611
Bus: 337-855-7768
www.melanieperry.net
00752473
Thursday, June 7, 2012 adverTising secTion aMerican Press 13
HURRICANE WATCH 2012
Special to the Amerian Press
With four predicted hurricanes
this year, Verizon Wireless is supply-
ing south Louisianans with the tools
to electronically prepare their fami-
lies for the storm season ahead.
Download applications that can
make disaster recovery efforts
easier. Examples include:
l Disaster Prep and Checklist
(iPhone) — Provides a means to col-
lect necessary information on your
phone including disaster kit check-
lists, family emergency plan forms,
basic CPR and first aid information.
lDocument Scanner (Android)
— Scans documents (like insurance
policies) with phone camera, convert-
ing them to PDFs and allows users to
later access them from their devices
through email, Dropbox and Google
Docs.
lFlashlight (Android and iPhone)
– Uses your phone’s camera flash to
emit bright light.
lHurricane Tracker (iPhone)
— Provides detailed information
to stay up-to-date on hurricanes in-
cluding over 50 satellite images and
radar, bulletins from the National
Hurricane Center and push notifi-
cations.
lS.O.S. by American Red Cross
(iPhone) — Provides emergency care
protocols and guides, by the Ameri-
can Red Cross and Dr. Oz.
Keep wireless phone batteries
fully charged — in case local power
is lost — well before warnings are
issued. Have a backup battery handy,
in the event you cannot get to a local
Verizon Wireless communications
store for a complimentary post-storm
charge.
lProgram emergency phone
numbers into your phone — police,
fire, and rescue agencies; insurance
providers; family, friends and co-
workers; etc.
lConsider purchasing your own
personal mobile hotspot — like the
4G MiFi– to have instant access to
the internet (for up to 5 devices) even
if power outages occur.
If you do not have a cell phone,
consider purchasing a prepaid phone
to use if needed during or after a
disaster
When a storm strikes or threatens
the area:
lForward your home phone calls
to your wireless number if you will
be away from your home or have to
evacuate.
lSend brief text messages rather
than voice calls, to preserve available
networks for emergency personnel.
lChange settings so that mobile
devices aren’t using unnecessary
data.
lUse your wireless device to help
find shelter and remain updated
with these applications:
American Red Cross: Shelter View (iPhone) —
Maps shelter locations and details across the
United States.
Disaster Alert (iPhone and Android) — Features
an interactive map that lists “disaster hazards”
around the globe in real-time including hur-
ricanes, earthquakes, foods, tsunamis and
volcanoes.
FEMA (Android) — Provides information on how
to stay safe and recover after a disaster, a map
with FEMA Disaster Recovery Center locations
(one-stop centers where disaster survivors can
access key relief services) and shelters.
Verizon offers wireless
hurricane preparation guide
l Cash or traveler’s checks to cover several
days’ living expenses, since power outages can
make ATMs and debit cards useless.
l Rolls of quarters for vending machines, coin
laundries and other needs.
l Emergency phone numbers, including those to
doctors, pharmacies, fnancial advisers, clergy,
repair contractors and family members. Don’t
forget to include cell phones of those who also
may be away from home.
l Copies of prescriptions for medicines and
eyeglasses, copies of children’s immunization
records and copies of medical, dental and pre-
scription insurance cards (or policy information).
l Copies of auto, food, renter’s and/or home-
owner’s insurance policies (or at least the policy
numbers) as well as contact information for your
local agents and the company’s headquarters.
l Copies of other important papers such as
deeds, titles, wills, trust documents, powers
of attorney, healthcare directives, stock and
bond certifcates, recent investment state-
ments, home inventory, birth certifcates, death
certifcates, adoption certifcates, marriage
certifcates, passports and/or other identity
documents, employee beneft documents and
federal and state tax returns (at least the frst
two pages).
l Keys to safe deposit box.
l Combination to safe (if you have one).
l Negatives or digital copies of irreplaceable
personal photos.
l Backup copies of computerized fnancial
records.
l Computer user names and passwords.
l Lists of Social Security numbers, credit card
numbers, bank account numbers, driver’s
license numbers, loan numbers, investment
account numbers and any other important
numbers.
l List of debt obligations, due dates of pay-
ments and contact information for companies.
Grab-and-go box
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me toaaetted.
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te\t +lerts tc |eep e.er¸cre s+¦e +ra ir¦crmea. ¦¦ t|ere is +r cat+¸e, we'll
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A message from Entergy Gulf States Louisiana, L.L.C. ©2012 Entergy Services, lnc. All Rights Reserved. 00752264
14 AMERICAN PRESS ADVERTISING SECTION ThuRSDAy, JuNE 7, 2012
Family pets were among
the victims of Hurricanes
Katrina and Rita.
The U.S. Department of
Homeland Security’s Federal
Emergency Management
Agency, working with the Hu-
mane Society of the United
States, promotes complete di-
saster planning that includes
pets and other animals. Their
message to the public is clear
and direct about safe and
protective action for animals
caught in disasters.
There are some steps pet
owners can take to prepare
for disasters even before hur-
ricane season begins:
l Contact your local ani-
mal shelter, humane society,
veterinarian or emergency
management office for infor-
mation on caring for pets in
an emergency.
l So pets will be safe if
you need to evacuate, spend
time before hurricane season
to find places to board your
pet away from coastal areas
or near relatives who live
outside your region.
l Make sure your pet has
a properly fitted collar that
includes current license,
rabies tags and your updated
contact information.
l Consider having your pet
identified through microchip
technology. Your local veteri-
narian can assist you in find-
ing a location that provides
this service.
l Contact motels and ho-
tels in communities outside
of your area and find out if
they will accept pets in an
emergency.
l During a disaster, bring
your pets inside. Never leave
a pet outside or tied up dur-
ing a storm. If you leave your
home after a disaster, take
your pets with you. If you
evacuate to a shelter, verify
their policy on accepting pets
before you go.
HURRICANE WATCH 2012 • AMERICANPRESS.COM
Photo courtesy of MGN-Online
Be aware that your pet’s behavior may change before, during
and after a disaster.
Have plan
for pets
By The Better Business Bureau
of SWLA Inc.
In time of disaster, un-
scrupulous individuals ap-
pear in many disguises, but
they all have one thing in
common: they want to take
advantage of the victims any
way they can.
Some of them appear to
be professionals of one kind
or another, others may want
to assess the “safety” of your
home or business. Some oth-
ers pose as charity workers.
The scams employed by
these people are numerous,
but there are some things you
can do to protect yourself and
your hard-earned money. Be
on the lookout for:
l Sale of water-damaged
vehicles.
lDisaster cleanup and
home repair scams.
lMoving and storage
scams.
lPest control-efforts to
scare you into paying for
“treatment.”
lRepair of building me-
chanical systems and major
appliances.
lBogus charity appeals
on the Internet, telemarket-
ers and in-person requests.
lPeople misrepresenting
themselves as FEMA of-
ficials or other government
employees.
lPhony websites that
pose a legitimate relief
organizations.
lEmails with attach-
ments containing computer
viruses.
lElectronic solicitations
offering to find missing
persons-for a fee.
Don’t respond to unsolic-
ited email appeals for pro-
fessional services or charity
contributions.
Be wary of door-to-door
solicitors pitching repair
services of all kinds, espe-
cially those who do not pres-
ent a professional appear-
ance (unmarked trucks, etc.)
Contact a business your-
self and get as much infor-
mation as you can; street
address, phone number and
literature about them. Con-
firm that they have appro-
priate licenses and insur-
ance. Get references.
BBB: Post-disaster alert
L-R (Back Row) Dennis Guillory, Blake Petry, Darlene Marsh,
Gary Pearce, Dooley Prince, Craig Martel, Keith Smith,
Cody Delcambre, Paul Lanier, Lydia Martin (Bottom) Tony Perot,
Eddy Robinson owner, Larry Christ owner, and Casey Christ
Insurance Unlimited is a locally owned business
where you get professional and personal
assistance with all of your insurance needs.
Call us today at Lake Charles 337-477-6922;
SLC 337-562-1808; Sulphur 337-527-8691;
DeRidder 337-660-7128 and Lafayette 337-456-5402
311 Ryan Street • Main Office
00752770
americanpress.com
337-494-4040
TAKE US
WITH
YOU
00753868
aame
Thursday, June 7, 2012 adverTising secTion aMerican Press 15
HURRICANE WATCH 2012 • AMERICANPRESS.COM
If an evacuation or other emergency separates
family and friends, you’ll want to find each other.
Fill out a card for each close friend and relative.
Carry it with you wherever you go.
Our emergency radio broadcast frequency
_____________________________________
Parish emergency manager’s phone number
_____________________________________
Parish Extension office phone number
_____________________________________
www.lsuagcenter.com
Finding Family and
Friends
in a Disaster
For the______________________Family
of ________________________
We care about you!
When we evacuate, WE WILL GO TO ________________________________________________
We will TELL OUR NEIGHBOR _____________________________________________________
at (#) _________________________________________________ where we are going.
We will CALL _____________________________________________________________
at (#) __________________________________________________________________
and tell him/her where we are going. (Someone who lives well away from the disaster area.)
We will also say what time we are leaving, how we are traveling and who is traveling with us.
If our family gets separated in a disaster we will each CALL
________________________________________at (#)___________________________________
to let them know we are safe and where we are staying.
If an evacuation or other emergency separates
family and friends, you’ll want to find each other.
Fill out a card for each close friend and relative.
Carry it with you wherever you go.
Our emergency radio broadcast frequency
_____________________________________
Parish emergency manager’s phone number
_____________________________________
Parish Extension office phone number
_____________________________________
www.lsuagcenter.com
Finding Family and
Friends
in a Disaster
For the______________________Family
of ________________________
We care about you!
When we evacuate, WE WILL GO TO ________________________________________________
We will TELL OUR NEIGHBOR _____________________________________________________
at (#) _________________________________________________ where we are going.
We will CALL ___________________________________________
at (#) ________________________________________________________
and tell him/her where we are going. (Someone who lives well away from the disaster area.)
We will also say what time we are leaving, how we are traveling and who is traveling with us.
If our family gets separated in a disaster we will each CALL
________________________________________at (#)___________________________________
to let them know we are safe and where we are staying.
If an evacuation or other emergency separates
family and friends, you’ll want to find each other.
Fill out a card for each close friend and relative.
Carry it with you wherever you go.
Our emergency radio broadcast frequency
_____________________________________
Parish emergency manager’s phone number
_____________________________________
Parish Extension office phone number
_____________________________________
www.lsuagcenter.com
Finding Family and
Friends
in a Disaster
For the______________________Family
of ________________________
We care about you!
When we evacuate, WE WILL GO TO ________________________________________________
We will TELL OUR NEIGHBOR _____________________________________________________
at (#) _________________________________________________ where we are going.
We will CALL _______________________________________________________________
at (#) __________________________________________________________________
and tell him/her where we are going. (Someone who lives well away from the disaster area.)
We will also say what time we are leaving, how we are traveling and who is traveling with us.
If our family gets separated in a disaster we will each CALL
________________________________________at (#)___________________________________
to let them know we are safe and where we are staying.
Trim closely around each card
Fold on this line if the paper is printed on one side
Cut on this line if the paper is printed front and back
Trim closely around each card
Fold on this line if the paper is printed on one side
Cut on this line if the paper is printed front and back
Disaster wallet cards
/ll u|ices SSwSR|. /.oilo|le ot uo|ticiuotir¸ Jeole|s w|ile suuulies lost. ©ZJ1Z STl|| SSw1Z|C|CZZ1J15Jcc
THIS YEAR
I WANT
SOMETHING 8ELIAßLE
1c' |o|
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Fealures greal power·lo·
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SE 122 STlhL
Wet /üry vacuuu
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HT 56 C-E
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ALWA¥8 WEA8 F8üIE6II¥E AFFA8EL WhEN
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8uIphur
Louisiana Fower Equipuent
950 South ßelgis Farkway
337-533-1ë57
LouisianaFowerEquipuent.net
WestIake
ßMC Sales & Service
929 Saupson Street
337-133-8335
ßMCSalesAndService.net
00752460
16 AMERICAN PRESS ADVERTISING SECTION ThuRSDAy, JuNE 7, 2012
MEMBER
SINCE 2003
3708 HWY 27 S. • CARLYSS, LA
337-583-21814
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A permanently installed automatic
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Protect the things that matter.
call FOR DETAILS
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MAINTENANCE CONTRACTS AVAILABLE
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22kw Model #QTO2224
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TRANSFER NOT INCLUDED
36kw Model #QTO3624
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48kw Model #QTO4824
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YOUR PRICE
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Regular Maintenance
24 Hour Emergency Service
Evacuation Program

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