...

THE TAO OF .
NUTRITION
THIRD EDITION
Maoshing Ni, Ph.D., O.M.D.
and Cathy McNease, B.S., Dip!. C.H.
foreword by Hua-Ching Ni
The Tao of Nutrition
Other Books by Dr. Maoshing Ni
Second Spring: Dr. Mao's Hundreds of Natural Secrets
for Women to Revitalize and Regenerate at Any Age
Secrets of Self-Healing: Harness Nature's Power to Heal
Common Ailments, Boost Your Vitality, and Achieve Optimum Wellness
Secrets of Longevity: 101 ways to Live to Be One Hundred
Dr. Mao's Harmony Tai Chi:
Simple Practice for Health and Well-Being
Chinese Herbology Made Easy
The Yellow Emperor's Classic of Medicine
(Editor and Translator)
Other Books by Cathy McNease
101 Vegetarian Delights (with Lily Chuang)
www.taostar.com
www.taoofwellness.com
THETAOof
NUTRITION
THIRD EDITION
Maoshing Ni, Ph.D., O.M.D.
and Cathy McNease, B.S., Dipl. c.H.
foreword by Hua-Ching Ni
TAO OF
WELLNESS
PRESS
Los Angeles
Published by:
Tao of Wellness Press
An Imprint of SevenS tar Communications
13315 W Washington Boulevard, Suite 200
Los Angeles, CA 90066
www.taoofwellness.com
© 2009 by Maoshing Ni and Cathy McNease. ©1987 by Maoshing Ni
and Cathy McNease. All rights reserved. No part of this book may be
used or reproduced in any manner whatsoever without permission,
except in the case of brief quotations in articles or reviews.
First Printing: January 1987
Second Printing: February 1989
Third Printing: June 1991
Fourth Printing: June 1993
Fifth Printing: March 1996
Sixth Printing: February 1998
Seventh Printing: June 2000
Eighth Printing: December 2004
Ninth Printing: April 2009
Publisher's Cataloging-in-Publication Data
Ni, Maoshing.
The Tao of nutrition / Maoshing Ni and Cathy McNease;
foreword by Hua-Ching Ni. - 3rd ed. - Los Angeles:
Tao of Wellness Press, © 2009.
p.; cm.
ISBN: 9781887575256
Includes bibliographical references and index.
1. Nutrition. 2. Health-Religious aspects-Taoism.
3. Diet therapy. 1. McNease, Cathy. II. Title.
RA784 .N5 2008
613.2-dc22
Cover Design: Justina Krakowski Design
Interior Design & Production: Judith Liggett
2008921765
0806
Dedication
Eat not for the pleasure thou mayest find therein. Eat to increase thy
strength. Eat to preserve the life thou has received from heaven.
Confucius
Acknowledgment
I would like to express my deepest gratitude to my father
who has endowed me with the great tradition and knowledge
of Chinese Nutrition so that I may be able to share it with
everyone. A special appreciation is extended to master herbalist
Cathy McNease who untiringly transcribed lectures, arranged
and edited text, and provided important new additions to this
third, expanded edition of The Tao of Nutrition.
We would also like to thank all our students, patients and friends
for their valuable suggestions and feedback with the remedies in
this book. To everyone who continues to support and promote
natural medicine in the world, we are most grateful to all of
you.
Disclaimer
This book is intended to inform the reader about the energetic
and healing aspects of foods. It is the authors' earnest desire
to further educate those who are open-minded about natural
alternatives to healing. However, the remedies offered in this
book are to be used at the reader's own discretion. If you wish
to try the therapeutic approaches outlined in this book for a
serious condition, it is best to first find a doctor of Chinese
Medicine who can supervise your treatment.
About the Authors
Maoshing Ni is a doctor of Traditional Chinese Medicine, a
bestselling author and an authority in Anti-Aging Medicine.
Dr. Mao, as he is known to his patients and students, practices
acupuncture and Chinese medicine with his brother, Dr.
Daoshing Ni, and a team of associates at the Tao of Wellness
in Santa Monica, California. He is cofounder and chancellor of
Yo San University in Los Angeles, where he teaches the art and
science of Wellness Medicine. Dr. Mao lectures internationally
and has been featured on radio and television as well as on the
pages of The New York Times, Los Angeles Times, and many other
publications. He is the author of twelve books including Secrets
of Self Healing Second Spring: Dr. Maols Hundreds of Natural
Secrets for Women to Revitalize and Regenerate at Any Age and the
bestselling Secrets of Longevity. For more information on his
other publications, please visit www.taostar.com.
Cathy McNease holds a Diplomate in Chinese Herbology
from the National Certification Commission for Acupuncture
and Oriental Medicine (NCCAOM), a B.S. in Biology and
Psychology from Western Michigan University and Master
Herbalist certificates from Emerson College of Herbology in
Canada and East-West Course of Herbology in Santa Cruz.
She has co-authored two books and a distance learning course,
Traditional Chinese Nutrition. She is currently on the faculties of
Yo San University and Emperor's College of Traditional Oriental
Medicine. In addition to her teaching profession she maintains
a Chinese herbal pharmacy business, Best Blends Herbs.
Table of Contents
Foreword I xiii
Preface I xvi
How to Use This Book xviii
Section 1: Introduction to Chinese Nutrition I 1
Energetic Properties I 3
Yin and Yang I 3
Your Body is the Greatest Healer I 5
Traditional Chinese View of the Body I 7
Organs of the Body I 8
Five Elements I 10
The Five Tastes I 11
The Eight Differentiations 13
Causes of Disease I 14
Prevention of Disease I 18
Guidelines for a Balanced Diet I 19
Section 2: Foods I 23
Vegetables I 25
Fruits I 53
Grains I 71
Beans and Peas (Legumes) I 81
Nuts and Seeds I 88
Meat, Fish, Poultry and Animal Products 95
Miscellaneous Foods, Herbs and Beverages I 101
Section 3: Remedies for Common Conditions I 113
Acne I 115
AIDS I 116
viii ~ The Tao of Nutrition
Allergies I 117
Anorexia and Bulimia I 118
Arthritis I 118
Asthma I 120
Cancer I 122
Candida Yeast Infection 123
Cataracts I 124
Chronic Bladder Infection I 125
Chronic Bronchitis I 126
Chronic Fatigue Syndrome I 127
Chronic Sinus Infection I 128
Common Cold I 129
Constipation I 130
Coronary Heart Disease I 132
Diabetes I 133
Diarrhea I 134
Dysentery I 135
Eczema I 136
Edema/Swelling I 137
Glaucoma I 138
Headache I 139
Hemorrhoids I 140
Hepatitis I 142
Hives I 143
Hypertension I 144
Hypoglycemia I 146
Impotence I 147
Indigestion I 148
Kidney Weakness I 149
Mastitis I 150
Menopause I 151
Table of Contents ~ ix
Morning Sickness I 151
Mouth Sores (Ulcers) I 152
Nephritis (Acute) I 153
Nephritis (Chronic) I 154
Premenstrual Syndrome (PMS) I 155
Prostate Enlargement I 156
Psoriasis I 156
Seminal Emission (Spermatorrhea) I 157
Sore Throat (Laryngitis) I 158
Stones (Gallbladder, Kidney, Urinary Tract) I 159
Tinnitus (Ear Ringing) I 160
Ulcers (Stomach or Duodenum) I 160
Worms I 162
Section 4: Simple Vegetarian Recipes I 165, 167
Soups
Sweet Squash and Seaweed I 169
Summer Vegetable Soup I 169
Soup Stock I 170
Black Bean Soup or Sauce I 170
Beet Soup or Sauce I 171
Chinese Noodle Soup I 172
Winter Melon Soup I 172
Creamy Split Pea Soup I 173
Grain Dishes
Fancy Rice I 174
Nori Burritos I 174
Vegetable Pie I 175
Millet Patties I 176
Stuffed Pumpkin I 176
Simple Couscous Pie I 177
x ~ The Tao of Nutrition
Basic Protein Cereal I 178
Chestnut Rice I 178
Simple Grain Dish I 179
The Fastest Cereal: Couscous I 179
Steamed Corn Bread I 180
Mochi I 181
Sweet Breakfast Porridge I 182
Bean and Tofu Dishes
Tofu and Mushroom Casserole I 183
Azuki Bean and Squash Casserole I 183
Clinton's Savory Chestnut Azuki Beans I 184
Tofu Skins and Mushrooms I 184
Steamed Peanuts I 185
Scrambled Tofu I 185
Tofu with Seaweed I 186
Tofu Dressing I 186
Herbal Dishes
Basic Herb Soup I 187
Dang Gui Cornish Hen Stew I 187
Shan Yao Longevity Stew I 188
Goji Berry (Gou Qi Zi) Oats I 188
Black Bean Stew I 188
Butternut Mushroom Soup I 189
Sweet and Spicy Pumpkin Soup I 190
Miscellaneous Recipes
Sesame Seed Garnish I 191
Basic Vegetable Stir-Fry I 191
Almond Nut Stir-Fry I 192
Stir-Fry Over Noodles I 192
Almond Milk I 193
Soybean Milk I 193
Protein Pudding I 194
Pecan Pudding I 194
Table of Contents ~ xi
Wheat Gluten (Wheat Meat) I 195
Basic Tomato Sauce I 195
Simple Oil and Vinegar Dressing I 196
Coriander Vinaigrette I 196
Lemon Vinaigrette I 197
Pecan Dressing I 197
Sprouts I 198
Sandwich Fillings I 199
Congee Recipes
Basic Congee Recipe I 200
Congee Variations I 201
Section 5: Sample Meal Plans I 203,205
Spring/Summer Meals I 206
Fall/Winter Meals I 209
Section 6: Appendix I 213
Chart 1: Energetic Properties of Foods I 215
Chart 2: Five Elements Correspondences I 219
Chart 3: Energetic Transformations I 221
Chart 4: Translations of Food & Herb Names I 222
Glossary I 224
Bibliography I 230
Sources for Chinese Food & Herbs I 237
Index I 239
Resources I 261
Foreword
T
HE KNOWLEDGE OF NUTRITION in China has roots that go back at
least 6,000 years and is based on the principles of balance and
harmony, as well as direct knowledge of the nature of individual
foods. This knowledge was first gathered by spiritually achieved
men and women who, by their own experiences, learned not
only what properties specific foods contained, but also how to
utilize them for the purposes of nutrition and longevity. Anyone
who learns and uses this ancient, time-tested knowledge will
find their health and longevity greatly enhanced.
Fu Shi, one of the great sages of ancient China, discovered eight
categories of universal energy, which later came to be known
as the Ba Gua or Eight Trigrams; this is a further division of the
two main categories of natural energy known as Yin and Yang.
The universe itself is an integration of these two interacting,
mutually assisting and also somewhat opposing forces that are
often expressed by the Tai Chi symboL
The deepest reality of universal life is the inner meaning of Yin
and Yang, and like Yin and Yang, the nature of the universe also
tends to be both harmonious and balanced. Even events that
could be conceptually classified as negative or conflicting, are
only stages in the accomplishment of further harmonization.
This is the truth expressed in the Tai Chi diagram.
Harmony and balance therefore, the principles of universal
existence, became the foundation of cultural development in
ancient China and were widely applied in public and private life
xiv ~ The Tao of Nutrition
as well as in spiritual practice. Many generations later, whatever
expressed these natural universal qualities of balance, harmony
and symmetry came to be known as Taoism; Tao being the way
or path of universal harmony through integration.
Shen N ung, another wise leader who lived some time after
Fu Shi, used these principles to develop herbal medicine and
essential nutrition. After him came the Yellow Emperor, one
of the greatest leaders in human history, who is considered the
founder of Taoism. He further developed the contributions of
the early sages, utilizing them in political as well as general
life, especially in the realms of medicine and nutrition, and
benefiting his hundred-year reign greatly by the guidance of
this special knowledge.
Fu Shi, Shen Nung and the Yellow Emperor are great symbols
of natural culture. Another symbolic figure of longevity is
popular even now in Chinese culture. He is called Pung Tzu
and is considered the founder of the art of Chinese cooking and
nutrition. Pung Tzu learned all the arts of long life, including
Dao-In, energy conducting exercises, and Fang Zhong, the art
and discipline of sexual practices. Legend has it that Pung Tzu
lived to be 800 years old and was still active in the reign of the
Emperor Jou, around 1123 B.C.
As the spiritual descendents of these men of spiritual devel-
opment and dedication to human development, we can still
benefit today from their great achievements and contributions,
as many have done before us. Through the traditional Chinese
healing arts and herbal medicine, I myself have offered much
useful knowledge and help to many people around the world.
Although I taught a class on diet and nutrition several years
ago, there was still a secret wish in my mind to do more in this
area. Because of my busy schedule, I have not had time to do
so, but fortunately my son Maoshing, had the same interest.
Thus he has brought this book into your hands to fill the gap
Foreword ~ xv
in my own work. It can be an important and useful tool in
your life that will serve your health and spiritual development.
With its support, I wish that each of you may become stronger
everyday.
Thank you,
Hua-Ching Ni
Preface
I
N OUR RAPIDLY CHANGING SOCIETY, humans have lost their
instinctive nature regarding healthy eating. People have a
poor concept of what makes up a good diet. They thrive and
rely on their taste buds and visual sensations for sustenance. In
most cases they do not eat to live but rather live to eat.
Even more sadly, caught in their daily lives, many people make
work, pleasure and sex a priority over what they eat. At the
same time, mind-boggling numbers of fads and controversial
dietary regimes add more confusion to their already uncertain
dietary habits.
The Tao of Nutrition presents the wisdom of the ancient Chinese.
Ancient people were much more aware of the environment and
how their bodies reacted to their surroundings. They lived by
the principle of being in harmony with nature and emphasized
balance in every aspect of life, especially diet, the Yin and Yang
of foods, and nourishment of the body. Their knowledge and
experiences were passed down through generations and was
further refined and systematized into what we today call
Chinese nutrition.
Chinese nutrition is a healing system of its own. Not only is it
a healing system, but it is also a disease-prevention system. The
advantage of Chinese nutrition lies in its flexibility in adapting
to every individual's needs, and treating the whole person
rather than just the symptoms.
Preface ~ xvii
Chinese nutrition differs from modern Western nutrition in
that it does not rely on analyzing the chemical constituents of
each food; rather it determines the properties or energies of each
food and combination. It takes into consideration the season,
method of preparation, geographical location, and information
that is in accord with the natural principles of life and balance.
It is hoped that the readers of this book will gain understanding
of their bodies, their surroundings, and their diet. So here it is,
the essence of the art and science of Chinese nutrition. With
this book in your hands, you can acquire insight and be the
master of your own body. Start now to achieve and maintain
health, vitality, and longevity.
How To Use This Book
T
HIS BOOK CONTAINS five sections: The first section deals with
the theories and philosophies of Chinese nutrition. Section
Two describes over 130 common foods in detail-their energetic
properties, their therapeutic actions, and individual remedies.
Section Three is a remedial section that gives recommendations
for various medical conditions. Sections Four and Five contain
recipes and meal plans.
It is strongly recommended that readers familiarize themselves
thoroughly with the first section in order to understand the basic
philosophies of Chinese nutrition. With that understanding,
one is able to more efficiently utilize the specific knowledge
given in the remaining sections.
Another way readers may find this book useful is to refer
to conditions that apply to them. They may either choose
to look up a condition in Section Three and follow the
recommendations given there or check the index for listings of
the condition.
For example, if you look up Headache in Section Three, you
will find the following therapeutic remedies to choose from:
For headaches due to common cold or flu:
1. Make tea from ginger and green onions, boiling for 5 minutes.
Drink and allow body to sweat.
2. Steam aching portion of head over mint and cinnamon tea
that is boiling. Dry head afterwards, avoiding drafts.
How to Use This Book ~ xix
3. Make tea from chrysanthemum flowers and cassia seeds and
drink.
4. Mash buckwheat meal into a paste and apply to painful area
until it sweats.
5. Drink green tea.
6. Make rice porridge and add garlic and green onions. Eat
while hot, and then get under blankets and sweat.
For headaches due to high blood pressure, menstrual
cycles, emotional stress or tension, or migraines:
1. Make carrot juice. If headache is on the left side, squirt
carrot juice into left nostril; if on the right side, squirt into right
nostril; if both sides are painful, squirt into both nostrils.
2. Take lemon juice and Y2 T baking soda mixed in a glass of
water and drink.
3. Make tea of Chinese prunes, mint, and green tea.
4. Make tea of oyster shells and chrysanthemum flowers,
slowly boiling the shells for 1 Y2 hours, then adding the flowers
for the last 30 minutes.
5. Mash peach kernels and walnuts. Mix with rice wine and
lightly roast; take 2 T. three times daily.
6. Rinse head with warm water, gradually increasing the
temperature to hot.
After studying the entire book, one will gain an insight into
maintaining balance and harmony between one's body and the
environment and ultimately will achieve health, happiness and
longevity.
Section One
Introduction to Chinese Nutrition
Energetic Properties
Chinese nutrition applies the traditional healing properties of
foods to correct disharmonies within the body. Over the course
of several millennia, countless experiences were gathered using
food for prevention and healing of disease. This treasure was
passed along as an important healing art, within the body of
information known as Traditional Chinese Medicine.
Chinese nutrition differs from Western nutrition in that it does
not talk about the biochemical nature of food. Rather, Chinese
nutrition deals on an energetic level where balance is the key.
Foods are selected according to their energetic qualities such as
warming, cooling, drying, or lubricating. Thus, Chinese nutri-
tion would seek to warm the coldness, cool the heat, dry the
dampness, lubricate the dryness, and so forth.
By carefully studying the individual's imbalances, one would
choose the appropriate foods to bring about a balanced state of
health. For example, for an excessive individual who is exhib-
iting conditions of heat in the body, cooling foods would be
appropriate. For a deficient individual who tends toward cold-
ness, warming foods would be chosen. In this way, balance is
achieved.
Foods all have specific inherent qualities determined by the
effect the food has on the body. Then the method of prepara-
tion further enhances or neutralizes the foods. Generally speak-
ing, warming foods raise metabolism and cooling foods lower
metabolism. Balance in the diet is essential for good health.
Yin and Yang
It is a universal law that everything is constantly changing,
except for the fundamental governing laws of life. This prin-
ciple applies to the universe surrounding us as well as the inner
3
4 ~ The Tao of Nutrition
universe of our bodies. The ancient Chinese developed ways
of looking at these changes to better understand them. One
such theory is that everything in the universe consists of two
opposite yet complementary aspects. This is called the Theory of
Yin and Yang. Yin and Yang exist relative to one another and are
also in a state of change at any given time; they are not static
conditions. Day and night is a good example of this. When Yin
and Yang are out of balance, diseases or disharmonies occur.
Within the body, Yin and Yang are often referred to as the
body's water and fire. These descriptions are very useful in
determining the relative nature of both the individual and the
energies of foods. The application of Chinese nutrition neces-
sitates determining the body type of the individuaL He or she
may be the cold type, considered of a Yin nature, the hot type,
considered Yang, or commonly a mixture. Some significant
questions to determine this may be as follows, with the Yang
tendencies listed first: male or female? feel hot or cold? drawn to hot
or cold foods? thirst or no thirst? constipated or loose stools? dark or
pale urine? red or pale face and tongue?
We are all a mixture of Yin and Yang, although we may be pre-
dominantly one or the other. Thus, Yang persons need relatively
more Yin, or cooling foods whereas, Yin types need relatively
more Yang, or warming foods. Chinese nutrition categorizes
foods according to the observed reactions within the body.
Easily observable changes occur according to the warming or
cooling nature of a food. Foods are categorized as Hot, Warm,
Neutral, Cool or Cold. (See Chart 1: Energetic Properties of Foods,
pgs. 215-218.)
Typical symptoms of the hot type or Yang type person could
include the following: red complexion, easy to sweat, always
hot, dominating, aggressive or outgoing personality, coarse-
ness, loud voice, dry mouth, thirst, affinity to cold liquids,
ferocious appetite, constipation, foul breath, scanty and dark
Introduction To Chinese Nutrition ~ 5
urine, sometimes dry cough with thick yellow sputum, easily
angered, very emotional, irritability, insomnia, and in women,
early and heavy menstruation with bright red blood.
Typical symptoms of the cold type or Yin type person could
include the following: paleness, coldness, disdains cold liquids,
likes warm liquids, low energy, loose stools, sleeps a lot, feeble
and weak voice, introverted personality, white and copious
sputum, lack of appetite, copious and clear urine, dizziness,
and edema.
To bring about balance and counteract the symptoms, hot type
persons would use primarily cooling foods such as wheat,
mung beans, watermelon, fresh fruit juices, and many of the
vegetables. Cold type persons would achieve balance by regu-
larly including the warming foods in their diet, such as garlic,
ginger, onions, black beans, lamb and chicken. Accordingly, hot
types would avoid hot, spicy foods, while cold types would avoid
cold, raw foods.
Yin and Yang also apply to the organs of our bodies. Those
which are considered solid, or with substance, are considered
Yin. These include Heart, Spleen, Liver, Lungs, and Kidneys.
Those which are considered hollow, active in transportation,
are considered Yang. These include Large and Small Intestines,
Gall Bladder, Stomach, and Urinary Bladder. Further descrip-
tions of each organ and their energetic components will follow.
(See Chart 2: Five Elements Correspondences, pg. 219-220.)
Your Body Is The Greatest Healer
Many people are overfed and undernourished. We are con-
stantly bombarded by information on nutrition from food
companies, current faddists, and diet cultists, yet the picture
is very incomplete. According to the Chinese point of view, the
body is looked at as a whole, working together in harmony.
6 ~ The Tao of Nutrition
Just as every screw and bolt on a machine has an important
purpose, if one part is broken the whole suffers. Our body is a
very intricate machine that works together as a whole.
Western medicine tends to focus on symptoms and the diseased
part of the body. It tries to attack and kill the diseased cells, not
taking into account how those cells became diseased. It is not
just because the cells are exposed to viruses and bacteria. We are
constantly being exposed; even our mouths are full of bacteria.
Yet why is it that some people break down and get sick and
others do not when both are exposed to the same pathogens?
Our body is equipped with a healing mechanism that is greater
than any invention. It is unique in that it has a system that can
repair the body's disharmonies, given the opportunity to do
so. Through inappropriate lifestyle, diet, thoughts, and actions,
we abuse the workings of this delicate system. Always keep
in mind that the body's own healing system is very powerful.
Suppressing a headache with aspirin does not take away the
underlying cause. The headache is a warning of some dishar-
mony. Thus, we should work on the underlying cause and use
natural healing methods to enhance the immune system so the
body can heal itself.
The focus of Traditional Chinese Medicine is to help the body
to heal, not interfere with the healing process. Often our sur-
roundings do not give us the proper chance to heal ourselves
because we are bombarded with chemicals in our soil, food,
water, and urban environment. These chemicals can accumu-
late in the liver and become very toxic.
Significant chemical pollution occurs in meats. Meat animals
are routinely injected with steroids such as bovine growth hor-
mone to fatten them quickly and made them produce more
milk. Antibiotics, including penicillin and sulfa, are used to c o n ~
trol rampant diseases. These drug residues remain in meat and
Introduction To Chinese Nutrition ~ 7
milk and cause health problems for the consumer. Hormones
can cause men to become more feminine and have problems
with impotency and sterility and women to experience prema-
ture aging and general disharmonies in their endocrine systems
and menstrual cycles.
Traditional Chinese View of the Body
According to Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM), the human
as an intricate whole is made up of the following essential com-
ponents: Chi, or vital energy, blood, body fluids; Jing, or the
essence of life; and Shen, or spirit. If anyone of these compo-
nents is missing, you cannot have life.
Chi comes in many forms with many different actions. In gen-
eral, Chi is like life force. The body is a network of Chi path-
ways called meridians. In a healthy person, Chi or energy flows
evenly along these channels. When the energy becomes blocked,
disease results. Acupuncture can be of great value in facilitating
the flow of energy through these pathways. Chi, the Yang com-
ponent, is closely related to blood, the Yin component. Blood
supplies nutrition to the body and nourishes Chi. Movement of
blood is dependent upon Chi.
Body fluids are of two types: Jin are the thin, refined fluids such
as sweat, tears, and tissue fluids and Ye are the thick, lubricat-
ing fluids such as spinal fluid and synovial, or joint fluids.
Jing is the essence of life found in the egg, sperm, marrow, and
brain (the sea of marrow) and is stored in the Kidneys. At the
time of conception, the fetus absorbs this vital essence from the
egg and the sperm. All of our chromosomes at that time give us
our Jing. Thus, we are born with a certain amount. Through-
out our lives we use up our Jing until we die. Our fast-paced
lifestyle uses up Jing at a very rapid rate. For this reason women
8 ~ The Tao of Nutrition
can have problems with menstruation, go through an earlier
menopause and cannot safely bear children for as many years
as in more natural cultures.
Spiritual cultivation is very important for the proper develop-
ment and preservation of our Jing, which is stored in the Kid-
neys. The Shen, or spirit, gives us intuition, instincts, and the
ability to comprehend. Shen is housed in the Heart.
Organs of the Body
TCM views the body organs as couples consisting of a Yin organ
and a Yang organ. Each pair also has energetic correlations that
we may not necessarily associate with the physical organ. For
example, the Kidneys in Chinese medicine would also include
functions of the reproductive organs. Each pair of organs is asso-
ciated with one of the five energies called the Five Elements:
Wood, Fire, Earth, Metal, and Water. (See Chart 2, pgs. 219-220.)
The quality of the element is reflected in its organ pair.
The pair related to the Wood element is the Liver and Gall Blad-
der. The Liver houses the soul, controls tendons, stores blood,
manifests externally in the eyes, and is responsible for keeping
energy flowing. Thus, when the energy is obstructed, look to
the Liver. Anger, frustration, and depression relates to the Liver.
The Gall Bladder stores and excretes bile, protects the nervous
system from overreaction, and helps to normalize a person
emotionally. Gall Bladder weakness may manifest as difficulty
making decisions.
Corresponding to the Fire element are the Heart and Small
Intestines. The Heart houses the Shen, governs blood, has taste
as its sensory function, externally manifests in the tongue, and
joy (mania) is its related emotion. The Small Intestines absorb
fluids. As one of the hollow organs, they are responsible for the
transporting of excretion.
Introduction To Chinese Nutrition ~ 9
Also related to the Fire element are the Triple Heater, or Sanjiao,
and the Pericardium. These are functions rather than organs.
The Triple Heater is responsible for communication between
the three cavities in the trunk and helps with fluid metabolism
in the body. The Pericardium surrounds and protects the Heart.
Corresponding to the element of Earth is the Spleen and Stom-
ach pair. The Spleen transforms and transports food into usable
food essence (the waste is transported to the intestines), pro-
duces blood, opens to the mouth, and controls muscles. It is
also responsible for keeping blood in the vessels. Thus, bruising
easily is a sign of weak Spleen function. The related emotion
is worry, or excessive thinking. Reference made to the Spleen
in the Chinese system also includes functions of the pancreas.
The Stomach breaks down and ripens the food and then trans-
ports it downward.
The pair corresponding to the Metal element is the Lungs and
Large Intestines. The main functions of the Lungs are breath-
ing, regulating water metabolism, and descending and dispers-
ing Chi throughout the body. The Lungs open out to the nose
and control the skin, pores, and hair on the skin. Sadness is the
related emotion. The Large Intestines excrete wastes from the
body and absorb water.
Related to the Water element are the Kidneys and Urinary Blad-
der. The Kidneys store Jing, are responsible for growth, devel-
opment, and reproduction. The Kidneys also produce marrow,
form the brain and spinal cord, control bones, open to the ears,
and balance body fluid metabolism. The related emotion is fear.
The Urinary Bladder stores and excretes urine.
10 ~ The Tao of Nutrition
Five Elements
A basic theory in the Chinese view of the universe is the Five Ele-
ments Theory, or the Five Energy Transformations. (See Chart
3: Five Energetic Transformations, p. 221.) This view gives us a
helpful framework for understanding the ever-changing world,
the inner relationships of change, and the interconnectedness
of all things. The five elements, Wood, Fire, Earth, Metal, and
Water, connect in that sequence for what is called the creation
cycle. This cycle occurs in nature as well as within our bodies.
In nature, rub two pieces of wood together and create fire; fire
burns to ash and becomes earth; from earth we dig up metal;
melt the metal to liquid and make water; put a seed into the
water and it germinates a tree and creates wood. The cycle is
circular.
In the creation cycle, the creator element is the mother who
gives birth to the son element. Thus, if the son is weak or defi-
cient, we can tonify or nourish the mother and thereby ben-
efit the son. If there is not enough Fire (corresponding to the
Heart), we would strengthen the Wood organ (the Liver) with
the proper foods or herbs.
In ancient times, these correspondences were made by observ-
ing that nature and our bodies work similarly. In nature the
Five Elements can be correlated to the seasons as follows: Wood
corresponds to spring; Fire corresponds to summer; Earth cor-
responds to late summer and the time between seasons; Metal
corresponds to autumn; and Water corresponds to winter.
There is a useful relationship between food colors and the ele-
ments and corresponding body systems. White foods nour-
ish the Lungs; black and dark blue foods nourish the Kidneys;
green foods nourish the Liver; yellow and orange foods nourish
the Spleen and Stomach; red foods nourish the Heart. Thus, a
person with weak digestion, a Spleen weakness, should include
plenty of the yellow and orange foods such as sweet potatoes
Introduction To Chinese Nutrition ~ 11
and winter squashes, as these are the colors that correspond to
the Earth element. Someone with Heart weakness would do
well to eat more red foods such as tomatoes and hawthorn ber-
ries, as red corresponds to the Fire element.
Another relationship that occurs within the Five Elements is
the control cycle. (See Chart 3, pg. 221). It goes like this: we take
wood, for example a tree, whose roots grow into the earth; we
take earth and build a dam to control water; water puts out
the fire; fire melts down the metal; metal makes the ax that
cuts the wood. If the Wood element (Liver) becomes excessive
and manifests as hypertension, red eyes and a headache, we
may want to strengthen or tonify the Metal element (Lungs)
to control the Wood.
The creation and control cycles occur as natural phenomenon,
keeping life in balance. However, when anyone of the elements
is either too strong or too weak, disharmony results. Keep in
mind as you use the Five Elements Theory that there are always
exceptions to the rule.
The Five Tastes
The physical sensation of taste has its significance in Chinese
medicine. Taste is classified into five flavors, although in the
text below you will actually find seven. These five tastes are:
sour, sweet, bitter, pungent, and salty. The other two are bland,
which falls under the sweet category, and astringent, which
falls under the sour category.
When a substance such as a food or an herb goes into the gas-
trointestinal tract to be digested, the sour taste is said to be
absorbed by the Liver and Gall Bladder, the bitter taste by the
Heart and Small Intestines, the sweet taste by the Spleen and
Stomach, the pungent taste by the Lungs and Large Intestines,
and the salty taste by the Kidneys and Urinary Bladder. There-
12 The Tao of Nutrition
fore, foods and herbs with different energies and tastes are
assimilated into the body to nourish different organs.
Take the example of someone with digestive difficulties as in
a weakness of Spleen and Stomach. He or she often likes to
eat sweets. Contrary to Western medicine, in which those with
digestive weakness are advised against sweets intake, Chinese
medicine utilizes foods, such as yam or winter squash, that are
actually slightly sweet and strengthen the weakness of Spleen
and Stomach. Thus, consumption of foods with various tastes
will benefit those organs that correspond to these tastes.
• Pungent is a taste that has functions of dispersing, invig-
orating, and promoting circulation. Its function of dispersing
is mainly used to disperse pathogens from the exterior of the
body, such as we see in common colds and flu. Its function of
invigorating is to promote circulation of Chi, blood and body
fluids. In Chinese medicine, disease is the result of stagnation;
therefore, foods that have this pungent taste will promote
and invigorate circulation of Chi, blood and body fluids. The
pathological condition of stagnation can be seen as local pain,
irregular and/or painful menstruation, edema, tumors, and so
on. The pungent taste, because of its dispersing quality also
acts to open the pores and promote sweating. This is a way to
expel the pathogen from the body. Examples of pungent tasting
foods are ginger, garlic and mint.
• Sour taste has consolidating, and astringent func-
tions. It functions in stopping abnormal discharge of body flu-
ids and substances as in the condition of excessive perspiration,
diarrhea, seminal emission, spermatorrhea, and enuresis. Exam-
ples of sour foods are Chinese sour plum, lemon and vinegar.
• Astringent taste falls under the sour taste category and its
actions are very similar to that of the sour taste.
• Bitter substances have the action of drying dampness and
dispersing obstructions. Often bitter also clears heat, so bitter
Introduction To Chinese Nutrition ~ 13
aids conditions like dampness and edema. Its function of dispers-
ing obstruction can be utilized for a cough due to Chi stagna-
tion and so forth. Examples of bitter-tasting foods are rhubarb,
apricot kernels, and kale.
• Salty taste has the function of softening and dissolving hard-
enings. It also moistens and lubricates the intestines. Body
symptoms such as lumps, nodes, masses, and cysts can be soft-
ened and dissolved by salty substances. An example can be seen
in goiter, which is treated by seaweed, a representative of salty
food. Also, in cases of constipation, one can drink salt water to
lubricate the intestines and promote evacuation.
• Sweet taste has the action of tonifying, harmonizing and
decelerating. In cases of fatigue or deficiency, sweet substances
have a reinforcing and strengthening action. Deficiencies may
occur in different aspects of the body, such as insufficiency of
Chi, blood, Yin or Yang. Specific organs may suffer from weak-
ness as well. This is why one is drawn to sweets when he or she
is experiencing low energy. Sweet taste is also used to deceler-
ate, which means to relax. It is used in conditions of acute pain
to help relax and hence, ease the pain. Sweet foods and herbs
can harmonize as an antidote or counterbalance undesirable
effects from some herbs. Examples of sweet-tasting foods are
yams, corn and rice.
• Bland taste falls under the sweet taste category. It tends to
be diuretic, promotes urination and relieves edema. An example
of a bland-tasting food is pearl barley.
The Eight Differentiations
In order to more clearly understand the energy of the patient
and the nature and location of the disease, the Chinese have
developed the Eight Differentiations system of diagnosis.
Internal and external serves to locate the area of disease. Deficiency
and excess determine the relative strength of the patient or
14 ~ The Tao of Nutrition
the disease. Cold and hot give indications of the nature of the
individual and/or the pathogens. Yin and Yang give the overall
picture of the condition. Together these eight differentiations
can provide an accurate picture of both the individual being
treated and the disease at hand. A mixture of symptoms can
be confusing. The Eight Differentiations provide a basis for
understanding seeming contradictions in the symptoms. A
practitioner of Traditional Chinese Medicine would make an
evaluation based on the tongue and pulse readings and the
presenting signs and symptoms.
Causes of Disease
In Traditional Chinese Medicine, the cause of disease is said to
be of an external or internal source. Just below the surface of the
skin lies a layer of energy that acts as a protective shield. In a
healthy person this shield is strong and without gaps as a barrier
of protection should be. It is impervious to external factors. If,
however, there are weak spots in this shield and external factors
can penetrate into the body, we have disease. This shield is part
of the immune system. If one's immune system is strong, one
does not catch the pathogen. For example, some people have
the AIDS virus and show no symptoms of it; others catch it
and soon die. That is the difference between strong Chi and
weak Chi.
In the Chinese perception of disease, external causes of diseases
include the following environmental conditions: cold, heat,
summer heat, dryness, dampness, and wind. In Western
thinking, we would put viruses and bacteria in this category.
Diseases can also arise as a result of internal factors. These
include the emotions: joy (mania), grief, anger, depression,
worry, melancholy, and fear. These reflect the mental state
induced by one's environment. That in itself does not cause
disease. However, when emotions are very intense or long
Introduction To Chinese Nutrition ~ 15
lasting, disharmony or disease can result. Mental attitude is
very important for good health. By calming one's mind, many
physical problems disappear.
An interesting survey done in China on a group of cancer
patients showed that 95% had been physically or mentally
tortured during the Cultural Revolution (1965-1975). During
that harsh period, intellectuals were tortured; even husbands
and wives betrayed each other for the sake of the Communist
Party. You could not trust anyone with your innermost feelings
and thoughts. These people built up frustration, depression, and
anger, and these destructive emotions in turn became cancer.
Isolation and inability to express emotions is very destructive
to one's health.
It is important to recognize the role of emotional balance in
maintaining good health. We must have a channel to release
excessive emotions, be it exercises such as tai chi chuan or
chi gong, breathing techniques, acupuncture, meditation, or
walking. These activities can help to regulate emotions and
promote more inner peace.
Other causes of disease include traumatic injury, stagnant blood
or mucus, improper exercise, improper activities, and improper
diet. Traumatic injuries include accidents, incisions, sprains,
burns, and animal or insect bites. Stagnancy of the blood and
mucus cause blocks in the energy pathways; a good example is
tumors.
Either too much or too little exercise can cause disease. Improper
activities include excessive sex, overworking, and overexertion.
Excessive sex is particularly injurious to the Kidneys, the
store-house of our Jing. Improper diet can be eating too little
for proper nourishment of the body, overeating, or eating too
much of the wrong foods, such as too much raw, cold, greasy,
or spicy foods.
16 ~ The Tao of Nutrition
Overeating is a very common imbalance and can cause many
diseases. We frequently overeat because we do not know how
to eat and tend to eat very fast. By chewing food slowly and
properly, the body will naturally tell us when to stop. People
also reach out to food and use it as an escape. Eating in a relaxed
frame of mind is essential to good digestion and assimilation of
nutrients.
It has been found in animal experiments that if one group is
allowed to eat as much as desired and another group is starved
every second day, the first group had five times more tendency
toward spontaneous cancer. Statistically, the United States
leads the world in both protein consumption per person and
the incidence of cancer. Protein is needed, but an excessive
amount causes problems. An over consumption of meat protein
will also result in a high percentage of fat in the diet, another
significant contributor to disease. Meat companies have led us
to believe that we need far more protein than is really healthy.
Moderation is essential to good health.
A study conducted from 1983-1988 of 6,500 people from 65
regions across China, showed the impact that regular exercise
and a low-fat, high-fiber diet have on maintaining good health.
This was the largest study of its kind to date. The findings of
the China Project on Nutrition, Health, and the Environment
were published in 1990 as Diet, Lifestyle, and Morality in China.
This project was under the direction of T Colin Campbell of
Cornell University, in collaboration with researchers from
Oxford University, Chinese Academy of Preventive Medicine,
and Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, both in Beijing.
The results suggested that the healthiest diet would contain
a minimum of 80-90% plant foods. Those in the Chinese
countryside, who get only about 10-15% of their calories
and 7% of their total protein from animal products, had low
incidence of heart disease, colon cancer, and osteoporosis. The
Introduction To Chinese Nutrition ~ 17
study showed that when the rural dweller moved to the city
and adopted the city lifestyle and higher fat diet (30%), diseases
increased.
The Western approach to diseases is to kill bacteria and suppress
the symptoms, thus driving the disease deeper into the body.
The Chinese way supports the body and lets it do the killing of
the pathogen. Supporting the body with tonification reinforces
the body's healing energy. The body can heal itself if given the
chance although we may need to give it assistance through
proper nutrition or herbal medicine.
Fasting or light eating is sometimes recommended during an
illness, such as a cold, so digestion of heavy foods will not
detract from the body's healing process. In many traditions
throughout the world, a thin, soupy grain porridge, or congee,
is given during illness. This is very easy to digest, and thus the
body can draw on its resources to heal. The antibiotic route,
on the other hand, weakens the immune system, makes one
prone to illness, causes the immune system to become lazy, and
generally interferes with the natural healing process.
There are many supportive measures that can be taken with
food and herbs. In many instances, we need to support the
body while concurrently detoxifying or sedating it. This is
the Chinese approach to disease. For cancer patients in some
hospitals in China, doctors combine the killing aspects of
chemotherapy and radiation with the supportive measures of
Traditional Chinese Medicine, including proper diet, herbs, chi
gong exercises and acupuncture. This has produced a longer life
expectancy than the conventional killing approach alone. Some
hospitals treat cancer patients solely with Chinese medicine;
this group often shows the longest life expectancy including
many total remissions.
18 ~ The Tao of Nutrition
Prevention of Disease
As we increase our awareness of health, we can maintain a state
of balance within the body, and become more responsible for
our health. Too often we suffer from our inappropriate actions
and thoughts. Chinese nutrition stresses prevention of disease.
Written 2,000-3,000 years ago, The Yellow Emperor's Classic of
Internal Medicine says, "A doctor who treats a disease after it has
happened is a mediocre doctor. But a doctor who treats a disease
before it happens is a superior doctor." Doctors were considered
to be teachers who taught their patients how to be healthy and
spiritually upright. Success was measured by vibrant health.
We as individuals choose to be one kind of doctor or the other.
Traditionally, herbs have been used to preserve good health
and prevent disease. Many of the tonifying herbs are used for
this purpose over a long period of time. The tonic herbs are
further categorized into Yin, Yang, Blood and Chi tonics, and
lend themselves well to preparations with foods, such as soups,
stew and porridges. Incorporating the appropriate herbs into
the diet on a regular basis can provide great benefit to health.
The use of herbs as food has a long history in China. The first
Chinese Materia Medica, Shen-Nong Herbal Classic, categorizes
herbs into three groups. The first group was called food herbs,
which were eaten as a part of the diet for general nourishment,
maintenance of health, and prevention of disease. Taoist
hermits called these herbs immortal foods and described them
as producing effects that rejuvenate health, prolong life, restore
youth, and increase clarity. They often used them as the main
part of their diet, along with some fruits, nuts and seeds.
Later sections of this book describe some of these food herbs.
For additional reading on food herbs and recipes, refer to the
Bibliography at the end of this book.
Introduction To Chinese Nutrition ~ 19
The other two groups of herbs were called medicinal herbs,
which were dispensed to patients in an individual formula
based on each patient's constitution, environment and medical
condition, by a traditional Chinese medical professional.
Prevention of disease includes proper nutrition, exercise,
emotional balance, and nourishing our spirit. As we nourish
body, mind, and spirit we maintain a state of balance.
Preventative maintenance is the most sensible route to take. As
The Yellow Emperor states,
The sages of ancient times emphasized not the treatment of
disease, but rather the prevention of its occurrence. To administer
medicine to disease that has already developed and to suppress
revolts that have already begun is comparable to the behavior
of one who begins to dig a well after he has become thirsty or
one who begins to forge weapons after he has engaged in battle.
Would these actions not be too late?
Guidelines for a Balanced Diet
As every body is unique, there will always be variations accord-
ing to individual needs. A few basic guidelines, however, are
appropriate as we seek a way of eating that creates balance and
harmony. Frame of mind is of utmost importance at mealtime;
relax and slowly chew your food for optimal digestion and
assimilation. The dinner table is not the place to discuss the
day's problems. Chewing is a major part of digestion. Remem-
ber, your stomach does not have teeth. Digestion, particularly
of the starches, begins in the mouth. Foods that are difficult
to thoroughly chew, such as sesame seeds, should be ground
before eating. Fruits digest quickly, while meats and other pro-
teins take more time to digest.
The preferred ways of preparing foods are steaming, stir-frying
in water, stewing (boiling, as in soups), or baking. Steaming
20 ~ The Tao of Nutrition
leaves the food in its most natural state, while baking creates
more heat and would be the best method for cold conditions.
Even the best quality oils become difficult to digest when
heated. So, if oil is desired, put it on after the food is cooked.
Foods should be eaten in their wholeness, when possible. Only
peel fruits or vegetables if the peel is hard to digest or con-
taminated with chemical sprays. Search out organically grown
foods to avoid the toxic chemical residues of commercial grow-
ing processes. To clean foods thoroughly, one may wash them
in salt water. Also avoid irradiated or microwaved foods, if pos-
sible. The best utensils for cooking in are glass, earthenware,
or stainless steel. One should avoid cooking in aluminum or
copper; these metals can easily leach into the food.
The food one eats should follow the seasons and should be
grown locally. Nature has the perfect plan for providing the
appropriate foods in each given season. The fruits and vegetables
that ripen in the summertime tend to be on the cooling side. In
wintertime we will tend toward a more warming diet. Also,
one should eat a wide variety of foods for good balance.
Most vegetables should be at least lightly cooked because raw
vegetables tend to be difficult to digest. Foods should never be
eaten cold because cold foods put out the digestive (ire, so to speak.
This is particularly upsetting to the female menstrual cycle as
the stomach sits right beside the liver which is responsible for
storing blood. Cooling off the stomach can lead to a stagnant
blood condition and a difficult menstrual period. Frozen foods,
such as ice cream and iced drinks, are very unhealthy. Neither
should we consume foods that are so hot that they burn the
mouth or stomach.
It is best to stop eating before becoming full. Also, eating just
before retiring is not a good idea; one should eat the last meal at
least three hours before going to bed. This will not only result
Introduction To Chinese Nutrition ~ 21
in better digestion, but also a more restful sleep. Late eating
also tends to be stored as unwanted pounds. One should wake
up with a good appetite for breakfast. This is the meal that
provides us with the fuel or energy for much of the day, so
make breakfast a very nutritious meal.
Nuts and seeds contain a large proportion of oil and should be
eaten as fresh as possible and kept refrigerated. Because most
people do not chew nuts well, grinding them into powder
makes them easier to digest.
Beans should be soaked prior to cooking for at least a few hours;
always discard the soaking water and cook them in fresh water.
Small beans like lentils and peas tend to be easier to digest
than large beans like lima or kidney beans. For a person with
particularly weak digestion, it is best to cook grains soupy with
additional water and cooking time. You may use up to ten parts
water per one part grain.
Always avoid highly processed foods and keep meals as simple
as possible. A balanced diet would consist of the following on
a regular basis:
Whole grains including rice, millet, barley, wheat, oats, corn,
rye, quinoa, amaranth, etc. This group of foods will account for
about 40% of the diet.
Freshly prepared vegetables including dark leafy greens,
cabbage, broccoli, celery, root vegetables, etc. This group of
foods will account for about 40% of the diet.
Fresh fruits will be consumed when in season but generally no
more than 10% of the diet. Fruits can be a great snack or sweet
treat.
22 ~ The Tao of Nutrition
Legumes/seeds/nuts including peas, beans, tofu, peanuts,
lentils, sunflower seeds, almonds, walnuts, etc. This group will
account for about 10-20% of the vegetarian diet and a lesser
portion of the meat-inclusive diet.
Animal products include dairy foods, meat, fish, poultry, and
eggs. They should be no more than 10% of the diet if one
chooses to include them. Attempt to locate growers who do
not use drugs or inhumane practices on the animals.
Seaweeds including nori, wakame, dulse, kombu, hiziki, and
arame. This is a valuable mineral source, consumed in small
amounts (a small handful dry), and of particular value to those
vegetarians who refrain from eating dairy foods.
As strictly as possible, avoid consuming the following: chemical
preservatives, additives, colorings and flavorings, MSG, fried or
greasy foods, coffee, ice cream and excessive sugar.
The United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) has
adopted a Food Pyramid that shows food proportions for a
healthy diet. It is very similar to the food group proportions
used in Chinese Nutrition. Grains, beans, vegetables and fruits
constitute the base of the pyramid and majority of the diet,
while meat and dairy foods, eaten in small proportions, are
at the top. This shows people how to make changes in their
dietary habits and ways of looking at food.
Section Two
Foods
Please note: In this section, food is frequently measured in grams.
Twenty-eight grams = one ounce
Vegetables
Alfalfa Sprouts
Nature/Taste: cool and slightly bitter
Actions: benefits Spleen and Stomach, dispels dampness, lubri-
cates intestines
Conditions: swelling, constipation, skin lesions
Folk Remedies:
1. Swelling - boil tea and drink three times daily.
2. Constipation - eat raw alfalfa sprouts.
3. Skin lesions - apply mashed alfalfa sprouts; change
poultice 3-4 times daily.
Artichoke
Nature/Taste: sweet, bitter, cooling
Actions: regulates Liver Chi, clears Liver heat, promotes diges-
tion, benefits Liver and Gall Bladder, dries dampness
Conditions: headache, melancholy, high blood pressure, indi-
gestion, bloating, gas, abdominal pain, high cholesterol, skin
itch, dysbiosis, candidiasis, diarrhea
Folk Remedies:
1. Headache - make tea by boiling one whole artichoke
with 1/2 cup fresh peppermint leaves in 4 cups water for
20 minutes. Make sure lid is tightly covered. Drink a
cup every 3 hours until headache is relieved
2. Yeast infection/candidiasis - eat a steamed artichoke
daily for 2 weeks
3. High cholesterol - make soup with diced artichoke
hearts, sliced ginger and 1/2 head of cabbage. Eat a bowl
daily.
4. Liver problem/jaundice - make tea by boiling 1/2 cup
artichoke leaves in 4 cups water for 30 minutes. Strain
and drink 1 cup of tea 3 times a day.
25
26 ~ The Tao of Nutrition
Asparagus
Nature/Taste: cool, sweet and bitter
Actions: clears heat, detoxifies, promotes blood circulation,
clears lungs
Conditions: constipation, cancer, hypertension, high blood
cholesterol, arteriosclerosis, bronchitis
Folk Remedies:
1. High cholesterol, hypertension, and arteriosclerosis-
drink one glass daily of pureed asparagus juice, including
the pulp; add one teaspoon of honey.
2. Breast cancer - boil asparagus with dandelions; drink
the liquid and apply the solids to the area.
3. Constipation - eat asparagus with cabbage, lightly
steamed.
Bamboo Shoots
Nature/Taste: cool and sweet
Actions: strengthens the stomach, relieves food retention,
resolves mucus, promotes diuresis, cuts or emulsifies fats,
relieves alcohol intoxication, eases thirst caused by measles
Conditions: diabetes, indigestion, stomach distention and full-
ness due to greasy foods, diarrhea, dysentery, rectal prolapse,
edema
Contraindications: not to be used after giving birth as they
may trigger the cleansing of an old illness, manifesting in skin
lesions.
Folk Remedies:
1. Diarrhea, dysentery, and rectal prolapse - cook bam-
boo shoots with rice.
2. Swelling due to kidney, heart, or liver disease - drink
tea of bamboo shoots and winter melon skin.
3. Diabetes - blend bamboo shoots and celery juice, warm
up and drink one cup twice daily. Eat plenty of bamboo
shoots.
Vegetables ~ 27
4. Stomach distension and fullness - make tea from bam-
boo shoots, ginger and orange peel and drink.
Beets
Nature/Taste: cool and sweet
Actions: nourishes blood, tonifies the Heart, calms the spirit,
lubricates the intestines, cleanses the liver
Conditions: anemia, heart weakness, irritability, restlessness,
habitual constipation, herpes, liver intoxification from drugs
or alcohol
Contraindications: not for someone with a history of kidney
stones due to the oxalic acid content.
Folk Remedies:
1. Constipation - make beet soup, or combine beets with
cabbage.
2. Blood deficiency - cook beets with black beans and
peanuts.
3. Liver cleansing - drink beet top tea, or combine with
dandelions and make tea.
4. Herpes - do a three-day fast with vegetable broth* and
beet top tea.
* Basic vegetable broth for detoxification can be made by simmering
carrots and carrot tops, celery, dandelions, asparagus, and squash.
Bell Pepper
Nature/Taste: slightly warm, pungent and sweet
Actions: strengthens stomach, improves appetite, promotes
blood circulation, removes stagnant food, reduces swelling
Conditions: indigestion, decreased appetite, swelling, food
retention, frostbite
Folk Remedies:
1. Indigestion and food retention - make green pepper tea.
28 ~ The Tao of Nutrition
2. Frostbite - wash affected area in bell pepper and cinna-
mon tea, and drink the tea.
3. Decreased appetite and anorexia - mix bell pepper
with black pepper and dry fry (no oil). Or lightly fry
chunks of bell pepper with oil.
Bok (hoy
Nature/Taste: cool, pungent and sweet
Actions: clears heat, lubricates the intestines, removes stagnant
food, quenches thirst, promotes digestion
Conditions: food retention, constipation, indigestion, diabe-
tes
Folk Remedies:
1. Food retention - boil tea or soup from bok choy and
orange peel.
2. Indigestion - eat pickled bok choy.
3. Constipation - cook bok choy with beets.
4. Thirst - drink bok choy and cucumber juice.
Broccoli
Nature/Taste: cool and sweet
Actions: clears heat, promotes diuresis, brightens eyes, clears
summer heat problems. This vegetable is weak in action.
Conditions: conjunctivitis, nearsightedness, difficult urina-
tion, irritability
Folk Remedies:
1. Clear heat - eat lightly steamed broccoli.
2. Conjunctivitis (pink eye) - drink carrot and broccoli tea.
3. Urinary difficulty - combine broccoli with Chinese cab-
bage and make soup.
Burdock Root (Gobo)
Nature/Taste: cool, pungent and bitter
Vegetables ~ 29
Actions: clears heat, dispels wind, brightens vision
Conditions: common cold of the wind-heat type, sore throat,
measles, conjunctivitis, mumps
Contraindications: not to be used in cases of diarrhea.
Folk Remedies:
1. Conjunctivitis (pink eye) - boil tea and expose eyes to
the steam, then drink the tea.
2. Common cold and measles - drink burdock tea and
sweat.
3. Mumps - make burdock and dandelion tea, apply locally
and drink the tea.
Cabbage, Red or Green
Nature/Taste: cool and sweet
Actions: clears heat, lubricates intestines, stops cough
Conditions: constipation, whooping cough, hot flashes, com-
mon colds, frostbite
Folk Remedies:
1. Common cold - combine 114 head cabbage and three
green onions, boil 10 minutes and drink the liquid, and
sweat.
2. Whooping cough - make cabbage tea and add two
teaspoons of honey to lubricate the lungs, or add apricot
kernel.
3. Frostbite - wash the area in cabbage and green onion
tea.
30 ~ The Tao of Nutrition
Carrots
Nature/Taste: cool, sweet and pungent
Actions: clears heat, detoxifies, strengthens all internal organs,
benefits the eyes, relieves measles, lubricates the intestines,
promotes digestion
Folk Remedies:
1. Night blindness - drink lukewarm carrot juice.
2. Diphtheria with sore throat - drink carrot top tea.
3. Indigestion - make carrot tea and add a teaspoon of
brown sugar or maltose.
4. Measles - make tea from carrots, water chestnut, and ci-
lantro to induce eruption. It goes away after completely
erupting.
5. Skin lesions or eye weakness - make tea or juice from
carrots and carrot tops.
6. Cancer - to prevent, cook liz stick carrot with Chinese
black mushrooms and consume daily. Also drink carrot
top tea.
Cauliflower
Nature/Taste: cool and sweet
Actions: lubricates the intestines, strengthens Spleen. This
vegetable is weak in action.
Conditions: constipation, weak digestion
Folk Remedies:
1. Weak digestion - eat lightly steamed cauliflower with
bell pepper and celery.
2. Constipation - eat raw cauliflower in salad.
Celery
Nature/Taste: cool, sweet and slightly bitter
Actions: tonifies Kidney, stops bleeding, strengthens Spleen
and Stomach, clears heat, lowers blood pressure, promotes
diuresis, benefits blood
Vegetables ~ 31
Folk Remedies:
1. High blood pressure, hypertension - eat celery regu-
larly; drink three cups lightly boiled celery juice daily.
2. Diabetes - drink three cups lightly boiled celery juice
daily. Or combine celery, yam and pumpkin to make
vegetable pie.
3. Whooping Cough -lightly steam celery juice, add a
pinch of salt, drink a warm glassful at 5am and 7pm,
three days in a row.
4. Insomnia - drink celery and beet tops tea in the evening,
two hours prior to bedtime.
Chard
Nature/Taste: neutral and sweet
Actions: clears heat, detoxifies, benefits blood
Contraindications: dysentery, boils, skin lesions
Folk Remedies:
1. Dysentery - make a tea from chard and dandelion
greens.
2. Boils - mix with aloe vera juice; apply externally.
Chinese Cabbage (Napa Cabbage)
Nature/Taste: cold and sweet
Actions: clears heat, lubricates intestines, promotes diuresis
and sweating
Conditions: irritability, restlessness, constipation, difficulty
urinating
Folk Remedies:
1. Constipation or difficulty urinating - make Chinese
cabbage soup.
2. Common cold, wind-cold type - mix Chinese cabbage
and ginger, simmer into tea, and sweat.
32 ~ The Tao of Nutrition
Chinese Chive
Nature/Taste: warm and pungent
Actions: tonifies Kidneys and sexual functions, removes damp-
ness, warms up coldness
Conditions: cold stomachache, vaginal discharge, diarrhea,
bedwetting, wet dreams, absence of menstrual period
Folk Remedies:
1. For the above conditions, boil Chinese chive tea for 25-
30 minutes.
2. Weak sexual functions - cook Chinese chives with
black beans, black sesame seeds, walnuts, sour plums
and two teaspoons honey. Make into paste and take one
tablespoon, three times daily.
Cilantro Leaves (Chinese Parsley)
Nature/Taste: slightly cool, * neutral and pungent
Actions: promotes sweating, strengthens digestion, regulates
Chi flow
Conditions: measles, common cold, indigestion, lack of appe-
tite, chest and stomach fullness
Folk Remedies:
1. Measles - drink cilantro and mint tea to induce erup-
tions.
2. Common cold of the wind-cold type - drink cilantro
and ginger tea.
3. Common cold of the wind-heat type - drink cilantro
and mint tea.
4. Chi stagnation - drink cilantro and orange peel tea.
* Cilantro seeds; or coriander; are slightly warm and beneficial to
digestion.
Collards (Collard Greens)
Nature/Taste: Pungent, bitter, cooling
Vegetables ~ 33
Actions: regulates Chi, clears Liver heat, detoxifies, strength-
ens Lungs, builds strong bones
Conditions: constipation, cough, bone loss, irritability, agita-
tion, headaches, abdominal fullness
Folk Remedies:
1. Constipation - alternate eating cooked collards, cabbage
and beets on a daily basis
2. Toxin buildup - to help the liver detoxify, juice collard
greens with kale, mustard greens, carrots, celery and
cucumber. Drink 1-2 glasses daily.
3. Weak bones - make bone-building broth with organic
beef bones, collard, kale, parsley and soybeans. Season to
taste but stay low on sodium. Drink 1-2 cups of broth
daily
Corn
Nature/Taste: cool and sweet
Actions: stops bleeding, promotes diuresis, benefits gall blad-
der, lowers blood pressure, clears heat, detoxifies
Conditions: difficult urination, gallstones, hepatitis, jaundice,
hypertension, heart disease
Folk Remedies:
1. Hypertension, jaundice, and gallstones - eat corn
regularly and drink fresh cornsilk tea.
2. Detoxify and clear heat - drink cornsilk and dandelion
tea.
3. Swelling or difficulty urinating - drink cornsilk and
pearl barley tea.
4. High blood pressure - drink cornsilk and chrysanthe-
mum tea.
5. Bloody urine - drink corn and lotus root tea.
34 ~ The Tao of Nutrition
Cucumber
Nature/Taste: cool, sweet and bland - peels are bitter
Actions: clears heat, quenches thirst, relieves irritability, pro-
motes diuresis
Conditions: swelling of the extremities, jaundice, diarrhea, epi-
lepsy, sore throat, conjunctivitis
Contraindications: Eating cucumbers to excess will cause
dampness. Cucumber seeds are difficult to digest.
Folk Remedies:
1. Swelling of the extremities and jaundice - boil tea
from cucumber skins.
2. Diarrhea - use two teaspoons of dried cucumber meal
mixed with rice porridge.
3. Epilepsy - boil tea from cucumber vines.
4. Hot, scratchy, or swollen (puffy) eyes - apply grated
cucumber packs to closed eyes; leave on 20 minutes.
Daikon Radish (White Carrot)
Nature/Taste: cool, pungent and sweet
Actions: removes stagnant food, moistens lungs, resolves
mucus, quenches thirst, relieves alcohol intoxication
Conditions: bronchitis, sore throat, dry cough, coughing of
blood, painful urination, excess of mucus, alcohol intoxica-
tion, food retention
Contraindications: daikon radish neutralizes the effects of
ginseng root; avoid consuming them together
Folk Remedies:
1. Bronchitis or sore throat - make daikon juice and add
two drops of ginger juice, drink one cup lukewarm, three
times daily.
2. Dry cough with yellow sputum - take warm daikon
and water chestnut juice with one teaspoon honey.
Vegetables ~ 35
3. Burns - apply grated daikon alone or mixed with aloe
vera gel.
4. Alcohol intoxication - drink daikon juice before and
after drinking alcoholic beverages.
Dandelion Greens
Nature/Taste: cool, bitter and slightly sweet
Actions: clears heat, detoxifies, anti-tumor, benefits liver func-
tion, promotes the flow of bile, diuretic
Conditions: toxic skin lesions, insect bites, poison oak blisters,
conjunctivitis (pink eye), Liver heat rising, beginning stages
of common cold
Folk Remedies:
1. Toxic skin lesions - apply crushed, fresh leaves; change
poultice hourly.
2. Conjunctivitis (Liver heat rising) - make tea or juice.
3. Common cold - make tea from fresh dandelions (the
whole plant), mint and licorice.
4. Breast lumps and tumors - apply dandelion and ginger
poultices.
Dandelion has been found to be extremely effective inhibiting bac-
teria, virus, and fungus. It is considered to be a natural antibiotic
similar in action to goldenseal root (Hydrastis Canadensis).
Eggplant
Nature/Taste: cool and sweet
Actions: relieves pain, promotes urination, reduces swelling,
removes blood stagnation
Conditions: abdominal pain, dysentery, hot diarrhea, painful
urination, frostbite, canker sores, snake and scorpion bites,
anal bleeding, hepatitis, jaundice
Contraindications: not to be used for cold-type problems.
36 ~ The Tao of Nutrition
Folk Remedies:
1. 8 ites - apply fresh to absorb toxins.
2. Jaundice and hepatitis - eat eggplant and rice three
times daily for one week.
3. Swelling and edema - dry the eggplant and grind to
a meal; take one teaspoon in warm water three times
daily.
4. Frostbite - soak area in eggplant tea.
5. Canker sores - charcoal eggplant and apply locally.
Garlic
Nature/Taste: hot and pungent
Actions: anti-viral, anti-fungal, detoxifies meat and seafood,
kills worms, removes stagnant food and stagnant blood,
reduces abscess
Conditions: cancer, high blood cholesterol, infections, diarrhea,
dysentery, vomiting, and coughing of blood
Contraindications: not to be used with hot or dry eye disor-
ders, mouth sores or tongue ulcers.
Folk Remedies:
1. Vaginal infections - boil a bulb of garlic, cool to luke-
warm, then douche with the liquid.
2. Coughing or vomiting of blood - apply crushed,
peeled, raw garlic to the soles of both feet at the depres-
sion behind the ball of the foot, also known as rushing
spring point (Kidney 1); change the poultice every four
hours.
3. Dysentery - mash 3-5 raw cloves, mix with warm wa-
ter; drink every two hours.
4. Vomiting - cook together a bulb of garlic and three slices
ginger; mix with a teaspoon of honey and some water.
5. Antidote for crab poisoning - cook garlic with crabs or
other sea foods.
Vegetables ~ 37
6. Earache or ear infection - put a few drops of garlic oil
or juice in ear several times daily.
7. Intestinal worms - eat cooked garlic on an empty stom-
ach; resume eating three hours later.
Green Beans
Nature/Taste: warm and sweet
Actions: warms Spleen and Stomach, descends Chi, tonifies
Kidneys, benefits Chi
Conditions: burping, chest fullness and discomfort, whooping
cough, hernia in children, chronic diarrhea, back pain due to
kidney weakness
Folk Remedies:
1. Whooping cough - boil Vz cup green beans and 6 grams
licorice in 1 Vz cups water; boil down to one cup and add
two teaspoons honey. Drink the liquid.
2. Chronic diarrhea - steam green beans with rice.
3. Hernia in children - dry-fry green beans with fennel
and then grind into powder. Take Vz teaspoon, three
times daily with lukewarm water. Also can be applied as
a paste (green beans and fennel) to the navel with black
pepper.
4. Back pain - make soup with green beans, black beans,
azuki beans and a pinch of cinnamon powder.
Jerusalem Artichoke
Nature/Taste: sweet, neutral
Actions: tonifies Spleen and Lung Chi, regulates blood sugar,
promotes digestion, replenishes Yin
Conditions: hepatitis, jaundice, diabetes, hypoglycemia,
fatigue, indigestion, night sweats, frequent colds and flu
38 ~ The Tao of Nutrition
Folk Remedies:
1. Diabetes and blood sugar imbalance - make artichoke
gratin by peeling and boiling artichoke until soft. Re-
move and cut into thin slices. Bake in baking pan until
slightly brown. Eat artichoke gratin instead of starchy
foods.
2. Susceptibility to colds/flu - make artichoke soup with
generous amounts of garlic and onions and eat daily dur-
ing flu season.
Kale
Nature/Taste: warm and slightly bitter
Actions: strengthens stomach, stops pains, promotes re-growth
of tissue
Conditions: stomach or duodenal ulcers
Folk Remedies:
1. Ulcers - take V2 glass warm kale juice before each meal.
Lettuce
Nature/Taste: neutral and bland*
Actions: invigorates Chi, removes stagnation, reduces swell-
ing, and softens hardening. This vegetable is mild in action.
Conditions: skin lesions, abdominal pain, breast abscess, post-
partum abdominal pain due to blood stagnation
Folk Remedies:
1. Skin lesions, insect bites, sores with pus - apply
mashed lettuce, changing poultice three times daily; and
drink one cup of lukewarm lettuce juice, three times
daily.
2. Breast abscess - make poultice and juice with dandeli-
ons. Drink the juice and apply with gauze pad externally.
* The more bitter varieties of lettuce such as romaine or endive are
cool and drying.
Vegetables ~ 39
Lotus Root
Nature/Taste: cool and sweet
Actions: very healing, clears heat, quenches thirst, relieves
irritability, stops bleeding, strengthens stomach, promotes
diuresis, cools the blood
Conditions: difficult urination, vomiting blood, nosebleed,
blood in stool or urine, hypertension, gastritis, colitis
Folk Remedies:
1. Nosebleed and hypertension - drink lotus root juice
daily.
2. Gastritis and colitis - drink diluted lotus root juice.
3. Vomiting or defecating blood - cook 1;2 cup of lotus
root starch with V2 cup rice porridge until jelly-like con-
sistency; consume while lukewarm.
4. Blood in the urine - make tea of lotus root and bamboo
leaves.
Mushroom (Button)
Nature/Taste: slightly cool and sweet
Actions: induces measle eruptions, detoxifies, improves appe-
tite, stops diarrhea, resolves phlegm, anti-tumor
Conditions: infectious hepatitis, measles, diarrhea, cough with
copious mucus, low appetite
Folk Remedies:
1. Infectious hepatitis, decrease in white cells - eat but-
ton mushrooms in the diet or in tea.
2. Measles - boil tea from button mushrooms and drink
one cup three times daily. Or, cook with poi and drink
the broth.
Mushroom (Reishi, Ganoderma, Ling Zhi)
Nature/Taste: warm and bland
Actions: nourishes the Heart, calms the spirit, fortifies the Chi
and blood
40 ~ The Tao of Nutrition
Conditions: Heart Chi deficiency, blood deficiency leading to
insomnia, excessive dreaming, anxiety, restlessness, fatigue;
coughs, asthma, high cholesterol, high blood pressure, coro-
nary heart disease, chronic hepatitis, low white blood cell
production
Folk Remedies:
1. High blood pressure, high cholesterol - Ling Zhi
mushroom is usually consumed in powder or tea form
on a daily routine.
2. Chronic hepatitis - make tea from Ling Zhi and licorice
root.
3. Chronic bronchitis - make a tea of Ling Zhi and lily
bulbs.
4. Allergic asthma - make tea of Ling Zhi, basil, and pep-
permint.
5. Allergic rhinitis - concentrate the Ling Zhi tea, strain
through filter, then wash nose with the tea.
Mushroom (Shitake, Black)*
Nature/Taste: neutral and sweet
Actions: strengthens stomach, promotes healing, lowers blood
pressure, detoxifies, anti-tumor, lowers cholesterol
Conditions: tumor, diabetes, hypertension, slow healing, high
blood pressure, high cholesterol
Folk Remedies:
1. Tumors - boil tea from black mushrooms and drink
three times daily, continuously. This can also be used as
a preventative to stomach and cervical cancer. Used post
surgery, this remedy is believed to prevent metastasis
(spreading) of tumor cells.
2. To clean toxins in the intestines - soak some Chinese
black mushrooms, blend with the soak water; heat like
soup and take on an empty stomach. One can also add a
little ginger.
* These are also known as Chinese mushrooms.
Mushroom (White)*
Nature/Taste: cold and sweet
Vegetables ~ 41
Actions: clears summer heat, lowers blood pressure, anti-
tumor, detoxifies
Conditions: hypertension, summer irritability, and other sum-
mer heat problems, tumors
Contraindications: white mushrooms should not be used by
those with skin problems, allergies or cold stomach.
Folk Remedies:
1. High blood cholesterol or hypertension - use white
mushrooms and cornsilk to make soup or tea regularly.
2. Tumors - make mushroom soup or tea daily and drink
three cups daily.
3. Summer heat problems - eat raw mushrooms in salad.
* This is the common supermarket variety of mushroom. Seek out
mushrooms that are grown without chemicals.
Mustard Greens
Nature/Taste: warm and pungent·
Actions: relieves common colds, promotes urination, dissolves
mucus, strengthens and lubricates intestines, ventilates
Lungs, increases appetite
Conditions: difficulty urinating, coughing of blood, dysentery,
sore throat, loss of voice, copious white sputum
Folk Remedies:
1. Difficulty urinating - make tea from fresh mustard
greens and drink frequently.
2. Coughing of blood - make raw mustard greens juice,
mix with some lukewarm water and drink gradually.
3. Dysentery - charcoal mustard plant roots and grind into
meal. Mix six ounces of meal with water and add one
teaspoon of honey; drink twice daily.
42 ~ The Tao of Nutrition
4. Common cold (wind cold type) - drink tea of mustard
greens, cilantro and green onions and try to sweat.
5. Copious white sputum - drink mustard seed tea.
Onion, Leek*
Nature/Taste: wann and pungent
Actions: promotes sweating, resolves phlegm, diuretic
Conditions: common cold, acute or chronic sinus infection,
upper respiratory infection, allergies, difficulty urinating,
intestinal worms, certain types of boils and lesions
Folk Remedies:
1. Common cold - make tea from chopped onion and a
few slices of fresh ginger root, or eat the onion alone.
2. Common cold and sinus congestion in infants - rub
onion juice on baby's upper lip, under the nose, or vapor-
ize the room with steam from onion tea.
3. Chronic or acute sinus infection - before bedtime rinse
nasal passages with saline solution. Then extract onion
juice and soak two cotton balls in it. Insert into nostrils,
one at a time, and leave there for five minutes each.
4. Cough, mucus, and upper respiratory infection - put
slices of onion over the nose like a mask and inhale the
aroma for 30 minutes. Or steam the sliced onion and
apply warm as a poultice to the chest area; cover to keep
warm and leave on for 20-30 minutes.
5. Difficulty urinating - mash onion and steam it; then
apply poultice to the abdomen below the navel (CV4) as
a hot compress.
6. Intestinal worms in children - mash onion and mix
with 1-2 tablespoons sesame oil and eat on an empty
stomach twice a day for three consecutive days.
7. Boils - mash and mix with vinegar and apply to lesions.
* The properties of onion also apply to leeks.
Vegetables ~ 43
Parsley
Nature/Taste: slightly warm and pungent
Actions: promotes digestion, removes stagnant food, regulates
flow of Chi, induces measles eruption, diuretic
Conditions: food retention, indigestion, stomach and abdomi-
nal fullness, measles, seafood or meat poisoning
Contraindications: Over-consumption of parsley is not ben-
eficial for the eyes.
Folk Remedies:
1. Breast abscess - make juice from V2 pound parsley;
divide into three portions. To be taken with warm wine.
2. Measles - make parsley tea; drink and mix the tea with
wine to be used as an external wash.
3. Food retention, ingestion, and fullness - make tea of
parsley, hawthorn berries, daikon radish, and unsprayed,
dried orange peels.
Parsley is a strong food that is eaten in small amounts. Seek natu-
rally grown parsley, if possible.
Parsnip
Nature/Taste: warm and pungent
Actions: promotes sweating, dispels wind and dampness,
relieves pain, stops bleeding (when charred) *
Conditions: common cold of the wind-cold type, headache,
muscle ache, dizziness, arthritis, tetanus
Folk Remedies:
1. Common cold (wind-cold-damp type) - make parsnip
and ginger tea.
2. Arthritis of the wind-cold type - combine parsnip, cin-
namon, black pepper, and dry ginger to make a tea, and
drink. Externally, apply either mashed, fresh jalepeno
pepper or dry jalepeno mixed with some ginger tea.
* Charred parsnips used as tea are used to stop bleeding such as
coughing blood or nosebleeds.
44 ~ The Tao of Nutrition
Potato
Nature/Taste: cool and sweet
Actions: relieves ulcer pain, strengthens Spleen, harmonizes
Stomach, tonifies Chi, lubricates intestines, promotes diure-
sis, heals inflammations
Conditions: stomach and duodenal ulcers, constipation,
eczema, skin lesions, swelling, small physical stature
Contraindications: Do not eat sprouted or green potatoes
because they are slightly toxic.
Folk Remedies:
1. Ulcer pain or constipation - make raw potato juice
in the blender, mix with a small amount of honey. Take
two tablespoons every morning on an empty stomach.
Make fresh daily.
2. Eczema or other damp, exuding sores - apply raw
grated potato locally with gauze, change every three
hours.
3. Genital eczema - apply raw grated potato at night;
change six times; repeat for three days.
4. Swelling - make tea of grated potato and cucumber.
Pumpkin, Winter Squash
Winter squashes are the hard-skin varieties like acorn, butternut,
buttercup, spaghetti, and kabocha
Nature/Taste: cool and sweet
Actions: dispels dampness, reduces fever, relieves pain, stabi-
lizes hyperactive fetus, stops dysentery, benefits diabetes; the
seeds kill worms and parasites
Conditions: dysentery, diabetes, ulcerations of the lower
extremities, eczema, stomachache, the feeling of steaming
bones*, intestinal worms, antidote for opium
Folk Remedies:
1. Burns - apply fresh pumpkin alone or mixed with aloe
vera gel.
Vegetables ~ 45
2. Lower limb ulcerations - apply dried pumpkin meal.
3. Intestinal worms - take one teaspoon pumpkin seed
meal three times daily on an empty stomach.
4. Childhood vomiting - make tea from the pumpkin
stem and cap.
5. Breast cancer - charcoal the cap and grind to powder.
Take one teaspoon of the powder in one shot of rice wine
twice daily. The alcohol is a useful agent for increas-
ing circulation and removing stagnancy. The tumor is
considered to be some type of stagnant blood, Chi, or
mucus.
6. Hyperactive fetus - take one teaspoon pumpkin ash in
sweet rice porridge.
7. Diabetes - eat a slice of pumpkin with every meal or
bake pie with pumpkin, yam, and potato.
* The sensation of heat deep in the body as if there is //steam in the
bones!/ is part of a condition of Yin exhaustion. Other symptoms
include insomnia/ irritabilitv flushed cheeks/ heat (especially
severe in late afternoon or evenings)/ night sweats/ thirst/ feverish
sensation in the palms and soles.
Scallion (Green Onion)
Nature/Taste: hot* and pungent
Actions: expels external pathogens, dispels wind and cold,
induces sweating; antiviral, and antibacterial
Conditions: common cold, nasal congestion, measles, abscesses,
arthritis of the cold-type
Contraindication: Not to be used for the heat-type arthritis.
Not to be used for heat stages of common cold, characterized
by fever, extreme thirst, and yellow sputum.
Folk Remedies:
1. Common cold - make tea by lightly boiling scallions for
five minutes. Can also add basil.
46 ~ The Tao of Nutrition
2. Measles - drink scallion tea and apply raw, mashed scal-
lions to the navel to draw out the measles.
3. Abscesses - mix raw scallions with egg white and apply;
change poultice every four hours.
4. Arthritis pain - make scallion tea and soak painful area;
apply mashed, cooked scallions to painful area. Scallion
and clove tea is also good to drink.
* The white part is hot
l
the green part is warm.
Seaweed
Nature/Taste: cold and salty
Actions: softens hardenings, clears heat, detoxifies, benefits the
thyroid gland, protects from radioactivity, benefits the lym-
phatic system, promotes diuresis, provides many minerals
Conditions: swollen lymph glands, goiters, cough, lung abscess
with thick, yellow, odoriferous mucus, edema, beriberi, fibroid
tumors, cystic breasts, nodules, lumps, cancer, low thyroid
Folk Remedies:
1. Goiter - make soup from dried (preferably green) orange
peel, carrots, and seaweed.
2. Lymph tuberculosis - incorporate seaweeds into the
diet for at least two months.
3. Cough and lung abscess - powder seaweed and mix
with honey; these can be rolled into pills.
4. Lumps, nodules, and tumors - make tea from seaweed,
peach kernel and green orange peels to take internally.
Externally, make poultice of seaweed, ginger, and dande-
lion and apply locally.
There are many varieties of seaweed that can be easily incorporated
into soups, stir-fry dishes
l
etc. A delicious healthful appetizer can be
made with soaked hiziki or arame (looks like thin black noodles), a
little soy sauce
l
honeYI and rice vinegar. The variety of seaweed that
would be the least cold is nori.
Vegetables ~ 47
Snow Pea
Nature/Taste: cold and sweet
Actions: strengthens middle warmer, detoxifies, relieves vom-
iting, promotes diuresis, relieves belching, stops dysentery,
promotes lactation, quenches thirst
Conditions: chronic diarrhea, dysentery, difficulty urinating,
lower abdominal distention and fullness, diabetes, blocked
lactation, vomiting
Folk Remedies:
1. Diabetes - cook snow peas, then blend juice; drink V2
cup twice daily.
2. Hypertension - make juice from fresh snow peas; drink
1Iz cup twice daily.
3. Diarrhea - cook snow peas in sweet rice and eat it with
every meal until relieved.
4. Poor lactation - consume steamed snow peas frequently.
Soybean Sprouts
Nature/Taste: cool and sweet
Actions: promotes diuresis, clears heat
Conditions: food retention, Stomach heat, swelling, arthritis,
spasms
Folk Remedies:
1. Hypertension - boil tea for four hours; drink lukewarm,
daily over a period of one month.
2. Warts - eat only steamed soybean sprouts for three days
consecutively without eating anything else.
Spinach
Nature/Taste: cool and sweet
Actions: strengthens all organs, lubricates intestines, promotes
urination, ventilates the chest, quenches thirst
48 ~ The Tao of Nutrition
Conditions: constipation, thirst, tightness in chest, inability to
urinate, night blindness, alcohol intoxication, diabetes
Contraindications: not to be used with diarrhea or a history of
kidney stones. Also, spinach does not mix well with tofu or
dairy products due to the unhealthy combination that results
from the oxalic acid in the spinach and the high calcium foods.
This can lead to crystallized stones in the kidneys, if one is so
predisposed.
Folk Remedies:
1. Acute Conjunctivitis - simmer spinach and chrysanthe-
mum flowers; drink the liquid.
2. Night blindness - make fresh spinach juice, drink one
cup twice daily.
3. Diabetes - boil tea from spinach and chicken gizzard,
drink one cup three times daily.
4. Constipation, urinary obstruction, headache - drink
spinach soup.
Squash. Summer (Zucchini)
Summer squash includes all the soft skin varieties. See IIPumpkin II
for properties of winter squash
Nature/Taste: cool and sweet
Actions: clears heat, detoxifies, promotes diuresis, quenches
thirst, relieves restlessness
Conditions: skin lesions, difficulty urinating, edema, summer
heat, irritability, thirst
Contraindications: not to be used in beriberi or scabies.
Folk Remedies:
1. Burns - preserve cut up squash until it becomes liquid
(usually 6-12 months) and apply the liquid to the burn.
2. Edema in the extremities or the abdomen - cook
squash with vinegar until soggy and eat on empty stom-
ach or make tea from squash skin.
Vegetables ~ 49
3. Summer heat and irritability - eat squash as a salad.
4. Jaundice - drink tea made from squash skin, one cup
three times daily.
Sweet Potato. Yam
Nature/Taste: neutral and sweet
Actions: strengthens Spleen and Stomach function, tonifies
Chi, clears heat, detoxifies, increases the production of milk
Conditions: bloody stools, diarrhea, constipation, jaundice,
edema, ascites, night blindness, diabetes, breast abscess, boils,
skin lesions
Contraindications: Overeating sweet potatoes will cause gas,
heartburn, indigestion, abdominal distention and acid regur-
gitation.
Folk Remedies:
1. Night blindness - cook yam or sweet potato with ani-
mal liver (preferably goat).
2. Jaundice - cook yam soup with squash and pearl barley.
3. Shingles and breast abscess - apply grated, raw yam
locally or mix in a pinch of borax. '
4. Eczema (particularly genital eczema) - make tea with
sweet potato and a pinch of salt and bathe the area.
Sprinkle afterwards with natural talcum powder.
5. Poison insect bites - mash yam or sweet potato with
honey and apply.
6. Cirrhosis of the liver and accompanying edema in
the abdomen - apply to the navel a mixture of mashed
sweet potato and brown sugar; change hourly.
7. Diabetes - cook soup with winter melon.
8. Bloody stools - mix sweet potato powder or yam pow-
der with honey.
50 ~ The Tao of Nutrition
Taro Root
Nature/Taste: neutral, sweet and pungent
Actions: clears heat, reduces swelling, benefits Spleen, regu-
lates digestive system
Conditions: swollen lymph glands, nodules, goiters, externally
for pain from tendonitis, sprains, traumas, snake bites, bee
stings
Contraindications: If you eat too much, taro root can cause
food retention and stomach pains. Externally, can cause aller-
gic reaction in some people; an antidote for this would be to
apply fresh ginger juice. Also, it is slightly toxic raw.
Folk Remedies:
1. Externally for infections such as pleurisy, peritonitis,
appendicitis, joint pain, sciatica, back pain, arthritis
- mix peeled taro root and ginger together with flour and
water until a paste is formed. Apply to the affected area
and cover with a cloth. During winter, heat up the paste
and apply. Change daily and always apply a fresh mixture.
2. Snake bite, bees sting, and bug bites - mash taro root
with a pinch of salt and apply locally.
3. Blisters that contain fluid - charcoal taro to ash, mix
with sesame oil and apply to blister.
4. Swollen lymph glands, nodules, scrofula, goiter, and
tuberculosis -dry taro root, grind to powder, then take
equal parts of water chestnuts and jellyfish and boil into
tea. Take the liquid and mix with the taro root powder;
roll into pills the size of mung beans, take two table-
spoons of pills three times daily with warm water.
Turnip
Nature/Taste: warm, sweet, bitter and pungent
Actions: regulates Chi, dries dampness, promotes digestion,
transforms phlegm
Vegetables ~ 51
Conditions: indigestion, bloating, excess gas, wet cough, diar-
rhea, heaviness
Folk Remedies:
1. Indigestion and gas - dice 1 turnip and boil in 4 cup
of water with 3-4 pieces of tangerine or orange peel and
5 slices of fresh ginger root for 30 minutes. Strain and
drink 3 cups of liquid daily right after each meal.
2. Diarrhea and malaise - make steamed turnip cake by
grating 2 turnips, mix with 1 cup barley flour and water,
season to taste and put in cake pan and steam for an
hour in a double boiler. Eat 1/4 slice each day.
3. Productive cough - juice raw turnipl and mix with
honey and warm water. Drink 2-3 cups a day.
Water Chestnut
Nature/Taste: cold and sweet
Actions: clears heat and stops bleeding
Conditions: dry cough due to heat in the lungs with thick,
tenacious mucus, jaundice, bloody stool, excessive uterine
bleeding, antidote for lead and copper poisoning
Folk Remedies:
1. Bloody stools - juice fresh water chestnuts and mix
with equal amount of rice wine and drink three times a
day on an empty stomach. Results should be seen within
three days.
2. Excess uterine bleeding - charcoal the water chest-
nuts, powder them and take with rice wine.
3. Bronchitis, pneumonia, cough - make tea from fresh
water chestnuts and honeysuckle flowers; drink 3-5 cups
daily.
4. Lead and copper poisoning - consume daily 1 pound
of fresh water chestnuts with Y4 pound of peach kernels.
52 ~ The Tao of Nutrition
Watercress
Nature/Taste: cool and bitter
Actions: clears heat, quenches thirst, lubricates lungs, pro-
motes diuresis
Conditions: thirst, irritability, restlessness, sore and dry throat,
cough with yellow sputum
Contra indications: not to be used in cases of diarrhea.
Folk Remedies:
1. Thirst, irritability, and sore throat - drink fresh, raw
watercress juice.
2. Cough - boil tea from watercress and apricot kernels (or
almonds). Remove the apex of the apricot kernel, which
is toxic. Drink one cup three times daily.
Winter Melon
Nature/Taste: cool, sweet and bland
Actions: clears heat, detoxifies, promotes urination, quenches
thirst, relieves irritability, dispels dampness, antidote for sea-
food poisoning
Conditions: boils, skin lesions, ascites (edema in the abdomen),
difficult urination, heatstroke
Folk Remedies:
1. Hives - make tea of winter melon skin and drink.
2. Chronic nephritis - cook winter melon with poi, no salt
added.
3. Difficulty urinating - drink the fresh juice with honey.
4. Heatstroke - make winter melon soup and drink three
times daily.
5. Promote lactation - cook winter melon rind with trout.
6. Summer heat with continuous high fever - make tea
from winter melon rind and grapefruit seeds (remove
shells or crush seeds) and drink constantly.
Yam (see Sweet Potato)
Fruits
Apple
Nature/Taste: cool, sweet and slightly sour
Actions: strengthens Heart, tonifies Chi, quenches thirst,
reduces dryness, alleviates thirst, lubricates lungs, resolves
mucus
Conditions: dry throat, dehydration, indigestion, hyperten-
sion, constipation, chronic diarrhea
Folk Remedies:
1. Constipation - eat a fresh apple on an empty stomach.
2. Indigestion - eat an apple after each meal.
3. Diarrhea - take two teaspoons of powdered, dried apple
three times daily on an empty stomach.
4. Cough with yellow sputum - drink apple juice.
5. Hypertension - eat three apples a day.
6. General cleansing - fast one day a week on apples,
apple juice, and beet top tea. The apples contain pectin
that acts as a broom in our intestines.
For problems of a cold nature, bake the apples to decrease their cool-
ing properties.
Apricot
Nature/Taste: slightly cool, sweet and sour
Actions: regenerates body fluids, clears heat, detoxifies,
quenches thirst
Conditions: dehydration, thirst, cough
Contraindications: too much injures bones and tendons and
produces mucus; in children this can cause skin rashes. Not
good to eat too many during pregnancy.
Folk Remedies:
1. Summer thirst and dehydration - eat fresh apricots (no
more than 5-10).
53
54 ~ The Tao of Nutrition
2. Cough - make tea from one teaspoon of ground apricot
kernels, adding a bit of honey. The inner kernel of the
apricot seed is used to ventilate lungs, descend rebellious
Chi, lubricate intestines, relieve constipation, relieve
cough and asthma. One should remove the apex of the
kernel, which is toxic.
Avocado
Nature/Taste: sweet, cool
Actions: nourishes Yin and blood; moistens lungs, skin and
intestines
Conditions: anemia, palpitations, dry skin, constipation/dry
stools, dry cough, diabetes, menopausal hot flashes
Contraindications: diarrhea
Folk Remedies:
1. Anemia and palpitations - eat 1/2 an avocado daily for
one month. Retest to monitor progress.
2. Constipation and dry skin - make a shake with 1/2
avocado, 1 banana, 1/2 cup of yogurt with 1 cup of al-
mond milk. Drink for breakfast.
3. Menopausal hot flashes - make avocado ice cream
with soymilk by blending 1 avocado with I cup of soy-
milk until smooth and put in freezer. Eat one scoop each
day until hot flashes abate.
Banana
Nature/Taste: cold and sweet
Actions: clears heat, lubricates lungs, lubricates intestines, low-
ers blood pressure, helps alleviate alcohol intoxication
Conditions: constipation, thirst, cough, hemorrhoids, hyper-
tension, alcohol intoxication
Contraindications: not to be used in cold conditions.
Folk Remedies:
1. Hemorrhoids and constipation - eat a banana every
day on an empty stomach.
Fruits ~ 55
2. Hypertension - drink organic banana peel tea.
3. Cough - cook banana with a bit of sugar. Note, this may
not be appropriate of Americans who already consume
about 120 pounds of sugar a year. If honey is substituted,
do not cook the honey.
Blueberry
Nature/Taste: sour, sweet, warm
Actions: tonifies Kidneys, nourishes blood, astringes Chi, slows
agmg process
Conditions: poor concentration, memory decline, kidney weak-
ness, frequent urination, anemia
Folk Remedies:
1. Poor concentration/ADD: incorporate 1/4 cup of either
fresh or frozen blueberries into breakfast daily for 2-4
weeks
2. Memory decline: make trail mix of equal portions of
dried blueberries, walnuts, pine nuts, goji/lycii berries
and pumpkin seeds
3. Anemia and Kidney weakness: mix together dried
blueberries, raisins and figs and eat a handful
Cantaloupe
Nature/Taste: cold and sweet
Actions: clears heat, quenches thirst, relieves summer heat
problems, eases urination
Conditions: summer heat thirst, lung abscess, irritability
Contraindications: not for cold conditions, history of cough-
ing or vomiting blood, diarrhea, ulcers, heart disease, or weak
stomach. Melons may upset stomach if eaten with other food
and should be eaten alone.
Folk Remedies:
1. To induce vomiting - take dried, ground cantaloupe
seeds in warm water.
56 ~ The Tao of Nutrition
Cherry
Nature/Taste: warm and sweet
Actions: benefits skin and overall body, rejuvenates, strength-
ens Spleen, stimulates appetite, stops dysentery and diarrhea,
quenches thirst, regenerates fluids, stops involuntary seminal
emissions, prolongs life
Conditions: measles, burns, diarrhea, dysentery, thirst, prema-
ture ejaculation
Contraindications: eaten in excess will cause nausea, vomit-
ing, skin lesions and cause a person to feel hot. This injures
the bones and tendons.
Folk Remedies:
1. Measles - drink fresh warmed cherry juice.
2. Burns - apply locally.
3. Enlarged thyroid or goiter - soak cherry pits in vinegar
until they disintegrate, then apply locally.
4. Hernia pain - fry cherry pits with vinegar, mash to
powder; take one teaspoon per dose.
Chinese Dates (Red or Black Jujube)
Nature/Taste: neutral* and sweet
Actions: strengthens Spleen, tonifies Yin, nourishes the body,
tonifies blood, lubricates lungs, stops coughs, stops diarrhea,
harmonizes within the body or within an herb formula. For
example, dates and licorice can reduce the harshness of a food
or herb and unite the combination into action.
Conditions: Yin deficiency, weak digestion, cough, night
sweats, weakness, anemia, blood in urine, diarrhea, bruises,
nervous hysteria
Contraindications: too much creates mucus, distended stom-
ach, and is hard on the teeth.
Folk Remedies:
1. Blood in urine - drink red date tea.
Fruits ~ 57
2. Spontaneous sweating - boil tea from ten red dates and
ten preserved plums.
* Black dates are slightly warming.
Chinese Prune
These prunes are made from half ripened plums and have a sour fla-
vor. They are more beneficial therapeutically than the sweet variety
that is made from fully ripened plums.
Nature/Taste: warm and sour
Actions: astringes intestines, stops diarrhea, kills worms, stops
cough, consolidates the Lungs, quenches thirst, promotes
body fluids. The sweet prunes quench thirst, promote body
fluids, and moisten the intestines.
Folk Remedies:
1. Dysentery - for both prevention (as before a trip to a
third-world country) and treatment, brew prune tea and
take before meals on an empty stomach.
2. Intestinal worms - make tea with prunes and black
pepper.
3. Fish bones stuck in the throat - brew concentrated
prune tea and add an equal part of rice vinegar; drink
slowly. The herb clematis, powdered and mixed with rice
vinegar could be given in an emergency, to dissolve a fish
bone.
4. Summer heat irritability - drink prune juice.
Coconut
Nature/Taste: warm * and sweet
Actions: strengthens the body, reduces swelling, stops bleed-
ing, kills worms, activates heart function
Conditions: weakness, nosebleeds, intestinal or skin worms
Folk Remedies:
1. Worms - every morning on an empty stomach, drink the
juice and eat the meat of V2 coconut; wait three hours
before eating anything else.
58 ~ The Tao of Nutrition
2. Edema due to weak heart - drink plenty of coconut
JUICe.
* The milk inside of the coconut is neutral and sweet.
Cranberry
Nature/Taste: Sour, cooling
Actions: promotes urination, relieves painful urination,
strengthens Kidneys and reproductive system
Conditions: frequent urination, painful burning urination,
incontinence, Kidney weakness, kidney stones, infertility
Contraindications: gastric acid reflux
Folk Remedies:
1. Bladder infection - drink 1 cup cranberry juice (prefer-
ably unsweetened and diluted) along with 1,000 mg.
vitamin C every 3-4 hours a day. Drink an additional 5-6
cups of water daily. If symptoms persist beyond 3 days
or lower back pain begins, see your doctor immediately.
2. Kidney stones and bladder infection prevention -
drink 1 cup of unsweetened cranberry juice along with 8
glasses of water daily. Avoid high oxalate foods such as
spinach, chard and beet greens.
3. Infertility - make a fertility-enhancing trail mix consist-
ing of equal parts of dried cranberries, walnuts, sesame
seeds, longan fruit, and cashews.
Fig
Nature/Taste: cool and sweet
Actions: clears heat, lubricates lungs and intestines, stop diar-
rhea
Conditions: dry cough, dry throat, Lung heat, constipation,
indigestion, hemorrhoids, prolapse of the rectum
Folk Remedies:
1. Lung-heat symptoms - make tea from figs (preferably
fresh).
Fruits ~ 59
2. Hemorrhoids - bathe area in fig tea.
3. Asthma - blend fig juice and drink three times daily.
4. Hernia - drink fig and fennel tea.
Goji Berry (Lycium Berry or Gou Qi Zi)
Nature/Taste: sweet, sour, neutral
Actions: nourishes blood and Yin, strengthens the Lungs, ben-
efits Liver and Kidney, improves vision, stop cough
Conditions: vision decline, anemia, lower back pain, Impo-
tence, tinnitus, chronic dry cough, diabetes
Contraindication: fevers, common cold and flu
Folk Remedies:
1. Vision decline or diabetes - make vision enhancing
trail mix with equal parts of dried goji berry, plums,
sunflower seeds, pistachios and pine nuts. Eat a small
handful daily as a snack.
2. Anemia - traditional Chinese blood tonic recipe calls for
making chicken soup with 1/4 cup of dried goji berries,
red jujube date, dang gui root, astragalus root and fresh
ginger root. Eat daily until anemia improves.
3. Tinnitus - make tea by boiling 1/4 cup dried goji berries
and 1/2 cup chrysanthemum blossoms in 4 cups of water
for 15 minutes. Strain immediately and drink 3 cups daily.
Grape
Nature/Taste: warm, sweet and sour
Actions: very tonifying (particularly the red or purple varieties),
nourishes blood, strengthens bones and tendons, tonifies Chi,
harmonizes Stomach, promotes diuresis, relieves irritability
Conditions: cold type arthritis, tendonitis, painful urination,
hepatitis, jaundice, anemia, flu
Contraindications: Wine should not be combined with fatty
foods because it can result in phlegm and heat that rises to
the heart and can cause strokes and heart attacks. Also, exces-
sive consumption of grapes leads to constipation or diarrhea.
60 ~ The Tao of Nutrition
Folk Remedies:
1. Anemia - eat raisins.
2. Arthritis (cold type) and tendonitis - make grape vine
tea and add some wine. The moderate use of wine can be
of benefit in cold environments and cold conditions.
3. Hepatitis and jaundice - make grape tea.
4. Flu - drink grape juice.
Grapefruit
Nature/Taste: cold, sweet and sour
Actions: strengthens stomach, aids digestion, circulates Chi,
detoxifies alcohol intoxication
Conditions: decreased appetite, weak digestion, stomach full-
ness, alcohol intoxication, dry cough
Contraindication: grapefruit and grapefruit juice can interfere
with certain medications including anti-hypertensives, statin
drugs, antihistamines, and drugs that decrease anxiety. Con-
sult with your doctor or pharmacist before consuming grape-
fruit if you are taking any medications.
Folk Remedies:
1. Dry cough - cook four grapefruit slices with either pork
or cabbage.
2. Chronic cough - make tea from about 20 grapefruit
seeds, adding a bit of honey; drink three times daily.
3. Jaundice and stomach distention - char and powder
grapefruit peel; * take a teaspoon with warm water three
times daily.
4. Gastritis or inflammation of the stomach - make tea
from aged grapefruit peel, green tea leaves, and two slices
of fresh ginger; drink all day.
5. Frostbite - wash or soak area in grapefruit peel tea.
Fruits ~ 61
* Grapefruit peel is warming and can be used to dispel cold, regu-
late C h / ~ aid digestion, dry dampness, resolve sputum, and aid
wind-cold cough, stomach distention and scratchy throat. Make
tea from the dried peel.
Hawthorn Berry
Nature/Taste: slightly warm, sweet and sour
Actions: strengthens Spleen, removes stagnant food, invigo-
rates blood, dissolves sputum, relieves stagnant Chi, aids
digestion
Conditions: food stagnation (especially meat), bloody stools,
abdominal pain, absence of menstruation due to blood stag-
nation, poor appetite, hypertension, high cholesterol
Folk Remedies:
1. Child with no appetite - give berries or tea daily.
2. Hypertension - drink tea daily.
Lemon, Limes
Nature/Taste: cool and sour
Actions: regenerates body fluids, harmonizes Stomach, regu-
lates Chi, quenches thirst, benefits Liver
Conditions: sore throat, dry mouth, stomach distention, cough
Folk Remedies:
1. Hypertension - make tea from one peeled lemon, ten
fresh water chestnuts, and 21;2 cups of water; drink once
daily.
2. Sore throat - drink lemon tea with honey.
3. Regulate Chi, benefit Liver - squeeze a half lemon in
warm water and drink every morning.
Litchi Fruit (Lychee)
Nature/Taste: warm, sweet and astringent
Actions: nourishes blood, calms spirit, soothes Liver, regulates
Chi
62 ~ The Tao of Nutrition
Conditions: hernia, weak and deficient conditions, irritability,
restless heart
Contraindications: over-consumption can lead to nosebleed,
feverish sensation, thirst. Not to be used in any type of heat
condition.
Folk Remedies:
1. Weak conditions, blood deficiency - take dried litchi
and black jujube date (seven of each) and boil tea; drink
daily.
2. Bedwetting - eat ten dried litchis daily.
3. Nausea, vomiting, burping, and belching - take dried
litchi with the kernel, charcoal powder and take with
warm water.
4. Bleeding after birth or abortion - take seven dried
litchis, mash and boil with two cups of water; reduce to
one cup, drink three times daily until the bleeding stops.
5. Hernia - take litchi kernel, bake and grind to powder;
take one teaspoon on an empty stomach daily. Or, grind
the litchi kernel, mix with rice wine and take every
morning on an empty stomach.
Loquat
Nature/Taste: neutral, sweet and sour
Actions: lubricates dryness, stops cough, harmonizes Stomach,
descends rebellious Chi, calms the Liver
Conditions: dry mouth, thirst, irritability, dry cough, nausea,
vomiting
Folk Remedies:
1. Vomiting and nausea - boilloquats to make tea.
2. Cough - eat fresh loquats.
Fruits ~ 63
Mango
Nature/Taste: neutral, sweet and sour
Actions: regenerates body fluids, stops cough, stops thirst,
strengthens stomach
Conditions: cough, thirst, poor digestion, enlarged prostate,
nausea
Contraindications: Overeating mangos can cause itching or
skin eruptions.
Folk Remedies:
1. Enlarged prostate - boil mango peel and seed into tea.
2. Weak digestion - drink mango juice.
Mulberry
Nature/Taste: slightly cold and sweet
Actions: quenches thirst, detoxifies, nourishes blood, tonifies
Kidneys, lubricates lungs, relieves constipation, calms the
spirit, promotes urination
Conditions: thirst, irritability, dry mouth, diabetes, anemia,
constipation, back pain due to Kidney weakness, alcohol
intoxication, lymph node enlargement, blurred vision
Folk Remedies:
1. Cough - take two teaspoons of mulberry syrup twice
daily. The syrup can be made by cooking mulberries on
low flame until they dissolve, then adding honey and
cooking down to a thick syrup.
2. Constipation - drink mulberry juice.
3. Insomnia - boil mulberry tea and drink Vz cup.
Orange
Nature/Taste: cool, sweet and sour
Actions: lubricates lungs, resolves mucus, increases appetite,
strengthens Spleen, quenches thirst, promotes body fluids
Conditions: thirst, dehydration, stagnant Chi, hernia
64 ~ The Tao of Nutrition
Folk Remedies:
1. Cough with copious mucus - cook the orange and eat it.
2. Stuck mucus, stagnant Chi, chest fullness or disten-
tion- make tea from unsprayed, dried orange peeL *
3. Chi stagnation, prostate enlargement and hernia -
make tea from orange seeds.
* Orange peel is warm, bitter and pungent, and is used to invigorate
the movement of Chi and dry dampness.
Papaya
Nature/Taste: neutral, sweet and sour
Actions: strengthens Stomach and Spleen, aids digestion, clears
summer heat, lubricates lungs, stops cough, aids irritability,
kills worms, increases milk production
Conditions: cough, indigestion, stomachache, eczema, skin
lesions, intestinal worms
Folk Remedies:
1. Increasing lactation - put fresh papaya in fish soup.
2. Cough - peel and steam papaya, then add honey.
3. Stomachache and indigestion - cook papaya and eat
with or after meals.
4. Intestinal worms - sun dry green papaya, powder, and
take two teaspoons on an empty stomach every morn-
ing.
5. Skin lesions - apply fresh papaya.
Dried papaya is warm, sweet and sour. It is used to invigorate and
activate the channels, aid digestion, and resolve dampness.
Peach
Nature/Taste: very cool, sweet and slightly sour
Actions: lubricates lungs, clears heat, aids diabetes, promotes
body fluids, induces sweating
Conditions: diabetes, dry cough, intestinal worms, vaginitis
Fruits ~ 65
Contraindications: not to be used with damp and cold condi-
tions.
Folk Remedies:
1. Inducing sweating or killing worms - drink peach leaf
tea.
2. Promoting blood circulation - make tea from the
innermost seed, the kernel.
3. Dry cough - eat fresh peaches.
4. Vaginitis - douche with peach leaf tea.
Pear Apple (Asian Pear)
Nature/Taste: cold and sweet
Actions: regenerates body fluids, quenches thirst, calms the
Heart, lubricates lungs, relieves restlessness, promotes urina-
tion, clears heat, detoxifies, lubricates the throat, dissolves
mucus, descends Chi and stops cough
Conditions: cough due to heat in the lungs, excess mucus, irri-
tability, thirst, dry throat, hoarse throat, retina pain, consti-
pation, difficult urination, skin lesions, alcohol intoxication
Con tra indica tions: not to be used with cold stomach and
Spleen, manifesting as cold extremities or diarrhea. Also, not
to be used by pregnant women, or in cases of anemia.
Folk Remedies:
1. Cough and bronchitis - core the pear and steam it; eat
3-4 times daily. Pear can also be cooked with scallions.
2. Cough with yellow phlegm - core pear, and fill with
3 grams powdered fritillaria bulb (Chuan Bei Mu) and a
little rock sugar or brown sugar; steam about 30 minutes
and eat completely.
3. Acute voice loss - peel and juice 2-3 pears, adding two
teaspoons of honey.
4. Whooping cough - core the pear and insert 1h gram of
ephedra; steam, then remove the herb and eat the pear.
5. Nausea, belching - core the pear and insert 10-15
cloves; steam, then remove the cloves and eat the pear.
66 ~ The Tao of Nutrition
6. Alcohol intoxication - drink pear juice or tea to prevent
hangover.
Domestic pear has the same properties as the Asian pear but is
milder.
Persimmon
Nature/Taste: cool, sweet and astringent
Actions: lubricates lungs, stops cough with heat, dissolves
sputum, strengthens Spleen, stops diarrhea, quenches thirst,
clears heat
Conditions: pain in the throat due to heat, cough, thirst, vom-
iting blood, dysentery, alcohol intoxication
Contraindications: Do not eat persimmons along with crabs,
because the combination produces extreme diarrhea.
Folk Remedies:
1. Vomiting or coughing blood - cook a partially ripened
persimmon in rice wine for ten minutes; eat the persim-
mon. Another remedy is to take dried, charred persim-
mon powder in warm water.
2. Bleeding ulcers and lower intestinal bleeding - take
dried, charred, powdered persimmon in warm water
(about a tablespoon of the powder).
3. Hypertension - drink three glasses of unripened persim-
mon juice daily.
4. Nausea and vomiting - add dried persimmon to water
to make a mush, steam it and take two tablespoons three
times daily for 3-4 days or until condition ceases. Cloves
could be a good addition; or make persimmon cap and
cloves tea.
5. Alcohol intoxication - drink persimmon juice or tea.
6. Ulcerated skin lesions - apply a combination of charred
persimmon powder and black pepper.
Fruits ~ 67
Pineapple
Nature/Taste: warm, sweet and sour
Actions: aids digestion, stops diarrhea, dispels summer heat
Conditions: heatstroke, irritability, thirst, indigestion, diar-
rhea
Contraindications: Pineapples are slightly toxic; this can be
neutralized by washing with salt water. Pineapple is also said
to generate dampness, so not to be used in those conditions.
Folk Remedies:
1. Heat stroke and irritability - drink fresh pineapple
JUice.
2. Nephritis (kidney inflammation) - make tea from
peeled pineapple and reed roots; drink freely throughout
the day.
3. Bronchitis - boil tea of pineapple and add honey.
4. Dysentery - boil tea of pineapple.
Plum
Nature/Taste: slightly warm, sweet and sour
Actions: stimulates appetite, aids digestion, regulates body flu-
ids, stops thirst, softens or soothes the Liver, removes stagna-
tion of Chi, removes the feeling of steaming bones (see pg. 44)
Conditions: dehydration, thirst, Chi stagnation, erratic energy
flow, poor digestion, dysentery
Contraindication: Too many plums are not good for the
teeth.
Folk Remedies:
1. Dysentery - drink plum skin tea.
Pomegranate
Nature/Taste: Sour, astringent, slightly warming
Actions: Astringes intestines, stops diarrhea, nourishes blood,
Yin and fluids
68 ~ The Tao of Nutrition
Conditions: chronic diarrhea, anemia, incontinence, nocturnal
emission, thirst, diabetes
Contraindications: common cold, flu, constipation
Folk Remedies:
1. Diabetes and excess thirst - make fresh pomegranate
and cucumber juice with a juicer and drink 1 glass daily.
Don't drink sweetened pomegranate juice.
2. Incontinence - mix equal portions of pomegranate and
cranberry juices and drink 2 glasses daily
3. Diarrhea - ground dried pomegranates into powder and
take 1 tsp with warm water 3 times a day. Alternatively,
take pure pomegranate capsules instead.
Raspberry
Nature/Taste: slightly warm, sweet and sour
Actions: tonifies Liver and Kidneys, astringes essence, astringes
urination, brightens the eyes
Conditions: Kidney and Liver deficiency, blurry vision, sper-
matorrhea, involuntary seminal emission, frequent urination
Folk Remedies:
1. Impotence and involuntary seminal emission - take
dry raspberries, charcoal and grind to powder; take three
teaspoons every night before bed with some rice wine.
2. Bedwetting or frequent urination - take charcoaled,
raspberry powder, make tea and drink before bedtime
every night.
3. Eczema, skin lesions, and fungus conditions - boil
fresh raspberries to a concentrate; wash area with this.
Raspberry leaf is very strengthening to the female system, and can
be used throughout pregnancy, as well as other phases of a woman's
life. It is generally taken as tea.
Fruits ~ 69
Strawberry
Nature/Taste: cool, sweet and sour
Actions: lubricates lungs, promotes body fluids, strengthens
Spleen, detoxifies in alcohol intoxication
Conditions: dry cough, sore throat, difficult urination, food
retention, lack of appetite
Folk Remedies:
1. Dry cough - mash strawberries with brown sugar; steam
and eat three times daily.
2. Dry throat, thirst, hoarse voice, sore throat - take
one glass fresh strawberry juice twice daily.
3. Difficult urination - mash fresh strawberries, add cold
water; drink three times daily.
4. Lack of appetite, food retention, abdominal disten-
tion and pain - eat five strawberries before each meal.
Tangerine
Nature/Taste: warm, sweet and sour
Actions: carminative, opens the channels, strengthens the
stomach, stops cough
Conditions: nausea, vomiting, cough, excess white or clear
mucus, chest tightness, rib pain
Folk Remedies:
1. Nausea, vomiting, stomach discomfort - make tea
from unsprayed tangerine peels, * fresh ginger root and
cardamom seeds.
2. Chest fullness, pain in ribs - use tangerine fruit com-
bined with rice wine and water to make a tea.
3. Hernia, testicular pain - roast equal parts of tangerine
seeds and fennel seeds; grind to powder. Take 3-6 grams
with warm sake before bed.
* Tangerine peel is warm, pungent and bitteri carminative, arrests
cough, strengthens stomach and resolves phlegm.
70 ~ The Tao of Nutrition
Tomato
Nature/Taste: slightly cool, sweet and sour
Actions: promotes body fluids, quenches thirst, strengthens
stomach, aids digestion, cools blood, clears heat, detoxifies,
calms the Liver, removes stagnant food
Conditions: Liver heat rising, hypertension, bloodshot eyes,
dehydration, indigestion due to low stomach acid, food reten-
tion, kidney infection
Folk Remedies:
1. Hypertension and eye hemorrhage - eat two raw to-
matoes on an empty stomach, every day for one month;
also avoid spicy foods.
2. Kidney disease - eat at least one raw tomato per day.
3. Indigestion and food retention - eat half or one whole
fresh tomato after meals.
Watermelon
Nature/Taste: cold and sweet
Actions: quenches thirst, relieves irritability, dispels summer
heat problems, promotes diuresis, detoxifies
Conditions: sores, dry mouth, summer heat irritability, bloody
dysentery, jaundice, edema, difficult urination
Contraindication: Not to be used in cold conditions, with
weak stomach or with excessive urination
Folk Remedies:
1. Edema from nephritis - boil tea from the rind and the
inner portion.
2. Jaundice - boil tea from the rind and red beans.
3. Fluid in the abdomen - make tea from the skins of
watermelon, squash, and winter melon.
4. Constipation - boil tea from watermelon seeds or grind
into meal and take with warm water.
Grains
Amaranth
Nature/Taste: sweet, bitter, warming
Actions: tonifies Chi, nourishes blood, strengthens Spleen,
reduces dampness, calms spirit
Conditions: fatigue, dizziness, anemia, diarrhea, bloating,
insomnia, anxiety
Folk Remedies:
1. Fatigue or anemia - substitute amaranth, which is rich
in iron, for other grains in your diet.
2. Diarrhea or bloating - avoid all gluten-containing
grains such as wheat, barley, rye and oats. Cook ama-
ranth with brown rice and use them as a staple.
3. Anxiety or insomnia - toast 1/4 cup amaranth in oven
until slightly brown, remove and steep in a cup of hot
water for 5 minutes and sip for immediate relief of anxi-
ety or before bedtime for insomnia.
Barley
Nature/Taste: sweet, cooling
Actions: tonifies Chi, promotes urination, reduces dampness,
soothes irritation in the digestive system and urinary tract
Conditions: indigestion, bloating, diarrhea, swelling, painful
urination, fatigue
Folk Remedies:
1. Indigestion, bloating and gas pain: boill!2 cup of
barley with 5 slices of fresh ginger root in 4 cups of water
for 30 minutes. Strain, and drink 3 cups daily.
2. Fatigue and swelling during summer heat: toast bar-
ley; combine with an equal amount of green tea. Steep 1
tbsp. of mixture in 1 cup hot water and drink 2 cups a day.
71
72 ~ The Tao of Nutrition
3. Painful urination: boil 114 cup barley, 114 cup mung
beans and a handful of corn silk in 4 cups of water for
30 minutes. Strain and drink 3 cups for up to 3 days. If
symptoms persist, see your doctor immediately.
4. Detoxification: take 2 tbsp. barley greens powder in 1
cup of water on empty stomach daily for cleansing of
bowels and general detoxification.
Buckwheat
Nature/Taste: neutral and sweet
Actions: descends Chi, strengthens stomach, stops dysentery,
lowers blood pressure, strengthens blood vessels
Conditions: chronic diarrhea, dysentery, spontaneous sweat-
ing, hypertension, skin lesions
Folk Remedies:
1. Skin lesions - boil buckwheat tea and wash area with it.
Or, roast buckwheat, grind to powder and mix with rice
vinegar to make a paste; then apply to area.
2. Leukorrhea and chronic diarrhea - grind roasted buck-
wheat, mix with warm water and take two teaspoons
twice daily.
3. High blood pressure - make tea from buckwheat and
lotus root.
4. Hemorrhoids - mix rooster bile with buckwheat meal
and roll in pill form. Take one teaspoon of pills twice
daily.
Cornmeal
Nature/Taste: neutral and sweet
Actions: tonifies Chi, strengthens the Stomach and Spleen,
benefits the Heart, diuretic, stimulates the flow of bile
Conditions: weak digestion, heart disease, high blood pressure,
edema, gallstones
Grains ~ 73
Folk Remedies:
1. Weak digestion - make a soupy porridge with corn-
meal. This is an easy to digest meal for recovery from the
flu or cold.
2. Edema, difficult urination, hypertension - eat corn-
meal regularly and drink corns ilk tea.
Fresh corn and corns ilk are cooling and more diuretic than dried
cornmeal.
Kamut
Nature/Taste: sweet, cooling
Actions: tonifies Chi, strengthens Spleen and Stomach, regu-
lates Chi, reduces bloating
Conditions: low appetite, abdominal distention and fullness,
diarrhea, muscle fatigue, underweight
Folk Remedies:
1. Underweight - incorporate kamut into diet as a daily
staple
2. Muscle fatigue - eat kamut cereall!2 hour before exer-
cising or exerting muscle
3. Abdominal distention - cook kamut with tangerine
peel, fennel and ginger.
Kamut, as well as spelt, is an ancient cousin of wheat that tends
to create less allergic reactions, but those sensitive to gluten should
avoid kamut.
Millet
Nature/Taste: cool and sweet
Actions: stops vomiting, relieves diarrhea, consolidates or
astringes the stomach and intestines, clears heat, promotes
urination, soothes morning sickness
Folk Remedies:
1. Morning sickness and vomiting - eat millet porridge as
a regular staple; may add fresh ginger.
74 ~ The Tao of Nutrition
2. Diarrhea - roast millet until aromatic; eat Y2 cup three
times daily.
3. Obstructed urination - boil tea from millet and add Y2
teaspoon brown sugar.
4. Diabetes - steam millet with yams and jujube dates.
Oats
Nature/Taste: warm and sweet
Actions: strengthens Spleen, tonifies and regulates Chi, har-
monizes Stomach, carminative, stops lactation (sprouted
form only)
Conditions: lack of appetite, indigestion, abdominal distention
and fullness, dysentery, swelling
Folk Remedies:
1. Stop lactation - boil sprouted oats or sprouted barley
tea and drink one cups three times daily. Or, use barley
malt as a sweetener in the diet.
2. Swelling - cook oats and azuki or mung beans to a
mush.
3. Postpartum urinary and bowel obstruction - roast
sprouted oats, grind into meal, take two teaspoons three
times a day with lukewarm water.
4. Hepatitis - make tea from sprouted oats and dried
orange peels; drink one cup three times daily.
Pearl Barley (Job's Tears, Coix)
Nature/Taste: cool and bland
Actions: promotes diuresis, strengthens Spleen, benefits gall
bladder, clears heat, detoxifies
Conditions: swelling, indigestion, diarrhea, jaundice, tumors,
dysuria
Folk Remedies:
1. For quitting coffee - substitute roasted barley tea for
coffee.
Grains ~ 75
2. Swelling - eat pearl barley soup.
3. Heat and damp conditions - make a soupy porridge of
mung beans and pearl barley, eat daily.
4. Heat conditions and skin lesions - blend barley and
water, boil, and drink the liquid.
5. Skin lesions with pus discharge - sprinkle pearl barley
powder locally.
6. Acne - mix pearl barley powder with aloe vera gel to
make a facial mask, apply every night before bed. Leave
on overnight and wash off with water on the morning.
Pearled (hulled) barley-the common variety found in supermarkets-
is smaller and milder than the Chinese herb variety. Coix has a
stronger taste and is more diuretic.
Quinoa
Nature/Taste: sweet, warming
Actions: tonifies Chi, strengthens Spleen, warms Yang, relieves
internal coldness
Conditions: fatigue, weak digestion, obesity, low resistance to
colds, loose bowels
Folk Remedies:
1. Fatigue or obesity - substitute quinoa for all other
grains except amaranth
2. Weak digestion and diarrhea - toast 2 tbsp quinoa
until slightly brown, steep in hot water with 3 slices of
ginger and a pinch of cardamom
3. Frequent colds - to strengthen resistance, add 1 tbsp
bee pollen, lemon juice from 1/2 of a lemon and 1 tbsp of
honey into daily quinoa cereal in the morning
Rice, Brown
Nature/Taste: neutral and sweet
Actions: strengthens Spleen, nourishes Stomach, quenches
thirst, relieves irritability, astringes intestines, stops diarrhea
76 ~ The Tao of Nutrition
Conditions: indigestion, diarrhea, vomiting, nausea, summer
heat irritability
Folk Remedies:
1. Bloody dysentery - cook brown rice with a persimmon
cap; eat the rice.
2. Digestive aid - eat fermented rice cake after each meal.
3. Child regurgitating mother's milk - roast rice until
overdone (brownish-black), add water and cook; give the
child the fluid.
4. Diarrhea - grind rice, charcoal and take 1-2 teaspoons
each time, three times daily.
5. Anorexia and digestive weakness - 1;2 cup over-done
rice (bottom of pot) mixed with cardamom, fennel and
orange peel, and cooked into porridge.
6. Difficulty urinating - consume rice porridge continu-
ously for one month.
Rice, Sweet
Nature/Taste: warm and sweet
Actions: warms Spleen and Stomach, tonifies Chi, astringes
urine
Conditions: stomach pains due to cold, diabetes, frequent uri-
nation, obesity, anemia
Contraindications: Eating too much will cause indigestion.
Folk Remedies:
1. Obesity - eat sweet rice cake (mochi); a small amount is
very filling.
2. Indigestion - make tea from malt and sweet rice
sprouts.
3. Anemia, lung tuberculosis - cook sweet rice porridge
with red dates and pearl barley and eat regularly.
4. Spontaneous sweating - dry-roast sweet rice and
wheat bran, grind into meal; take one tablespoon three
times daily.
Grains ~ 77
5. Stomach pains due to cold, diarrhea - make sweet
rice porridge with yams, lotus seeds, Chinese red dates,
and a pinch of pepper.
Rice. White
Nature/Taste: slightly cool and sweet
Actions: moistens Yin, clears heat, diuretic, reduces swelling
Conditions: febrile diseases, swelling, vomiting of blood, nose-
bleeds, nausea
Folk Remedies:
1. Chronic gastritis - burn rice, powder it and take twice
daily with ginger tea before meals for three consecutive
days, followed by a liquid diet, avoiding cold, raw and
oily foods.
2. Vomiting due to febrile disease - consume rice por-
ridge.
3. Food retention - wash rice thoroughly, then bring rice
to a boil, add aloe vera juice and drink the liquid. This
will produce a loose stool and reduction of the stomach
distress.
Rice Bran
Nature/Taste: neutral and sweet
Actions: dispels dampness, diuretic
Conditions: mild edema in legs and feet, high cholesterol
Folk Remedies:
1. High cholesterol - add rice bran to a grain dish every
day for at least two months.
Rye
Nature/Taste: neutral and sweet
Actions: arrests perspiration due to weakness, strengthens
stomach, fortifies Chi
78 ~ The Tao of Nutrition
Conditions: fatigue, lethargy, night or day sweats due to weak-
ness, fetal retention (baby has died but is not yet expelled by
mother)
Folk Remedies:
1. Weakness type perspiration - boil whole rye for 15-20
minutes, add molasses and drink the liquid.
2. Feta I retention - make tea from the entire rye plant
and raspberry leaves, and drink as much as possible.
Spelt
Nature/Taste: sweet, slightly bitter, warm
Actions: tonifies Chi, activates blood, strengthens Spleen,
clears dampness, calms spirit
Conditions: tiredness, high cholesterol, obesity, restlessness
Contraindications: gluten-sensitive patients may react to
spelt. However, this is an ancient cousin of wheat that tends
to create less allergic reactions than wheat.
Folk Remedies:
1. High cholesterol - switch to whole grains like spelt,
quinoa and amaranth and take fiber supplements
2. Obesity - eat spelt and oat bran cereals and eliminate all
refined starch from diet
3. Restlessness - toast 1/4 cup of spelt until slightly brown
and steep in 1 cup of hot water with 1 tbsp. of chamo-
mile for 3-5 minutes. Drink throughout the day.
Wheat
Nature/Taste: slightly cool and sweet
Actions: clears heat, quenches thirst, relieves restlessness, pro-
motes diuresis, calms spirit, stops sweating
Conditions: dry mouth and throat, swelling, difficult urina-
tion, insomnia, irritability, restlessness, menopause, sponta-
neous sweating, night sweats, diarrhea, burns
Grains ~ 79
Contraindications: Always use organically grown wheat.
Wheat absorbs ten times more nitrates (often in chemical
fertilizers) than any other grain. This could explain the high
incidence of allergies to modern day wheat.
Folk Remedies:
1. Insomnia, menopause, restlessness - make tea from
one cup wheat, 12 grams licorice, and 15 Chinese black
dates. Drink one cup three times daily.
2. Burns (Initial stages) - make a paste of charcoaled
wheat meal and sesame oil and apply locally.
3. Swelling, difficult urination - make tea from wheat
and pearl barley.
4. Spontaneous sweating - make tea from wheat, crushed
oyster shells and Chinese red dates.
Wheat Bran
Nature/Taste: slightly warm and sweet
Actions: calms the spirit, resolves dampness, moves stool
Conditions: agitation, swelling, high cholesterol, constipation
Contraindications: not for use in colitis; can be irritating
Folk Remedies:
1. Restlessness and emotional instability - make a tea of
wheat bran, licorice root and Chinese jujube dates. Drink
three times daily until symptoms are relieved.
2. Constipation - add wheat bran to diet regularly, being
sure to drink plenty of water too. Psyllium seed products
will also provide excellent bulk laxative action.
80 ~ The Tao of Nutrition
Wheat Germ
Nature/Taste: warm and sweet
Actions: relieves restlessness, arrests diabetes
Conditions: emotional agitation, diabetes
Con traindica tions: Always buy wheat germ fresh and store in
the refrigerator. Due to the high oil content of wheat germ,
it can become rancid if it not properly stored. Rancid oil will
cause a burning sensation in the throat.
Folk Remedies:
1. Diabetes - make bread from 60% wheat germ and 40%
whole-wheat flour with an egg added in. Ideally, con-
sume up to 1 Vz pounds of wheat germ per day.
Beans and Peas (Legumes)
Azuki Bean (Aduki. Red)
Nature/Taste: neutral, sweet and sour
Actions: strengthens Spleen, benefits diabetes, counteracts
toxins, reduces dampness, benefits Kidney
Conditions: mumps, diabetes, leukorrhea, excessive thirst,
hunger, excretion of fluids, edema
Folk Remedies:
1. D i a betes - after soaking red beans, boil two hours; drink
the liquid three times daily.
2. Mumps - mash sprouted red beans and apply, either
alone or mixed with dandelion.
Black Bean
Nature/Taste: warm and sweet
Actions: tonifies Kidney, nourishes the Yin, strengthens and
nourishes blood, brightens eyes, promotes urination
Conditions: lower back pain, knee pain, infertility, seminal
emissions, blurry vision, ear problems, difficult urination
Folk Remedies:
1. Beriberi - cook black beans with carp.
2. Spontaneous menopausal sweating - make boiled
black bean juice.
3. Low back pain, weak knees, frequent urination, and
other Kidney weakness symptoms - slowly cook (for
about 2 -3 hours) V2 cup black beans, V2 cup water, and %
cup rice wine. This is a good winter tonic.
4. Kidney stones - add kombu seaweed to the above win-
ter tonic.
5. Bedwetting - include black beans in the diet regularly.
81
82 ~ The Tao of Nutrition
Garbanzo Bean (Chickpea)
Nature/Taste: sweet, slightly warm
Actions: strengthens Spleen, tonifies Chi, calms spirit, clears
dampness, promotes bowel movement
Conditions: low energy, anxiety, restlessness, constipation,
lack of concentration
Folk Remedies:
1. Low energy - eat hummus made from garbonzos as a
snack between meals. You can use it as a dip for vegeta-
ble sticks like carrots, celery and jicama sticks instead of
crackers or pita bread.
2. Anxiety and restlessness - make hummus with garbon-
zos as well as herbs like parsley, basil and chives
3. Constipation - regularly eat garbonzo bean soup cooked
with beets, turnip, and squashes
Kidney Bean
Nature/Taste: neutral and sweet
Actions: strengthens digestion, promotes elimination, diuretic
Conditions: swelling, difficulty urinating, diarrhea
Folk Remedies:
1. Swelling due to nephritis - make a strong soup with %
cup beans to five cups of water, cooked down to one cup.
2. Chronic diarrhea - roast kidney beans, then cook with
rice water (the soaking water) to make a tea.
Lentil
Nature/Taste: slightly warm and sweet
Actions: harmonizes digestion, strengthens stomach, descends
rebellious Chi, clears summer heat
Conditions: cholera, vomiting, diarrhea, dysentery
Beans and Peas ~ 83
Folk Remedies:
1. Summer diarrhea, dysentery - grind lentils into meal
and mix with rice porridge and eat.
2. Heatstroke with fever, restlessness, and difficult urina-
tion - eat cool lentil soup.
Lima Bean
Nature/Taste: sweet, cool
Actions: tonifies Chi, nourishes blood, clears heat, resolves
dampness, promotes bowel movement, strengthens Lung,
calms spirit
Conditions: tiredness, sinus allergies, rashes, hives, high cho-
lesterol, constipation, anxiety, insomnia, anemia
Folk Remedies:
1. Tiredness and anemia - puree lima beans with roasted
garlic and fresh basil and eat in between meals.
2. Insomnia - eat soup for dinner made from lima beans
with other calming foods like turkey and sage.
3. Allergic reaction to sulfites - make broth from boil-
ing equal portions of lima and mung beans. Drink 3 cups
daily.
Mung Bean
Nature/Taste: very cool and sweet
Actions: clears heat, detoxifies, quenches thirst, promotes
urination, reduces swelling, aids edema in the lower limbs,
counteracts toxins
Conditions: edema, conjunctivitis, diabetes, dysentery, sum-
mer heat conditions, heatstroke, dehydration, food poisoning
from spoiled food, carbuncles
Contraindications: not for cold conditions. Females should
avoid mung beans if trying to get pregnant.
84 ~ The Tao of Nutrition
Folk Remedies:
1. Dysentery - take five parts mung beans to one part
black pepper; grind to a powder and take one tablespoon
three times daily. Usually one will notice results in 6 -12
hours. The black pepper acts as an antibacterial agent.
2. Breast abscess and boils - take two tablespoons mung
bean powder in warm water twice daily.
3. Hives and bad skin lesions - make mung bean juice in
a blender and drink raw.
4. Summer heat conditions - make soup from mung
beans, barley, and rice.
Sweet and cold, mung bean sprouts clear heat and toxins as well as
generate fluids.
Navy Bean
Nature/Taste: Sweet, warm
Actions: tonifies Chi, nourishes blood, activates blood, removes
stagnation, improves memory, calms spirit
Conditions: anemia, memory decline, high cholesterol, blood
sugar imbalance, fatigue
Contraindication: gout
Folk Remedies:
1. Memory decline - make a brain tonic bean soup by
cooking equal portions of navy beans, black beans and
kidney beans and seasoned with rosemary, thyme and
tumeric. Eat a bowl daily.
2. Diabetes - incorporate navy beans and other beans into
diet to help balance the blood sugar level.
3. Anemia - cooked up a hearty white chili with navy
beans, ground chicken, and chopped parsley. Eat daily.
Beans and Peas ~ 85
Pea
Nature/Taste: neutral and sweet
Actions: strengthens digestion, strengthens Spleen and Stom-
ach, promotes urination, lubricates intestines
Conditions: indigestion, edema, constipation
Folk Remedies:
1. Edema - roast peas until dry, powder and take with
warm water.
2. Indigestion - blend peas into a juice and take with
meals.
Pinto Bean
Nature/Taste: sweet, warm
Actions: tonifies Chi, nourishes blood, clears heat, resolves
dampness, calms spirit
Conditions: fatigue, anemia, edema, sulfite allergies, high cho-
lesterol, insomnia, anxiety
Folk Remedies:
1. High cholesterol - incorporate pinto beans and other
beans into your regular diet that are high in fiber and
contain rich folate that lowers cholesterol
2. Edema and swelling - make broth from boiling pinto
beans with cabbage for 1/2 hour, strain and drink 1 cup
of broth, 3 times a day until swelling improves. Season
with herbs and spices, but avoid adding salt to the broth.
3. Anxiety - eat hummus made from pinto beans, lima
beans and garbonzos beans reguarly
Soybean
Nature/Taste: cool and sweet
Actions: clears heat, detoxifies, eases urination, lubricates lungs
and intestines, provides an excellent protein source
86 ~ The Tao of Nutrition
Conditions: Lung and Stomach heat, dry skin, intense appe-
tite, stomach or mouth ulcers, swollen gums, diarrhea, con-
stipation, general heat problems
Contraindications: Do not eat soybeans raw; they cannot be
digested.
Folk Remedies:
1. Heat conditions - drink soymilk or eat tofu. Soymilk is
easily made by blending soaked soybeans with a larger
volume of water; strain off the milk and bring to a boil
for about twenty minutes; sweeten to taste. To make
tofu, curdle the soymilk with calcium sulfate, nigari, or
lemon juice; strain and press the solids into a block.
2. Diarrhea - charcoal soybeans and grind to a powder;
take one teaspoon three times daily.
3. Habitual constipation - boil tea from soybeans and
drink four times daily.
Tofu, Soybean Curd
Nature/Taste: cool and sweet
Actions: clears heat, lubricates dryness, promotes body fluids,
detoxifies, strengthens Spleen and Stomach
Conditions: chronic dysentery, malaria, lung tuberculosis, ane-
mia, leukorrhea, irregular menstruation
Folk Remedies:
1. Chronic dysentery - stir-fry tofu with vinegar.
2. Malaria - stir-fry tofu with vinegar; take three hours
prior to the onset of symptoms.
3. Lung tuberculosis - combine tofu and the herb, Alisma-
tis rhizome (water plantain tuber); boil, and eat the tofu.
Take daily for two months.
4. Anemia - take frozen tofu that has been thawed, mix
with egg white, until the egg white has soaked into the
tofu; cook and eat daily for one month.
Beans and Peas ~ 87
5. Leukorrhea - steam tofu and brown sugar.
6. Irregular menstruation due to coldness - stew
together tofu, lamb, and ginger.
To reduce the cool nature of tofu, press out the extra water; marinate
with ginger and garlic; then bake. This would be more suitable for
conditions of cold or dampness. Baked tofu is widely available in
Asian and health food markets.
Nuts and Seeds
Almond
Nature/Taste: neutral and sweet
Actions: ventilates Lungs, relieves cough and asthma, trans-
forms phlegm, lubricates intestines
Conditions: lung conditions, asthma, constipation, cough
Folk Remedies:
1. Cough and asthma - grind almonds to a fine meal, add
fructose; dissolve two tablespoons in water.
Cashews
Nature/Taste: sweet, warm
Actions: tonifies Kidney, strengthens bones, nourishes blood,
boosts Chi, moistens Yin, promotes bowel movement
Conditions: lower back pain, osteopenia, frequent urination,
dizziness, fatigue, low libido, infertility, constipation
Contraindications: dampness, diarrhea
Folk Remedies:
1. Lower back pain - make curry cashews by dry roasting
cashews in a pan and sprinkle with curry powder for a
couple of minutes on high flame. Remove promptly and
do not burn the cashews. Eat a handful a day.
2. Infertility or low libido - make a libido and fertilityen-
hancing trail mix consisting of equal parts of dried cran-
berry, walnut, sesame seeds, longan fruit, and cashews.
3. Constipation - ground cashews into powder. Mix 1 tsp.
cashew powder and 1 tbsp. honey into a cup of hot water
and drink on empty stomach upon waking each morning.
Chestnut
Nature/Taste: warm, sweet and salty
Actions: tonifies Kidney, strengthens digestion, fortifies the
Chi, arrests cough
88
Nuts and Seeds ~ 89
Conditions: weak Kidney Chi, back pain, weak lower extremi-
ties, frequent urination, nausea, burping, hiccups, chronic
bronchitis, cough, asthma, diarrhea
Folk Remedies:
1. Diarrhea - grind chestnuts to flour and boil for 10-15
minutes, then consume the porridge.
2. Chronic cough, bronchitis - eat steamed chestnuts and
drink chestnut leaf tea.
3. Nausea, hiccups, gastritis - charcoal and powder the
membrane (not the shell) of the chestnut and cook about
1 Y2 -3 grams into rice porridge.
4. Kidney weakness, back or leg pain, frequent urina-
tion - eat two raw chestnuts daily, one in the morning
and one at night; chew thoroughly.
5. Splinters, traumas, sores - mash raw chestnuts and
apply to the affected area to draw out a splinter or pus,
reduce pain and stop bleeding.
Filbert. Hazelnut
Nature/Taste: neutral and sweet
Actions: fortifies Chi, strengthens digestion
Conditions: diarrhea, lack of appetite
Folk Remedies:
1. Diarrhea - roast filberts and grind into meal; take one
teaspoon twice daily with jujube date tea.
2. Lack of appetite - grind raw filberts into a meal; take
one teaspoon twice daily with tea made from citrus peel.
Lotus Seed
Nature/Taste: neutral and sweet
Actions: strengthens Kidney, astringent, nutritive tonic
Conditions: Kidney weakness, frequent urination, involuntary
seminal emission, diarrhea
90 ~ The Tao of Nutrition
Folk Remedies:
1. Nutritive tonic - a delicious winter tonic soup can be
made by boiling together lotus seeds, azuki (red) beans,
and pearl barley; add a dash of honey before serving.
2. Frequent urination, involuntary seminal emission,
diarrhea - cook lotus seeds and cubes of sweet potato in
a rice porridge.
Peanut
Nature/Taste: neutral and sweet
Actions: improves appetite, strengthens Spleen, regulates
blood, lubricates lungs, promotes diuresis, aids in lactation
Conditions: edema, difficult lactation, blood in urine, insom-
nia, lack of appetite
Folk Remedies:
1. Edema - drink peanut tea for seven consecutive days.
2. Lack of milk - steam peanuts, mash, and add to soupy
nee.
3. Chronic cough - combine peanuts, jujube dates, and
honey; make tea and drink twice daily.
4. Chronic nephritis - combine peanuts and red dates;
make tea and eat the solids. Take for one week.
5. Insomnia - boil peanut tea; drink in the evening.
6. Hypertension - take peanut shells and boil tea or grind
into powder and take with warm water; drink three
times daily for at least twenty days.
Pecan
Nature/Taste: sweet, slightly warm
Actions: tonifies Chi, strengthens Lung, stops cough, strength-
ens Kidney, promotes bowel movement
Conditions: fatigue, chronic cough, lower back pain, low libido,
erectile dysfunction, frequent urination, constipation
Contraindications: dampness, diarrhea
Nuts and Seeds ~ 91
Folk Remedies:
1. Chronic cough - ground pecan into powder. Mix 1 tbsp.
each of pecan powder, apricot seed/kernel powder and
honey into 1 cup of hot water. Drink 2-3 cups daily.
2. Lower back pain - soak pecan in sherry or port for one
week or more. Eat a small handful daily.
3. Erectile dysfunction or low libido - make a libido- and
fertility-enhancing trail mix consisting of equal parts of
goji berry, pecan, raisin, and pistachios. Eat a small hand-
ful each day.
Pine Nut
Nature/Taste: warm and sweet
Actions: lubricates lungs, relieves cough, lubricates intestines,
promotes production of body fluids
Conditions: dry cough, constipation
Contraindications: not to be used with diarrhea, involuntary
seminal emission, or any mucous conditions.
Folk Remedies:
1. Dry cough - grind pine nuts and walnuts, add honey
and slowly cook over low flame until thick; take two
teaspoons with warm water.
2. Constipation - eat pine nuts with rice porridge.
Pumpkin Seed
Nature/Taste: cold and sweet
Actions: anti-parasitic, diuretic
Conditions: intestinal worms and parasites, swelling, diabetes,
prostate problems
Folk Remedies:
1. Intestinal worms - roast and powder pumpkin seeds,
then mix with honey and take twice daily. Or eat a large
handful of pumpkin seeds 2-3 times a day.
92 ~ The Tao of Nutrition
2. Swelling after pregnancy, diabetes - make a tea from
roasted pumpkin seeds.
3. Prostate problems - eat a large handful of pumpkin
seeds twice daily.
Sesame Seed, Brown
Nature/Taste: slightly warm and sweet
Actions: nourishes Liver and Kidney, lubricates intestines,
blackens gray hair, overall body tonic, benefits skin
Conditions: backache, weakness, premature graying, ringing
in the ears, blurry vision, dizziness, constipation, dry cough,
blood in the urine, tonic for older people, weak knees
Contraindications: Always grind seeds because the tough cell
wall makes whole seeds indigestible.
Folk Remedies:
1. Weakness conditions, constipation - grind sesame
seeds to a meal, mix with honey to make a paste; take
two teaspoons twice daily.
2. Dry cough and asthma - roast sesame seeds, grind to a
meal and add ginger juice and honey. Take one teaspoon
three times daily.
Sesame Seed, Black
Nature/Taste: neutral and sweet
Actions: tonifies Liver and Kidney, harmonizes the blood, lubri-
cates intestines, restores hair color, nourishes Yin, promotes
lactation
Conditions: chronic constipation, premature balding or gray-
ing, chronic arthritis, joint inflammation, cough
Folk Remedies:
1. Chronic constipation - grind into a meal and mix with
honey and form small chewable balls, about 6 grams
each. Take one ball three times daily with rice wine.
Nuts and Seeds ~ 93
2. Premature balding or graying - grind both black sesa-
mes and black beans to a meal; cook with rice milk. Take
once daily for at least three months.
3. Chronic cough, asthma - grind equal parts black
sesame seeds and apricot kernels; take one teaspoon with
warm water three times daily.
Sunflower Seed
Nature/Taste: neutral and sweet
Actions: subdues Liver, lowers blood pressure, relieves dysen-
tery, resolves pus, moistens intestines
Conditions: headache, dizziness, liver-fire rising, bloody dysen-
tery, intestinal worms
Folk Remedies:
1. Headache or dizziness - grind the seeds and take with
honey and warm water before bed.
2. Hypertension - take sunflower seed meal with celery
JUlCe.
3. Bloody dysentery - cook the seeds with water of one
hour, add honey; drink the liquid and eat the seeds.
Walnut
Nature/Taste: slightly warm and sweet
Actions: tonifies Kidney, strengthens back, astringes Lung,
relieves asthma, lubricates intestines, aids erratic or rebellious
Chi, reduces cholesterol
Conditions: Kidney deficiency, impotency, sexual dysfunc-
tions, infertility, frequent urination, back and leg pain, stones
in the urinary tract, cough, constipation, neurasthenia
Folk Remedies:
1. Impotence and Kidney weakness - eat twenty wal-
nuts a day for one month.
94 ~ The Tao of Nutrition
2. Back pain and cold type arthritis - take walnut meal
with warm wine (preferably red wine).
3. Kidney stones - take 120 grams walnuts, grind to a
meal and add 120 grams brown sugar; roast with sesame
oil. Take V4 of the mixture four times a day.
4. Neurasthenia - take equal portions of walnuts, sesame
seeds, and dried mulberries, mash together to a paste; roll
into small pills and take three pills three times a day.
5. Cough, constipation - grind walnuts into meal and
mix with honey. Take two tablespoons daily with warm
water.
Winter Melon Seed
Nature/Taste: cool and bland
Actions: promotes diuresis, resolves mucus, stops cough, clears
heat, detoxifies
Conditions: coughing of blood, constipation, intestinal abscess,
edema, leukorrhea
Folk Remedies:
1. Coughing of blood, constipation, and intestinal ab-
scess - make tea from the seeds.
2. Edema and leukorrhea - grind seeds into meal and take
one teaspoon with warm water three times daily.
3. Edema in the summer - cook soup with winter melon
peel (purchased dry), winter melon seed, mung beans
and pearl barley.
4. Coughing blood - make tea from winter melon seed,
pearl barley and fresh lotus root.
Meat, Fish, Poultry and Animal Products
Meat, fish, poultry and eggs should always be properly cooked and
never eaten raw. Seek producers that treat animals humanely and do
not use drugs.
Eating fish that comes from around the world helps avoid mercury
exposure. Try not to eat fish from the same region in the same week, as
eating fish from a variety of locations diminishes your risk of repeated
exposure to the same toxins. The larger the fish, the more mercury ac-
cumulates. For example, tuna, swordfish and shark have been found
to have larger amounts of mercury. Fresh sardines, which are sma'"
have very little mercury. Pregnant women should eat no more than 2-3
servings of fish per week.
For complete lists of safe fish to eat, visit: www.seafoodwatch.org.
Beef
Nature/Taste: warm and sweet
Actions: tonifies Chi and blood, strengthens Spleen and Stom-
ach, dispels dampness, relieves edema, strengthens bones and
tendons
Conditions: edema, abdominal distention and fullness, weak
back and knees, deficient Stomach and Spleen
Contraindications: not to be used with any type of skin lesions,
hepatitis, or any kind of kidney inflammation.
Folk Remedies:
1. Deficiencies of blood. Chi. Spleen - take cooked
ground beef and soak it in hot water for 10 minutes;
drink the juice.
2. Edema or chronic diarrhea - stew beef in water for
two hours; drink the liquid.
95
96 ~ The Tao of Nutrition
Chicken
Nature/Taste: warm and sweet
Actions: tonifies Chi, nourishes blood, aids Kidney deficiency,
benefits Spleen and Stomach
Conditions: postpartum weakness, weakness in old people,
cold-type arthritis, weakness after illness or blood loss
Contraindications: Do not eat chickens that are force fed
chemical pellets and injected with steroids and antibiotics.
These chickens can cause a variety of health problems, includ-
ing sterility, early female puberty, disharmony in the men-
strual cycle, male impotence, to name a few. Also, chicken
is not to be consumed by those with heat type cancers such
as leukemia, or when there are heat symptoms such as red
tongue, fever, and extreme thirst.
Folk Remedies:
1. Weakness or anemia - cook one chicken with 30 grams
dang gui (Angelica sinensis), and 61h cups water. Simmer
together for one hour. The darker meat birds such as the
Chinese black chicken are the most tonifying.
Turkey is also warm but not as tonifying as chicken.
Chicken Egg
Nature/Taste: cool and sweet
Actions: nourishes Yin, tonifies blood, stabilizes hyperactive
fetus, lubricates dryness
Conditions: dry cough, hoarse voice, dysentery, blood and Yin
deficiency, hyperactive fetus
Contraindications: Eating too many eggs is not healthy. In
general, do not eat fried or raw eggs.
Meat, Fish, Poultry and Animal Products ~ 97
Folk Remedies:
1. Yin and blood deficiency - steam the eggs and eat.
2. Postpartum - eat eggs with green onions.
3. Pain of dysentery - cook eggs with rice vinegar.
4. Hyperactive fetus - eat a hard boiled egg daily.
Duck
Nature/Taste: sweet, salty, neutral
Actions: tonifies Chi, nourishes Yin, moistens dryness, nour-
ishes Kidney and Lung, relieves edema
Conditions: dry cough, postpartum weakness, fatigue, swell-
ing due to kidney weakness
Contraindications: duck tends to be greasy and hard on people
with weak digestion
Folk Remedies:
1. Postpartum fatigue and weakness - cook duck with
ginger, scallions and black beans
2. Weak lungs with dry cough - make duck soup with
apricot seed/kernel, lily bulbs and Asian pears
3. Kidney weakness with edema - make salad with shred-
ded duck breast meat, cucumber, celery and sweet onions
Fish
Nature/Taste: warm * and sweet
Actions: strengthens Spleen, tonifies Chi, removes dampness,
regulates blood, aids diarrhea from Spleen weakness
Conditions: low energy states, hemorrhoids, postpartum exces-
sive bleeding, itching or exuding damp type skin lesions
Contraindications: Do not eat fish raw as it is often loaded
with parasites. Always cook fish with garlic, ginger or onion
to neutralize potential toxins.
98 ~ The Tao of Nutrition
Folk Remedies:
1. Kidney deficiency and back pain - cook fish with
chicken.
* Ocean fish are energetically cooler than freshwater fish. Many
ocean fish are considered neutral. Clams and crabs are cool, oys-
ters are neutral, and shrimp is warm. Shellfish can cause rashes
and other allergic reactions.
Goat's Milk
Nature/Taste: sweet, salty, warm
Actions: tonifies Chi, nourishes blood, strengthens Kidney and
builds strong bones, moistens dryness, calms spirit
Conditions: fatigue, diabetes, metabolic syndrome, weak bone
health, anemia, dry skin and hair, insomnia, nervousness
Contraindications: fevers
Folk Remedies:
1. Metabolic syndrome or blood sugar imbalance -
substitute goat milk and goat yogurt for cow milk and
ice cream.
2. Osteopenia or osteoporosis - make bone-building
hummus with black beans and goat milk yogurt. Eat as a
snack in between meals regularly.
3. Dry skin and hair - once a week, condition hair with
goat milk by rubbing a cup of goat milk into hair and
body in the shower and let it remain for 10 minutes
before washing off.
Lamb
Nature/Taste: hot and sweet
Actions: tonifies weakness, dispels cold, strengthens and nour-
ishes Chi and blood, promotes appetite, aids lactation
Conditions: Kidney deficiency causing back pain, impotence,
cold conditions, deficiency conditions, postpartum blood
loss, lack of milk, leukorrhea
Meat, Fish, Poultry and Animal Products ~ 99
Contraindications: Lamb is generally not consumed in sum-
mer because of its hot nature. It is not to be consumed in
conditions of edema, malaria, common cold, toothache and
any type of heat conditions.
Folk Remedies:
1. Anemia, weakness, blood deficiency - cook lamb with
ginger and dang gui (Angelica sinensis). In general, meats
are traditionally prepared with such herbs as dang gui,
jujube date, astragalus, ginger, scallions, or ginseng for
problems of weakness and coldness.
Milk and Milk Products
Nature/Taste: neutral and sweet
Actions: strengthens weakness, nourishes Chi and blood, lubri-
cates dryness
Conditions: nutritional deficiency, weakness, malnutrition,
anemia, constipation, dryness
Contraindications: not to be used with damp or cold condi-
tions, or in cases of diarrhea. In general not to be used by
adults or those who are healthy as dairy products can cause
mucus and other disorders. As an occasional food used mod-
erately, dairy products should not cause a problem; however,
they are not to be used daily. Allergy is common with this
food since many adults lose the ability to digest milk sugar
after infancy. Allergic reactions usually include diarrhea and
bloating.
Folk Remedies:
1. Weakness, malnutrition - drink a glass of warm milk.
Pork
Nature/Taste: slightly cold and sweet
Actions: moistens and nourishes organs, tonifies Chi, strength-
ens digestion
100 ~ The Tao of Nutrition
Conditions: internal dryness, constipation, dry cough, emacia-
tion
Contraindications: not to be taken by overweight people,
those with deficient Spleen and Stomach, hypertension,
stroke victims, or those with diarrhea.
Folk Remedies:
1. Constipation, dry cough - make soup with pork, car-
rots and lily bulbs.
2. Weakness, emaciation - cook pork in a rice porridge.
Quail Egg
Nature/Taste: sweet, salty, warm
Actions: tonifies Chi, restores Jing, warms Yang, resolves
dampness, improves vision, activates blood and removes
stagnation
Conditions: fatigue, memory decline, loss of concentration,
infertility, cataract, age-related macular degeneration,
blood clots, arthritic inflammation
Contraindications: people with egg allergies
Folk Remedies:
1. Infertility or inadequate sperm - 3 fresh quail eggs in
a shot glass mixed with 1 oz. of clear alcohol like gin or
vodka. Drink before bedtime daily for 1 month.
(Note: alcohol is necessary to prevent salmonella. If
alcohol is not preferred, eat the eggs cooked.)
2. Vision decline - scramble quail eggs with spinach and
carrots for breakfast daily
3. Memory and focus issues - eat hardboiled quail eggs
regularly
Miscellaneous Foods, Herbs and Beverages
Anise
Nature/Taste: warm and pungent
Actions: strengthens stomach, regulates Chi flow, harmonizes
Stomach, stops vomiting
Conditions: hernia, beriberi, abdominal pain, distention and
gas, back pain and coldness, cold stomach
Contraindications: not to be used in any type of heat condi-
tions.
Folk Remedies:
1. Stomach pain due to coldness - make anise tea and
add some wine.
2. Hernia - charcoal anise and grind to powder; add brown
sugar and take with rice wine.
Barley Malt Syrup
Nature/Taste: neutral and sweet
Actions: promotes digestion, relieves food stagnation, strength-
ens stomach, stops lactation
Conditions: food retention caused by wheat products, epigas-
tric fullness and distention, belching, constipation, undesir-
able lactation
Folk Remedies:
1. Food retention and stopping lactation - drink barley
malt in warm water until condition resolves.
Rice malt syrup is neutral and sweet and has properties similar to
barley malt/ except that rice malt is preferred for food stagnation
caused by rice products.
Basil
Nature/Taste: warm and pungent
Actions: induces sweating, harmonizes Stomach, antidote for
seafood poisoning
101
1 02 ~ The Tao of Nutrition
Conditions: wind-cold, vomiting, diarrhea, seafood poisoning
Folk Remedies:
1. Common cold - boil tea from basil, ginger, and green
onions.
2. Diarrhea, vomiting, seafood poisoning - boil basil
tea.
Black Fungus (Wood Ears)
Nature/Taste: neutral and sweet, slightly toxic when raw
Actions: nourishes Stomach, calms spirit, lubricates dryness,
promotes blood flow, removes stagnation
Conditions: blood stagnation such as tumor, especially uterine,
abnormal uterine bleeding, bloody stools, hemorrhoids, con-
stipation, hypertension
Contraindications: not to be used by pregnant women.
Folk Remedies:
1. Hypertension, bloody stools, and hemorrhoids - add
honey to some black fungus and dried persimmon, cook,
and eat once a day.
2. Abnormal bleeding, anemia - boil tea from black fun-
gus and Chinese dates.
3. Dysentery - take 10 grams fresh black fungus with
warm water twice daily.
4. Tumors of the viscera and female organs - make tea
from black fungus and peach kernel, and drink.
Black Pepper
Nature/Taste: hot and pungent
Actions: warms digestion, dispels internal cold, antidote to
food poisoning
Conditions: stomachache due to cold, diarrhea, food poi-
soning
Miscellaneous Foods, Herbs and Beverages ~ 103
Folk Remedies:
1. Food poisoning - mix one teaspoon black pepper with
rice porridge and grated ginger and drink as much as pos-
sible.
Brown Sugar, Turbinado
Nature/Taste: warm and sweet
Actions: strengthens digestion, lubricates lungs, stops cough,
warms up the body
Conditions: dry cough, poor digestion, coldness
Contraindications: not to be consumed in excess, can lead to
mucus and dampness in the body.
Folk Remedies:
1. Stomach pains, ulcer pains - mix a spoonful of brown
sugar into warm water and drink to arrest pain.
2. Dry cough, sore throat - grate carrots and mix with
brown sugar. Refrigerate overnight, then consume the
next day.
White sugar is sweet and cold
i
it lubricates the lungs and treats dry
cough
i
it can be used externally to promote the healing of bed sores,
ulcerations and burns. Apply sugar to the lesion and re-bandage
every 3-5 days. The same contraindications for brown sugar apply to
white sugar.
Cardamom Seed
Nature/Taste: warm and pungent
Actions: warms digestion, resolves dampness, invigorates the
flow of Chi, stops vomiting
Conditions: dampness, diarrhea, nausea, vomiting, stomach
ulcers, abdominal distention and fullness
Folk Remedies:
1. Stomach and duodenal ulcers - drink cardamom and
fresh ginger root tea on an empty stomach every
mornmg.
1 04 ~ The Tao of Nutrition
2. Abdominal pain and distention - make tea from car-
damom, cloves and orange peel. Drink three times daily.
3. Nausea and diarrhea - stir one teaspoon cardamom
powder into one cup warm water and drink three times
daily.
Carob Pod
Nature/Taste: warm and sweet
Actions: soothes and calms the spirit
Conditions: used as an alternative to chocolate, and for caf-
feine addiction
Contraindications: Eating carob to excess will cause agitation.
Folk Remedies:
1. Chocolate substitute - use powdered carob pods.
Cinnamon
Nature/Taste: hot, pungent and sweet
Actions: strengthens stomach, warms any coldness in the
body, stops pain
Conditions: common cold, abdominal pain due to cold stagna-
tion, lack of appetite due to cold stomach, low back pain
Contraindications: not to be used in pregnancy.
Folk Remedies:
1. Postpartum abdominal pain - boil tea with cinnamon
and brown sugar.
2. Premenstrual syndrome, including lower abdominal
pain and bloating prior to menstruation - make tea
from cinnamon and hawthorn berries.
3. Gas pain in stomach area - take V2 teaspoon cinnamon
powder with lukewarm water, twice daily.
Miscellaneous Foods, Herbs and Beverages ~ 1 05
Cloves
Nature/Taste: warm and pungent
Actions: warms the middle of the body, dispels internal cold,
reverses rebellious Chi, warms Kidney, stops pain
Conditions: stomachache due to cold, vomiting, nausea, belch-
ing, hiccupping, toothache
Folk Remedies:
1. Vomiting, nausea, belching - drink one teaspoon clove
powder in warm water.
2. Toothache - place clove above or below the affected
tooth on the gum until pain is relieved.
Coffee
Nature/Taste: warm, sweet and bitter
Actions: stimulating, diuretic, promotes elimination
Conditions: mild swelling, constipation, hypersomnia, leth-
argy, mental cloudiness, conditions that require stimulation
Contraindications: This beverage is a very addictive sub-
stance. Avoid in high blood pressure, insomnia, nervousness,
and stomach ulcers or acidity. Coffee is easier on the stomach
if taken with milk or soymilk. Always exercise moderation in
its use. Avoid during pregnancy.
Fennel
Nature/Taste: warm and pungent
Actions: unblocks and regulates Chi, strengthens stomach, dis-
pels cold, stops pain, stimulates peristalsis
Conditions: stomachache, hernia, abdominal discomfort, cold-
ness is the stomach, colic in babies
Folk Remedies:
1. Hernia - boil tea from fennel seeds, black pepper, cinna-
mon, and orange peel. Externally apply warming lini-
ment along with a heating pad.
1 06 ~ The Tao of Nutrition
Ginger Root [Fresh]
Nature/Taste: warm and pungent
Actions: promotes sweating, anti-toxin, antidote for seafood
poisoning, benefits Lung and Stomach, expels pathogens
Conditions: common cold, cough due to coldness (clear or
white mucus), nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, cold-type arthritis
Folk Remedies:
1. Colds, cough, vomiting - drink ginger tea.
2. Diarrhea - apply ginger plaster to the belly.
3. Baldness - rub fresh ginger on the scalp.
4. Arthritis - rub fresh ginger on painful areas and drink
tea (not for heat-type arthritis).
5. Nausea - squeeze ginger juice into some water and sip
slowly until nausea is reduced.
Dried ginger is hot and pungent and should be used to dispel cold-
ness. For stomach or abdominal pain, drink tea made from dried
ginger and cloves.
Honey
Nature/Taste: neutral, unless heated, then it is warm and
sweet
Actions: nourishes Yin, lubricates dryness, tonifies weakness,
harmonizes, antidote to drugs, strengthens Spleen
Conditions: diabetes (small amounts), constipation, ulcers, dry
cough, hoarse voice, burns, cold sores
Contraindications: not to be used in diarrhea or conditions of
dampness or phlegm.
Folk Remedies:
1. Ulcers - mix honey and ginger juice and take on an
empty stomach every morning.
2. Burns - apply locally.
3. Cough, constipation, and hoarseness - mix honey
with water and/or almonds.
Miscellaneous Foods, Herbs and Beverages ~ 107
Avoid heating honey unless a warming nature is desired
i
heating
lowers the nourishing and beneficial effects. The darker honeys are
more tonifying and tend to sink to the lower parts of the body. The
lighter honeys are better for upper body problems.
Molasses
Nature/Taste: warm and sweet
Actions: tonifies Chi, strengthens Spleen, lubricates lungs,
stops cough
Conditions: stomach and abdominal pain, Chi deficiency,
cough
Folk Remedies:
1. Stomach or duodenal ulcers - take two teaspoons of
molasses in lukewarm water to stop pain.
2. Cough - dice carrots, mix with molasses and leave it
overnight; take two teaspoons three times daily.
3. Bedwetting - boil cinnamon and licorice tea, adding
two teaspoons of molasses.
Olive
Nature/Taste: neutral, sweet, sour and astringent
Actions: clears heat, detoxifies, promotes production of body
fluids, quenches thirst, clears lungs, benefits the throat
Conditions: whooping cough, dysentery, sore throat, dehydra-
tion, laryngitis, thirst
Folk Remedies:
1. Cough and dry conditions - eat olives regularly.
2. Sore, dry throat and laryngitis - take fifty black, pit-
ted olives with 3-4 cups of honey; heat over a low flame.
Take 2-3 tablespoons three times daily, swallowing
slowly.
1 OS ~ The Tao of Nutrition
Rice Vinegar
Nature/Taste: warm and sour
Actions: detoxifies, invigorates blood circulation, inhibits
growth of bacteria, astringent, closes pores
Conditions: preventative for common colds, prevents invasion
from external pathogens, malaria, acute arthritis, vomiting,
nausea, intestinal worms, hypertension, burns, fungus infes-
tation, bones caught in the throat, gum disease, hives, hepa-
titis, lung tuberculosis, lung abscess, bronchitis
Contraindications: not to be used at the onset of a cold as it
will trap pathogens inside of the body.
Folk Remedies:
1. Malaria - mix 2-3 tablespoons of rice vinegar with two
teaspoons baking soda; take two hours before the epi-
sodic attacks of chills and fever.
2. Acute arthritis - boil two cups rice vinegar down to one
cup; add green onions and boil another five minutes.
Soak gauze pad and apply to sore area twice daily until
condition improves.
3. Nausea and vomiting - mix equal parts rice vinegar and
water and drink.
4. Intestinal worms - take rice vinegar with water on an
empty stomach.
5. Hypertension - soak peanuts in vinegar; eat twenty pea-
nuts every morning.
6. Burns - apply undiluted.
7. Fish bones in the throat - slowly drink one cup vinegar,
and then eat a hard bread crust.
S. Gum disease - rinse mouth often with undiluted vinegar.
9. Hives - make ginger tea, add rice vinegar and brown
sugar; drink twice daily.
10. Hepatitis - soak apple-pear in vinegar; eat daily.
11. Lung tuberculosis - soak garlic in rice vinegar for 2-7
days; take one clove twice daily.
Miscellaneous Foods, Herbs and Beverages ~ 1 0 9
12. Lung abscess - boil garlic in vinegar; eat 1-2 cloves daily.
13. Bronchitis - combine ten mashed garlic cloves, one cup
vinegar, and two teaspoons brown sugar; take two tea
spoons three times daily.
Salt
Nature/Taste: cold, salty and slightly sweet
Actions: harmonizes and promotes digestion, strengthens Kid-
ney (in small amounts), fortifies bones, tendons and teeth,
brightens eyes, detoxifies, used as a natural preservative
Conditions: food poisoning, Kidney weakness from lack of
sodium in the diet, sore throat
Folk Remedies:
1. Food poisoning - for immediate relief, roast salt and
take with warm water which will cause vomiting to
relieve condition.
2. Itchy, inflamed skin - wash area with salt water or ap-
ply salt.
3. Sore throat - gargle with warm salt water several times
a day.
Spirulina/Chlorelia
Nature/Taste: salty, cool
Actions: tonifies Chi, nourishes Yin and blood, strengthens
Kidney, clears heat toxins from Liver
Conditions: low energy, anemia, kidney weakness, lower back
pain, weak knees, night sweat, irritability, agitation, hepati-
tis, liver toxicity, indigestion
Folk Remedies:
1. Low energy and anemia - make a shake from 1 tbsp
spirulina or chlorella with raspberry, banana and goat
yogurt. Drink daily
11 0 ~ The Tao of Nutrition
2. Liver toxicity - make vegetable juice from chard, kale,
spinach, beet and carrot greens, carrot, apple and 1 tbsp
of spirulina or chlorella. Consume 1-2 glasses daily
3. Kidney and low back or knee weakness - eat a rich
breakfast cereal by cooking together any of the follow-
ing: black beans, kidney beans, adzuki beans, chestnuts,
walnuts, sesame seeds, amaranth, guinoa, millet.
Sprinkle 1 tbsp. spirulina or chlorella and 1 tbsp. flax
seed meal to a bowl of this cereal daily.
Tea
Nature/Taste: cool, bitter and sweet
Actions: clears the head, refreshes the mind, relieves thirst and
restlessness, resolves phlegm, diuretic, promotes digestion,
detoxifies, reduces cholesterol
Conditions: headaches, blurry vision, thirst, restlessness, foggy
head, hypersomnia, food retention, dysentery, difficulty uri-
nating, overweight
Contraindications: Avoid or use minimally with insomnia.
Due to tannin, better not to drink tea on an empty stomach.
Folk Remedies:
1. For the conditions listed above - prepare tea leaves
(preferably green tea) and drink as needed.
White Fungus (Silver Ears)
Nature/Taste: neutral and sweet
Actions: clears Lung heat, strengthens Spleen and Stomach,
promotes body fluids, tonifies Chi, invigorates blood, lubri-
cates intestines, relieves alcohol intoxication, nourishes Yin
Conditions: cough, dry lungs, bloody sputum, irregular men-
struation, arteriosclerosis, hypertension, alcohol intoxication,
blood stagnation, constipation
Miscellaneous Foods, Herbs and Beverages ~ 111
Folk Remedies:
1. Lung problems, constipation, bloody sputum - soak
white fungus for twelve hours, add honey, and steam.
Drink the liquid on an empty stomach. This is known as
silver ears soup.
2. Arteriosclerosis, hypertension, eye hemorrhage -
drink silver ears soup before bedtime.
3. Weakness after long illness or loss of blood - slowly
stew white fungus, ten Chinese dates, and either pork or
chicken.
Wine
Nature/Taste: warm, pungent and sweet
Actions: promotes circulation, enhances the effect of circula-
tory herbs, temporarily stops pain
Conditions: arthritis, traumas, bruises, painful conditions
Contraindications: wine can be a very addictive substance. In
case of allergy to alcohol, avoid it completely. Wine is not rec-
ommended for heat conditions. Avoid during pregnancy. Do
not mix wine with fatty foods.
Folk Remedies:
1. Arthritis (cold-type) with numbness and stiffness,
neuralgia - stir-fry dry black beans until the bean splits
and they slightly burn; soak in good quality rice wine
overnight. Filter and drink a small amount twice daily.
2. Trauma and pain - drink warm sake (rice wine), or
other good quality wine for temporary relief.
3. Menstrual pain - drink wine that was prepared with
the herb Motherwort (Leonorus cardiaca) prior to the
onset of menses; the menstrual period will probably be a
little heavier than usual.
Section Three
Remedies for Common Conditions
Conditions
Acne
This condition is characterized by skin blemishes or pimples.
It can occur at any point throughout the lifetime and is often
related to a hormonal imbalance. In Chinese terminology, the
skin is controlled by the lungs, and acne is commonly a condi-
tion of heat in the lungs. Thus, the Chinese approach to this
condition is to cool the heat, cleanse the lungs, and externally
promote the healing process.
Recommendations: squash, cucumbers, watermelon, winter
melon, celery, carrots, cabbage, beet tops, dandelions, aloe
vera, mulberry leaf, carrot tops, lettuce, potato, cherries,
papaya, pear, persimmon, raspberries, buckwheat, alfalfa
sprouts, millet, brown rice, mung beans, plenty of water
Remedies:
1. Blend a cucumber, apply externally; leave on for twenty
minutes then wash off.
2. Apply plain, low fat organic yogurt; leave on for twenty
minutes then wash off.
3. Rub watermelon rind on the acne.
4. Apply aloe vera.
5. Eat watermelon or drink watermelon juice.
6. Drink dandelion and beet top tea.
7. Drink lukewarm water with two teaspoons of honey
every morning on an empty stomach. This effectively
lubricates the intestines. If one does not evacuate the
intestines regularly, toxins either accumulate in the liver
or erupt on the skin.
8. Boil raspberries to a concentrate and wash area with it.
9. Roast buckwheat, grind to a powder and mix with rice
vinegar into a paste, then apply to area.
10. For oozing acne conditions, cover area with pearl barley
powder overnight, wash off with water; or mix pearl
115
116 ~ The Tao of Nutrition
barley powder with aloe vera gel into a paste and leave
on area overnight, then wash off with water.
11. Drink tea made from carrot tops, carrots, and beet tops.
12. For infected acne, apply a dandelion poultice to the area.
Avoid: fried foods, fatty or oily foods, spicy foods, coffee,
alcohol, sugar, smoking, all stresses, constipation, makeup,
washing with chemicals or soap (wash with cool water) *,
chocolate, ice cream, soft drinks, dairy foods, red meat, shell-
fish, bamboo shoots, white mushrooms
If the face is dirty, steam it with hot water to induce sweating, then
wash with cold water.
Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS)
AIDS is a chronic retro-viral infection with the Human Immu-
nodeficiency Virus (HIV) in a susceptible host, which produces
severe defects in the cells. There is a reduction of part of the
immune system called the HelperT cells. This leaves the patient
vulnerable to many opportunistic infections and unusual can-
cers. The HIV virus is transmitted via sexual contact, exposure
to infected blood, perinatal exposure or infected breast milk.
Prominent symptoms include diarrhea, sweating, weight loss,
neuropathy and wasting away. Aggressive infections like pneu-
monia and candidiasis can prove to be life threatening when
AIDS compromises the immune system.
Recommendations: pearl barley, shiitake mushroom, ling zhi
(ganoderma) mushroom, garlic, white and black fungus,
brussel sprouts, bitter melon, squash, pumpkin, pumpkin
seed, yam, apricot kernel, Chinese cucumber (Trichosanthes),
water chestnut, mung bean, black bean, ginkgo nut, loquat,
dandelion greens, egg yolk, jujube date, wild yam, green tea,
daikon radish, lotus root, lotus seed, hawthorn berry
Remedies:
1. Make brown rice porridge with pearl barley, mung
beans, yams and lotus seeds.
Conditions ~ 117
2. Soak dried shiitake mushrooms and/or white fungus,
black fungus, and ling zhi mushrooms overnight. Boil
for ten minutes in the soaking water. Then liquify in
blender along with organic carrot tops. Drink on empty
stomach daily.
3. Make tea from Chinese cucumber and jujube dates by
simmering for thirty minutes. Drink three cups per day.
4. Make juice with fresh water chestnuts, lotus root, dan-
delion greens and fresh ginger.
5. Grind together apricot kernels, pumpkin seeds, nori sea-
weed, sesame seeds, cardamom and a pinch of salt. Use
generously as seasoning over vegetables and grains.
6. Liquify fresh ginger root and aloe vera leaf (use only the
soft center, peeling away the hard outer part). Drink one
cup daily.
7. Consult a Chinese herbalist/acupuncturist for a Chinese
herb formula.
Avoid: dairy, alcohol, coffee, sugar, fatty or fried foods, highly
spiced foods, cold and raw foods, tomato, eggplant, bell pep-
pers, shellfish
Allergies
An allergy is an acquired hypersensitivity to a substance that
does not normally cause a body reaction. The allergenic sub-
stance may be pollen, smog, dust, certain chemicals in the air,
chlorine, or certain food substances, which sometimes elicit a
violent body response. This condition is characterized by nasal
congestion, tearing, sneezing, wheezing, coughing, itching,
skin rash and eruptions, dizziness and nausea.
Recommendations: ginger, onions, garlic, bamboo shoots, cab-
bage, beets, beet top tea, carrots, leafy greens, yams, organic
chicken gizzards, ling zhi mushrooms
Remedies:
1. Drink ginger tea to induce sweating.
118 ~ The Tao of Nutrition
2. Drink beet top tea as a water source.
Avoid: wheat, citrus fruits, chocolate, shellfish, dairy products,
eggs, potatoes, polluted meats, polluted air, and constipa-
tion
Anorexia and Bulimia
Anorexia is medically defined as a lack of appetite for food or a
hysterical avoidance of food. This condition is particularly prev-
alent among young women obsessed with being thin. There is
usually an extreme loss of weight, cessation of menstruation,
fatigue, depression, and hypoglycemic patterns. Closely related
to anorexia is bulimia, a condition in which one binges then
purges, usually by vomiting. Emotional factors playa large part
in both of these conditions.
Recommendations: bell pepper, cilantro, mustard greens, green
onions, garlic, cinnamon, ginger, pumpkin, yam, beans, corn,
barley, rice, persimmons, potatoes
Remedies:
1. For anorexia, prepare tea from green onions, garlic, cin-
namon or ginger, to warm the stomach and stimulate
digestive juices.
2. For anorexia, prepare soup from pumpkin, yam, beans,
potatoes, corn, barley or vegetables.
3. For anorexia, prepare soupy rice.
4. For bulimia, give foods that bring rebellious Chi down,
such as persimmons, cloves, potatoes, prune or plum
tea, and mineral herbs such as oyster shell or mother of
pearl shell tea.
5. For anorexia, dry fry bell pepper and black pepper.
Arthritis
Arthritis is an inflammation of the joints characterized by
pain, redness, swelling, stiffness and hot sensation in the
joints. Chinese medicine differentiates the following four
Conditions ~ 119
types of arthritis: cold, wind, damp and hot. Often we observe
two or three types of arthritis occurring simultaneously, such
as cold and damp types together. In such cases, choose foods
that aid each condition and are not contraindicated for either
type. Herbal therapy can be of great benefit in clearing joints,
improving circulation, and reducing pain. Acupuncture is one
of the most effective treatments for arthritis, although progress
is sometimes slow.
1. Cold Type Arthritis
This type is characterized by sharp, stabbing pain in a fixed
location and coldness in the joints. The pain is relieved by heat
such as a warming liniment, sunshine, or a heating pad. Usu-
ally, cold type individuals have a pale complexion.
Recommendations: garlic, green onions, pepper, black beans,
sesame seeds, chicken, lamb, mustard greens, ginger, a small
amount of rice wine if the individual does not have hyper-
tension, spicy foods, grapes, parsnips, and 10-20 minutes of
fresh air and sunshine daily
Remedies:
1. Rub garlic or ginger on the painful areas. Or moxa could
be burned on a slice of ginger over the painful areas.
2. Drink scallion tea and rub on the painful areas.
3. Rub rice wine on the painful areas and drink one small
glassful in the evening.
4. Drink grape vine tea added to red wine.
5. Make tea from parsnip, cinnamon, black pepper, and
dried ginger.
Avoid: cold foods, raw foods, cold weather elements
2. Wind Type Arthritis
This type of arthritis is characterized by pain that shifts loca-
tions, comes and goes suddenly (much like the wind does), and
sometimes causes dizziness.
120 ~ The Tao of Nutrition
Recommendations: nonpoisonous snake meat, scallions,
grapes (not wine), grape vine and mulberry vine tea, black
beans, most grains, and plenty of leafy vegetables
Avoid: meats, shellfish, sugar, alcohol, smoking, and all stimu-
lants
3. Damp Type Arthritis
This type is characterized by heavy feeling extremities, stiff-
ness, swelling, dull aching pain that lingers and sluggishness.
Most obese people tend to be damp.
Recommendations: barley, mung beans, mustard greens,
red beans, millet, sweet rice wine with meals, cornsilk tea,
diuretic foods and herbs
Remedies:
1. Cook together barley, mung beans and red beans.
2. Drink cornsilk tea freely.
Avoid: cold foods, raw foods, and dairy products
4. Heat Type Arthritis
This is characterized by red, swollen, painful, hot joints, gen-
eral disability and usually an acute onset.
Recommendations: plenty of fresh fruits and vegetables, dan-
delion, cabbage, mung beans, winter melon, soybean sprouts
Remedies:
1. Apply poultices of crushed dandelion greens, changing
every two hours.
Avoid: spicy foods, green onions, alcohol, smoking, and all
types of stress
Asthma
Asthma is characterized by wheezing or difficulty breathing
due to the bronchials (branches) of the lungs becoming clogged
Conditions ~ 121
with waste products, or constriction due to spasms, or swell-
ing of the bronchials. Asthma may be triggered by an allergy
to food, air pollution, cold air, heart weakness, previous lung
damage, mental or physical fatigue, emotional disturbance, or
hormonal imbalance. In the case of a weak heart, the heart is
not strong enough to push the blood through the lungs to be
oxygenated, and the blood flows back into the lungs. In this
case there will also be edema and bruising as well.
Chinese medicine divides asthma into two types: the hot type
characterized by rapid, coarse breathing, yellow, sticky mucus,
fever, and red face; and the cold type characterized by white,
clear, or foamy mucus, cold extremities, and pale face. The rem-
edies listed would be useful for either type. During times of
remission from asthma attacks, one would seek to nourish the
lungs and kidneys.
Recommendations: apricot kernels, almonds, walnuts, basil,
carrots, pumpkins, winter melon, sunflower seeds, loofa
squash, figs, daikon, litchi (lychee) fruit, tangerines, loquats,
honey, molasses, mustard greens, sesame seeds, placenta *
and umbilical cord *
* These substances are not easily obtainable in the United States.
Only those from a healthy mother source are desirable.
Remedies:
1. Egg yolk oil. This is made as follows: take 20 hard-boiled
egg yolks; slowly heat in a dry pan, mashing them until
the oil comes out. When the yolk has blackened, sepa-
rate the egg yolk oil. Since it is very strong tasting, it
is best taken in gelatin capsules, two after meals, three
times daily. Continue this remedy for 15-30 days.
2. Mix V2 cup fig juice with Vz cup lukewarm water and
drink daily.
3. Cut the top out of a small winter melon, remove the
seeds, fill with molasses. Close the top with cheesecloth,
and steam. Consume daily for seven days.
122 ~ The Tao of Nutrition
4. Take an unpeeled orange, pierce with a chopstick and
roast until the peel blackens. Remove the peel and eat
the fruit; one orange daily for seven days.
5. Bake squid bone until crisp; grind to a powder and take 1
teaspoon with honey daily for seven days.
6. Drink apricot kernel tea.
7. Drink fresh fig juice three times daily.
Avoid: mucus producing foods, cold foods, fruits, salads, all
shellfish, dairy products, watermelon, bananas, mung beans,
salty foods, cold weather, and especially ice cream
Cancer
According to Chinese Medicine, cancer is an abnormal growth
of tissue that results from stagnation of Chi, blood, mucus, or
body fluids. The stagnation can be caused by an external irritant
such as cigarette smoke or chemical-laden foods, or by strong
emotions. When the body is irritated over a long period of time,
it reacts to the irritant by producing cells to protect itself. How-
ever, at certain point the cell growth becomes abnormal and
uncontrollable and cancer cells result. Strong emotions lead to
Chi stagnation which in turn can lead to stagnation of blood,
mucus or body fluids.
The Western approach to cancer is to kill the cancer cells with
harsh chemicals, radiation, or surgery. However, these meth-
ods also harm healthy cells. The Chinese approach to cancer is
to support the body so that it can combat the cancer cells by
itself. Because cancer is considered to be a toxin in the body, a
detoxifying diet is also utilized.
Recommendations: seaweed, shiitake mushrooms, figs, beet
tops, papayas, mung beans, licorice, sea cucumbers, carrots,
garlic, walnuts, litchi (lychee) fruits, mulberries, asparagus,
pumpkins, burdock, dandelion greens, white fungus, taro
roots, pearl barley, grains, plenty of fresh fruits and vege-
tables
Conditions ~ 123
Remedies:
1. Blend shiitake or ling zhi mushrooms and white fungus,
boil and drink the soup three times daily.
2. Boil together mung beans, pearl barley, azuki beans, and
figs. This makes a delicious dessert that will aid appetite
and sustain energy level.
3. Make tea from dandelion, burdock, and chrysanthe-
mum flowers; you may also add beet tops or carrot tops.
Drink this as the regular beverage every day.
4. Always wash commercially grown fruits and vegetables
in salt water to neutralize chemicals.
5. Eat garlic and seaweed, slightly stir-fried in water.
6. Drink carrot and celery juice.
7. Make blender juice from a mixture of fresh vegetables
and drink warm.
8. For breast cancer, make tea from asparagus and dande-
lion and apply poultice to breast.
9. For breast tumor, charcoal the pumpkin cap into pow-
der; take one teaspoon of powder in one small glass of
rice wine twice daily.
10. Make tea from seaweed (any variety), peach kernel and
green orange peels.
11. For externally visible tumors, make a poultice from sea-
weed, ginger and dandelion, and apply locally.
Avoid: meat (if patient cannot tolerate a vegetarian diet, a little
fish can be eaten), chicken, coffee, cinnamon, anise, pepper,
dairy products, spicy foods (except garlic), high-fat foods,
cooked oils, chemical additives, moldy foods, smoking, con-
stipation, stress, and all irritations
Candida Yeast Infection
This condition is becoming fairly common in modern soci-
ety, primarily due to the widespread, long-term use of antibi-
otics which severely weakens the immune system. Everyone
has candida yeast living in our bodies; only when disharmony
124 ~ The Tao of Nutrition
and weakness occur do systemic yeast infections develop. The
symptoms include chronic fatigue, chronic infections (primar-
ily in the skin, bowels, bladder, vagina, and throat), diarrhea
or constipation, headaches, bloating, and poor digestion. When
the immune system is weakened because of overwork, exces-
sive sex, or stress, the candida flares up and the body can no
longer control it. In the case of AIDS, candida infection can
become life threatening.
Recommendation: dandelions, beet tops, carrot tops, barley,
garlic, rice vinegar, mung beans, citrus fruits
Avoid: sugar, excessive fruits, and yeast containing foods, pro-
cessed foods, cheese, fermented foods, soy sauce, smoking,
alcohol, caffeine and constipation
Cataracts
This condition usually affects older people. The lens of the
eye becomes cloudy and visual acuity is decreased. It may be
accompanied by dizziness, vertigo, fatigue, and lower back
pain. Western medicine treats cataracts by surgically removing
the lens.
Recommendations: chrysanthemum, cilantro, spinach, cloves,
water chestnuts, yams, goji berries, black beans. Exercise
the eyes regularly and get plenty of oxygen into the blood-
stream.
Remedies:
1. Stuff nose with fresh cilantro and inhale the aroma. Do
this three times daily.
2. Cook spinach with no spices and eat daily.
3. Steam the eyes over boiling spinach.
4. Grind cloves into a very fine powder and add a little
milk to make an ointment. Apply to eyes 3-5 times daily.
5. Make fresh water chestnut juice and use as an eye drop.
Conditions ~ 125
6. Make tea from clam shells, orange peels, goji berries, and
chrysanthemum. Drink three times daily for at least two
weeks.
7. Mash together black beans, sesame seeds, yams, and
walnuts. Then add a little honey and eat one tablespoon
of the mixture twice daily for one month.
Avoid: any type of spices (very important), salt, garlic, eye-
strain, constipation
Chronic Bladder Infection
This is a common condition in women, characterized by painful
or burning urination, the feeling that urine remains in the blad-
der after urinating, fever and low backache. If this condition
occurs in a man it is a warning sign of something more serious
such as venereal disease or cancer. Women are prone to chronic
bladder infections because of the short length of their urethras.
In Chinese terminology it is a condition of damp heat.
Recommendations: watermelon, cranberry, blueberry, pears,
carrots, celery, corn, mung beans, cornsilk, squash, wheat,
water chestnuts, barley, red beans, millet, cantaloupe, grapes,
strawberries, lotus roots, loquats, plenty of water, cooling
and diuretic foods in general.
Remedies:
1. Drink watermelon and pear juice three times daily.
2. Drink carrot and celery juice three times daily.
3. Drink cornsilk tea freely.
4. Eat squash soup for at least seven days.
5. Eat steamed lotus root and water chestnuts twice daily.
6. Drink blended mung bean juice.
7. Drink fresh strawberry or unsweetend cranberry juice.
S. Drink tea made from wheat and pearl barley.
Avoid: heavy proteins, meat, dairy products, onions, scallions,
ginger, black pepper, alcohol
126 ~ The Tao of Nutrition
Chronic Bronchitis
This is a common condition in older people, often due to a low-
ered immune system. It often occurs during winter and spring.
Main symptoms include cough, mucus, shortness of breath,
and a feeling of fullness in the chest.
Recommendations: carrots, apricot kernels, persimmons,
white fungus, pears, honey, jellyfish, ginger, water chest-
nuts, yams, sweet potatoes, Chinese red or black dates,
daikon radish, walnuts, papaya, peach kernels, lotus root,
seaweed, betel nut, white pepper, loquat leaves, lily bulbs,
pine nuts, mulberry leaves, chrysanthemum, ginko nuts,
basil seeds, pumpkins, taro, winter melon seeds. Always try
to keep warm.
Remedies:
1. Cook carrots and apricot kernels in rice porridge. Eat
three times daily for one month.
2. Take white fungus and rock sugar, steam and eat 2-3
times daily for one month.
3. Remove cores of 2-3 pears and fill with honey, eat before
bed every day for one month.
4. Blend together jellyfish and water chestnut to make
soup.
5. Mash together ginger, apricot kernels, pine nuts, and
walnuts; add rock sugar, and steam. Eat 2-3 tablespoons
twice daily for at least two weeks.
6. Make juice from pineapple and lemon; drink before
meals for immediate relief.
7. Boil three dried persimmons in two cups of water, re-
duced to one cup. Add some honey and drink 2-3 times
daily.
8. Add maltose to daikon radish and steam. Eat 2-3 times
daily for relief within one week.
9. Peel a papaya, add some honey, steam and eat.
10. Grind seaweed into powder, add honey and make into
small pills. Take one teaspoon of pills 2-3 times daily
after meals.
Conditions ~ 127
11. Boil tea from betel nuts, drink as your water for one
month.
12. Make a tea from carrots, white pepper, ginger, and dried
orange peels. Drink two cups daily.
13. Warm one tablespoon each of honey and sesame oil, in a
pan and take for immediate relief.
14. Cut banana into small pieces and cook with rock sugar
until sugar melts. Eat 1-2 pieces of banana every evening
for one week.
15. Use seed from such vegetables as daikon, basil, spinach,
and make tea, adding honey.
16. Take one tablespoon molasses and 1/2 tablespoon raw
ginger juice with warm water 2-3 times daily.
17. Use fresh, yellow chrysanthemum flowers and boil into
a thick juice; take regularly.
18. Mash cooked taro root and add honey.
19. Drink raw eggplant juice (especially good for blood in
the mucus).
Avoid: overworking, getting chilled, stimulating foods, spicy
foods, smoking, alcohol, caffeine, cold drinks
Chronic Fatigue Syndrome
This syndrome consists of a set of variable symptoms including
chronic or recurrent fatigue, sore throat, tender lymph nodes,
headaches, muscle pains, and general depression. Often the
patient has flu-like symptoms that extend for a long period of
time. Most chronic fatigue patients are observed to have under-
gone prolonged stress, repeated infections, and often become
overwhelmed by life's simple demands. Conditions like her-
pes, candida and hypoglycemia compound the situation. The
patient is advised to seek lifestyle corrections such as reducing
stress, resting more, and gentle exercise.
Recommendations: winter melon, pumpkins, pumpkin seeds,
yams, sweet potatoes, lima beans, black beans, soybeans,
strawberries, watermelon, azuki beans, pineapple, chestnuts,
128 ~ The Tao of Nutrition
papaya, figs, garlic, onions, scallions, ginger, daikon radish,
pearl barley, lotus seed, white fungus, egg white, cabbage,
carrots, pears, organic chicken, mung beans, buckwheat,
jujube dates
Remedies:
1. Eat frequent, small meals and drink more liquids.
2. Juice and drink daily: fresh water chestnut, lotus root,
pear, watermelon, and carrots.
3. Make soup from lotus seed, white fungus and figs.
4. Chop garlic finely and stir-fry with egg white, parsley
and diced yams.
5. Make soup from cabbage, azuki beans, winter melon
and pumpkin.
6. Make chicken soup with garlic, onions, scallions, ginger
and daikon radish. Drink soup or cook rice porridge with
the broth.
7. Make buckwheat and rice porridge with chestnuts and
longan fruit (Euphoria longan).
Avoid: dairy products, alcohol, coffee, sugar, fatty or fried
foods, overly spicy foods, cold and raw foods, tomato, egg-
plant, bell pepper, shellfish
Chronic Sinus Infection
This condition is due to an acute inflammation of the nasal
passages over a long period of time. There is often drainage or
congestion, difficulty breathing through the nose, sometimes
dryness of the nostrils, headaches, and ringing in the ears.
Recommendations: ginger, green onions, magnolia flower,
bananas, garlic, black mushrooms, chrysanthemum flowers,
mulberry leaves, apricot kernels. Get plenty of fresh air.
Remedies:
1. Make tea from magnolia flower, basil, ginger, and green
onion. Drink three times daily for at least one week.
2. Combine magnolia flowers and eggs, cook and eat.
Conditions ~ 129
3. Make tea from mulberry leaves and chrysanthemums,
then cook rice porridge in the tea, adding apricot kernels.
4. Mash green onions, soak cotton balls and alternately put
in nostrils after having washed them with salt water.
5. Mix garlic juice and olive oil, soak cotton balls with mix-
ture and alternately put in nostrils after having washed
them with salt water.
6. Cook black mushrooms into a concentrated soup, then
slowly use a dropper to put drops in the nose.
7. Boil tea of mint, basil, and ginger. While boiling the tea,
inhale the steam through the nose, three times daily for
at least two months.
Avoid: extremes of exposure to weather elements, coffee, smok-
ing, stress, picking the nose, polluted air and smog
Common Cold
There are two basic types or stages of colds. In Chinese termi-
nology they are the wind cold type and the wind heat type.
They have different symptoms and different treatments.
1. Wind cold type
This type often occurs during a change in the weather or when
one is exposed to wind and cold. With a weak immune function,
these pathogens enter the skin. The symptoms could include
chills, fever, no sweating, headache, body ache, stiff neck, and
clear copious nasal discharge. This is often the first stage of a
cold. When the pathogens are at this initial, superficial stage,
we seek to sweat them out. A hot bath or dry sauna could be
beneficial to begin the sweating process.
Recommendations: ginger, garlic, mustard greens and seeds,
grapefruit peel, cilantro, parsnip, scallions, cinnamon, basil,
soupy rice porridge, and eating as little as possible so as not
to burden the body with a lot of digestion
130 ~ The Tao of Nutrition
Remedies:
1. Lightly boil for five minutes the following: garlic, ginger,
green onion, basil, mustard, or cinnamon. Drink the tea;
go to bed and prepare to sweat.
2. Drink cilantro and ginger tea.
3. Drink scallion and basil tea.
4. Make tea from dried grapefruit peel.
5. Make tea from mustard greens, ci.1antro and green onion.
6. Make tea from parsnip and ginger.
Avoid: shellfish, heavy proteins and fats, meats and all vinegars.
Vinegar closes the pores and "traps the thief in the house. II
2. Wind heat type
This type of common cold is characterized by high fever, some
chills, sweating, sore throat, cough, headache, body ache, and
yellow nasal discharge or sputum.
Recommendations: mint, cabbage, chrysanthemum flowers,
burdock root, cilantro, dandelion, apples, pears, bitter melon,
drink plenty of fluids and get plenty of rest
Remedies:
1. Drink cabbage broth freely.
2. Drink cilantro and mint tea.
3. Drink mint, chrysanthemum and dandelion tea.
4. Drink mint, dandelion and licorice tea.
5. Drink burdock tea.
Avoid: shellfish, meats, vinegar, drafts, and hot foods
Constipation
Constipation is a lack of regular evacuation of the bowels or
difficulty in defecation. The resulting symptoms may include
bloating, abdominal pain, abdominal hardness, and bad breath.
We should evacuate at least once daily, with the optimal times
energetically being from 5:00 a.m.-7:00 a.m. The longer the
Conditions ~ 131
waste remains in the intestines, the drier it gets and the more
difficult to pass. Food takes about 6-8 hours to go from the
mouth to the intestines. Strained evacuation leads to hemor-
rhoids. Regular enemas or colonics are not a healthy solution
to the problem. It is best to set a certain time for evacuation
and train the body to respond accordingly. Rubbing the belly
in a clockwise direction 100 times can stimulate peristalsis.
Breathing with the mouth open is also beneficial in stimulating
a bowel movement
Recommendations: bananas, apples, walnuts, figs, spinach,
peaches, pears, pine nuts, sesame seeds, mulberries, grape-
fruit, yams, honey, azuki beans, apricot kernel, milk, yogurt,
alfalfa sprouts, beets, cabbage, bok choy, cauliflower, potato,
Chinese cabbage, salt water
Remedies:
1. Eat two bananas on an empty stomach, followed by a
glass of water.
2. Drink a glass of lukewarm water with 2 teaspoons of
honey on an empty stomach.
3. Drink blended beets and cabbage on an empty stomach.
4. Make beet soup.
5. Eat 5-10 figs on an empty stomach, followed by a glass
of water.
6. Drink a glass of lukewarm water with 2 teaspoons of
salt, on an empty stomach. This remedy should be used
as a last resort when nothing else has worked and should
not be used by those with edema or hypertension.
7. Eat a fresh apple on an empty stomach.
8. Drink mulberry juice.
9. Eat lightly steamed asparagus and cabbage at night be-
fore retiring.
Avoid: stress, tension, spicy foods, fried foods and meat
132 ~ The Tao of Nutrition
Coronary Heart Disease
This is a condition in which the arteries that supply the heart
become hardened and clogged, eventually leading to depriva-
tion of oxygen and nourishment to the heart, thereby causing
heart attack. Recent research has attributed the cause of coro-
nary heart disease to faulty diet, obesity, continuous stress and
tension, mental fatigue, hypertension, diabetes, low thyroid
function, and smoking. Typical symptoms with coronary heart
disease are dizziness, vertigo, palpitations, chest fullness, short-
ness of breath, pain in the chest area, irregular heart beat, spon-
taneous sweating, hardness in the lips and tongue, and angina
pain when there is an obstruction.
Recommendations: American ginseng, brown rice, black fun-
gus, sea cucumber, Chinese black dates, peanuts, vinegar,
shiitake mushrooms, celery, seaweed, cassia seeds, lotus
roots, jellyfish, chrysanthemums, hawthorn berries, water
chestnuts, mung beans, pearl barley, peach kernels, ginger,
soy sprouts, mung sprouts, other sprouts, wheat bran, buck-
wheat, persimmons, bananas, watermelon, sunflower seeds,
lotus seeds, black sesame seeds, wheat, garlic, green tea
Remedies:
1. Take three grams American ginseng and cook with one
cup brown rice and some rock sugar. Cook into a por-
ridge and consume every morning.
2. Soak black fungus and black mushrooms overnight, then
steam one hour; eat before bedtime.
3. Steam together the following: sea cucumber, Chinese
black dates. Eat every morning on an empty stomach.
4. Soak 10-15 peanuts in rice vinegar for 24 hours and
consume both the peanuts and the rice vinegar in the
morning.
5. Cook tea from white or button mushrooms and Chinese
black dates. Drink twice daily for one month.
6. Make tea from seaweed, cassia seeds, and lotus root.
Drink the tea and eat the seaweed and lotus root twice
daily for at least one month.
Conditions ~ 133
7. Combine jellyfish, water chestnut, and rice vinegar;
cook together into a soup.
8. Cook celery and yellow squash soup and eat once a day
for at least twenty days.
9. Make tea from chrysanthemum flowers, hawthorn ber-
ries, and cassia seeds. Drink one cup three times daily for
at least twenty days.
10. Take black fungus, pearl barley, and dried orange peel
and boil into a soup.
11. Grind betel nut and hawthorn berries; add rice flour, stir
together and steam. Eat often.
12. Take one tablespoon honey three times daily.
13. Steam soy and alfalfa sprouts together and add some rice
vinegar.
14. Slightly roast wheat and oat bran with black sesame and
sunflower seeds. Sprinkle on vegetables or porridge.
15. Drink at least two cups green tea every day.
16. Go on a watermelon fast for three consecutive days.
17. Take peach kernels, safflowers, hawthorn berries, and
make tea. Drink two cups daily for at least one month.
Avoid: fatty foods, stimulating foods, spicy foods, coffee,
smoking, alcohol, simple carbohydrates (sugar, white flour),
salt, stress, tension, worrying, emotional stimulation, lack
of sleep
Diabetes
Diabetes is characterized by a high level of sugar in the blood
and urine. Symptoms include excessive thirst, hunger, and uri-
nation. The Chinese refer to this condition as exhaustion syn-
drome. Proper exercise is of utmost importance in stimulating
normal glandular functions; exercises such as tai chi chuan, chi
gong or the Taoist Eight Treasures are particularly valuable (visit
www.taoofwellness.com for DVDs and books).
Recommendations: pumpkin, wheat, mung beans, winter
melon, celery, pears, spinach, yams, peas, sweet rice, soy-
134 ~ The Tao of Nutrition
beans, tofu, mulberries, squash, daikon radish, cabbage,
organic pig or chicken pancreas
Remedies:
1. Eat a slice of pumpkin with each meal.
2. Make pumpkin and yam pie with no sweeteners.
3. Prepare soup from cabbage, yam, winter melon, and
lentils.
4. Drink daikon, celery, carrot, and spinach juice.
5. Steam tofu, cool to room temperature, add sesame oil
and slices of raw squash.
6. Make soup from mung beans, peas, and barley.
7. Drink chrysanthemum tea whenever thirsty.
8. Eat non-sweetened sweet rice cake or mochi between
meals.
9. Steam millet with yam and a few dates.
Avoid: sweets, sugar, honey, molasses, smoking, alcohol, caf-
feine, spicy foods and most raw fruits
Diarrhea
This is characterized by the frequent passage of abnormally
watery stools, usually caused by increased peristalsis, irrita-
tion of the intestines through improper diet, drugs, bacterial
infections, parasites, or worms. This differs from dysentery in
that diarrhea is generally due to digestive weakness, biological
imbalance, and in general is a chronic condition. Dysentery, on
the other hand, is caused by an infectious condition.
Recommendations: garlic, black pepper, blueberries, cinna-
mon, raspberry leaves, lotus seeds, burned rice, yams, sweet
potatoes, fresh fig leaves, peas, buckwheat, litchi, guava peel,
apples, charcoaled bread, ginger, pearl barley, basil, unripe
prunes
Remedies:
1. Cook rice porridge with lotus seed and yam or with
barley.
Conditions ~ 135
2. Eat burnt rice or bread.
3. Make tea from dried litchi and Chinese black date.
4. Take two tablespoons dried apples, three times daily on
an empty stomach with warm water.
5. Cook rice porridge with ginger and black pepper.
6. Drink black tea.
7. Take two bulbs of garlic, bake until black. Then boil in
water and drink the tea.
8. Make tea from guava peel.
9. Make tea from ginger, fennel, basil, and Chinese black
dates.
10. Make tea from unripe prunes.
11. Eat sweet rice porridge.
Avoid: cold, raw foods, most fruits, juices, overeating
Dysentery
Dysentery is a condition of intestinal inflammation character-
ized by abdominal pain, intense, urgent, watery diarrhea with
foul smelling, bloody or mucous feces, dry mouth, thirst, and
decreased urination. To prevent dehydration, plenty of fluids
should be consumed. The person will sometimes defecate 30 or
40 times daily. Food poisoning can be a possible cause. Dysen-
tery is considered to be contagious and is usually transmitted
through unsanitary food or water. Sometimes the person also
has vomiting.
Recommendations: buckwheat, sweet potatoes, peas, cel-
ery, scallions, taro root, ginger, garlic, carrots, daikon rad-
ish, green pepper, winter melon, cantaloupe, bitter melon,
hawthorn berries, figs, Chinese prunes, pears, persimmons,
guavas, olives, sunflower seeds, lotus roots, tea, soy prod-
ucts, corn, pumpkins, water chestnuts, squash, honey, mung
beans, cherries, pineapples, watermelon, brown rice, oats,
chicken eggs (only if chronic)
136 ~ The Tao of Nutrition
Remedies:
1. Take carrot juice mixed with a little ginger juice, honey,
and green tea; drink one cup daily.
2. Make mung bean soup and drink throughout the day.
3. Stir-fry ginger, garlic, celery and peas together; incorpo-
rate into regular diet.
4. Eat four persimmons daily.
5. Soak Chinese prunes in rice wine for three days; take 10
prunes twice daily.
6. Make sweet potato and pumpkin mush and have three
times a day; for breakfast, lunch, and dinner.
7. Steam black fungus with a little sugar in about 1- liz
cups of water.
S. Charcoal dried ginger, powder it, and take one teaspoon
with soupy rice.
9. Drink sour prune tea before meals on an empty stom-
ach.
10. Drink plum peel tea.
11. Cook brown rice with persimmon cap and consume the
rice.
12. Consume eggs cooked with rice vinegar. This remedy is
only appropriate for chronic cases of dysentery.
Avoid: dairy products, eggs, high-fiber foods, hard to digest
foods, fried foods, meats, fish, raw foods, cold foods, chicken
eggs (in acute cases of dysentery)
Eczema
This is a common skin condition that often affects extremities,
genitalia, as well as other parts. The skin lesion is characterized
by a raised spot that turns into a blister and eventually erupts,
ulcerates and then forms a scab which is later sloughed off. It
can cause extreme itching and pain.
Recommendations: potatoes, broccoli, dandelion, mung beans,
seaweed, pearl barley, azuki beans, corns ilk, water chestnuts,
winter melon, watermelon
Conditions ~ 137
Remedies:
1. Mash fresh potato and apply locally, changing every four
hours, for three days.
2. Apply honey to area.
3. Apply mashed daikon radish to area.
4. Make tea from mung beans and pearl barley and drink.
5. Make tea from dandelion and corns ilk.
6. Make tea from azuki beans, pearl barley, and cornsilk.
Drink tea and eat the solids three times daily.
7. Boil soup from seaweed and winter melon, drinking at
least once a day for ten days.
8. Externally, wash with equal portions of salt and borax,
dissolved in warm water; wash area 2-3 times daily.
9. Make tea from lily bulbs, Chinese black dates, and mul-
berries, drink three times daily for at least ten days.
Avoid: external stimulation such as extreme weather condi-
tions of wind, cold, dampness, dryness, heat; excessive sun
exposure, chemical exposure. Use clean water to bathe; avoid
soap.
Edema/Swelling
Edema is a condition of swelling due to abnormal accumula-
tion of fluids in the cells. It can occur anywhere in the body,
however, the common places that edema occurs are face, lower
extremities, and abdomen. Abdominal edema can cause ascites
and is usually related to liver dysfunction, such as cirrhosis of
the liver. The treatment is chosen to promote diuresis and ease
urination. Heart, kidney, and lungs are the organs that may be
involved.
Recommendations: red azuki beans, corn, ginger skin, win-
ter melon, winter melon skin, squash, apples, mulberries,
peaches, tangerines, coconuts, seaweed, fish, celery, green
onions, garlic, bamboo shoots, spinach, water chestnuts,
millet, wheat, black beans, pearl barley, carrots, watermelon,
oats, beef
138 ~ The Tao of Nutrition
Remedies:
1. Take fish, preferably carp, and cook into soup with azuki
beans. Use ten cups of water and cook down to one cup;
consume only the liquid.
2. Take winter melon rind and azuki beans and enough
water to cover; cook and eat three times daily.
3. Drink blended juice of apple, carrot, and green onion
twice daily.
4. Boil tea made from ginger skin.
5. Cook together pearl barley, mung beans, and azuki beans
into a soup; consume three times daily. You may also
add black beans to this soup.
6. Daily diet should be bland and should include plenty of
vegetables and fish.
7. Eat plenty of watermelon in the summer.
8. Drink coconut juice daily.
9. Cook oats and mung beans to a mash and consume until
swelling subsides.
10. Consume soupy pearl barley.
11. Drink beef stew broth.
12. Drink tea made from watermelon rind.
Avoid: rich foods, salty foods, lamb, stimulating foods, wine,
garlic, pepper, shellfish, fatty foods, and greasy foods
Glaucoma
This is a disease characterized by an increase in the pressure
inside of the eye. Its onset can be either acute or chronic. The
sufferer often complains that lights have halos around them.
The condition can progress to a point in which the pressure
causes atrophy of the optic nerve, leading to blindness. During
the onset, there may be pain, headaches, nausea, vomiting, and
blurry vision.
Recommendations: chrysanthemum, mint, oyster shells, mul-
berries, black sesame seeds, betel nuts, goji berries, cassia seeds,
grapefruit, lemons, oranges, carrots, beets, beet tops
Conditions ~ 139
Remedies:
1. Boil tea from mulberries, oyster shell, and black sesame
seeds; drink three times daily.
2. Make tea from chrysanthemum and mint; drink twice
daily.
3. Boil tea from betel nut; drink twice daily.
4. Boil tea from cassia seeds, orange peels, beets, and goji
berries; then use the tea to cook rice porridge; add a little
honey.
Avoid: Self-treatment is not recommended due to the serious-
ness of this condition. Seek professional guidance for close
observation of the condition. Avoid visual stimulation, stim-
ulating foods, alcohol, drugs, smoking, coffee, salt, drinking
too much water
Headache
There are many different types of headaches, such as migraines
and headaches caused by muscular tension, hypertension, com-
mon cold, mental stress, hormonal changes, and eye strain.
Each type of headache has a corresponding treatment.
Recommendations: chrysanthemum flowers, mint, green
onions, ginger, oyster shells, pearl barley, carrots, prunes,
buckwheat, peach kernels
Remedies for headaches due to common cold or flu:
1. Make tea from ginger and green onions, boiling for five
minutes; drink and try to sweat.
2. Steam aching portion of head over mint and cinnamon
tea that is cooking, then dry head afterwards, avoiding
drafts.
3. Make tea from chrysanthemum flowers, cassia seeds and
drink.
4. Make buckwheat meal into a paste and apply to painful
area until it sweats.
5. Drink green tea.
140 ~ The Tao of Nutrition
6. Make rice porridge and add garlic and green onions. Eat
while hot, then get under covers and sweat.
Remedies for headaches due to high blood pressure,
menstrual cycles, emotional stress or tension, or migraines:
1. Make carrot juice. If headache is on left side, squirt car-
rot juice into left nostril; if only right side, squirt into
right nostril; if both sides are painful, squirt into both
nostrils.
2. Take lemon juice and V2 tablespoon baking soda mixed in
a glass of water and drink.
3. Make tea of Chinese prunes, mint, and green tea.
4. Make tea of oyster shells and chrysanthemum flowers,
slowly boiling the shells for 1 V2 hours, then adding the
flowers for the last 30 minutes.
5. Mash peach kernels and walnuts, mix with rice wine
and lightly roast it; take two tablespoons three times
daily.
6. Rinse head with warm water, gradually increasing the
temperature to hot.
Avoid: spicy food, lack of sleep, alcohol, smoking, excessive
stimulation, eye strain, stress
For menstrual-type headaches, please see section on Premenstrual
Syndrome (PMS).
Hemorrhoids
This common condition is related to constipation. With dry
stools, the person strains to move the bowels which causes fric-
tion on delicate rectal tissues. Sometimes it can cause bleeding.
Hemorrhoids can be due to over-consumption of alcohol, spicy
or fried foods, lack of exercise, sitting or standing too long, too
much sex, pregnancy, or chronic constipation. A hemorrhoid is
a varicose vein in the rectum and can be very painful.
Conditions ~ 141
Recommendations: sea cucumber, black fungus, water chest-
nut, buckwheat, tangerines, figs, plums, fish, prunes, guavas,
bamboo shoots, mung beans, winter melon, black sesame
seeds, persimmons, bananas, squash, cucumbers, taro, tofu,
cooling foods
Remedies:
1. Soak lower body in a warm bath to which has been
added the tea of either mugwort (Artemsia argyi), car-
rot tops or figs. Bath should be warm enough to induce
sweating and done daily.
2. Take black fungus with rice every morning for breakfast
on an empty stomach; do this for one month.
3. Steam sea cucumber without salt or spices and eat for
immediate pain relief.
4. Roast and grind black sesame seeds; take with warm
water and honey every night before retiring.
5. Steam dried persimmons and eat.
6. Wash hemorrhoid with winter melon tea.
7. Boil papaya tea for two hours, without the skin, soak
the area.
8. Grind mung bean powder, boil with dandelion greens
and wash area with the tea.
9. Steam figs; add honey and steam again several times,
until it becomes soggy; consume every day.
10. Insert a raw potato suppository after each bowel move-
ment.
11. Eat a banana every day on an empty stomach.
The following remedies are used for bleeding hemorrhoids:
1. Cook black fungus with brown sugar; consume daily.
2. Eat three bananas with some honey on an empty stom-
ach every morning.
3. Eat a fresh squash before breakfast and after dinner
everyday for two weeks.
142 ~ The Tao of Nutrition
4. Make taro root soup and eat regularly until bleeding
stops and hemorrhoid heals.
5. Mash fresh plums and take with lukewarm water three
times daily.
6. Wash area with hot water, then apply a cotton ball that
has been soaked in garlic juice. Change cotton ball every
hour.
Avoid: stimulating foods, spicy foods, alcohol, smoking, consti-
pation, stress, lack of exercise, standing or sitting too long
Hepatitis
Hepatitis is a liver condition that can be caused by many drugs
and toxic agents, as well as by numerous viruses. The manifes-
tations include jaundice, anorexia, nausea, vomiting, malaise,
fever, tender liver area, and flu-like symptoms. Upon examina-
tion of the blood, the liver enzymes are abnormally high. Viral
Hepatitis A is generally transmitted via the fecal-oral route,
whereas viral Hepatitis Band C is transmitted via blood and
sexual fluids. Bed rest is necessary in the initial stages. Hepati-
tis Band C can become chronic.
Recommendations: rice, barley, millet, azuki bean, pearl bar-
ley, squash, cucumber, grapefruit, ling zhi mushroom, corn-
silk, dandelion greens, beet greens, pears, water chestnut,
carrot, cabbage, spinach, celery, winter melon, rice vinegar,
apple, orange, pineapple, lotus root, watermelon
Remedies:
1. Cook lotus root and puree, then cook into rice or millet
porridge.
2. Make tea from cornsilk, dandelion and beet greens.
Drink regularly as a beverage.
3. Juice watermelon, celery and pears.
4. Make mung bean soup with pearl barley.
5. Soak grapefruit and peel in rice vinegar overnight, then
take one teaspoon in one cup of warm liquid.
Conditions ~ 143
6. Make tea from ling zhi mushrooms and jujube dates.
7. Take cucumber juice on empty stomach every morning.
8. Charcoal grapefruit peel and take Y2 teaspoon with rice
water after every meal.
9. Make soup from winter melon and kabocha squash.
Avoid: dairy products, alcohol, coffee, sugar, fatty and fried
foods, overly spicy foods, cold and raw foods, tomato, egg-
plant, bell peppers, shellfish
Hives
Hives is a skin condition which is characterized by an intermit-
tent attack of extreme itching which results in welts, primar-
ily on the arms, legs, back and face. These elevated spots can
spread throughout the entire body with scratching. Hives may
be brought on by an exposure to an allergen or after consump-
tion of shellfish. This condition in Chinese Medicine is consid-
ered an invasion of wind.
Recommendations: winter melon rind, chrysanthemum, vin-
egar, papaya, ginger, Chinese black dates, dried prunes, black
sesame seeds, black beans, litchi, pearl barley, cornsilk, soy-
beans, mung beans, licorice, hawthorn berries, peach kernels,
maple leaves, shiitake mushrooms, mint
Remedies:
1. Externally, take a sea salt bath, rubbing salt on the hives.
2. Boil a thick tea from fresh maple leaves for an external
wash of hives.
3. Internally, drink tea made from 15 grams gypsum,
9 grams hawthorn berries, 60 grams black beans, some
winter melon rind and chrysanthemum flowers. Add
some honey and drink three times daily.
4. Cook together papaya, ginger and rice vinegar until vin-
egar dries up. Eat the ginger and papaya twice daily for
at least ten days.
5. Mix honey with rice wine and steam. Drink two table-
spoons on an empty stomach every morning.
144 ~ The Tao of Nutrition
6. Cook together black sesame seeds, black beans, and Chi-
nese black dates and eat at least once daily.
7. Make tea of dried litchi, add some brown sugar and
drink three times daily.
8. Make tea of lotus seeds and Vz teaspoon pearl powder.
9. Make tea of cornsilk and pearl barley and drink twice
daily for at least ten days.
10. Take equal portions of mung and soybeans, grind into
powder, add water and boil fifteen minutes. Then strain
and drink one cup twice daily.
11. Make tea of licorice, mung beans, and gypsum, drink
three times daily for at least three days.
12. Eat 2-3 dried prunes daily.
Avoid: shellfish, allergic foods
Hypertension
Hypertension, or high blood pressure, is characterized by a wiry
and rapid pulse, headache, dizziness, tinnitus, blurry vision,
palpitations, chest tightness or fullness, fatigue, insomnia, ver-
tigo and numbness of the extremities. It is commonly caused
by hardening of the arteries, kidney dysfunction, or liver dys-
function. The normal range of blood pressure is between 100-
135 mmHg for the systolic measurement and 70-85 mmHg for
the diastolic measurement.
Recommendations: celery, spinach, garlic, bananas, sunflower
seeds, honey, tofu, mung beans, bamboo shoots, seaweed,
vinegar, tomatoes, water chestnuts, corn, apples, persim-
mons, peas, buckwheat, jellyfish, watermelon, hawthorn
berries, eggplant, plums, mushrooms, lemons, lotus root,
chrysanthemum, cassia seeds
Remedies:
1. Drink warm celery juice three times daily.
2. Eat two raw tomatoes on an empty stomach every day
for a month.
Conditions ~ 145
3. Drink water, vinegar and honey regularly.
4. Drink chrysanthemum and spinach tea regularly.
5. Drink cornsilk tea.
6. Sleep on a pillow of chrysanthemum flowers to draw
heat out of the head.
7. Make mung bean soup.
8. Take garlic oil capsules to clean out the arteries. The
capsules have the advantage of not overly stimulating
the taste buds in the warming direction. The taste buds
start the functions of many physiological processes; the
spicy flavor can be too stimulating, in general for hyper-
sensitive individuals.
9. Steam or bake jellyfish about twelve minutes; add vin-
egar, soy sauce, and sesame oil. Take daily for about two
months.
10. Steam tofu, cool to room temperature, add vinegar and
sesame oil. This can be combined with soupy rice for a
nutritious breakfast.
11. Make lotus root tea and drink three cups daily for one
month.
12. Make tea from chrysanthemum flowers and cassia seeds
and drink daily.
13. Steam white fungus for two hours and take before bed-
time.
14. Drink hawthorn berry tea continuously for a long period
of time.
15. Make soup from abalone and seaweed.
16. During the summer months, make watermelon juice or
eat watermelon every day.
17. Make tea from watermelon rind, mugwort, and mul-
berry branches, drink three cups daily for two months.
18. Take celery, white onion (sweet), garlic, water chestnuts,
tomatoes and four cups water; boil down to one cup and
drink every night before bed.
146 ~ The Tao of Nutrition
19. Make soup using seaweed, pearl barley and a little
honey; eat every day for five days.
20. Mix pig bile and mung bean powder; take one teaspoon
daily for at least eight days.
21. Eat soup of black or white mushrooms daily.
22. Eat three apples daily.
23. Drink organic banana peel tea.
24. Make tea from one peeled lemon, ten fresh water chest-
nuts, and 2 Y2 cups water.
25. Drink three glasses daily of unripened persimmon juice
for one week.
Avoid: smoking, alcohol, spicy foods, coffee, caffeine, all stimu-
lants, fatty or fried foods, salty foods, stress, constipation,
potatoes, strong emotions, pork, overeating, and low levels
of calcium * in the body
* For low calcium levels, make tea made from shells (oyster, abalone,
mother of pearl) or fossils (dragon bones and teeth)i strain and
drink.
Hypoglycemia
This very common condition is due to a stressful lifestyle and
a heavily sugar laden diet. Hypoglycemia is characterized by
low blood sugar, chronic fatigue, nervousness, shakiness, head-
aches, fatigue when hungry, irritability or faintness if a meal
is late, sweet cravings, waking at night hungry, night sweats,
light-headedness, mood swings, depression and difficulty con-
centrating.
Recommendations: sweet rice, brown rice, yams, potatoes,
walnuts, tofu, soybeans, corn, fish, chicken, vegetables,
black beans, nuts (a good snack between meals), mild exer-
cise, regular meal schedule, 4-5 small meals daily
Avoid: simple carbohydrates such as white flour and sugar,
honey, fructose, maple syrup, sweet fruits (eat very sparingly),
coffee, smoking, fatty or fried foods, and all stimulants
Conditions ~ 147
Impotence
This is a weak condition, most likely due to a nervous weak-
ness, excessive stress, worrying, tension, physical fatigue, fre-
quent masturbation, or excessive indulgence in sex. Impotence
is characterized by not being able to have an erection when
there is a desire to have intercourse, and there may be premature
ejaculation. Other symptoms may include dizziness, insomnia,
excessive dreams, low appetite, back pain, lower extremities
weakness, knee pain and fatigue.
Recommendations: scallions, scallion seeds, lamb, sea cucum-
ber, shrimps, rooster, bitter melon seeds, ginseng, black
beans, kidney beans, yams, goji berries, maintaining com-
posure. Tonifying foods are needed, thus many of the rem-
edies include meat, however impotence does not have to be
treated with meat.
Remedies:
1. Make lamb stew with daikon radish and Chinese black
dates. Drink the broth and eat the lamb.
2. Make cake from black sweet rice, black sesame seeds,
black fungus, lotus seeds, walnuts, and black beans. Eat
with Vz glass of red wine.
3. Steam rooster with ginger.
4. Dry roast dried shrimps, sea cucumber, and fennel, then
grind into a powder. Take one teaspoon three times daily
with rice wine.
5. Roast and grind bitter melon seeds. Take one teaspoon
three times daily with rice wine.
6. Make tea from walnuts, lotus seeds, pearl barley, Chinese
black dates and goji berries. Drink three times daily.
7. Add 50 grams of chopped ginseng to Y2 bottle of white
liquor (like vodka or gin). Seal bottle, shake bottle daily,
and preserve for one month. Drink one shot every night
with dinner for at least twenty days.
8. Cook together scallions, shrimp, and egg. Eat with a
shot of white liquor.
148 ~ The Tao of Nutrition
Avoid: obscene visual stimulation, dairy products, sweets,
masturbation, overwork, too much sex
Indigestion
This is a condition of poor digestion due to a weak stomach,
lack of digestive enzymes, or eating too fast. This causes a stag-
nation of food in the stomach, resulting in abdominal fullness
or distention, bloating and sometimes diarrhea due to insuf-
ficient digestion.
Recommendations: hawthorn berries, papayas, sweet pota-
toes or yams, daikon radish, black sesame seeds, apples,
oranges, parsley. It is important to eat slowly and chew the
food properly because digestion begins in the mouth.
Remedies:
1. Dry and age orange peel for about one month. Boil tea
and take after meals or simply suck on the peel for indi-
gestion.
2. Eat papaya twice daily, in any form.
3. Eat sweet potato cooked with brown sugar and water.
In the last three minutes of cooking this mush, add
some rice wine. Eat regularly for two weeks to improve
digestion.
4. Blend daikon radish juice and take after meals.
5. Roast black sesame seeds with salt and take with warm
water.
6. Eat a leaf of fresh mugwort, or blend into a juice.
7. Drink apple, lemon, or orange juice after meals; or eat an
apple after each meal.
8. Consume Y2 cup of overdone rice (from bottom of pan)
mixed with cardamom, fennel and orange peels.
9. Make tea from sweet rice sprouts and malt.
Avoid: rich foods, fatty foods, tension and stress while eating,
reading the newspaper or watching television while eating
as this takes energy away from digestion
Conditions ~ 149
Kidney Weakness
This common ailment is characterized by weakness and lack
of energy. In Chinese medicine, the Kidney system involves
much more than just filtering water. It also includes storing the
essence of life (sperms and eggs); controlling the bones, bone
marrow and the brain (called the sea of marrow); growth, main-
tenance, and reproduction; producing blood; and opening to
the ear. The adrenal function is included in the kidney system;
thus adrenal exhaustion is Kidney exhaustion. Weakness of the
Kidneys often manifests as problems in the back, knees, ears, or
reproductive functions. The Kidney is of great importance to
health and longevity. Kidney function (and resulting problems)
can be divided into Kidney Yang and Kidney Yin.
1. Kidney Yang deficiency
This is characterized by impotence, infertility, coldness, swol-
len extremities, swollen face, frequent urination, premature
ejaculation, diarrhea, low sexual drive, low energy, fatigue, pale
face and tongue, low back pain, knee pain or weakness, deaf-
ness, ringing in the ears, and a general feeling as though the fire
of life is about to be extinguished.
Recommendations: warming foods, chicken, lamb, scallions,
sesame seeds, fish, baked tofu, soybeans, walnuts, eggs, len-
tils, black beans, lotus seeds, a little wine, ginger, cinnamon
bark tea
Avoid: cold foods, cold fruits, raw foods
2. Kidney Yin deficiency
In this condition there is not enough water to cool the fire so
it manifests as heat symptoms. These may include irritability,
insomnia, red cheeks, night sweats, low afternoon fever, damp
palms, damp soles of the feet, dry mouth, low back pain, invol-
untary seminal emissions, ear ringing, red tongue, and blurry
150 ~ The Tao of Nutrition
vision. Kidney Yin deficiency often occurs in thin people since
yin corresponds to substance.
Recommendations: cooling foods, mulberries, apples, peaches,
pears, fresh vegetables, mung beans, soybeans, tofu, soy
sprouts, chrysanthemum flowers
Avoid: hot foods, spicy foods, smoking, alcohol, stress, and
strong emotions
Mastitis
This is an inflammation of the mammary glands, often occur-
ring 3-4 weeks after delivery. It is a very common condition,
resulting from an obstructed mammary duct and is accompa-
nied by a bacterial infection. There may be distention of the
breast, swelling, redness on the surface, and fever. As the con-
dition progresses, the symptoms may worsen and the patient
may have chills, fever, increase in white blood cell count, swol-
len and painful lymph glands in the armpits, pus and ulceration
of breast.
Recommendations: cooling foods such as cabbage, cucumber,
dandelion, lettuce, malt, reed root, lotus root, honeysuckle.
It is important to keep the affected breast clean.
Remedies:
1. Make tea from malt (sprouted oat), drink three times
daily.
2. Externally, take egg white mixed with green onions and
apply to the area, changing 2-3 times daily.
3. Make tea from dandelion and honey, drink three times
daily for at least five days.
4. Make tea from honeysuckle, mint, and licorice. Drink
tea and apply the solids locally.
5. Boil dandelions into tea, condensing to a syrup and add
to rice porridge. Eat three times daily for five days.
6. Combine cabbage, lettuce, and dandelions to make a
poultice for external application.
Conditions ~ 151
Avoid: spicy, stimulating foods, coffee, smoking, alcohol, dairy
products (especially if there is pus), breast feeding
Menopause
This is the time when a woman stops menstruating completely,
usually occurring between 45 and 53 years of age. It may occur
slowly or suddenly. Symptoms may include hot flashes, weak-
ness, depression, emotional instability, anxiety, lack of con-
centration, irritability, headaches, insomnia, night sweats and
dryness.
Recommendations: black beans, sesame seeds, soybeans, wal-
nuts, goji berries, mulberries, yams, licorice, Chinese black
dates, lotus seeds, chrysanthemum flowers.
Remedies:
1. Cook black beans with rice into porridge. Eat twice
daily.
2. Roast sesame seeds and add to rice porridge for break-
fast.
3. Steam chicken with goji berries and yam.
4. Make tea from chrysanthemum and cassia seeds and
drink three times daily.
5. Take walnuts, lotus seeds, and sunflower seeds and
make a porridge with rice.
6. Stew millet, mulberries, lamb and goji berries.
7. Make tea from licorice, Chinese black dates, and wheat.
This will help extreme mood swings and depression.
Avoid: stress, tension, stimulants
Morning Sickness
This is characterized by nausea and vomiting and affects some
women during the first few months of pregnancy, usually clear-
ing up after the third month. It occurs particularly in the morn-
ing, although in serious cases, it may last all day. Accompanying
152 ~ The Tao of Nutrition
symptoms may include headache, dizziness, and exhaustion.
One should seek treatment right away because this condition
will affect nourishment to the fetus.
Recommendations: lentils, grapefruit peel, carp, ginger, orange
peel, bamboo shavings, persimmon cap, millet
Remedies:
1. Grind lentils into powder then take two tablespoons
with rice porridge, three times daily.
2. Make tea from ginger and grapefruit peel, drink three
times daily.
3. Steam carp with ginger and cardamom for thirty min-
utes. Eat daily for at least one week.
4. Make tea from ginger, orange peels, and a little bit of
brown sugar.
5. Make persimmon cap tea, drink three times daily.
6. Make fresh scallion juice and fresh ginger juice and add a
little sweetener. Take 2-3 teaspoons three times daily.
As soon as the morning sickness stops, discontinue the remedies.
Avoid: overeating, heavy meats
Mouth Sores (Ulcers)
This condition includes herpes simplex, fever blisters and can-
ker sores. It is basically an ulceration on or in the mouth. One
may also experience pain, heat sensation, irritability, insomnia,
headache, dizziness, palpitations, and bad breath.
Recommendations: mung beans, daikon, carrots, lotus root,
persimmon caps, mint, honeysuckle flower
Remedies:
1. Make juice from carrots and lotus root and rinse the
mouth 3-4 times a day for at least four days.
2. Take 5-6 persimmon caps and boil tea. When cool, rinse
mouth 4-5 times a day.
3. Apply honey to local area to help heal faster.
Conditions ~ 153
4. Char eggplant into ashes, powder and mix with honey.
Apply to the sores.
5. Boil mung bean soup and eat on an empty stomach.
6. Grind mung beans into powder, mix with honey; apply
to area.
7. Rub sea salt on the sores three times a day for two days.
Also rinse mouth with salt water.
Avoid: spicy foods, stimulating foods, smoking, stress, alcohol,
coffee, chocolate, constipation
Nephritis (Acute)
This is an acute kidney infection. This condition is character-
ized by some type of infection that precedes the condition, such
as laryngitis, tonsillitis, scarlet fever, or mumps. There may be
swelling beginning in the face area then spreading throughout
the body in about two days, followed by blood in the urine,
hypertension, headache, dizziness, fatigue, malaise, low appe-
tite, nausea, vomiting, and scanty urination.
Recommendations: black beans, mung beans, azuki beans,
pearl barley, garlic, carp, winter melon, watermelon, water-
melon rind, reed root, cornsilk, sweet rice, lotus root, water
chestnuts
Remedies:
1. Cook soup with azuki beans, winter melon rind, water-
melon rind and cornsilk. Drink at least 3-4 times daily.
2. Make tea from lotus root; drink four large glasses daily.
3. Do a watermelon fast or eat lots of watermelon.
4. Cook soup with carp, azuki beans, winter melon, and
green onions. Start with five cups water and cook down
to three cups. Drink the soup and sweat.
5. Make tea from cornsilk, cooking for one hour, then
strain and cook again until almost dry, then add some
fructose powder. Then take one tablespoon three times
daily dissolved in warm water.
154 ~ The Tao of Nutrition
6. Cook rice porridge with pearl barley, black beans and
water chestnuts.
7. Make juice from carrots, celery, cucumbers, and squash.
Avoid: stimulating (sour, spicy, salty) foods, alcohol, caffeine,
smoking, overworking, high protein foods
Nephritis (Chronic)
This can result from acute nephritis that is not properly treated,
ora low immunity causing kidney infection. The symptoms
include swelling, hypertension, hyperprotein urea, fatigue,
headache, dizziness, and achiness. If this condition does not
get proper treatment, over a long period of time it can cause
damage to the kidney, leading to uremia.
Recommendations: ginger, Chinese black dates, sweet rice,
soybeans, winter melon, carp, yams, mung beans, black
beans
Remedies:
1. Make rice porridge and add ginger, cinnamon, and Chi-
nese black dates. Eat for breakfast and dinner.
2. Remove the internal organs of a duck and stuff it with
4-5 garlic cloves, then cook in soup. Do not add salt.
Drink the broth and eat the duck every other day.
3. Cook carp with soybeans, winter melon and green on-
ions into soup. Eat once a day for at least twenty days.
4. Cook rice porridge with yams and eat for breakfast and
dinner.
5. Steam together crab, garlic, and white wine. Eat once
daily for fifteen days.
6. Boil tea from corns ilk, winter melon rind, watermelon
rind, and azuki beans.
7. Crush entire watermelon and rind, and slowly cook to a
thick syrup. Take two tablespoons syrup in warm water
three times daily.
Conditions ~ 155
Avoid: stimulating (sour, spicy, salty) foods, alcohol, caffeine,
smoking, overworking, high protein foods
Premenstrual Syndrome (PMS)
PMS is a condition that occurs after ovulation or before men-
struation, due to hormonal fluctuations. It may be charac-
terized by abdominal cramps, bloating, backache, headache,
tension, irritability, low energy, and mood swings. A healthy
woman should have little or no discomfort during this time;
however, approximately 70% of American women suffer from
these symptoms. This is partially due to the large consumption
of cold foods and drinks that can cause the blood to stagnate. In
Chinese terminology, PMS is a condition of disharmony in the
blood: either stagnant blood, not enough blood, or heat in the
blood; and stagnation of Chi. Acupuncture, acupressure, herbs,
diet, and Chi gong exercises are all very beneficial for relieving
the symptoms and correcting the disharmony.
Recommendations: At least one week prior to the usual onset
of PMS symptoms, consume some of the following: ginger,
green onions, fennel, orange peel, spinach, walnuts, haw-
thorn berries, cinnamon, black pepper, Chinese dates, Dang
Cui (Angelica sinensis)
Remedies:
1. Make tea from ginger, green onions, fennel, black pepper,
and orange peel, boiling for ten minutes. Drink three
times daily, starting at least one week before usual onset
of PMS symptoms. This is a good remedy for those who
feel cold.
2. Make spinach soup, boiling for 30 minutes.
3. Make hawthorn berry and cinnamon tea.
Avoid: cold foods, raw foods, excessive consumption of fruit,
vinegar, all shellfish, coffee, stimulants, sugar, dairy prod-
ucts, and smoking
156 ~ The Tao of Nutrition
Prostate Enlargement
This condition generally affects older men over forty. As the
man ages the prostate can become swollen and the urethra and
bladder become less elastic. Thus symptoms usually include
difficulty urinating or dribbling.
Recommendations: pumpkin seeds, anise, tangerines, cherries,
figs, litchis, sunflower seeds, mangos and seaweeds
Remedies:
1. Roast pumpkin seeds or boil into tea and incorporate
into the diet, one large handful twice daily.
2. Make tea from rhubarb root, peach kernels, winter
melon seeds, pearl barley, azuki beans, and cornsilk;
drink three times daily.
3. Boil fig tea.
Avoid: dairy products, rich foods, fatty foods, all stimulants
such as alcohol, caffeine, and smoking; stress, tension, sex
and eating meat late in the day
Psoriasis
This is a common skin condition, usually genetically inherited,
characterized by pink or dull red lesions with silvery scaling.
The skin may become very rough and scaly and may tempo-
rarily improve, although it is usually a chronic type of condi-
tion. When the scaling takes place one can also see reddish dots
under the skin, accompanied by various degrees of itching and
discomfort. It can affect any part of the body, and is usually
worse during the wintertime. In Western medicine there are
few treatment options for psoriasis.
Recommendations: Chinese prunes, guava skins, pearl bar-
ley, vinegar, garlic, walnuts, cucumber, beet tops, dandelion
greens, squash, mung beans
Remedies:
1. Take fifteen peeled and sliced water chestnuts and one
cup vinegar (preferably aged rice vinegar), slowly sim-
Conditions ~ 157
mer in a non-metal pot for twenty minutes until water
chestnuts absorb most of the vinegar. Then mash into a
paste and seal in a jar. Spread evenly on a gauze pad and
apply to affected area, changing daily if not too serious,
three times daily if serious condition. Mild cases should
show improvement within five days; serious conditions
may take two weeks.
2. Take dried Chinese prunes, remove pits, and simmer into
a tea, then condense into syrup. Take two tablespoons in
warm water, three times daily.
3. Take peel from guava, char and powder it, mix with
sesame oil into a paste and apply twice daily for one
week.
4. Apply mashed garlic to the affected area, changing twice
daily for one week.
5. Make porridge from lily bulb, gypsum, and rice. Eat once
daily for at least ten days.
6. Take mashed walnuts, use cotton to absorb the oil, ap-
ply the pulp three times daily.
Avoid: spicy food, stimulating food, alcohol, caffeine, smoking,
excessive sun exposure
Seminal Emission (Spermatorrhea)
There are two types of this condition. The first type happens
when one has a dream and then ejaculates during sleep, also
known as a wet dream. The other type is when one has ejacu-
lation without a dream, either during sleep or during waking
hours. One may also have dizziness, back pain, leg pain, weak-
ness, palpitations, shortness of breath, lethargy, or fatigue.
These symptoms point to a weakness which if not dealt with
can lead to degeneration.
Recommendations: lotus seeds, sea cucumber, yams, dried gin-
ger, scallions, pearl barley, black beans, shrimps, seaweeds,
cool showers daily.
158 ~ The Tao of Nutrition
Remedies:
1. Steam scallions with shrimp and rice wine. Eat daily for
at least fifteen days or until condition improves.
2. Cook soup from sea cucumber, seaweed, and black
beans. Walnuts can be added also.
3. Cook sea cucumber with rice porridge and eat for break-
fast every morning.
4. Cook pearl barley, black beans, walnuts, and scallions to
make a porridge. Eat every morning for breakfast.
5. Make tea from ginseng, Chinese black dates, and lotus
seeds. Drink three times daily.
Avoid: spicy foods, stimulating foods, overworking, obscene
visual images, masturbation, sleeping on one's back (sleep
on the side instead)
Sore throat (Laryngitis)
Sore throat can be caused by various factors including com-
mon cold, flu or eating too much spicy food. There may also be
mucus, fever and chills, headaches and so on.
Recommendations: carrots, olives, daikon radish, celery, sea-
weed, licorice, Chinese prunes, cilantro, mint. Drink a lot of
water, and gargle with warm salt water
Remedies:
1. Make tea from carrots and olives; drink three times daily
for at least one week.
2. Make tea from daikon radish and green apples; drink
twice daily.
3. Lightly cook seaweed, preserve with brown sugar for
three days. Eat daily for one week.
4. Make tea from cilantro, one tablespoon green tea, and a
little salt. Steep for about five minutes.
5. Slowly chew and swallow rock sugar and cilantro.
6. For a dry hot throat, take a spoonful of honey in a glass
of warm water and drink.
Conditions ~ 159
Avoid: alcohol, smoking, pollution, sleeping with the mouth
open, stimulating or spicy foods, fatty foods
Stones (Gallbladder, Kidney, Urinary Tract)
Various combinations of minerals can calcify or crystallize in
the gallbladder, kidney, or urinary tract. These can range in
size from the size of a grain of sand to two inches in diameter.
Gallstones are a combination of bile and minerals and are char-
acterized by pain in the right upper abdomen or pain in the
corresponding area of the back and shooting up to the shoulder
blade. Gallstones may also cause poor digestion of fats. If the
gallstones obstruct the flow of bile, the result may be jaundice.
Kidney stones are formed as the kidneys filter excessive miner-
als in an acid environment which combine with either excessive
calcium or wastes in the blood. These are very painful, with the
pain being in the kidney area of the lower back or the corre-
sponding area on the front of the abdomen. There may also be
painful urination with kidney stones.
Recommendations: cornsilk, water chestnuts, seaweed, beet
tops, watermelon, celery, watercress, winter melon, pearl
barley, walnuts, watermelon rind, winter melon rind, green
tea powder, distilled water
Remedies:
1. Drink watermelon juice.
2. Drink celery, carrot, and water chestnut juice.
3. Drink cornsilk tea for water; 3-5 glasses daily.
4. Drink tea from beet tops, winter melon rind, and water-
melon rind.
5. Take two teaspoons ground walnuts in cornsilk tea.
6. Take one teaspoon green tea powder in warm water
three times daily.
After consuming any of the above diuretic remedies, do some mild
jumping exercise to help break up the stones.
160 ~ The Tao of Nutrition
Avoid: spicy foods, fried foods, oily foods, coffee, hard water,
spinach, citrus, tomatoes, spinach combined with tofu or
dairy products
Tinnitus (Ear Ringing)
This is a common problem that has two major causes. The first
is a local problem in which there may be a local obstruction
or infection, nerve damage, or drug interference. The second
problem stems more from a systemic condition such as coro-
nary heart disease, hypertension, or kidney weakness. Along
with ringing in the ears, one may also complain of headaches,
irritability, restlessness, dizziness, red face, sore back, vomiting,
or nausea.
Recommendations: black sesame seeds, black beans, walnuts,
grapes, celery, oyster shells, pearl barley, azuki beans, Chi-
nese black dates, yams, lotus seeds, chestnuts, chrysanthe-
mum. Get plenty of sleep, massage the neck and head area,
and try to live in a quiet, peaceful place if possible.
Remedies:
1. Make tea from lotus seeds and chrysanthemums.
2. Make juice from celery and grapes. Drink one cup 2-3
times daily.
3. Cook azuki beans and black beans with rice porridge and
eat at least once daily.
4. Boil Chinese black dates, walnuts, and lotus seeds with
rice porridge and eat once daily.
Avoid: loud noise, stress, tension, stimulating foods, spicy
foods, smoking, alcohol, coffee
Ulcers (Stomach or Duodenum)
Ulcers can occur anywhere along the food pathway, from the
mouth to the stomach to the intestines. Ulcers can also occur
in the vagina. The most common places for ulcers to occur are
the stomach and duodenum (first part of the small intestines).
Conditions ~ 161
Ulcers are characterized by burning pain. In the stomach, pain
is usually worse on an empty stomach. If the ulcer is further
down, there will be pain after meals. There may also be nau-
sea. If the stools are black (digested blood), the ulcer is in the
stomach or higher. If stools are red, the ulcer is lower than the
stomach. If the red blood is mixed in the stool, the ulcer is in
the small intestines. If red blood is on the stool, then the ulcer
is in the lower intestines or a result of a hemorrhoid.
Recommendations: potatoes, honey, cabbage, ginger, figs, papa-
yas, squid bone, peanut oil, kale, persimmons, licorice tea
Remedies:
1. For mouth ulcers, apply the ash of charcoaled eggplant.
2. Drink potato juice daily on an empty stomach for at
least two weeks.
3. Drink warm kale juice or cabbage juice on an empty
stomach to help heal the ulcer.
4. Take two teaspoons peanut oil every morning on an
empty stomach to help close the wound.
5. Drink fig juice.
6. Bake squid bone until crisp, powder it and take one tea-
spoon daily with honey.
7. Take blended papaya and milk or soymilk. Note, this
remedy would not be good for a person with a lot of
mucus, dampness, or allergies, unless soymilk is substi-
tuted for milk.
8. Take two tablespoons steamed honey on an empty
stomach in the mornings.
9. Cook ginger (an amount the size of the thumb) with
rice and have for breakfast every morning on an empty
stomach.
10. Dry and charcoal persimmon and grind into powder;
take one tablespoon in a glass of warm water.
Avoid: spicy foods, hot foods, stimulants, shellfish, coffee,
smoking, alcohol, fried foods, and stress
162 ~ The Tao of Nutrition
Worms
This condition is most common among children. It can mani-
fest in such symptoms as decreased appetite, abdominal pain,
nausea, diarrhea or constipation, vomiting, anal itching at
night and malnourished appearance. There are many types of
worms including roundworms, pinworms, tapeworms, and
hookworms.
Recommendations: pumpkin seeds, papaya seeds, coconut,
garlic, hawthorn berries, sunflower seeds, Chinese prunes,
ginger, vinegar, black pepper, walnut leaf
Remedies:
1. Make tea from ten Chinese prunes, 6 grams black pepper
and three slices fresh ginger. Drink two cups, an hour
apart in the morning on an empty stomach. Do this
every day for one week.
2. Take one tablespoon raw pumpkin seeds and grind to a
powder. Mix with warm water and drink. Do this twice
daily in the morning an hour apart, every day for one
week.
3. Eat two tablespoons sunflower seeds every morning on
an empty stomach.
4. Make tea from hawthorn berries and betel nuts and
drink two cups in the morning on an empty stomach,
one hour apart.
5. Charcoal black pepper, grind to a powder, take V2 tea-
spoon three times daily with warm water.
6. Make tea from betel nuts and pumpkin seeds. Eat pump-
kin seeds then drink the tea and within 4-5 hours expect
diarrhea and excretion of the worms.
7. Take the white part of a green onion, make into juice
and add 1-2 teaspoons sesame oil. Take twice daily on an
empty stomach for three days.
8. Take coconut juice and 1;2 of a coconut every morning on
an empty stomach; wait three hours before eating.
9. Take garlic on an empty stomach every morning.
Conditions ~ 163
10. Soak cotton with rice vinegar and plug up anus at night
for three days, changing cotton each day. This will at-
tract the worms to the anal area. Or do a rice vinegar
enema and hold in all night; do this three days in a row.
11. Mash garlic and mix with Vaseline, apply around anus
every night for three days.
12. Mix raw garlic juice and rice vinegar with an equal part
water and take on an empty stomach three days in a
row.
13. Take one teaspoon ground papaya seeds with warm wa-
ter every morning on an empty stomach for seven days.
Avoid: unsanitary foods, uncooked meats or fish, raw foods
Section Four
Simple Vegetarian Recipes
Simple Vegetarian Recipes
T
HESE RECIPES ARE PROVIDED to serve as a guide to those wishing
to move away from a heavily meat-based diet. Ideally, meat
should comprise no more than 1/10 of the diet. Soy foods such
as tofu, tempeh, soymilk and wheat gluten can provide good
alternatives to the animal products.
Cooking is an art. To do it well one must be creative, paying
attention to how the combinations look as well as how they
taste. Always choose foods according to what is seasonally
available. Feel free to make substitutions in the recipes with
this in mind. Let your taste buds guide you in the appropriate
seasonings and combinations of dishes.
Some of the recipes call for tamari. This is a naturally aged soy
sauce. Miso is a salty, aged soybean and grain paste, used for
seasoning. Also used for seasoning is Bragg's Liquid Aminos, this
is a low-salt soy liquid available in health food stores. Kuzu and
arrowroot are thickening agents, similar to cornstarch. Couscous
is a grain product that comes from the heart of durum wheat
and is sweet in flavor.
Many of the recipes use sea vegetables such as kombu, wakame,
nori, or hiziki. Sea vegetables (also known as seaweeds) should
be included in the diet regularly for they are an excellent source
of nutrients, particularly the minerals. They are also known
to alkalinize the body, purify the blood, help dissolve fat and
mucous deposits, and neutralize radioactive matter. Seaweeds
come in a wide variety of shapes and sizes. The thin sheets
called nori can be used to wrap grains or vegetables. Wakame
and kombu are good soup additions. Kombu added to beans
increases digestibility and decreases cooking time. One of the
most flavorful sea vegetables is the red-leafed dulse. The adven-
turesome may wish to try arame or hiziki; these look like thin
black noodles, and are delicious with vegetables or tofu. Agar
flakes can be used to make a gelatin-like dish called kanten.
167
168 ~ The Tao of Nutrition
In general, sea vegetables (except nori) need to be rinsed and
soaked prior to using. For soups, washing is sufficient. Dried
seaweeds are always available in Asian markets. Many delicious
varieties from northern Pacific waters are available in larger
health food or grocery stores.
In the recipes that follow, substitutions may be needed to fol-
Iowa specific remedial diet. For example, a person with can-
dida yeast infection should leave out the tamari and miso (fer-
mented foods) and substitute herb salt or some other season-
ing. Someone with a cold type condition may need to add more
warming foods to the recipes, such as scallions, garlic, ginger, or
pepper. Those with hot type conditions may need to leave out
the warming seasonings and so forth.
Imbalances can be well addressed by the addition of therapeu-
tic herbs to the diet. Many of the herbs in the Chinese pharma-
copeia were actually recognized as foods prior to their use as
medicines. A few of the really delicious ones are lily bulbs, goji
berries (Gou Qi Zi, also called lycii berries), Chinese Dioscorea
yam, and jujube dates. The typical way of using these food herbs
would be in soups, stews or grain dishes. The rich colors and
textures add a great deal to the dish. For more information on
cooking with Chinese herbs and specific recipes read 101 Ikg-
etarian Delights by Lily Chuang and Cathy McNease, and Chi-
nese Ikgetarian Delights: Sugar and Dairy-Free Cookbook by Lily
Chuang.
The following common abbreviations are used:
t. is teaspoon
T is tablespoon (3 teaspoons)
c. is cup (8 fluid ounces)
Soups
Sweet Squash and Seaweed Soup
1 stalk celery, diced
1 butternut squash (or other winter squash)
1 small onion or bunch of scallions
Few chopped leaves of Chinese cabbage
1 small piece of wakame seaweed, cut in small pieces
2 T. tamari or Bragg's Liquid Aminos
3 T. garbanzo miso (or other light miso)
Begin with 2 quarts water. Peel and dice the butternut squash
and simmer in water, adding the wakame. Add the onion, celery
and cabbage. When the vegetables are tender, add the tamari
or Bragg's Liquid Aminos and garbanzo miso, which has been
dissolved in a small amount of broth. Garnish with a sprig of
cilantro. Serves 4.
Summer Vegetable Soup
1 onion
2 carrots
1 clove garlic
1 zucchini
2 tomatoes
1 handful green beans
1 c. fresh corn
1 c. tomato sauce
Herb salt to season
Tamari or Bragg's Liquid Aminos
Chop vegetables into small pieces; add to 2 quarts water. Cook
until tender then add 1 c. tomato sauce, heat until warm.
Season to taste with herb salt, tamari, or Bragg's Liquid Aminos
and garnish with finely chopped cilantro and chives. Serves 4.
169
170 ~ The Tao of Nutrition
Soup Stock
4 six- to eight- inch pieces kombu seaweed
6 Chinese mushrooms
1 carrot
1 stalk celery
1 onion
Add all the above ingredients to 2 quarts water and bring to
a boil. Then simmer for 1 hour. Strain and use the liquid for
making soups or grains. It will store well in the refrigerator
for about a week. Use the vegetables in some dish, perhaps a
soup.
Black Bean Soup or Sauce
1 c. black beans
1 four-inch piece kombu
1 small onion, finely chopped
2 garlic cloves
3 T tamari
1 t. ginger juice
112 red bell pepper
2 T cilantro
Soak beans overnight. Discard soak water, cover with fresh
water and cook beans and kombu for about an hour. You may
need to add more water. During the last 20 minutes of cooking,
add garlic, onions, and red bell pepper. Mix tamari and ginger
juice in at the end. Blend for a creamy sauce to pour over grains
or steamed vegetables. Garnish with cilantro. Serves 4.
Beet Soup or Sauce
5-6 carrots
2-3 large beets
2 onions
2-4 stalks celery
3-4 cloves garlic
2 T miso
2 T olive oil
1 t. basil, chopped
1 t. oregano, chopped
1 t. umeboshi plum paste
Soups ~ 171
Cook vegetables with 3-4 cups water until tender. Blend
vegetables with the cooking liquid. Add the miso, olive oil,
basil, oregano, and umeboshi plum paste. Return to flame and
simmer for 20 minutes to mix flavors. To make into a sauce,
add arrowroot dissolved in 114 c. water to the mixture and heat
until thick and smooth. Serve sauce over noodles or steamed
vegetables. Serves 4-6.
172 ~ The Tao of Nutrition
Chinese Noodle Soup
8 Chinese mushrooms, soaked with stems removed and sliced
very thin
6 white mushrooms, sliced very thin
1 red bell pepper, sliced very thin
1 small yellow squash, sliced
1 small piece wakame, sliced into small pieces
Put vegetables into 2 quarts water or vegetable broth and cook
until tender. Then add the following:
3 T. cilantro, chopped
3 green onions, chopped
1 T. tamari
1 t. peanut oil or toasted sesame oil
1 small handful bean threads (mung bean noodles)
Remove from fire and let sit covered for 5 minutes. Serves 4.
Winter Melon Soup
3 qt. vegetable broth
3 c. winter melon, peeled and chopped
2 carrots
2 celery stalks
1 onion
12 Chinese mushrooms, stems removed
6 oz. tofu noodles or finely sliced baked tofu
1 t. chives
1 t peanut oil
1 T. tamari
Cook together until tender, about 25 minutes. Season with
chives, tamari, and peanut oil. Serves 4.
Creamy Split Pea Soup
1 c. green split peas
3 c. water
1 six-inch piece kombu
1 carrot
1 celery stalk
1 small onion
1 t. tamari
112 c. soymilk (or almond milk)
1 T cilantro
% t. paprika
Y2 t. curry powder
Y2 t. coriander seed
Pinch nutmeg
Soups ~ 173
Cook peas and kombu until soft. Add the vegetables and cook
another 15 minutes. When vegetables are done, put in blender
with the tamari, soy milk, cilantro, paprika, curry powder,
coriander seed powder, and nutmeg. Serves 4-6.
Grain Dishes
Fancy Rice
1 c. dry brown rice
2 c. water
1 carrot, chopped finely
3 scallions, chopped
14 red bell pepper, chopped finely
Cook brown rice as usual with water. After about 25 minutes,
add the carrot, scallions, and red bell pepper. Cook another 20
minutes or until water is all absorbed. Serves 2.
Nori Burritos
Sheets of nori seaweed
Cooked rice
Carrots, sliced and steamed
Pickled ginger
Sesame seeds, toasted and crushed
Toast sheets of nori seaweed briefly over stovetop flame until it
changes color from brown to green (this take about 15 seconds)
or use sushi nori that has already been toasted. On one end, lay
out cooked rice, chopped green onion, steamed carrot slices,
pickled ginger, and crushed, toasted sesame seeds. Roll up like
a burrito, moistening the edge to make it stick. The edge can
be moistened with tamari or Bragg's Liquid Aminos for added
flavor.
174
Vegetable Pie
Crust:
1 c. brown rice
2V2 c. water
V2 c. couscous
1 c. jicama root, grated
1 t. chives
V2 t. basil
Y4 t. curry powder
1 t. tamari or Bragg's Liquid Aminos
Filling {finely chopped}:
6 oz. tempeh
2 small carrots
1 leek
1 celery stalk
Grains ~ 175
5 Chinese mushrooms, soaked with stems removed
Cook brown rice in water for 30 minutes, then add couscous
and cook another 10-15 minutes or until water is absorbed.
When done, stir in the jicama, chives, basil, curry powder and
tamari. Press into a pie pan and add the filling ingredients.
Steam the pie for 30 minutes. Garnish the top with chopped
cilantro. Serves 4-6.
176 ~ The Tao of Nutrition
Millet Patties
1 c. millet
2
1
h c. water
1h t. basil
3 scallions, finely chopped
1;4 c. grated carrots
1 T. tamari
Cook millet in water for 30 minutes, or until water is absorbed.
Add basil, scallions, carrots and tamari and mix well. Form 2-
inch wide patties and put on an oiled cookie sheet. Bake at 325
degrees for 20-30 minutes. They should be crisp on the outside.
Serves 4-6.
Stuffed Pumpkin
Cut the top off a small pumpkin; clean out the seeds and strings;
save the lid. Fill with the following mixture:
3 c. cooked rice or barley
1 T. toasted sesame seeds, crushed
2-3 stalks celery, chopped
1 onion, finely chopped
1 T. parsley
1 t. thyme
1 t. sage
1h t. rosemary .
1 T. tamari
Cover with lid and bake at 350 degrees for 1 V4-11h hours (until
fork easily goes into pumpkin).
Serves 4-6.
Simple Couscous Pie
1 c. couscous
Grains ~ 177
% c. amaranth or quinoa or millet (presoaked a few hours)
1 Vz c. boiling water or broth
6 Chinese mushrooms, soaked and sliced
1 c. winter squash, grated or mashed
1 small leek
2 chard leaves
112 red bell pepper
Chopped walnuts
Soak grains in the water 15-30 minutes until soft. Mix with
vegetables, all finely chopped. Press into a pie pan and top
with chopped walnuts. Steam 40 minutes over medium flame.
Serves 6.
Variations:
1. Substitute 1 c. fresh corn kernels for the red bell pepper.
2. Substitute 1 c. grated carrot for the squash.
3. Substitute 1 c. spinach for the chard.
This is an very portable dish and easy to pack for lunch.
178 ~ The Tao of Nutrition
Basic Protein Cereal
1 c. brown rice (or 112 barley, 1;2 brown rice)
1/3 c. soybeans
1 T sesame or sunflower seeds
Soak above in 3 c. water overnight or in hot water for a few
hours. Pour into blender and blend well. Put into a bowl and
steam for 11;2-2 hours. Serves 4.
Variations:
1. Substitute black or azuki beans for the soybeans.
2. Substitute 1;2 c. millet for 1;2 c. brown rice.
3. Substitute walnuts or pecans for the sesame seeds.
4. Season with ginger or cinnamon, or honey or rice syrup, or
nut butter.
5. Substitute raw peanuts for the soybeans.
Chestnut Rice
1;2 c. dried chestnuts
1/3 c. raw peanuts
1 c. brown rice or sweet rice
Soak together the above with 3 % c. water overnight or in hot
water for several hours. Pour into a bowl and steam over low
flame for 2 hours, stirring occasionally, until chestnuts are
tender. Serves 4.
Variations:
1. Substitute walnuts for the chestnuts
2. Substitute 1;2 c. barley for V2 c. rice
Grains ~ 179
Simple Grain Dish
1 c. whole grains (brown rice, barley, millet, sweet rice, couscous,
or a mixture of these)
2 c. water
Preparation:
1. Mix grains and water and steam for 1 lIz-2 hours over a
medium flame. Serves 2-4.
2. Use 1 c. grain to 2-2l1z c. water to cook grains in pot with
lid directly on stove (as opposed to steaming) for 45-50
minutes or until the water is absorbed.
Variations:
1. Add dates or raisins and cinnamon for seasoning.
2. Add steamed peanuts.
3. Add brown rice syrup or maple syrup.
The Fastest Cereal: Couscous
Pour 1 c. boiling water over % c. couscous. Let sit for 5 minutes,
covered. Garnish with scallions and cilantro. Serves 2-4.
Variations:
1. Omit the scallions and cilantro and add a grated apple,
Y4 c. raisins and a pinch of cinnamon.
2. Add steamed peanuts.
3. Add V2 c. grated carrots and a pinch of ginger.
180 ~ The Tao of Nutrition
Steamed Corn Bread
1 c. grated apple (or chopped fresh pineapple)
2 c. coconut milk (or soymilk, or almond milk, or pineapple-
coconut juice)
1 medium banana
1/3 c. whole wheat flour
1 c. cornmeal
V2 c. oatmeal (or millet flour or brown rice flour)
1/8 c. goji berries or raisins (optional)
Blend the liquid with the banana. Add the rest of the ingredients
and mix well. Pour into a pie plate and steam 30 minutes over
medium flame. It is done when a chopstick inserted in the
center comes out clean. Serves 6.
Variations:
1. Substitute 1 c. grated carrot for the apple or use V2 carrot
and V2 apple.
2. Add a pinch of each: cinnamon, ginger, and nutmeg.
3. Add Y4 c. coconut.
Mochi*
Preparation:
Grains ~ 181
1. Soak 2 c. brown or black sweet rice in 2 c. water. Then put
in blender, a little at a time. Continue until all is blended.
2. Combine 2 c. powdered brown or black sweet rice and 2 c.
water. Mix together well.
Steam for 11h hours on medium flame, covered. Open and stir
well about 1h hour before it is done. Let the rice paste cool.
Use wet hands to handle the rice paste. Form a small ball, flatten
between hands, and put a small amount of one of the following
fillings in the center: a combination of chopped, cooked
Chinese mushrooms, seaweed, baked tofu and seasoning; bean
paste (azuki, black, or mung-good in summer); nut butter; or
raisins. For a sweeter variety, fill with bean paste and honey or
rice syrup. This makes an excellent dessert.
Next, close the patty and form a ball. Roll it over one of the
following: sunflower, sesame, or cashew meal, coconut, carob
powder, or toasted soybean flour. Serves 4-6.
* This recipe is reprinted courtesy of Lily Chuang from her cookbook,
Chinese Vegetarian Delights: Sugar and Dairy-Free Cookbook available at
www.taostar.com.
182 ~ The Tao of Nutrition
Sweet Breakfast Porridge
% c. brown rice
% c. barley flakes
V2 c. raw skinless peanuts
10 Chinese jujube dates·
1 slice fresh ginger root
Cook all ingredients with 5 c. water in a crock-pot overnight,
or on the stove for 2V2-3 hours on low, stirring occasionally.
Serves 4.
Bean and Tofu Dishes
Tofu and Mushroom Casserole
2 lb. plain tofu, lightly steamed
12 large Chinese mushrooms, soaked until soft, thinly sliced
2 c. pea pods
1 bunch scallions
2 T tamari or Bragg's Liquid Aminos
3 T kuzu (or arrowroot or cornstarch)
Slice tofu into 1/2 inch slices and put in bottom of rectangular
baking dish. Lightly simmer mushrooms then add pea pods and
scallions for last 5 minutes. Put these vegetables on top of the
tofu. Use the vegetable cooking water plus enough water to
make 3 c. liquid. Add tamari. Dissolve kuzu in a small amount
of liquid; add to the rest of the liquid, simmer, stirring often,
until the liquid thickens. Pour this gravy on top of the tofu and
vegetable mixture. Garnish with crushed, toasted almonds and
finely chopped cilantro. Serves 4.
Azuki Bean and Squash Casserole
1 c. azuki beans, soaked overnight
Two 6-8 inch pieces of kombu
1 small butternut squash or other winter squash
Cover beans and kombu with water and simmer about one
hour, adding water if needed. Peel and cube the squash and add
to the beans. Cook until tender, about liz hour. Stir in a pinch of
sea salt or 1-2 teaspoons tamari. Serves 4.
183
184 ~ The Tao of Nutrition
Clinton's Savory Azuki Beans with Chestnuts
1 c. azuki beans, soaked overnight
114 c. dried chestnuts, soaked 1 hour
4 six-inch strips kombu seaweed
1 t. tamari or pinch sea salt
1 t. goji berries (optional)
Soak azuki beans overnight; discard soak water. Place kombu in
pot then add chestnuts and beans. Cover with 2 inches water
and bring to a boil. Simmer 2-3 hours, adding enough water
to keep beans covered. Add tamari and the goji berries to-15
minutes before cooking is done. Serves 4.
Tofu Skins and Mushrooms
12 strips dried tofu skins (available at Asian grocery stores)
6 Chinese mushrooms, thinly sliced, stems removed
8 white mushrooms, sliced
Red bell pepper, sliced
4-6 c. water
2 T. tamari
1-2 T. kuzu (or arrowroot)
Soak the dried tofu skins and Chinese mushrooms in 4-6 cups
water and tamari for at least 4 hours. Then tie each strip in a
knot, and simmer for 20 minutes. Add the white mushrooms
and the red bell pepper and continue to simmer another 10-15
minutes. Pour off the liquid and thicken it with kuzu (do this
in a separate pan, heating until thick). Pour the sauce over the
tofu and mushroom mixture and serve over steamed greens.
Serves 4.
Steamed Peanuts
1 c. raw peanuts
2 c. water
Bean and Tofu Dishes ~ 185
Soak peanuts in water overnight or in hot water for a few hours.
Steam using the soaking water for 1V2-2 hours over medium
flame. This makes a delicious, nutritious addition to cereals,
vegetable dishes and grains.
Scrambled Tofu
V21b. tofu
2 stalks celery
6 white mushrooms
1 tomato
1 t. tamari
Chop vegetables finely. Saute in 114 c. water or 1 T oil. When
almost done, add crumbled tofu. Let heat 5-10 minutes. Season
with tamari.
Variations:
1. Substitute one beaten egg for V2 of the tofu.
2. Substitute one small zucchini squash for the mushrooms.
186 ~ The Tao of Nutrition
Tofu with Seaweed
1 package baked tofu, sliced or 1f2 lb. plain tofu, cubed
1 handful hiziki or arame seaweed, soaked in hot water 20-30
minutes
1 large carrot, diced
V2 c. jicama, diced
1 small onion, chopped
4 Chinese mushrooms, presoaked and sliced
Stir-fry carrots, onions, mushrooms and lastly jicama in small
amount of water (or mushroom soak water). When almost
done, add the tofu and seaweed. Cover and let steam for 5-10
minutes. Season with tamari and toasted sesame oil.
Variations:
1. Substitute wakame or kombu for the hiziki. These need to
be presoaked for 1-2 hours.
2. Add diced burdock root (gobo) at the beginning with the
carrots.
3. Use white mushrooms instead of the Chinese ones.
Tofu Dressing
lh lb. plain tofu
1;4 c. oil
1 T lemon juice
1 t. honey or rice syrup
1 t. rice or apple cider vinegar
V2 t. tamari
1 T sesame tahini
Blend all the ingredients until creamy. Use on salads, vegetables
or sandwiches.
Variations:
1. Add 1;4 c. poppy seeds.
2. Add l1f2 t. prepared mustard.
3. Add 1f2 t. basil and V4 t. garlic powder.
4. Add two whole green onions.
Herbal Dishes
For vegetarians, use vegetable broth instead of chicken broth in the following
recipes, and substitute baked tofu for meat or fish. Note: 28 grams = 1 ounce
Basic Herb Soup
1-3 oz. (30-90 grams) herb combination
V2-11h lb. meat or fish (optional)
V2 c. grain
% c. beans, presoaked (optional)
1-3 c. chopped vegetables
6-8 c. water or broth
Cook herbs, meat, beans, grains and hard vegetables (like
carrots, potatoes) about 1 hour, until done. Add soft or leafy
vegetables and finish cooking for 15-30 minutes. Season to taste
with miso, tamari, soy sauce, rice vinegar or sea salt. The soup
could be prepared in a crockpot on high heat for 3-4 hours.
Dang Gui Cornish Hen Stew
1 Cornish hen (or 3 chicken legs)
10 grams Dang Cui (Angelica sinensis)
2 parsnips, chopped
2 carrots, chopped
1 onion, chopped
2 celery stalks, chopped
1 handful wakame or dulse seaweed
8 c. water
Put all ingredients together and simmer for 1 hour. Remove the
Cornish hen (or chicken legs). Remove bones, chop meat, and
return to the soup. Cook for an additional 15 minutes. Season to
taste with miso or soy sauce and chopped cilantro (or parsley).
This soup will nourish Chi and blood.
187
188 ~ The Tao of Nutrition
Shan Yao Longevity Stew
10 grams Chinese Yam (Shan Yao)
10 grams goji berries (Gou Oi Zi, also called lycii berries)
10 grams lotus seed (Lian Zi)-presoaked
5 shiitake mushrooms-presoaked
1 onion, chopped
1 carrot or sweet potato, chopped
Vz c. white or brown rice
8 c. water (include the shiitake soaking water)
Put all ingredients together and simmer for 1 hour. Season to
taste with coriander seed and sea salt. This stew strengthens
Spleen and Kidney.
Goji Berry (Gou Qi Zi) Oats
Add a small handful of goji berries (also called lycii berries) and
a small handful of almonds (or walnuts) into Scotch oats and
cook until soft. Usually 3 parts water to 1 part oats. This will
tonify Chi and blood.
Black Bean Stew
Simmer V2 c. black beans with 3 c. water for 1 hour. Then add
6-8 c. chicken broth and the following herbs and vegetables:
1 oz. Shan Yao (Chinese yam)
1 oz. goji berries (Gou Oi Zi)
1/2 oz. Long Yan Rou (longan fruit)
1 fennel root, chopped
6-7 shiitake mushrooms, soaked and sliced
Simmer the whole dish for 1 hour. Season to taste with sea salt,
cumin seeds and brown rice vinegar. This will tonify Chi and
blood.
Butternut Mushroom Soup
1 butternut squash, chopped
1 handful wakame seaweed
1 oz. lily bulbs (Bai He)
Enough water to cover vegetables
Herbal Dishes ~ 189
Cook the above ingredients together until the squash are soft.
Remove the butternut squash peel, than blend all ingredients
until smooth with the cooking water
In a separate pan saute in olive oil:
1 purple onion, chopped
2 celery stalks, chopped
12 fresh shiitake mushrooms, sliced
Combine the sauteed ingredients and the blended ones together
with the following seasonings:
1 t. basil
1 t. oregano
Sea salt, Bragg's Liquid Aminos or soy sauce, to taste
190 ~ The Tao of Nutrition
Sweet and Spicy Pumpkin Soup
1 kabocha squash (Japanese pumpkin)
1 onion, chopped
1 fennel bulb, chopped
1 red bell pepper, chopped
Cook squash in enough water to cover until soft, then blend
with the cooking water. Return to pan and add the chopped
vegetables and the following presoaked herbs:
1 oz. Chinese yam (Shan Yao)
1 oz. lily bulb (Bai He)
1 oz. goji berries (Gou Oi Zi)
1 oz. longan fruit (Long Van Rou)
Simmer for 45 minutes. Remove from flame and season with:
1 T lemon juice
1 t. ginger juice
1h t. cinnamon
1;2 t. coriander powder
1h t. curry powder
Sea salt or soy sauce to taste
Garnish with chopped cilantro. This soup is both tonifying and
calming.
Miscellaneous Recipes
Sesame Seed Garnish
Wash 2 c. whole, brown sesame seeds. Toast in dry skillet,
stirring often until seeds can be easily crushed between the
fingers. Separately, heat V2 t. sea salt in dry skillet until the
chlorine gas is removed (you will smell it). Then mix together
sesame seeds and salt and grind in blender or in mortar and
pestle. Store in the refrigerator. Use as a garnish for a strong
nutty flavor. Salt can be omitted if desired; kelp powder may be
substituted for salt.
Basic Vegetable Stir-Fry
Use a variety of vegetables, diced or sliced. Stir-fry in a small
amount of water or broth, covered, the slower cooking
vegetables and presoaked seaweed first (i.e. carrots, green beans,
cauliflower, nori, kombu, etc.), then add the faster cooking
vegetables (i.e. jicama, zucchini, broccoli, etc.) When the last
vegetables go in, you can add tofu or gluten pieces.
When the vegetables and seaweed are cooked, season to taste
with oil, soy sauce (or Bragg's Liquid Aminos), herb salt, or
your favorite cooking herbs. Basil and cilantro are particularly
good with vegetables.
Variations:
1. Add steamed peanuts or almonds.
2. Add one garlic clove at the beginning.
S. Add finely grated ginger toward the end of the cooking.
4. Add chopped green onions at the end.
5. Add Chinese mushrooms (presoaked) at the beginning.
191
192 ~ The Tao of Nutrition
Almond Nut Stir-Fry
1 small yam
1 small head cauliflower
1 leek or onion
2 summer squash
1 handful green beans
% lb. white mushrooms
V2-% c. almonds
1f2 t. toasted sesame oil
1 T arrowroot (or cornstarch)
Chop vegetables into small pieces. Put in skillet with about %
inch water. Cover and steam until vegetables are tender. Pour
out any remaining water into a bowl. Add arrowroot and stir
until dissolved; pour back into vegetables and heat briefly until
liquid thickens. Stir in almonds and toasted sesame oil. Garnish
with toasted sesame seeds. Serves 2-4.
Stir-Fry Over Noodles
2 c. broccoli, chopped
1 red bell pepper, sliced
2 garlic cloves
1 zucchini, diced
2 leeks, chopped
1 carrot, diced
5 white mushrooms, sliced
1 T peanut oil
% c. water or broth
Heat peanut oil and saute the garlic and leeks. Add the
mushrooms, carrots, broccoli, and water or broth. Cover and
cook 5 minutes. Lastly, add the zucchini and red bell pepper and
cook another 5 minutes. Season to taste with basil, cilantro,
and tamari. Serve over whole wheat or tofu noodles. Serves 2-4.
Almond Milk
1 c. raw almonds
2 c. water
Y2 t. vanilla or almond extract
2 T honey or maple syrup
Pinch cinnamon
Miscellaneous Recipes ~ 193
Soak almonds for at least 4 hours. Grind in blender with water,
strain and put the solids back in the blender and repeat the
process two more times. Combining all of the strained milk
there should be a total of 6 cups. Put some of the liquid back
in the blender with the vanilla, honey and cinnamon. Blend
and mix back into the other liquid. Store in the refrigerator and
use within a few days. Almond milk can also be sweetened by
grinding in 5-6 dates or a small handful of raisins. This same
procedure can be used to make other nut milks like cashew or
sesame milk.
Soybean Milk
Soak soybeans at least 8 hours, or as long as three days in the
refrigerator. Blend soaked beans with 3 c. water, then strain
through a cloth, squeezing out the milk. Put the pulp back in
the blender with more water and repeat the process until you
have 1 Y2 quarts of soymilk. Bring to a boil and simmer for 15-
20 minutes, stirring often to prevent sticking and boiling over.
Soymilk can be used plain, mixed with carob powder and rice
syrup, or blended with fruits such as papaya or banana (cool
soymilk before mixing with fruit).
194 ~ The Tao of Nutrition
Protein Pudding
3 c. soymilk
1/3 c. rice syrup (or maple syrup)
1 bar agar seaweed
Rinse agar, then mix with soymilk. Cook together until agar is
dissolved. Stir in syrup. Pour into dishes and let firm.
Variations:
1. Add 1/2 C. raisins or chopped dates.
2. Add 1h c. pecans, sunflower seeds, walnuts, or cashews.
3. Flavor with 1;2 t. vanilla or 3 T carob powder.
4. Substitute almond milk for the soymilk and garnish the
top with 1/4 c. almonds when almost firm.
Pecan Pudding
2 c. soymilk
1/2 c. pecans or walnuts
1/4-1/3 c. maple or brown rice syrup
3 T arrowroot (or kudzu or sweet rice flour)
2 T carob powder
Blend all ingredients well. Heat over low flame until thickened,
stirring constantly. Serve warm.
Miscellaneous Recipes ~ 195
Wheat Gluten (Wheat Meat)
2V2lbs. gluten flour (or unbleached white flour or whole wheat
flour)
1 qt. water
Tamari to season
Mix flour and water until it forms a stiff dough. Let sit one
hour. Then cover with water and knead with both hands.
Pour off the starchy white water and repeat the process until
the water is clear. This will take many washings and much
kneading. For tender gluten, cover the finished gluten with
water and let stand for 1-2 days before using. To cook, drop
small pieces into boiling water for 30 minutes. Remove from
water and season with tamari. Gluten can also be marinated
before or after cooking. Tamari, ginger, garlic, and onions make
a good marinade. Gluten can be used whenever a "meaty"
textured food is desired.
Basic Tomato Sauce
3 c. chopped tomatoes
1 bell pepper, chopped
1 garlic clove
1 small onion, chopped
2 T fresh basil (or V2 t. dried)
V2 t. oregano
1 t. onion powder
1 V2 T tamari
2 T arrowroot (or kudzu or cornstarch)
Cook the tomatoes, bell pepper, garlic and onion until tender.
Then put in blender with the basil, oregano, onion powder and
tamari. Return to pan when well blended. Mix arrowroot with
a small amount of water. Add to the tomato mixture, and heat
stirring often until thick.
196 ~ The Tao of Nutrition
Variations for Basic Tomato Sauce:
1. Add 1;2 c. sauteed white mushrooms.
2. Add 1;2 c. zucchini
3. Serve over noodles or steamed spaghetti squash.
Simple Oil and Vinegar Dressing
1;2 c. oil
Y2 c. vinegar, rice or apple cider
Lemon juice (optional)
1 T tamari or Bragg's Liquid Aminos (optional)
Y4 t. garlic or onion powder
Blend the oil and vinegar by whisk, shaker or blender. You may
add the optional ingredients. For an Italian dressing, add 1;2 t.
oregano and 1;2 t. basil to the oil and vinegar mixture.
Coriander Vinaigrette
2 T coriander seeds
Y2 c. olive oil
Y4 c. brown rice vinegar
liz bunch cilantro, roughly chopped
1 T shallots or chives, chopped
Salt and pepper to taste
Blend together until smooth. Serve over mixed greens or
grains.
Lemon Vinaigrette
1 clove garlic
Miscellaneous Recipes ~ 197
1h lemon, whole with seeds removed
1h c. chopped sweet onion
1h c. lemon juice
l1h t. Dijon mustard
1h c. red wine vinegar
1h t. honey
1h t. pepper
1h t. salt
2 c. olive oil
Blend together until smooth. Serve over dark leafy greens for a
Liver benefiting effect.
Pecan Dressing
1h c. sesame oil
1h c. toasted pecans
1h c. coconut milk
3 T lemon juice
2 T honey
Salt to taste
Blend the above ingredients together and serve over the
following cole slaw:
1h c. each: finely shredded cabbage, fennel and carrots
1/3 c. chopped crystallized ginger
1 T coriander or fennel seeds
% c. cilantro, chopped
Sprouts
Sprouts are easy to grow and very nutritious. The nutritional value of sprouts
is increased manifold over the unsprouted seeds.
Rainbow Mix
This is a blend of azuki beans, mung beans and lentils. Soak
seeds (together or separately) overnight. Pour off the soak
water and rinse twice daily. A jar with a screen on top is
very handy for growing sprouts. Store in a warm, dark place
for 3-5 days remembering to rinse twice daily. At the end
of the growth period, put in sunlight for 30-60 minutes for
the leaves to produce chlorophyll. These can be eaten raw
or lightly sauteed. Whole peas or whole wheat may also be
added to this mix.
Light Mix
This blend is alfalfa seeds, red clover seeds and daikon radish
seeds (optional). Sprout these in the same fashion as above.
These sprouts can be eaten raw as a garnish in salads and
sandwiches.
198
Sandwich Fillings
These fillings can be used with any whole grain bread or pita (pocket) breads
or rolled inside whole wheat tortillas (chapatis).
Rainbow Sprouts
Lightly saute the following in water or oil: mung, azuki and
lentil sprouts, grated carrots, shredded red cabbage, soaked
hiziki seaweed and grated ginger.
Garbanzo Spread
Cook garbanzo beans until soft. Mash and mix with sesame
tahini, lemon juice, garlic powder and a pinch of salt. Garnish
with alfalfa/clover sprouts and tomato slices.
Nut Butter
Blend almond butter, sesame butter, or cashew butter, grated
carrots, green onions and cilantro.
Soy Burger
Combine cooked soy and garbanzo beans, grated carrots,
sliced mushrooms, and enough cornstarch or arrowroot or
flour to hold together. Steam for 15-20 minutes over medium
flame.
Sweet Treat
Combine almond butter, rice syrup, grated apple and a pinch
of ginger or cinnamon.
Eggplant Spread
Steam eggplant until soft. Mash and mix with sesame tahini,
garlic and lemon juice.
Colorful Sandwich
Steam beets and carrots. Mash and mix with sauteed, finely
chopped tofu, cabbage, and celery.
199
Congee Recipes
A congee (also known as jook, porridge or gruel) is a soupy grain
dish typically eaten for breakfast. It may be used for other
meals by those who are weak or chronically ill. Congees are
highly digestible, easily assimilated, and good for people with
weak digestion, fatigue, or poor appetite and those who are
convalescing from surgery or illness.
Traditionally cooked with rice or millet, congees can be cooked
with other grains, or a combination of grains, including barley,
cornmeal, and guinoa. The basic recipe can be modified with
the addition of therapeutic foods, medicinal herbs, and spices.
Basic Congee Recipe
1 c. rice (white, brown, sweet, basmati)
5-10 c. water (depending on how thick or thin you want the
dish to be)
Cook for about 4-6 hours on a low flame or overnight in a crock
pot. The finished congee can be mildly seasoned with sea salt,
miso or honey.
200
Congee Recipes ~ 201
Congee variations to be added at the beginning of the cooking
process:
% c. mung beans to clear heat and toxins
% c. aduki beans
% c. Job's tears or pearled barley (Yi Yi Ren) to promote urina-
tion, reduce damp and heat
2 chopped celery stalks to clear heat, reduce hypertension
1 chopped carrot to promote digestion and strengthen the Lung
1 t. fennel seeds or coriander seed to relieve gas and bloating
5 pitted Chinese dates (Da Zao) and 3 slices fresh ginger to
harmonize the Stomach and relieve nausea or vomiting
V4 c. goji berries (Gou Oi Zi) to benefit the eyes and nourish
blood and Yin
10 grams astragalus (Huang Oi), 10 grams Chinese yam (Shan
Yao) and 5 shiitake mushrooms to benefit the immune
system (remove the astragalus at the end of cooking as it
remains woody)
% c. dried seaweed such as wakame, nori or dulse to reduce
yellow phlegm
2 t. turmeric powder to activate the blood and relieve pain
1h c. chopped walnuts, almonds, pine nuts or sesame seed to
promote a bowel movement
1 chopped pear
% c. chopped almonds to descend the Lung chi and stop cough
Congee variations to be added at the end of the cooking, the
last 10-15 minutes:
% c. chopped mint to promote sweat and relieve fever and sore
throat
% c. chopped parsley. to promote digestion and relieve food
stagnation, bloating and indigestion
% c. chopped scallions and 6 slices of fresh ginger to relieve
chills and nasal congestion
Section Five
Sample Meal Plans
Sample Meal Plans
O
ur meal plans are intended to provide some direction in
nutritional meal planning. They are not meant to be a rigid
regimen, rather a framework within which to plan your meals.
Feel free to make substitutions to suit your individual needs.
If your diet includes fish and meat, they may be substituted
for tofu or other soy products for up to 10% of your diet. If
your diet includes eggs or dairy products, those too can be
substituted as protein sources.
In general, each meal will be constructed around a grain food
with fresh vegetables and fruits. As a vegetarian, it is important
to eat a variety of bean foods also to provide a more balanced
protein than grain alone. Examples are soybean milk over
oatmeal, lentils and rice, or black bean soup with corn bread.
Dairy products, eggs, nuts and seeds are also used to complement
grain or bean protein.
Breakfast should sustain us through the first portion of our
productive day, so don't skimp on it. Lunch is usually lighter
because of the typical time frame within which we have to eat
at midday, although this is an ideal time for the biggest meal
of the day. Dinnertime is usually more leisurely, and allows
for more creativity in the kitchen. Try not to overeat before
bedtime.
In the spring/summer, we tend to eat lighter and include more
fresh fruits and cooling foods. Moister foods will be needed
during the hot and dry season. Fall/winter meals need to provide
extra fuel to sustain our energy and keep us warm. Thus we
will need to eat more baked and warming foods during the cold
season.
205
Spring/Summer Meals
Monday
BREAKFAST
• Cream of rice or wheat with raisins and cinnamon
• Steamed apple
LUNCH
• Winter melon soup with tofu*
• Rice cake with nut butter
DINNER
• Stir-fried vegetables with tofu and gluten *
• Brown rice *
Tuesday
BREAKFAST
• Scrambled tofu with tomato and zucchini
• Brown rice with pecans
LUNCH
• Chinese noodle soup*
• Couscous with steamed peanuts*
• Papaya slices
DINNER
• Fancy rice*
• Brown rice *
Please note: Those dishes that are marked with an asterisk (*) are listed
in the recipe section. Detailed preparation instructions are
included.
206
Meal Plans ~ 207
Wednesday
BREAKFAST
• Apple/banana or carrot corn bread *
• Soybean milk*
LUNCH
• Fruit salad with soy yogurt and almonds
• Brown rice drink (amasake)
DINNER
• Tomato-mushroom sauce over whole-wheat noodles
and tempeh cubes*
• Steamed broccoli
Thursday
BREAKFAST
• Couscous with grated apples and raisins *
• Almond milk *
LUNCH
• Nori rolls with rice, steamed carrots and stir-fry
cilantro *
• Brown rice drink (amasake)
DINNER
• Vegetable tofu stir-fry*
• Machi rice balls *
208 ~ The Tao of Nutrition
Friday
BREAKFAST
• Steamed pineapple corn bread*
• Almond pudding*
LUNCH
• Pita bread with rainbow sprouts and carrots*
• Green salad with tofu dressing*
DINNER
• Tofu skins and mushrooms*
• Brown rice*
• Steamed eggplant
Saturday
BREAKFAST
• Simple cereal with dates, raisins, and sunflower seeds
LUNCH
• Summer vegetable soup*
• Chapatis with avocado and sprouts
DINNER
• Couscous-corn pie*
• Green salad with sesame garnish *
Sunday
BREAKFAST
• Scrambled tofu with egg*
• Couscous pie*
• Soybean milk *
LUNCH
• Garbonzo spread on whole-wheat bread *
• Apple slices
DINNER
• Vegetable stir-fry*
• Protein cereal with peanuts and pecans*
Fall/Winter Meals
Monday
BREAKFAST
• Basic protein cereal with azuki or black beans
• Steamed tofu with ginger, soy sauce, and nut meal
LUNCH
• S tir-fry vegeta bles with tofu and seaweed *
• Simple grain dish *
DINNER
• Tofu skins with Chinese mushrooms*
• Rice/barley/couscous*
• Steamed broccoli
Tuesday
BREAKFAST
• Simple cereal with dates, raisins, and peanuts*
• Steamed corn bread with sesame butter and rice
syrup*
LUNCH
• Soyburger sandwich *
• Vegetable soup
DINNER
• Couscous-corn pie*
• Azuki beans and chestnuts*
• Steamed spinach
209
210 ~ The Tao of Nutrition
Wednesday
BREAKFAST
• Simple cereal with ginger, scallions, and miso*
• S teamed broccoli and green beans
• Soy milk*
LUNCH
• Nori burritos *
• Black bean soup*
DINNER
• Tofu-mushroom casserole*
• Stuffed pumpkin *
• Pecan pudding*
Thursday
BREAKFAST
• Steamed corn bread with black bean spread and
sliced banana *
• Soy milk with carob*
LUNCH
• Vegetable pie*
• S teamed greens
DINNER
• Cashew stir-fry*
• Millet and rice *
• Protein pudding*
Meal Plans ~ 211
Friday
BREAKFAST
• Steamed corn, beets, and spinach
• Pita bread sandwiches with mochi *
• Cinnamon soy milk *
LUNCH
• Stir-fry vegetables over noodles*
• Sweet squash and seaweed soup*
DINNER
• Azuki bean and squash casserole*
• Sweet brown rice and couscous*
• Cauliflower
Saturday
BREAKFAST
• Simple cereal with tempeh, mushrooms, and celery*
• Steamed apples
LUNCH
• Creamy split pea soup*
• Millet patties*
DINNER
• Beet sauce over noodles*
• Tofu and Chinese mushrooms*
Sunday
BREAKFAST
• Chestnut rice with peanuts*
• Steamed carrots
LUNCH
• Chapatis with rainbow sprouts and carrots*
• S teamed yam
DINNER
• Black bean over rice*
• Vegetable stir-fry*
Section Six
Appendix
Cold
Chinese cabbage
Mung bean sprouts
Seaweed
Snow peas
Water chestnut
White mushrooms
Chart 1: Energetic Properties of Foods
Vegetables
Alfalfa sprouts
Asparagus
Bamboo shoots
Beets
Bok choy
Broccoli
Cool
Burdock root
Button mushrooms
Cabbage
Carrot
Cauliflower
Celery
Cilantro
Collards
Corn
Cucumber
Daikon radish
Dandelion greens
Eggplant
Endive lettuce
Lotus root
Potato
Pumpkin
Romaine lettuce
Soybean sprouts
Spinach
Summer squash
Turnip
Watercress
Winter melon
Winter squash
Zucchini
215
Neutral
Chard
Jerusalem artichoke
Lettuce
Shitake mushrooms
Sweet potato
Taro root
Yam
Warm
Bell pepper
Chinese chives
Ganoderma
mushrooms
Green beans
Kale
Leek
Mustard Green
Onion
Parsley
Parsnip
Hot
Garlic
Scallions
Cold
Banana
Cantaloupe
Grapefruit
Mulberry
Pear
Pear-apple
Watermelon
Cool
Apple
Apricot
Avocado
Cranberry
Fig
Lemon
Barley
Kamut
Millet
Pearl barley
White rice
Wheat
Energetic Properties of Foods (continued)
Limes
Orange
Peach
Persimmon
Strawberry
Tomato
Fruits
Neutral
Chinese date
Coconut milk
Goji berry
Loquat
Mango
Olive
Grains
Buckwheat
Brown rice
Corn meal
Rice bran
Rye
216
Warm
Blueberry
Cherry
Chinese prune
Coconut
Dried papaya
Grape
Amaranth
Oats
Ouinoa
Spelt
Sweet rice
Wheat bran
Wheat germ
Hawthorn berry
Litchi (lychee)
Papaya
Pineapple
Plum
Raspberry
Tangerine
Hot
Energetic Properties of Foods (continued)
Seeds and Beans
Cold Cool Neutral Warm Hot
Pumpkin seeds Mung beans Almond Black bean Navy bean
Lima beans Azuki bean Brown sesame seed Pecan
Soybeans Black sesame seed Cashew Pine nut
Tofu Filbert Chestnut Pinto bean
Winter melon seeds Kidney bean Garbonzo bean Walnut
Lotus seed Lentil
Peanut
Pea
Sunflower seed
Animal Products
Pork Chicken egg Dairy products Beef Shrimp Lamb
Clam Duck Chicken Turkey
Crab Fish (ocean) Fish (freshwat er)
Gelatin Goat's milk
Oyster Ouail egg
217
Cold
Bamboo shavings Mulberry leaf
Cassia seeds Oyster shell
Chinese cucumber Reed root
Chrysanthemum
Goldenseal root
Gypsum
Honeysuckle flower
Lily bulb
Mother of pearl
shell
Motherwort leaf
Salt
Vitamin C
White sugar
Energetic Properties of Foods (continued)
Herbs
Cool Neutral Warm
American ginseng Chinese yam
Cilantro Licorice root
Corn silk Loquat leaf
Kudzu Lycii (goji) berry
(pueraria root)
Poria mushroom
Mint leaf Peach kernel
Persimmon cap
Miscellaneous
Tea (green) Barley malt
Spirulina Rice malt
ChIarella Black fungus
Honey
White fungus
218
Anise seed
Basil
Cardamom
seed
Carob pod
Citrus peel
Clove
Coriander
seed
Dang gui
Fennel seed
Brown sugar
Coffee
Molasses
Rice vinegar
Wine
Fresh ginger
Hawthorn
berry
Longan fruit
Mugwort
Oriental ginseng
Squid bone
Hot
Black pepper
Cinnamon
bark
Dry ginger
Chart 2: Five Elements Correspondences
Wood Fire Earth Metal Water
Organ Liver, Heart, Spleen, Lungs, Kidneys
Gall bladder Small Intestine, Stomach Large Bladder
Pericardium, Sanjiao Pancreas intestine
Flavor Sour Bitter Sweet Pungent Salty
Sense Sight/eyes Taste/ tongue Touch/ skin Smell/nose Hearing! ears
Color Green Red Yellow White Black
Emotion Anger Joy (mania) Worry Sadness Fear
Voice Shouting Laughter Singing Crying Groaning
Physical Muscles and Blood vessels Flesh Skin and Bone
manifestation tendons body hair
Mode of action Twitching Itching Hiccuping Coughing Shivering
Internal energy Hun Chi Shen Chi Yuan Chi Po Chi Ching Chi
(psychic Chi) (directing Chi) (primal Chi) (physical Chi) (creative Chi)
Body fluid Bile and tears Blood and swea t Saliva Jin (mucous Sexual fluids
secretions)
Climate Wind Heat Humidity Dryness Cold
Season Spring Summer Late summer and Autumn Winter
between seasons
219
Five Elements Correspondences (continued)
Wood Fire Earth Metal Water
Orientation East South Center West North
Development Birth Growth Maturity Harvest Storage
Negative drive Hostility Greed Ambition Stubbornness Desire
Corrupting influence Competition Sex Mind Money Alcohol
Attributes of mind Rationality Spirituality Tranquility Sentimentality Desire
Moral trait Benevolence Humility Trustfulness Rectitude Wisdom
220
Chart 3: Five Energetic Transformations
The Creation Cycle
The Control Cycle
221
Chart 4: Translations of Food & Herb Names
Name Pin Yin Latin Other
alismatis root ze xie Rhizoma Alismatis
abalone shell shi jue ming Concha Haliotidis
American ginseng xi yang shen Radix Panacis Quinquefolii
apricot kernels xing ren Semen Armeniacae Amarum
astragalus huangqi Radix Astragali
bamboo shavings zhu ru Caulis Bambusae in Taenia
betel nut bing lang Semen Arecae
black fungus hei mu er Auricularia Auricula wood ears
black sesame seed heizhi rna Semen Sesami Nigrum
burdock root niu banggen Radix Arctii gobo
cardamom seed bai dou kou Fructus Amomi Rotundus
sha ren Fructus Amomi Villosum
cassia seeds jue ming zi Semen Cassiae
chicken gizzard ji nei jin Endothelium Corneum
Gigeriae Galli
Chinese cucumber tian hua fen Radix Trichosanthis
Chinese date da zao Fructus Jujubae
Chinese date (black) hei zao Fructus Jujubae
Chinese date (red) hongzao Fructus Jujubae
Chinese prune wumei Fructus Mume
Chinese yam shanyao Rhizoma Dioscoreae
chrysanthemum juhua Flos Chrysanthmi
citrus peel chen pi Pericarpium Citri
Reticulatae
cinnamon bark rou gui Cortex Cinnamomi
clematis wei ling xian Radix Clematidis
cloves ding xiang Flos Caryophylli
cornsilk yu mixu Stigma Maydis
dandelion pu gongying Herba Taraxaci
danggui danggui Radix Angelica Sinensis
fennel seed xiao hui xiang Fructus Foeniculi
fritillaria bulb chuan bei mu Bulbus Fritillariae Cirrhosae
ganoderma
mushroom ling zhi Ganoderma reishi
ginger root (fresh) sheng jiang Rhizoma Zingiberis
ginger root (dried) gan jiang Rhizoma Zingiberis
ginkgo nut baiguo Semen Ginkgo
222
Translations of Food & Herb Names (continued)
Name Pin Yin Latin Other
goji berry gou qi zi Fructus Lycii lycii
gypsum shigao Gypsum Fibrosum
hawthorn berry shan zha Fructus Crataegi
honeysuckle jin yinhua Flos Lonicerae
kudzu gegen Radix Puerariae kuzu
licorice gan cao Radix Glycyrrhizae
ling zhi mushroom (See ganoderma mushroom)
litchi kernel Ii zhi he Semen Litchi
loquat leaf pi pa ye Folium Eriobotryae
lotus root lian gen Rhizoma Nelumbinis
lotus seed lian zi Semen Nelumbinis
lychee li zhi Litchi chinensis litchi
lycii berry gou qi zi Fructus Lycii goji
lily bulb baihe Bulbus Lilii
longan fruit longyan rou Arillus Longan
malt syrup yi tang Saccharum Granorum barley malt
mother of pearl shell zhenzhu mu Concha Margaritae
motherwortleaf yi mu cao Folium Leonuri
mulberry sang shen Fructus Mori
mugwort ai ye Folium Artemisiae argyi
mung bean lu dou Semen Phaseoli radiati
Oriental ginseng ren shen Radix Ginseng
oyster shell mull Concha Ostreae
peach kernel tao ren Semen Persicae
pearl barley yi yi ren Semen Coicis coix
Job's tears
persimmon cap shi di Calyx Kaki
poria mushroom fu ling! fu shen Poria
prunes (unripe) wumei Fructus Mume
pumpkin seed nan gua zi Semen Cucurbitae
raspberry fu pen zi Fructus Rubi
reed root lu gen Rhizoma Phragmitis
squid bone hai piao xiao Endoconcha Sepiae
walnut hu tao ren Semen Juglandis
white fungus bai mu er; yi er Tremella silver ears
winter melon seed donggua ren Semen Benincasae
223
Glossary
Astringent - substance that has a constricting action or causes
contraction of orifices. Examples of astringent action are to
stop sweating or stop diarrhea.
Arteriosclerosis - hardening of the arteries, usually due to
aging or high consumption of fatty foods over a long period of
time.
Ascites - accumulation of fluids in the abdomen, usually due
to cirrhosis of the liver.
Cap - calyx; the sepals of a flower. A persimmon cap is the
green papery calyx at the stem end of the orange fruit.
Carminative - substance that promotes normal flow of energy
and removes obstructions; substance that relieves gas from the
gastrointestinal tract.
Chi (qi) - energy or life force; an entity that denotes the
functional aspect of the body in Chinese Medicine.
Chi gong (qi gong) - a set of breathing exercises for strength-
ening and balancing the energy (Chi), relaxing the mind, and
for the purpose of maintaining health and curing disease.
Clears heat - to remove or neutralize pathogenic heat from the
body; to soothe a hot, feverish condition with cooling foods or
herbs.
Colitis - inflammation of the colon.
224
Glossary ~ 225
Cold type condition - a condition caused by cold, one of the
six pathogenic factors in the environment, or simply the result
of insufficient fire (Yang) in the body. It is benefited by warming
foods and herbs, and application of warmth (i.e. heating pad)
and is aggravated by cold.
Cold type person - one who frequently tends to feel cold, be
pale-complexioned, lack energy, tend toward loose stools.
Conjunctivitis - inflammation and infection of the mucous
membranes of the eyelids as a result of too much heat in the
body, specifically in the Liver, according to Chinese Medicine.
Consol idate (the lungs) - to strengthen the lungs in conditions
of chronic cough, asthma and shortness of breath.
Cooling food - a food that has a counteracting effect to heat
in the body, i.e., elicits a cooling response from the body; food
of a Yin nature, food that lowers metabolism.
Dampness - one of the external causes of disease that disturbs
the normal flow of energy and particularly the digestive
functioning of the Spleen and Stomach, characterized by
heaviness, stagnation, and turbidity; fluid accumulation due to
impaired water metabolism.
Deficiency - condition of weakness or lack of either energy or
substance due to illness or improper lifestyle, diet, or mental
attitude.
Descend - to move energy in a downward direction in the
body.
Diaphoretic - a substance that induces perspiration in order to
expel pathogenic factors and toxins.
226 ~ The Tao of Nutrition
Disharmony - imbalance or disease or lack of healthy
function.
Diuresis - a process that promotes smooth urination and re-
duces edema.
Diuretic - a food or herb that promotes urination in order to
. relieve swelling or discomfort in urination.
Dryness - one of the six pathogenic factors in the environment.
Disorders with dryness are associated with thirst, dry mouth
and throat, fever, constipation, scanty concentrated urine,
dry cough and emaciation. This can also be due to internal
imbalances in the body.
Dysentery - extreme diarrhea and tenesmus due to bacterial or
viral infection.
Dysuria - painful or difficult urination.
Edema - abnormal accumulation of fluids in the body;
swelling.
Essence (uJingU) - the source of life, found in eggs, sperm,
marrow, and the brain and stored in the Kidneys; provides
for growth, development and reproduction throughout one's
entire lifetime.
Five Element Theory - an ancient philosophical concept to
explain the phenomena of energy transformation and the
composition and relationships of the natural world and the
human body. A further refinement of the concept of opposites
(Yin and Yang) into four degrees, the fifth being the center
or balance. For a more thorough understanding of the Five
Element Theory, please refer to Tao, The Subtle Universal Law by
Hua-Ching Ni.
Glossary ~ 227
Gastritis - inflammation of the stomach.
Gruel (congee or porridge) - grain that has been cooked with
extra water and cooking time to the point of being soupy.
Harmonize - restore general balance; to bring together into
smooth functioning.
Hot type condition - a condition that is usually caused by
heat, one of the six pathogenic factors in the environment,
or a lack of water (Yin) to counterbalance the fire (Yang) in
the body. It is benefited by cooling foods and treatment, and
aggravated by heat. This is usually an acute, excess condition,
i.e., infections, fevers and boils.
Hot type person - one who frequently tends to feel hot, sweat
freely, be red in face or tongue, have an excess of energy, be
thirsty.
Hypertension - high blood pressure.
Lactostasis - hampered milk production or secretion due to
physical or functional obstruction.
Leukorrhea - white or yellow mucous discharge from the
cervix or the vagina.
Liver heat (or fire) rising - a condition in which an excessive
amount of heat in the Liver rises to the upper part of the body
causing red painful eyes, flushed cheeks, headache, fits of
anger, emotional instability, dizziness, ringing in the ears and
insomnia.
Neurasthenia - nervous exhaustion characterized by fatigue,
weakness, headache, sweating, polyuria, tinnitus, dizziness,
fear, photophobia and insomnia.
228 ~ The Tao of Nutrition
Pathogen - a microorganism or substance capable of producing
a disease. In Chinese Medicine, it refers to anything that may
cause imbalance within the body including environmental
factors (wind, cold, heat, dampness, dryness, summer heat)
and emotions.
Qi (see Chi)
Qi gong (see chi gong)
Rebellious Chi -energy that moves upwardly when it normally
should be going down, i.e. coughing, vomiting and hiccuping.
Shen - spirit.
Stagnancy - a sluggishness or impeded circulation of blood,
Chi, or body fluids.
Summer heat - one of the external causes of disease
characterized by irritability, fever, headache, thirst, restlessness
and sweating
Tai Chi Chuan - an ancient Chinese exercise for harmonizing
the mind, body and spirit. The connected movements somewhat
resemble a graceful dance.
Tenesmus - A painfully urgent but ineffectual attempt to
urinate or defecate.
Tonify - to strengthen or build.
Toxins - poisons; in Chinese Medicine this term often refers to
the presence of bacteria or virus.
Ventilate (lungs) - to disperse energy stagnation in the lungs
and to soothe breathing and help relieve cough and asthma.
Glossary ~ 229
Viscera - internal organs.
Warming food - one that reduces coldness in the body or is of
a Yang nature; food that raises metabolism.
Wind - one of the external causes of disease; a syndrome
characterized by fever, chills, head and body ache. Internal
wind can disrupt the balance and manifest such symptoms as
dizziness, fainting, convulsions, tremor, numbness, or pain that
moves around (like the wind).
Wind cold - common cold or flu caused by the invasion of
wind and cold. Symptoms are severe chills, mild fever, head and
body ache, no sweat, and sinus congestion.
Wind heat - common cold or flu caused by the invasion of
wind and heat. Symptoms are high fever, mild chills, sore
throat, body and headache, sweating and thirst.
Yang - relating to the male, active, positive, fiery, energetic side
of life or nature of a person.
Yang deficiency - a lack of heat or fire (Yang) within the body
to counterbalance the water (Yin), characterized by coldness,
Chi deficiency, tiredness, diarrhea with watery stools; a lack of
energy to balance bodily substance.
Yin - relating to the female, passive, negative, watery, cool,
substance side of life or nature of a person.
Yin deficiency - a lack of the coolness or water (Yin) within
the body to counterbalance the fire (Yang), usually resulting in
heat symptoms such as irritability, red cheeks, night sweats,
dry cough, dry throat and insomnia; a lack of bodily substance
to balance energy.
Bibliography
For further reading on the subjects of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Chinese
nutrition, and the Taoist healing arts, we suggest the following books. Those
books marked by an asterisk (*) supply additional information on Chinese
herbs.
Traditional Chinese Medicine
* Beinfield, Harriet and Efrem Korngold. Between Heaven and
Earth: A Guide to Chinese Medicine. New York: Random House
Publishing (Ballantine Books), 1991.
Deng, Tietao. Practical Diagnosis in Traditional Chinese Medicine.
Edinburgh: Churchill Livingstone, 2000.
Kaptchuk, Ted J. The mb That Has No maver. New York:
McGraw-Hill, 2000.
L'Orange, Darlena with Gary Dolowich. Ancient Roots, Many
Branches. Twin Lakes, WI: Lotus Press, 2002.
Maciocia, Giovanni. The Foundations of Chinese Medicine, Second
Edition. New York: Elsevier (Churchill Livingstone), 2005.
Ni, Daoshing. The Tao of Fertility. New York: Collins (Harper-
Colllins), 2008.
Ni, Maoshing. Secrets of Self-Healing. New York: Avery (Penguin
Group),2008.
Ni, Maoshing. The Yellow Emperor's Classic of Medicine. Boston
and London: Shambhala, 1995.
*Unschuld, Paul. Medicine in China: History of Pharmaceutics.
Berkeley, California: University of California Press, 1986.
230
Bibliography ~ 231
Xinnong, Cheng. Chinese Acupuncture and Moxibustion. Bejing:
Foreign Language Press, 1987.
Chinese Nutrition
Campbell, T Colin and Thomas M. Campbell II, The China
Study. Dallas, TX: BenBella Books, 2006.
Colbin, Annemarie. Food and Healing. New York: Ballantine
Books, 1986.
Flaws, Bob and Honora Wolfe. Prince wen Hui's Cook: Chinese
Dietary Therapy. Brookline, Massachusetts: Paradigm Publica-
tions, 1983.
Haas, Elson. Staying Healthy With the Seasons. Berkeley,
California: Celestial Arts, 2003.
Kastner, Joerg. Chinese Nutrition Therapy: Dietetics in Traditional
Chinese Medicine. New York: Thieme, 2004.
Liu, Jilin and Gordon Peck. Chinese Dietary Therapy. London,
England: Churchill Livingstone, 2004.
Lu, Henry C. Chinese System of Food Cures. New York: Sterling
Publishing Co., 1986.
Lu, Henry C. Chinese Natural Cures. New York: Black Dog and
Leventhal Publishers, 2005.
Pitchford, Paul. Healing with Whole Foods: Asian Traditions and
Modern Nutrition. Berkeley, California: North Atlantic Books,
2002.
Zhang Enqin. Chinese Medicated Diet. Shanghai, China: Publish-
ing House of Shanghai College of Traditional Chinese Medi-
cine, 1988.
232 ~ The Tao of Nutrition
Chinese Herbs
Bensky, Dan, Steven Clavey, & Erich Stager, Chinese Herbal
Medicine: Materia Medica, Third Edition. Seattle: Eastland Press,
2004
Chen, John K. and Tina T Chen. Chinese Medical Herbology
and Pharmacology. City of Industry, CA: Art of Medicine Press,
2004.
Han, Henry, Glenn E. Miller, and Nancy Deville. Ancient Herbs,
Modern Medicine. New York: Bantam Books, 2003.
Harrar, Sari and Sara Altshul O'Donnell. Woman's Book of Healing
Herbs. Emmaus, PA: Rodale Press, 1999.
Hobbs, Christopher. Medicinal Mushrooms. Santa Cruz, CA:
Botanica Press, 1995.
Holmes, Peter with Jing Wang. The Traditional Chinese Medicine
Materia Medica Clinical Reference and Study Guide. Boulder, CO:
Snow Lotus Press, 2002.
L'Orange, Darlena. Herbal Healing Secrets of the Orient. Paramus,
NJ: Prentice Hall. 1998.
Ni, Maoshing. Chinese Herbology Made Easy. Los Angeles:
SevenStar Communications, 1986.
Reid, Daniel. A Handbook of Chinese Healing Herbs. Boston, MA:
Shambhala, 1995.
Teeguarden, Ron. The Ancient Wisdom of the Chinese Tonic Herbs.
New York: Grand Central Publishing, 2000.
Tierra, Lesley. Healing with Chinese Herbs. Freedom, CA: The
Crossing Press, 1997.
Bibliography ~ 233
Tierra, Lesley. Healing with the Herbs of Life. Berkeley, CA: The
Crossing Press, 2003.
Tierra, Michael. The way of Chinese Herbs. New York: Pocket
Books, 1998.
Tillotson, Alan Keith with Nai-shing Hu Tillotson and Robert
Abel, Jr. The One Earth Herbal Source Book: Everything You Need
to Know about Chinese, ~ s t e r n , and Ayurvedic Herbal Treatments.
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Taoist Healing Arts
Jou, Tsung Hwa. The Tao ofT'ai Chi Ch'uan: way to Rejuvenation.
Piscataway, New Jersey: T'ai Chi Foundation, 1983.
Liu, Da. Taoist Health Exercises Book. New York: Perigee Books,
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Ming-dao, Deng. Scholar warrior: An Introduction to the Tao in
Everyday Life. San Francisco: HarperCollins, 1990.
Ni, Hua Ching. 8000 Years of Wisdom: Conversations With
Taoist Master Ni, Hua Ching, Vol. 1. Los Angeles: SevenS tar
Communications, 1995.
Ni, Hua Ching. Tao, The Subtle Universal Law and Integral way of
Life. Los Angeles: SevenS tar Communications, 2003.
Ni, Maoshing. Dr. Maols Harmony Tai Chi. San Francisco:
Chronicle Books, 2006.
Ni, Maoshing. Secrets of Longevity: Hundreds of ways to Live to Be
100. San Francisco: Chronicle Books, 2006.
234 ~ The Tao of Nutrition
Companion Cookbooks
The following book is a companion cookbook to The Tao of Nutrition that
utilizes the principles of Chinese nutrition and includes recipes with Chinese
food herbs:
Chuang, Lily. Chinese Vegetarian Delights: Sugar and Dairy Free
Cookbook. Los Angeles: SevenS tar Communications, 1987.
Chuang, Lily and Cathy McNease. 101 Vegetarian Delights. Los
Angeles: SevenStar Communications, 1992.
Cookbooks
Colbin, Annemarie. The Book of Whole Meals. New York:
Ballantine Books, 1985.
Conrad, Kendall. Eat Well Feel Well. New York: Clarkson Potter,
2006.
Compestine, Ying Chang. Secrets from a Healthy Asian Kitchen.
New York: Penguin Putnum, 2002.
Estella, Mary. Natural Foods Cookbook: Vegetarian Dairy-Free
Cuisine. New York: Japan Publications, 1985.
Fessler, Stella Lau. Chinese Meatless Cooking. New York: Signet
Books, 1983.
Flaws, Bob. The Book ofJook. Boulder, Colorado: Blue Poppy
Press, 2007.
Haas, Elson M. The New Detox Diet: The Complete Guide for
Lifelong Vitality with Receipes, Menus, & Detox Plans. Berkeley/
Toronto: Celestial Arts, 2004.
Hagler, Louise. Tofu Cookery. Summertown, Tennessee: The
Book Publishing Co., 2008.
Bibliography ~ 235
Hou, FaXiang. Unleashing the Power of Food: Recipes to Heal By.
Baltimore, Maryland: Agora Health Books, 2003.
Jacobs, Barbara and Leonard. Cooking with Seitan: The Complete
Vegetarian IIWheat-Meat
ll
Cookbook. New York: Avery, 1994.
Kafka, Barbara with Christopher Styler. Vegetable Love. New
York: Workman Publishing, 2005.
Lappe, Frances Moore. Diet for a Small Planet. New York:
Ballantine Books, 1991.
Leggett, Daverick. Recipes for Self-Healing. Totnes, England:
Meridian Press, 1999
Lin, Florence. Florence Lin IS Chinese Vegetarian Cookbook. Boulder,
Colorado: Shambhala, 1983.
Madison, Deborah. Vegetable Soups from Deborah Madisonls
Kitchen. New York: Broadway Books, 2006.
Ody, Penelopy. The Chinese Herbal Cookbook: Healing Foods for
Inner Balance. Trumbull, CT: Weatherhill, 2001.
Piekarski, Brother Ron. Friendly Foods. Berkeley, California: Ten
Speed Press, 1991.
Robertson, Laurel, Carol Flinders, and Brian Ruppenthal. The
New Laurefs Kitchen. Berkeley, California: Ten Speed Press,
1986.
Saltzman, Joanne. Amazing Grains: Creating Vegetarian Main
Dishes from Whole Grains. Tiburon, California: H.J. Kramer,
1990.
236 ~ The Tao of Nutrition
Shurtleff, William and Akiko Aoyagi. The Book of Tofu. Berkeley,
California: Ten Speed Press, 2001.
Turner, Lisa. Meals That Heal. Rochester, Vermont: Healing Arts
Press, 1996.
Weber, Marcea. Whole Meals. Newberry Park, California: Prism
Press, 1983.
Zhao, Zhuo and George Ellis. The Healing Cuisine of China.
Rochester, VT: Healing Arts Press, 1998.
Sources for Chinese Food & Herbs
Some of the foods and herbs mentioned are only available from Asian markets,
health food stores or specialty food stores. Chinatown in any large city will
have the foods and herbs mentioned. Or, you may find sources by searching
online for Chinese food or Chinese herbs. You can also look in the yellow
pages of your local telephone directory. The following stores are potential
sources for the Chinese foods and herbs recommended in this book:
www.asianfoodgrocer.com
www.99RanchMarket.com
(includes a directory of over 25 stores)
99 Ranch Market
6450 N. Sepulveda Blvd.
Van Nuys, CA 91411
(818) 988-7899
99 Ranch Market
22511 Highway 99
Edmonds, WA 98026
Best Blends Herbs
PO Box 1329
Ojai, CA 93023
(805) 798-1107
Email: cathymcnease@hotmail.com
Tak Shing Hong
835 N. Broadway
Los Angeles, CA 90012
(213) 628-83333
TinBo Co.
841 N. Broadway
Los Angeles, CA 90012
(213) 680-3395
Traditions of Tao Herbal Supplements
13315 W Washington Blvd., Ste. 200
Los Angeles, CA 90066
www.taostar.com
237
Wing Hop Fung
727 N. Broadway
Los Angeles, CA 90012
(213) 626-7200
INDEX
Please n.ote: A listing in boldface means the page contains a major heading.
When Llvet; Heart, Spleen, Lungs, and Kidneys are capitalized, they refer to
the organ system in Chinese medicine.
A
AIDS 116, 124
ADD 55
abdominal
cramps 155
distention 33, 48, 148
pain 104, 130, 135, 162
abscess 36, 45, 46, 49, 94
(See breast,lungs: abscess)
abortion 62
acid 49,58, 70, 159
acne 75, 115-116
acupuncture 15, 17, 119, 155
agar flakes 167
alcohol intoxication 26,34,35,
110
alfalfa sprouts 25, 115, 131, 133,
198,199,215
allergies 40,41,42,79, 83, 100,
117
almond 88, 121,217
milk 193
aloe vera 31,35,44,75, 77, 115,
116,117
amaranth 71, 75, 78, 177,216
anemia 27,54,55,56,59,63,71,
102, 109
anger 5,8,14,15,219,228
angina pain 132
anise seed 101,218
anorexia 28, 76, 118, 142
antibacterial 35, 45, 84, 108
antibiotic 35, 123
anxiety 40, 60, 71, 82, 83, 85,
151
appendicitis 50
appetite 27, 28, 61, 69, 89, 118
appetizer 46
apple 53,110, 131, 142,216
apricot 53, 216, 222
arteriosclerosis 26, 110, 111, 224
arthritis 106, 108, 118
cold type 45,60,96,111,119
damp type 43, 106, 120
heat type 120
pain 46, 118-120
wind type 43, 105. 119
artichoke 25
Jerusalem 37-38, 215
ascites 49, 137, 224
Asian pear 65,97
asparagus 26, 215
asthma 40, 54, 59, 88, 92, 93,
120
astragalus 59, 99, 201, 222
astringent 11, 12, 61, 66, 67, 89,
108,224
autumn 10,219
avocado 54,208,216
azuki beans (See beans, azuki)
B
Ba Gua xiii
back pain 37, 50, 58, 59, 63, 81,
88,91,94,98,101,104,109,
124, 147, 149, 157
bacteria 6 (See. antibacterial)
bacterial infection 134, 150
balanced diet 19,21
baldness 93, 106
239
240 ~ The Tao of Nutrition
bamboo
shavings 218,222
shoots 26, 116, 137, 141,215
banana 54, 109, 122, 127, 128,
131,141,142,145,216
barley 71, 118, 120, 124, 125,
142,216
flour 51
malt 74, 101,218
pearl 33, 49, 74, 115, 116, 122,
125, 138, 142, 144, 146, 147,
154,156,158,216,223
powder 75
sprouted 74
basil 101,218
beans
azuki (aduki) 37, 81, 110, 160,
181,217
recipes 183, 184
black 27, 32, 37, 81, 84, 93,
97, 98, 110, 125, 138, 143,
140151,154,158,160,205,
210,217
recipes 170, 188
garbanzo 82,170,199,217
kidney 82,84,110,217
lima 83, 85, 127,217
mung 72,74,83,94, 116, 120,
122, 125, 134, 136, 138, 141,
145, 153, 157, 172, 181, 198,
201,223
sprouts 84,199,215
navy 84,217
pinto 85,217
red 70,81,120,121,125,137
soy 33,85,144,154,167,217
milk 193, 205, 207, 208
in recipes 178, 199
sprouts 47, 215
sprouts 198
bedwetting 32, 62, 68, 81, 107
bee sting 49,50
beef 95, 137, 138,217
beets 27, 116, 131, 139, 171,
199,211,215
belching 48, 62, 65, 101, 105
bell pepper 27, 30, 117, 118,
143,215
beriberi 46, 48, 81, 101
berries
goji 55, 59, 91, 125, 138, 147,
151,216,218,223
recipes using 168, 180, 184,
188,190,202
hawthorn 61, 105, 133, 143,
148,162,216,218,223
lycii (See goji berries)
betel nut 126.217, 13,. 139, 163,
222
beverages 101
bites 35, 36, 38, 49, 50
bitter taste 11, 12,25,219
black
bean (See beans, black)
date 57, 79, 126, 132, 135,
144, 150, 154, 160
fungus (See fungus, black)
mushroom 30, 40, 129, 132
pepper 28, 37, 43, 66, 84, 102,
105,218
bladder infection 58, 124, 125
bland taste 11, 13, 138
bleeding 30,33,39,43,51,57,
62,66,89,97,102
blisters 50
bloating 25, 50, 71, 73, 104, 130,
148, 155
blood 7, 8, 39
circulation 26, 27, 65, 108
coughing 41,66,94
deficiency 27, 40, 62, 97, 99
loss 111
nourishes 27, 54, 55, 59, 63,
60 71,82,84,85,96
blood (continued)
pressure 30,33,40, 72, 140,
144
stagnant 15, 34, 155
sugar 37, 38, 98
bloody stools 49,51, 102
blueberry 55, 134,216
boils 31,42,49,84
bok choy 28, 131,215
bones 33,44,59,88,95,98,149
steaming 44-45,67
stuck in the throat 57, 108
weak 33
bowel obstruction 74
bowels 72, 75, 130, 140
breast
abscess 38,43,49,84
cancer (See cancer, breast)
lumps 35
broccoli 28, 191, 192,215
bronchitis 34,40,51,65, 67, 89,
108, 112, 126
broth 27,33,39,83,85,128,
130, 138, 147, 154, 187
brown rice (See rice, brown)
brown sugar 30,49,65,69, 74,
94, 101, 103, 141, 144, 148,
152, 158
bruises 56, 111
buckwheat 72, 115, 128, 132,
139,144,216
bulimia 118
burdock root 29, 123, 130, 186,
215,222
burns 35,44,48,56,79,106,
108
burping 37,62,89
Index ~ 241
C
cabbage 25,26,27,33,85,128,
130, 131, 134, 150, 161, 197,
199,215
red or green 29, 199,215
napa (See Chinese, cabbage)
cancer 26,30,36,46,96, 108,
116, 122, 125
breast 26, 45, 123
cervical 40
candida (candidiasis) 25, 116,
123,127
canker sores 36, 152
cantaloupe 55, 125, 135,216
cap 46,66,76,123,136,152,
224
carbuncle 83
cardamom (See seeds, cardamom
and spices & seasonings)
carminative 69,74,224
carob 104,218
carrot 27,28, 30, 110, 116. 117,
123,125,134,136,215
white 34
cashews 88, 194
cassia seeds (See seeds, cassia)
cataracts 124
cauliflower 30, 131,215
causes of disease 14
celery 27, 30, 33, 82, 93, 97, 133,
136,145,215
juice 26, 125, 142, 144, 154,
158, 160
in recipes 169-201
chard 31,58,110,215
Charts 215-223
cherry 56,216
chest
fullness 32, 64, 69, 126, 144
tightness 48,69, 144
chestnut (See nuts, chestnut)
242 ~ The Tao of Nutrition
chi 7, 9, 14,224
rebellious 54. 62, 93, 105,82,
118
stagnation 32, 64, 67, 122, 155
chigong 15,17,134,155,224
chive 82 (See Chinese, chive)
chicken 96,217
egg 96
pox 62
chickpea (See garbanzo bean)
Chinese
cabbage 31,169,215
chive 32, 215
cucumber 117,218,222
dates 135,56,216,222
herb 75,96,117,168,230,232
parsley 32
prunes 57, 136, 140, 157, 162,
216,222
yarn 168,188, 190,201,218,
222
chlorella 109,218
chocolate 104, 116, 118, 153
cholesterol, high 25, 26,40,41,
77, 78, 85
chronic fatigue 124, 127, 146
chrysanthemum 33,48,59,123,
125, 127, 129, 130, 133, 134,
139, 140, 143, 145, 151, 160,
218,222
cilantro 30,32,42,215,218
in recipes 169-199
cinnamon 28,37,43, 104, 107,
118,119,130,139,155,179,
190,192,199,206,211.218
cirrhosis 49, 137
citrus peel 89,218,222
clam 98, 125,217
cleansing 27, 53, 72
clears heat 26,28,29, 30, 31, 33,
34,35,39,46,47,49,50,51,
64,70,73,74,78,94,107,108,
224
cloves 36,46, 65, 105, 108, 118,
124,218,222
coconut 57,138,162,216
milk 216
coffee 74, 105,218
coix 74,75
colds 14
common 29, 35, 38, 42, 45,
102, 106, 129
frequent 38, 75
wind cold type 31,32,42,43,
129
wind heat type 29, 32, 130
cold sores 106
cold type condition 225
cold type person 4, 5, 225
colitis 39, 40, 79, 224
collards 33, 215
congee 17,227
recipes 200-201
(Also see porridge)
conjunctivitis (see pink eye) 29,
30,34,35,48,83,225
cooling food 3, 4, 5, 20, 25, 33,
53,58,71,73,141,150,226
constipation 25, 26, 27, 28, 30,
31,33,44,48,54,58,63,70,
79, 82, 86, 88, 91, 92, 100, 130
coriander 32,218
in recipes 173,188,190, 196,
197,201
corn 33,215
bread 180
meal 72, 216
silk 41,153,218,222
tea 33, 73, 120, 125, 137,
142, 144, 156, 159
coronary heart disease 132
(See heart disease)
cough 51,52,53,55,60,62,63,
106, 107, 107
chronic 60, 90, 91
dry 34, 60, 65, 69, 91, 92, 97,
100,103
whooping 29,31,37, 65
with yellow phlegm 51,53,
65,
crab 36,66,98,217
cramps 155
cranberry 58,68,88,216
cucumber 34,114,143,154,215
sea 122, 132, 141, 147, 158
D
daikon radish 34, 134,215
dairy products 99,217
dampness 25, 32, 34, 43, 44, 50,
61, 64, 67, 71, 77, 88, 95, 97,
103, 106, 225
dandelion 26, 27, 29, 35, 38,
116,120,141,150,215,222
tea 31,33,115,123,130,137
dang gui 59,97,99.187,218,
222
Dao-In xv (See Books on the
Integral Way)
deficiency 27, 62, 97, 98, 99,
225,229
dehydration 53, 63, 67, 70, 83,
107
depression 8, 14, 15, 118, 127,
146, 151
descend 37,54,62,65,82,225
detoxification 27, 33, 72, 110
diabetes 26,31,38,45,47,48,
49,59,64,68,74,81,84,133
diaphoretic 225
diarrhea 26,34, 37, 47, 51, 68,
72, 74, 75, 76, 82, 83, 86, 89,
89, 102, 106, 134-135
Index ~ 243
digestion 10, 19,20,30,32, 60,
61,63,73,75,200,201
diphtheria 30
disharmony 96, 124, 154, 226
diuresis 26, 28, 30, 34, 44, 47,
59,75,91,138,226
diuretic 35, 42, 43, 72, 75, 77,
82,91,105,110,159,226
dizziness 43,88,93, 117, 124,
144, 154, 160
dressing, salad
Coriander Vinaigrette 196
Lemon Vinaigrette 197
Oil and Vinegar 196
Pecan 197
dry skin 5, 86, 98
dryness 52,62, 96, 98, 99, 100,
102,106,137,151,226
duck 97,154,217
duodenal ulcers 38,44, 103, 107
dysentery 26,31,36,41,57,
67, 76, 83, 84, 86, 97, 102,
135,226
bloody 93
dysuria 74, 226 (See urinary
difficulty)
E
ear 81
infection 37
ringing 149, 160
Earth Element 9,10,219,220,
221
eczema 44, 49, 68, 136
genital 44
edema 36,48,58,70,73,85,90,
94,95,97,137,226
egg
chicken 96,217
quail 100
yolk oil 121
eggplant 35-36, 117, 215
244 ~ The Tao of Nutrition
Eight Differentiations 13-14
Eight Trigrams xii
emotion 5, 8, 9, 14, 15, 19, 79,
80, 118, 121, 122, 133, 140,
146,151,219,227,228
endive lettuce 38,215
Energetic Properties of Foods
(Chart 1) 3, 4, 215
energy 7, 8, 13, 14, 15, 16, 21,
123, 148
epilepsy 34
erectile dysfunction 90-91
essence 7, 9, 68, 149, 211
exercise 133, 159, 229
external source 13, 14
eyes
bloodshot 70
blurry vision 138, 144, 149
hemorrhage 70, 111
night blindness 30, 48, 49
pain 64,138
swollen 34
vision decline 100
weakness 30
F
facial mask 76
Fang Zhong xv
fasting 17, 27, 53, 133, 153
fatigue 37,40, 71, 75, 84, 88, 90,
98, 119, 121, 124, 127, 144,
146, 155
muscle 73
fear 9, 14,219
fennel 105 (See seeds, fennel
and spices & seasonings)
fetus 14, 45, 97
fever 44,96,98,83, 121, 126,
129, 130, 142, 149, 150,
blister 152
scarlet 153
fig 58,121,156,161,216
filbert 89,217
Fire Element 8-9, 10,219,220,
221
fish 64,95,97, 187,217
bones 57, 108
Five Elements 8, 10-11,211
Correspondences (Chart 2) 219-
220
Theory 10,11,226
Five Energetic Transformations
(Chart 3) 10, 221
creation cycle 10, 221
control cycle 11, 221
Five Seasons 10
Five Tastes 13-15
flu 38,59,60,68,73,139,142,
158
food
colors 10-11
poisoning 83, 102-103, 109,
135
retention 26, 27, 28, 43, 69,
70, 77, 101, 110
frostbite 28,29,36,60
fruit 53-70
Fu Shi xiii, xiv
fungus 35,68
black 102,218,222
white 110-111,117,123,126,
128,145,218,223
G
Gall Bladder 5,8, 11
gall bladder 25,33, 74
gallstones 33, 72, 159
ganoderma mushroom (See
mushroom, ganoderma)
garlic 36, 38, 83, 87, 97, 109,
118, 119, 123, 125, 128, 129,
135, 1 3 ~ 140, 145, 154, 157,
162, 168,215
garbanzo bean (See beans,
garbanzo)
gas 25,49,50,51, 71, 101, 104
gastritis 39, 60, 77, 89, 227
ginger 5,12,25,31,32,34,35,
36,40,42,46,50,51,59, 71,
73, 75, 97, 99, 102, 106,218,
~ 2 . 2 (See spices & seasonings)
JUlce 92
tea 27,43, 71, 73, 75, 77, 103
gelatin 121, 167,217
ginkgo 116,222
ginseng 34, 99, 147, 158
American 132,218,222
Oriental 218 223
glaucoma 138'
gluten, wheat 71,73,78 167
195 ' ,
goat's milk 98,217
gobo 29, 186
goiter 46, 50, 56
goji berry (See berries, goji)
goldenseal root 35,218
grain 21,71-80
grain recipes 174-182
Cereal, Basic Protein 178
Corn Bread, Steamed 180
Couscous Cereal 179
Couscous Pie 177
Grain Dish, Simple 179
Millet Patties 176
Mochi 181
Nori Burritos 174
Porridge, Breakfast 182
Pumpkin, Stuffed 176
Rice, Chestnut 178
Rice, Fancy 174
Vegetable Pie 175
grapes 59,119,216
grapefruit 60, 130, 142, 143
152,216 '
Index ~ 245
green
beans 37, 215
onion 29,42,45,118,119,
120, 128, 130, 138, 1 4 ~ 155,
172, 186, 199
tea 61, 110, 116, 133. 139, 158
gruel (See congee)
gums 86,108
gypsum 143,144,157,218,223
H
hangover 66
harmonize 13, 44, 56, 82, 92,
106,109,211
stomach 44,59,61,62,74,
101
hawthorn berry 61, 133, 143,
145,155,162,216
headache 25, 93, 130, 139 144
152, 154 ' ,
common cold 139
emotional stress 140
Heart 5, 8-9, 11
heart disease 33 40 55 72 132
160 "'"
heartburn 49 (See indigestion)
heat (See summer, heat)
heatstroke 52, 67, 83
hemorrhoids 54,59,72, 102,
140,141
hepatitis 36,39,40,60,74, 108,
142
herbal recipes 187-190
Goji Berry Oats 188
soups
Basic Herb 187
Butternut Mushroom 189
Sweet and Spicy
Pumpkin 190
246 The Tao of Nutrition
herbal recipes (continued)
stews
Black Bean 188
Dang Cui Cornish Hen 187
Shan Yao Longevity 188
herbs 55,82,99, 101, 111, 118,
120, 168,
hernia 56,59, 62, 64, 69, 101,
105
children 37
pain 56,69
herpes 27, 127, 152
hiccups 89, 105,219
high blood pressure (See
hypertension)
hives 52, 84, 108, 143
hoarseness 65,69,96, 106
honey
65,75, 106, 125, 126, 127. 131,
133, 136, 137, 152, 158,
218
in recipes 178, 181, 186, 193,
197
honeysuckle 51, 150, 152,218,
222
hot flashes 54, 151 (See
menopause)
hot type condition 211
hot type persons 4,5,212
hypertension 26,31,33,39,41,
70,90, 130,
93,102,108,111,144,227
hypoglycemia 38, 127, 146
hysteria 56
incontinence 58, 68
impotence 68,93,147
indigestion 27, 28, 30, 51, 53,
64,70,71,76,85,148
infection 25, 36, 42, 50, 58, 116,
123, 125, 127, 128, 150, 153,
154, 160
infertility 58,88, 100, 149
insect bites (See bites)
insomnia 31,63,71,79, 83, 144,
146, 148, 152
intestines
clean toxins in 40
lubrication of 25, 27, 28, 29,
30,44
intoxication (See alcohol
intoxication)
irritability 5, 27, 28, 32, 33, 34,
39,45,49,57,67,146,149,155
itching 25,63,109, 117, 136,
143,162,219
J
jaundice 25, 33, 34, 35, 36, 49,
60, 70, 142, 158
jellyfish 50, 126, 132, 133, 144
Jerusalem artichoke 37,215
Jin body fluids 7
Jing 7, 8, 9, 15, 100, 226
Job's Tears 74
joints 50,93, 118-120
jook (See congee)
joy 8,14,219
jujube 56,59,62, 74, 79, 89, 90,
99, 116, 128, 143
K
kabocha (See squash, winter)
kale 33, 38, 110, 161, 215
kamut 73,216
Kidney 5, 7, 9, 15, 149
Jing 7-8
weakness 32, 37, 55, 63, 89,
93,97,110,149,160
Yang deficiency 149
Yin deficiency 149
kidney
bean (See beans, kidney)
disease 70
infection 139, 153, 154
stones 27,48,58, 81, 94, 159
knees 81,92, 95, 109, 110,
pain 147, 149
kudzu 194,195,218,223
l
lactation 47,52,64,74,90,101,
136
lactostasis 227
lamb 98,119,138,147,151,217
laryngitis 107, 153, 158
Large Intestine 5, 9
leek 42,215
legumes 22, 81
kntil 82, 1 3 ~ 1 4 ~ 152,217
pea 85
peanut 27, 90, 108, 132, 161,
185
lemon 61, 126, 140, 146, 148,
216
in recipes 186,190,196,197,
199
lentil (See legumes, lentil)
lesions 30, 35, 38, 64, 66, 72
(See skin, lesions)
lethargy 78, 105, 157
kttuce 38,150,215
romaine 215
leukocytopenia 39
leukorrhea 72, 81, 86, 94, 98,
227
licorice 36,37,41,56,79,151,
158,161,218,223
tea 107, 130, 144, 150,
lily bulb 40, 97, 100, 137, 157,
168,189,190,218,223
lima bean (See beans, lima)
Index ~ 247
lime 60
ling zhi mushroom
(See mushroom, ling zhi)
litchi fruit (lychee) 61, 121, 135,
144,216,223
Liver 5,8,10,11,25,33
liver 6, 20, 49, 61, 142, 144
cleansing 27,33
deficiency 67
disease 26
fire rising 93, 212
heat rising 35,69,212
toxicity, 109, 110
longan fruit 58, 88, 128, 188,
190,218,223
loquat 62,116,121,125,216,
223
leaf 218
lotus
root 39, 72, 94, 125, 128, 142,
153,215,223
seed 77,89,90,128,116,134,
147, 151, 160, 188, 217, 223
tea 33, 133, 144, 153, 158
low blood sugar 132, 146
low energy 5, 13, 82,97, 109,
149, 155
Lung 37,54,59,83,90
lungs 5,9, 111
abscess 46,55,109
heat 58, 110
lycii berry (See berries, goji)
lychee (See litchi fruit)
lymph 46, 50, 63, 127, 150
M
malaria 86, 99, 108
malnutrition 99
malt syrup 101,223
mango 63, 156, 216
mania 8, 14
mastitis 150
248 The Tao of Nutrition
meal plans 205-211
Spring/Summer 206
FalllWinter 209
measles 29, 30, 32, 39, 43, 46, 56
meat 36, 95, 99, 116, 118, 120,
122, 124, 131, 147, 153
55,84,100
menopause 79, 151
hot flashes 54
menstruation 61, 96, 105, 155
and headache 140
cessation of 33, 118
irregular 86-87
pain 104, 111
premenstrual syndrome 104,
155
95
meridians 7
Metal Element 9, 10,219,220,
221
migraine 139, 140
milk 99,161
almond 54, 179, 193
coconut 58, 180, 196
85
goat's 98
in recipes 173, 180, 194
lack of 90,98
production of 49
rice 93
soy 54,86, 179, 193
milk products 99
millet 73, 110, 134, 142, 151,
200,210,211,216
in recipes 176, 177, 179
mint 32, 35, 129, 130, 139, 140,
150,218
miso 167, 168, 169, 171,200
molasses 78, 107, 121, 127, 134,
218
morning sickness 73, 151
mother of pearl 118, 146, 218,
223
motherwort 111, 218, 223
mouth 131, 148, 159
dry 61,63,70,78,36,135,149
sores 36, 152
ulcers 161
mucus 15,26,34,39,42,45,53,
56,64,69,99,121,122,123,
126, 127, 158, 161
mugwort 141, 145, 148,218,223
63,216, 120, 126, 129,
131,
mumps 29, 81, 153
mung bean (See beans, mung)
mushroom
black 40
button 39,215
ganoderma 39, 116, 215, 222
ling zhi 39, 40, 117, 123, 143,
223
poria 218, 223
reishi 39, 222
shitake 40,215
soup 195
white 41,215
mustard greens 33,41, 130,215
N
napa cabbage (See Chinese,
cabbage)
nausea 62, 66, 69, 89, 104, 106,
108, 117, 153, 161, 162
nephritis 67, 70, 82, 90
acute 153
chronic 52, 90, 154
nervous 56,98, 105, 147
neuralgia 111
neurasthenia 93, 94, 227
nocturnal emissions 68, 143
nodules 46, 50
nosebleed 39, 43, 57, 62, 77
nuts
almond 88, 106, 120,
in recipes 183,188,191,
192,193,199,201
cashews 58,88,217
in recipes 181, 194, 199
chestnut 88,110,217
inrecipes 178,184,209,211
filbert 89,217
hazelnut 89
peanut 90 (See legumes,
peanut)
pecan 90,217
pine 55,59,77,91,217
walnut 32, 88, 91, 93, 110,
o
125, 126, 140, 148, 151, 158,
160,217,223
inrecipes 178,188,194,201
oats 71, 74, 138,216
in recipe 188
obesity 75, 76, 78, 132
olive 107,216
onion 29,42, 97, 116, 124, 128,
145,215
in recipes 169-197
orange 63, 121, 216
peel 27,29, 33, 43, 47, 51, 75,
77, 104, 105, 123, 127, 138,
148, 152, 155
organs 5,8,9,12,13,30,47,99,
102
osteoporosis 98
overeating 15, 16,49, 63
oxalic acid 27, 48
oyster 217
shells 79,138,140,218
Index ~ 249
p
pain 34, 35, 43, 44, 50, 66, 119,
132, 162,
abdominal 25,35,37,38, 104,
130, 135, 158
arthritis 46
gas 71
hernia, testicular 69
leg 89, 93, 157
rib 69
palpitations 54, 132, 144, 152,
157
pancreas 9, 134
papaya 64, 126, 140, 143, 148,
160,193,216
parsley 32, 33, 43, 82, 84, 128,
148,215
parsnip 43, 119, 130,215
in recipes 187
pathogen 12, 14, 17, 129, 228
pea 77,85
peach 64
kernel xvix, 46, 51, 102, 123,
133,140,156,218,223
peanut (See legumes, peanut)
pear 216
Asian 65,216
apple (see Asian Pear)
pearl barley (See barley, pearl)
pecan 90, 194
pericardium 9
peristalsis 105, 131, 134
persimmon 66, 76, 102, 136,
146,152,161,216,218,223
perspiration, excessive 12 (See
sweating)
phlegm 39,42,50,59,69, 88,
106,110
yellow 65
250 ~ The Tao of Nutrition
pineapple 67, 126, 127, 142,216
plum 57,59,67, 118, 137, 142,
216
PMS 140 (See menstruation)
poison 36,43,49,51, 83, 101,
103, 106, 135
induce vomiting 109
oak 35
seafood 102
pollution 6, 121, 129, 159
pomegranate 67
pork 60,111,146,99
porridge 34, 39, 45, 73, 75, 76,
77,83, 89, 91, 100, 103, 116,
126, 128, 129, 133, 134, 139,
140, 142, 150, 151, 154, 157,
158, 160, 182, 200 (See congee)
postpartum 97
bleeding 97
fatigue/weakness 96, 97
obstruction 74
pain 38, 104
potato 44, 118, 126, 137, 141,
161,215
poultry 95
pregnancy 53,68,92,104,105,
110, 137
premature ejaculation 56, 147,
149
premenstrual syndrome (See
menstruation)
prevention of disease 18
prolapse 26, 58
prostate 91, 92
enlargement 63,64, 156
protein 16,85,125,130,154,194
prune 57,118, 134, 139, 141,
143,144,223
psoriasis 156
psyllium seed 79
pudding reci pes
protein 194
pueraria root (See kudzu)
pumpkin 44,215
seed 45,55,91,217,223
soup 176
pungent taste 11, 12
PungTzu xiv
pus 38, 75, 150
Q
Qi (see chi)
quail egg 100,217
quinoa 75,78, 110, 177,200,
216
R
radish, daikon 34,43, 116, 126,
128, 137, 147, 158, 198
raisin 55,60,179,180,193,194
raspberry 68, 78, 109,216,223
raw food 5, 117, 119, 120, 128,
135, 136, 143, 149, 155
recipes 169-201
bean and tofu dishes 183
congee 200
dressings 196
grains 174
herbal 187
miscellaneous 191
sandwich fillings 199
sprouts 198
soups 169
vinaigrettes 196-197
red dates (See Chinese, date)
reed root 67, 150, 153,218, 223
reproduction 9, 149,226
respiratory infection 42
restlessness 27,31,40,48,62,
65,78,79,80,82,83,110, 160,
retention, food 69, 70, 77, 101
rhinitis 40
rice 12, 20, 26, 36, 37, 91
bran 77,216
brown 71, 75, 216
malt syrup 101
sweet 47, 76, 216
vinegar 46,57, 72, 108, 218
white 77,216
ringing in ears 93, 128, 149, 160
rye 71,77,216
s
sadness 9,219
salt 31,49,51,67, 109, 117,
123, 125, 131, 1 3 ~ 1 3 ~
143, 153,218 (See spices &
seasonings)
salty taste 11, 13
sandwich fillings 199
Sanjiao 9
sauce recipes
beet 171
black bean 170
tomato, basic 195
scallion 45,119,130,152,215
sciatica 50
scrofula 50
sea cucumber 122 132 141 , , ,
147, 157, 158,
seaweed 22,46,117,123,126,
136, 146, 158, 167-168, 215
in recipes 169, 170, 174, 181,
184, 186, 187, 189, 191, 194,
199,201,209,211
seeds 22,73
anise 101,218
cardamom 103,218,222
cassia 132, 138, 139, 144, 151
218,222 '
fennel 69, 105, 106, 197,201
218,222 '
lotus (See lotus, seeds)
seeds (continued)
Index ~ 251
pumpkin 91, 116
sesame 78-79 116 125 151 , , , ,
201
black 92, 133, 139, 141, 144,
147,148,217,222
brown 92,217
garnish 191
in recipes 176,178,181
oil 127, 134, 145, 157, 162,
172,187
sunflower 59, 93, 133, 150,
162,217
in recipes 178, 181, 194
winter melon 26,83,94,217,
223
seminal emission 56 68 81 89 , , , ,
90, 91, 149, 157
sex 15,32,93,116,142,148
shellfish 98, 116,118, 120, 128,
130, 143, 155, 161
shells 125, 146, 118, 125
shen 7, 8, 228
Shen Nung xiv
Shen-Nong Herbal Classic 18
shingles 49
shrimp 98,147,158,217
silver ears 110
soup 111
sinus infection, sinusitis 42, 128
skin
dry 5, 86, 98
itchy 109
lesions 25,26,30,31,36,38,
42,48,156
Small Intestine 5 8-9
snake '
bite 35,50
meat 120
snow pea 47,215
sore throat 34,52,61, 103, 107,
109, 127, 130, 158
soup recipes 169-173
252 ~ The Tao of Nutrition
Beet 171
Black bean 170
Butternut Mushroom 189
Chinese Noodle 172
Creamy Split Pea 173
Summer Vegetable 169
Sweet and Spicy Pumpkin 190
Sweet Squash and
Seaweed 169,211
stock 170
Winter Melon 172
sour taste 11, 12
soybean (See beans, soy)
spasms 47, 121
spelt 73, 78, 216
sperm 100
spermatorrhea (See seminal
emission)
spices & seasonings 101-106
anise 101
basil 101
black pepper 102
cardamom 103
cinnamon 104
cloves 105
fennel 105
ginger 106
salt 109
spicy food 70, 116, 119, 120,
1 2 ~ 1 2 ~ 128, 131, 1 4 ~ 1 4 ~
146, 151, 155, 158
spinach 47,58, 100, 110, 124,
134,145,155,160,215
in reci pe 177
spirulina 109,218
Spleen 37, 82,5,9, 10, 11, 12,
25,30,44,49,50,56,61,63,
66, 69, 71, 73, 74, 75, 76, 78,
90,95,96,97,100,107,110
splinter 89
sprains 50
spring 10, 36
Spring/Summer Meal Plans 206
sprouts 115,132,148,198,199
alfalfa 25, 131,
light mix 198
mung bean 85
rainbow 198, 199
soybean 47, 121
sputum 34,42,45,53,61, 66,
111
squash 27, 70, 125, 133, 134,
141,143,211,215
in recipes 169,172, 177,
183, 189, 190, 192
summer 48,215
winter 44, 215
squid bone 122, 161. 218
stagnancy 45, 228
stagnant food 27, 28, 34, 36, 43,
61, 70
steroids 6, 96
stews, herbal
black bean stew 174
dang gui cornish hen stew 173
shan yao longevity stew 174
stir-fry 46, 86, 128, 136
reCIpes
Almond Nut 192
Basic Vegetable 191
Over Noodles 192
Stomach 5, 9, 10, 11, 12,25,30,
37,44,49,59,61,62,64,72,
74,75,76,95,96,100,101,
106, 111, 201
stomach 19,20,26, 38, 39, 40,
60,63,69,70,118,160
ache 32,44,64,102,105
distention 27, 56, 60, 61
fullness 32, 43, 60
heat 47,86
inflammation 60
stomach (continued)
pain 77, 101, 103, 104, 106,
107
weak 55,70
ulcer 103, 105, 146
stones
gallbladder 159
kidney 159
urinary 159
strawberry 69, 125.216
stroke 59, 100
heat 67,83
sugar 22,55, 89, 117, 120, 124,
128, 133, 134, 146, 148, 152,
154, 158, 168
brown 30,49,65,69,74,94,
101, 103, 105, 109, 141, 144,
218
white 218
sulfites 83
summer 10, 20, 99
heat 14,28,41,49,52,55,57,
64,67,71,76,82,84,213
sweating 57, 65, 76, 78, 79,
menopausal 81
night 37,45,56, 78, 109, 146,
148, 151
spontaneous 57, 73, 76, 79,
132
sweet taste 11, 13, 21
sweet potato 10, 49, 90, 136,
148,188,215
sweeteners
barley malt syrup 101
brown (turbinado) sugar 103
honey 106 (See honey)
molasses 107
swelling 34,36,44, 71, 74, 75,
79,91,118,137,150,153
T
Index ~ 253
Tai Chi diagram xiii
taichichuan 15,133,228
tahini 186, 199
tamari 167, 168
tangerine 51,69,73,216
tannin 110
Taoism xiii
taro root 50, 127,215
taste, five flavors 11-13
tea 110,218
teeth 56, 67, 109, 146
tempeh 167,175,211
tendonitis 50, 59, 60
tendons 50,53,56,59,95,109
tenesmus 228
thirst 4,26,28,34, 39, 45, 47,
48,52,132,134,135
throat,dry 52,58,65,69,107
thyroid 46, 56, 132
tinnitus 59, 144, 160
tofu 86,172
recipes 183-186
scrambled tofu 185
tofu dressing 186
tofu and mushroom
casserole 183
tofu skins and
mushrooms 184
tofu with seaweed 186
tomato 70,117,128,143,199,
216
sauce 169, 195-196
tonk 59,81,84,90,92
tonify 10, 17,27,30,32, 37, 44,
49,228
toothache 99, 105
toxins 33,36,40,83,95,97,106,
109,110,114,122,228
Translations of Food & Herb
Names (Chart 4) 222-223
254 ~ The Tao of Nutrition
trail mix 55,58,59, 88, 91
trauma 50,89, 111
Triple Heater 9
tuberculosis 46, 50, 76, 86, 108
tumor 40,41,46,102,123
fibroid 46
turbinado 103
turkey 83,96,217
turnip 50, 82, 215
U
ulcers 38,44,66, 106
duodenal 103, 160
mouth 152
pain 44, 103, 161
stomach 146, 103, 160
umeboshi plum paste 171
underweight 73
Urinary Bladder 5, 9, 11
urinary difficulty 28,31,33,41,
42,48,52,68,69,70,72,74,76
bloody 56
frequent 90
tract stones 93, 159
uterine bleeding 51, 102
v
vagina 124, 160
vaginal
discharge 32
infection 36
vaginitis 65
vegetable juice 110
vegetables 5,20,21,22,25-52,
117,133
washing 123
vegetarian 21,22, 123, 167
recipes 167-201
ventilate lungs 54, 228
vinegar 48,56,86,145,155,163
rice 46, 57, 72, 97, 108, 115,
130,132,142,218
virus 6,14,35,116,142
viscera, organs 102,229
vision (See eyes)
voice loss 65
vomiting 36, 39, 47, 62, 69, 73,
77, 101, 102, 105, 106, 108,
118, 135, 138, 143, 151, 153,
162
and poison 109
blood 36,39,54,66,77
childhood 45
induce 55
w
walnut (See nuts, walnuts)
warts 47
warming food 3,4,5,20,57, 61,
68,69,71,74,75,225,229
water chestnut 30, 34, 51, 61,
117, 124, 126, 128, 134, 146,
154,157,215
Water Element 8,9, 10,219,
220,221
watercress 52, 159,215
watermelon 70, 115, 122, 125,
132,138,153,154,216
weakness 55, 58, 77, 78, 92, 96,
98, 99, 100
after illness 111, 200
digestive 76
wet dreams 32, 158
wheat 78,216
bran 79,216
germ 80,216
gluten 167, 195
white fungus (See fungus,
white)
whooping cough (See cough,
whooping)
wind 29, 43, 45, 229
cold 31-32,42,43,61, 102,
229
heat 32,229
wine 43,60,94,101,111,218
rice 45,51,62, 6 ~ 81,111
winter 10
melon 26,49,52,70,215
melon seed (See seeds, winter
melon)
squash 44
Wood Element 8,10,11,219,
220,221
wood ears 102
worms 37,42,45,57, 64, 91,
108,162
worry 9,14,133,147,219
y
yam 31,45,49,74,77, 116, 118,
125, 128, 1 3 ~ 151, 1 5 ~ 192,
211,215 (See Chinese, yam)
Yang xiii, 3, 4, 14, 18,211, 229
deficiency 229
yeast infection 25, 123
Yellow Emperor xiv, 18-19
Yin xiii, 3, 4, 7, 14, 18,211,229
deficiency 229
yogurt 54,115,131
acne remedy 115
goat 98,109
soy 207
z
zucchini 48, 215
in recipes 169,185,191,192,
196
Index ~ 255
BOOKS ON THE INTEGRAL WAY BY THE NI FAMILY
Love of Mother
Universe
Love of Mother Universe-Imagine a life without artificial
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Resources
College of Tao & Integral Health
Distance Learning Courses
Traditional Chinese Medicine: Concepts of Chinese Nutrition
Includes DVD and course materials
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800-772-0222
taostar@taostar.com
Achieve a basic understanding of Chinese nutrition theories and
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261
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HEALTH I CHINESE NUTRITION
THE TAO Of
NUTRITION
THIRD EDITION
E
ach meal is an opportunity to heal. ' The Tao of Nutrition provides information on
making every meal therapeutic, teaching you how to make appropriate food
choices for your ailments, your constitution, and the season of the year. Whether you
are trying to become healthy or stay healthy, the authors guide you to a balanced way
of eating. Included are delicious recipes and meal plans that have greatly benefited
patients and families. This ancient knowledge from China provides guidance for the
seasoned practitioner as well as the new student of healthy living.
The Tao of Nutrition describes how the Five Elements and the opposing energies of
Yin and Yang apply to food. Find the energetic and healing properties of common
foods or look up an ailment and discover the foods helpful in restoring health.
By balancing your energies, the body heals itself. Balance is the key to health.
Dr. Maoshing Ni was born into the 38th generation of traditional Chinese
healers. Co-founder of Yo San University of Traditional Chinese Medicine and
Tao of Well ness healing center, he is a celebrated doctor, author and teacher.
Cathy McNease holds degrees and Master Herbalist certificates. She has
co-authored several books and a certified continuing education course on
traditional Chinese nutrition.
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The Tao of Nutrition

Other Books by Dr. Maoshing Ni

Second Spring: Dr. Mao's Hundreds of Natural Secrets for Women to Revitalize and Regenerate at Any Age Secrets of Self-Healing: Harness Nature's Power to Heal Common Ailments, Boost Your Vitality, and Achieve Optimum Wellness Secrets of Longevity:
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ways to Live to Be One Hundred

Dr. Mao's Harmony Tai Chi: Simple Practice for Health and Well-Being Chinese Herbology Made Easy The Yellow Emperor's Classic of Medicine
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Other Books by Cathy McNease
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Vegetarian Delights (with Lily Chuang)

www.taostar.com www.taoofwellness.com

THETAOof NUTRITION
THIRD EDITION

Maoshing Ni, Ph.D., O.M.D.

and Cathy McNease, B.S., Dipl. c.H.
foreword by Hua-Ching Ni

TAO OF WELLNESS PRESS
Los Angeles

Published by: Tao of Wellness Press An Imprint of SevenS tar Communications 13315 W Washington Boulevard, Suite 200 Los Angeles, CA 90066 www.taoofwellness.com © 2009 by Maoshing Ni and Cathy McNease. ©1987 by Maoshing Ni and Cathy McNease. All rights reserved. No part of this book may be used or reproduced in any manner whatsoever without permission, except in the case of brief quotations in articles or reviews. First Printing: January 1987 Second Printing: February 1989 Third Printing: June 1991 Fourth Printing: June 1993 Fifth Printing: March 1996 Sixth Printing: February 1998 Seventh Printing: June 2000 Eighth Printing: December 2004 Ninth Printing: April 2009

Publisher's Cataloging-in-Publication Data
Ni, Maoshing. The Tao of nutrition / Maoshing Ni and Cathy McNease; foreword by Hua-Ching Ni. - 3rd ed. - Los Angeles: Tao of Wellness Press, © 2009.
p.; cm.

ISBN: 9781887575256 Includes bibliographical references and index.
1. Nutrition. 2. Health-Religious aspects-Taoism. 3. Diet therapy. 1. McNease, Cathy. II. Title.

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We would also like to thank all our students. However. the remedies offered in this book are to be used at the reader's own discretion. A special appreciation is extended to master herbalist Cathy McNease who untiringly transcribed lectures. Confucius Acknowledgment I would like to express my deepest gratitude to my father who has endowed me with the great tradition and knowledge of Chinese Nutrition so that I may be able to share it with everyone. Eat to preserve the life thou has received from heaven. It is the authors' earnest desire to further educate those who are open-minded about natural alternatives to healing. expanded edition of The Tao of Nutrition. and provided important new additions to this third. Eat to increase thy strength. we are most grateful to all of you. . If you wish to try the therapeutic approaches outlined in this book for a serious condition. it is best to first find a doctor of Chinese Medicine who can supervise your treatment. To everyone who continues to support and promote natural medicine in the world.Dedication Eat not for the pleasure thou mayest find therein. arranged and edited text. Disclaimer This book is intended to inform the reader about the energetic and healing aspects of foods. patients and friends for their valuable suggestions and feedback with the remedies in this book.

and a team of associates at the Tao of Wellness in Santa Monica. Cathy McNease holds a Diplomate in Chinese Herbology from the National Certification Commission for Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine (NCCAOM). Daoshing Ni. California. Maols Hundreds of Natural Secrets for Women to Revitalize and Regenerate at Any Age and the bestselling Secrets of Longevity. as he is known to his patients and students. In addition to her teaching profession she maintains a Chinese herbal pharmacy business. Mao. He is the author of twelve books including Secrets of Self Healing Second Spring: Dr. in Biology and Psychology from Western Michigan University and Master Herbalist certificates from Emerson College of Herbology in Canada and East-West Course of Herbology in Santa Cruz. For more information on his other publications.About the Authors Maoshing Ni is a doctor of Traditional Chinese Medicine. Traditional Chinese Nutrition.com. practices acupuncture and Chinese medicine with his brother. a bestselling author and an authority in Anti-Aging Medicine. Dr. He is cofounder and chancellor of Yo San University in Los Angeles. Best Blends Herbs. a B. please visit www.taostar. . Dr.S. Los Angeles Times. She is currently on the faculties of Yo San University and Emperor's College of Traditional Oriental Medicine. and many other publications. Mao lectures internationally and has been featured on radio and television as well as on the pages of The New York Times. Dr. She has co-authored two books and a distance learning course. where he teaches the art and science of Wellness Medicine.

Fish. Poultry and Animal Products Miscellaneous Foods.Table of Contents Foreword I xiii Preface I xvi How to Use This Book xviii Section 1: Introduction to Chinese Nutrition I 1 Energetic Properties I 3 Yin and Yang I 3 Your Body is the Greatest Healer I 5 Traditional Chinese View of the Body Organs of the Body I 8 Five Elements I 10 The Five Tastes I 11 The Eight Differentiations 13 Causes of Disease I 14 Prevention of Disease I 18 Guidelines for a Balanced Diet I 19 I 7 Section 2: Foods I 23 Vegetables I 25 Fruits I 53 Grains I 71 Beans and Peas (Legumes) I 81 Nuts and Seeds I 88 95 Meat. Herbs and Beverages I 101 Section 3: Remedies for Common Conditions I 113 Acne AIDS I 115 I 116 .

viii ~ The Tao of Nutrition Allergies I 117 Anorexia and Bulimia I 118 Arthritis I 118 Asthma I 120 Cancer I 122 Candida Yeast Infection 123 Cataracts I 124 Chronic Bladder Infection I 125 Chronic Bronchitis I 126 Chronic Fatigue Syndrome I 127 Chronic Sinus Infection I 128 Common Cold I 129 Constipation I 130 Coronary Heart Disease I 132 Diabetes I 133 Diarrhea I 134 Dysentery I 135 Eczema I 136 Edema/Swelling I 137 Glaucoma I 138 Headache I 139 Hemorrhoids I 140 Hepatitis I 142 Hives I 143 Hypertension I 144 Hypoglycemia I 146 Impotence I 147 Indigestion I 148 Kidney Weakness I 149 Mastitis I 150 Menopause I 151 .

Urinary Tract) Tinnitus (Ear Ringing) I 160 Ulcers (Stomach or Duodenum) I 160 Worms I 162 I 159 Section 4: Simple Vegetarian Recipes Soups I 165. Kidney.Table of Contents ~ ix Morning Sickness I 151 Mouth Sores (Ulcers) I 152 Nephritis (Acute) I 153 Nephritis (Chronic) I 154 Premenstrual Syndrome (PMS) I 155 Prostate Enlargement I 156 Psoriasis I 156 Seminal Emission (Spermatorrhea) I 157 Sore Throat (Laryngitis) I 158 Stones (Gallbladder. 167 Sweet Squash and Seaweed I 169 Summer Vegetable Soup I 169 Soup Stock I 170 Black Bean Soup or Sauce I 170 Beet Soup or Sauce I 171 Chinese Noodle Soup I 172 Winter Melon Soup I 172 Creamy Split Pea Soup I 173 Grain Dishes Fancy Rice I 174 Nori Burritos I 174 Vegetable Pie I 175 Millet Patties I 176 Stuffed Pumpkin I 176 Simple Couscous Pie I 177 .

x ~ The Tao of Nutrition Basic Protein Cereal I 178 Chestnut Rice I 178 Simple Grain Dish I 179 The Fastest Cereal: Couscous I 179 Steamed Corn Bread I 180 Mochi I 181 Sweet Breakfast Porridge I 182 Bean and Tofu Dishes Tofu and Mushroom Casserole I 183 Azuki Bean and Squash Casserole I 183 Clinton's Savory Chestnut Azuki Beans Tofu Skins and Mushrooms I 184 Steamed Peanuts I 185 Scrambled Tofu I 185 Tofu with Seaweed I 186 Tofu Dressing I 186 Herbal Dishes I 184 Basic Herb Soup I 187 Dang Gui Cornish Hen Stew I 187 Shan Yao Longevity Stew I 188 Goji Berry (Gou Qi Zi) Oats I 188 Black Bean Stew I 188 Butternut Mushroom Soup I 189 Sweet and Spicy Pumpkin Soup I 190 Miscellaneous Recipes Sesame Seed Garnish I 191 Basic Vegetable Stir-Fry I 191 Almond Nut Stir-Fry I 192 Stir-Fry Over Noodles I 192 Almond Milk I 193 .

Table of Contents ~ xi Soybean Milk I 193 Protein Pudding I 194 Pecan Pudding I 194 Wheat Gluten (Wheat Meat) I 195 Basic Tomato Sauce I 195 Simple Oil and Vinegar Dressing I 196 Coriander Vinaigrette I 196 Lemon Vinaigrette I 197 Pecan Dressing I 197 Sprouts I 198 Sandwich Fillings I 199 Congee Recipes Basic Congee Recipe I 200 Congee Variations I 201 Section 5: Sample Meal Plans Spring/Summer Meals Fall/Winter Meals I 209 Section 6: Appendix I 203.205 I 206 213 Chart 1: Energetic Properties of Foods I 215 Chart 2: Five Elements Correspondences I 219 Chart 3: Energetic Transformations I 221 Chart 4: Translations of Food & Herb Names I 222 224 I Glossary I Bibliography Index I 230 Sources for Chinese Food & Herbs I 237 I 239 Resources I 261 .

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The universe itself is an integration of these two interacting.Foreword T HE KNOWLEDGE OF NUTRITION in China has roots that go back at least 6. by their own experiences. This is the truth expressed in the Tai Chi diagram. and like Yin and Yang. which later came to be known as the Ba Gua or Eight Trigrams. became the foundation of cultural development in ancient China and were widely applied in public and private life . discovered eight categories of universal energy. Harmony and balance therefore. are only stages in the accomplishment of further harmonization. Even events that could be conceptually classified as negative or conflicting. mutually assisting and also somewhat opposing forces that are often expressed by the Tai Chi symboL The deepest reality of universal life is the inner meaning of Yin and Yang. learned not only what properties specific foods contained.000 years and is based on the principles of balance and harmony. time-tested knowledge will find their health and longevity greatly enhanced. Anyone who learns and uses this ancient. this is a further division of the two main categories of natural energy known as Yin and Yang. one of the great sages of ancient China. the nature of the universe also tends to be both harmonious and balanced. as well as direct knowledge of the nature of individual foods. This knowledge was first gathered by spiritually achieved men and women who. the principles of universal existence. but also how to utilize them for the purposes of nutrition and longevity. Fu Shi.

had the same interest. used these principles to develop herbal medicine and essential nutrition. Pung Tzu learned all the arts of long life. Tao being the way or path of universal harmony through integration. another wise leader who lived some time after Fu Shi. Because of my busy schedule. the art and discipline of sexual practices. I have not had time to do so. Another symbolic figure of longevity is popular even now in Chinese culture. Shen N ung. harmony and symmetry came to be known as Taoism. Legend has it that Pung Tzu lived to be 800 years old and was still active in the reign of the Emperor Jou. Shen Nung and the Yellow Emperor are great symbols of natural culture. around 1123 B. who is considered the founder of Taoism. Through the traditional Chinese healing arts and herbal medicine. we can still benefit today from their great achievements and contributions. whatever expressed these natural universal qualities of balance. utilizing them in political as well as general life. as many have done before us. and Fang Zhong. I myself have offered much useful knowledge and help to many people around the world.xiv ~ The Tao of Nutrition as well as in spiritual practice. Thus he has brought this book into your hands to fill the gap . Although I taught a class on diet and nutrition several years ago. and benefiting his hundred-year reign greatly by the guidance of this special knowledge. one of the greatest leaders in human history.C. Many generations later. but fortunately my son Maoshing. He further developed the contributions of the early sages. He is called Pung Tzu and is considered the founder of the art of Chinese cooking and nutrition. there was still a secret wish in my mind to do more in this area. As the spiritual descendents of these men of spiritual development and dedication to human development. including Dao-In. energy conducting exercises. After him came the Yellow Emperor. Fu Shi. especially in the realms of medicine and nutrition.

Hua-Ching Ni . I wish that each of you may become stronger everyday. It can be an important and useful tool in your life that will serve your health and spiritual development.Foreword ~ xv in my own work. Thank you. With its support.

Chinese nutrition is a healing system of its own. . The advantage of Chinese nutrition lies in its flexibility in adapting to every individual's needs. The Tao of Nutrition presents the wisdom of the ancient Chinese. People have a poor concept of what makes up a good diet. In most cases they do not eat to live but rather live to eat. especially diet. and treating the whole person rather than just the symptoms. many people make work. pleasure and sex a priority over what they eat. They lived by the principle of being in harmony with nature and emphasized balance in every aspect of life.Preface N OUR RAPIDLY CHANGING SOCIETY. Ancient people were much more aware of the environment and how their bodies reacted to their surroundings. At the same time. Not only is it a healing system. the Yin and Yang of foods. Their knowledge and experiences were passed down through generations and was further refined and systematized into what we today call Chinese nutrition. mind-boggling numbers of fads and controversial dietary regimes add more confusion to their already uncertain dietary habits. humans have lost their instinctive nature regarding healthy eating. but it is also a disease-prevention system. and nourishment of the body. I Even more sadly. They thrive and rely on their taste buds and visual sensations for sustenance. caught in their daily lives.

It is hoped that the readers of this book will gain understanding of their bodies. With this book in your hands. Start now to achieve and maintain health. and information that is in accord with the natural principles of life and balance. their surroundings. . and longevity. So here it is. It takes into consideration the season. rather it determines the properties or energies of each food and combination. geographical location. method of preparation. and their diet. you can acquire insight and be the master of your own body. the essence of the art and science of Chinese nutrition.Preface ~ xvii Chinese nutrition differs from modern Western nutrition in that it does not rely on analyzing the chemical constituents of each food. vitality.

Sections Four and Five contain recipes and meal plans.How To Use This Book five sections: The first section deals with the theories and philosophies of Chinese nutrition. Make tea from ginger and green onions. Dry head afterwards. HIS BOOK CONTAINS T It is strongly recommended that readers familiarize themselves thoroughly with the first section in order to understand the basic philosophies of Chinese nutrition. Drink and allow body to sweat. their therapeutic actions. Section Three is a remedial section that gives recommendations for various medical conditions. . you will find the following therapeutic remedies to choose from: For headaches due to common cold or flu: 1. They may either choose to look up a condition in Section Three and follow the recommendations given there or check the index for listings of the condition. one is able to more efficiently utilize the specific knowledge given in the remaining sections. if you look up Headache in Section Three. avoiding drafts. and individual remedies. For example. Steam aching portion of head over mint and cinnamon tea that is boiling. With that understanding. boiling for 5 minutes. Section Two describes over 130 common foods in detail-their energetic properties. 2. Another way readers may find this book useful is to refer to conditions that apply to them.

Mash peach kernels and walnuts. 6. one will gain an insight into maintaining balance and harmony between one's body and the environment and ultimately will achieve health. 4. then adding the flowers for the last 30 minutes. mint. . For headaches due to high blood pressure. slowly boiling the shells for 1 Y2 hours. gradually increasing the temperature to hot. if on the right side. happiness and longevity. 2. three times daily. Make carrot juice. Make tea of Chinese prunes. Make tea of oyster shells and chrysanthemum flowers. Eat while hot. 5. take 2 T. squirt into both nostrils. 5. if both sides are painful. Mash buckwheat meal into a paste and apply to painful area until it sweats. or migraines: 1. menstrual cycles. Make rice porridge and add garlic and green onions. and then get under blankets and sweat. After studying the entire book. Drink green tea. 3. squirt into right nostril. squirt carrot juice into left nostril. Take lemon juice and Y2 T baking soda mixed in a glass of water and drink. If headache is on the left side. Mix with rice wine and lightly roast. Rinse head with warm water. 4. emotional stress or tension.How to Use This Book ~ xix 3. 6. and green tea. Make tea from chrysanthemum flowers and cassia seeds and drink.

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Section One Introduction to Chinese Nutrition .

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Foods are selected according to their energetic qualities such as warming. warming foods raise metabolism and cooling foods lower metabolism. Yin and Yang It is a universal law that everything is constantly changing. Over the course of several millennia. dry the dampness. and so forth. Balance in the diet is essential for good health. except for the fundamental governing laws of life. balance is achieved. within the body of information known as Traditional Chinese Medicine. Rather. Generally speaking.Energetic Properties Chinese nutrition applies the traditional healing properties of foods to correct disharmonies within the body. cool the heat. countless experiences were gathered using food for prevention and healing of disease. Foods all have specific inherent qualities determined by the effect the food has on the body. cooling. This principle applies to the universe surrounding us as well as the inner 3 . Then the method of preparation further enhances or neutralizes the foods. Chinese nutrition differs from Western nutrition in that it does not talk about the biochemical nature of food. or lubricating. lubricate the dryness. For example. This treasure was passed along as an important healing art. Chinese nutrition deals on an energetic level where balance is the key. Thus. cooling foods would be appropriate. Chinese nutrition would seek to warm the coldness. warming foods would be chosen. In this way. drying. By carefully studying the individual's imbalances. For a deficient individual who tends toward coldness. for an excessive individual who is exhibiting conditions of heat in the body. one would choose the appropriate foods to bring about a balanced state of health.

Some significant questions to determine this may be as follows. although we may be predominantly one or the other. 215-218. Foods are categorized as Hot. Yin and Yang are often referred to as the body's water and fire. Easily observable changes occur according to the warming or cooling nature of a food. Warm. or commonly a mixture. Yang persons need relatively more Yin. ferocious appetite. (See Chart 1: Energetic Properties of Foods. Yin types need relatively more Yang. Yin and Yang exist relative to one another and are also in a state of change at any given time. The application of Chinese nutrition necessitates determining the body type of the individuaL He or she may be the cold type. the hot type. always hot. dry mouth. These descriptions are very useful in determining the relative nature of both the individual and the energies of foods. constipation. or warming foods. Day and night is a good example of this. This is called the Theory of Yin and Yang. One such theory is that everything in the universe consists of two opposite yet complementary aspects. pgs.) Typical symptoms of the hot type or Yang type person could include the following: red complexion. dominating. considered of a Yin nature. Cool or Cold. they are not static conditions. or cooling foods whereas. scanty and dark . thirst. Neutral. diseases or disharmonies occur. with the Yang tendencies listed first: male or female? feel hot or cold? drawn to hot or cold foods? thirst or no thirst? constipated or loose stools? dark or pale urine? red or pale face and tongue? We are all a mixture of Yin and Yang. aggressive or outgoing personality.4 ~ The Tao of Nutrition universe of our bodies. affinity to cold liquids. When Yin and Yang are out of balance. Within the body. foul breath. Thus. considered Yang. The ancient Chinese developed ways of looking at these changes to better understand them. easy to sweat. coarseness. loud voice. Chinese nutrition categorizes foods according to the observed reactions within the body.

such as garlic. 219-220. Stomach. early and heavy menstruation with bright red blood. feeble and weak voice. raw foods. onions. coldness. very emotional. are considered Yin. These include Large and Small Intestines. working together in harmony. and edema. lack of appetite. copious and clear urine. likes warm liquids. Gall Bladder. disdains cold liquids. loose stools. Lungs. sometimes dry cough with thick yellow sputum. pg. lamb and chicken. According to the Chinese point of view. sleeps a lot. mung beans.Introduction To Chinese Nutrition ~ 5 urine. ginger. (See Chart 2: Five Elements Correspondences. low energy. Typical symptoms of the cold type or Yin type person could include the following: paleness. watermelon. insomnia. Liver. are considered Yang. the body is looked at as a whole. easily angered. To bring about balance and counteract the symptoms. . dizziness. Accordingly. and many of the vegetables. current faddists. hot type persons would use primarily cooling foods such as wheat. irritability. Spleen. These include Heart. and Kidneys. and diet cultists. white and copious sputum. yet the picture is very incomplete. and in women. active in transportation. spicy foods. Those which are considered hollow. fresh fruit juices. hot types would avoid hot. black beans. while cold types would avoid cold. and Urinary Bladder. Further descriptions of each organ and their energetic components will follow. Cold type persons would achieve balance by regularly including the warming foods in their diet. Yin and Yang also apply to the organs of our bodies.) Your Body Is The Greatest Healer Many people are overfed and undernourished. Those which are considered solid. We are constantly bombarded by information on nutrition from food companies. or with substance. introverted personality.

not taking into account how those cells became diseased. thoughts. Antibiotics. Our body is a very intricate machine that works together as a whole. even our mouths are full of bacteria. Often our surroundings do not give us the proper chance to heal ourselves because we are bombarded with chemicals in our soil. food. Thus. It is not just because the cells are exposed to viruses and bacteria. if one part is broken the whole suffers. given the opportunity to do so. The headache is a warning of some disharmony. These chemicals can accumulate in the liver and become very toxic. water. diet. not interfere with the healing process. Through inappropriate lifestyle. Always keep in mind that the body's own healing system is very powerful. Yet why is it that some people break down and get sick and others do not when both are exposed to the same pathogens? Our body is equipped with a healing mechanism that is greater than any invention. we abuse the workings of this delicate system. It tries to attack and kill the diseased cells. Significant chemical pollution occurs in meats. Meat animals are routinely injected with steroids such as bovine growth hormone to fatten them quickly and made them produce more milk. and actions. Suppressing a headache with aspirin does not take away the underlying cause. are used to con~ trol rampant diseases. These drug residues remain in meat and . we should work on the underlying cause and use natural healing methods to enhance the immune system so the body can heal itself. Western medicine tends to focus on symptoms and the diseased part of the body.6 ~ The Tao of Nutrition Just as every screw and bolt on a machine has an important purpose. and urban environment. The focus of Traditional Chinese Medicine is to help the body to heal. We are constantly being exposed. including penicillin and sulfa. It is unique in that it has a system that can repair the body's disharmonies.

Blood supplies nutrition to the body and nourishes Chi. All of our chromosomes at that time give us our Jing. Chi comes in many forms with many different actions. or the essence of life. Body fluids are of two types: Jin are the thin. When the energy becomes blocked. tears. body fluids.Introduction To Chinese Nutrition ~ 7 milk and cause health problems for the consumer. or vital energy. or spirit. marrow. Thus. the Yin component. At the time of conception. Jing. Acupuncture can be of great value in facilitating the flow of energy through these pathways. and brain (the sea of marrow) and is stored in the Kidneys. In a healthy person. and Shen. is closely related to blood. the Yang component. you cannot have life. In general. Chi. we are born with a certain amount. refined fluids such as sweat. sperm. disease results. Traditional Chinese View of the Body According to Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM). Chi or energy flows evenly along these channels. blood. Chi is like life force. Movement of blood is dependent upon Chi. the human as an intricate whole is made up of the following essential components: Chi. Our fast-paced lifestyle uses up Jing at a very rapid rate. Jing is the essence of life found in the egg. lubricating fluids such as spinal fluid and synovial. the fetus absorbs this vital essence from the egg and the sperm. The body is a network of Chi pathways called meridians. Throughout our lives we use up our Jing until we die. and tissue fluids and Ye are the thick. Hormones can cause men to become more feminine and have problems with impotency and sterility and women to experience premature aging and general disharmonies in their endocrine systems and menstrual cycles. or joint fluids. If anyone of these components is missing. For this reason women .

or spirit. Corresponding to the Fire element are the Heart and Small Intestines. Metal. frustration. they are responsible for the transporting of excretion. stores blood. externally manifests in the tongue. when the energy is obstructed. gives us intuition. The Gall Bladder stores and excretes bile. and joy (mania) is its related emotion. governs blood. instincts. protects the nervous system from overreaction.) The quality of the element is reflected in its organ pair. Spiritual cultivation is very important for the proper development and preservation of our Jing. Thus. which is stored in the Kidneys. Anger. Each pair of organs is associated with one of the five energies called the Five Elements: Wood. Shen is housed in the Heart. The Heart houses the Shen. and depression relates to the Liver. pgs. Each pair also has energetic correlations that we may not necessarily associate with the physical organ. The Small Intestines absorb fluids. . As one of the hollow organs. go through an earlier menopause and cannot safely bear children for as many years as in more natural cultures. manifests externally in the eyes. and Water. Earth. has taste as its sensory function. The Liver houses the soul. Gall Bladder weakness may manifest as difficulty making decisions.8 ~ The Tao of Nutrition can have problems with menstruation. look to the Liver. Fire. the Kidneys in Chinese medicine would also include functions of the reproductive organs. Organs of the Body TCM views the body organs as couples consisting of a Yin organ and a Yang organ. and is responsible for keeping energy flowing. The Shen. (See Chart 2. controls tendons. 219-220. and helps to normalize a person emotionally. For example. and the ability to comprehend. The pair related to the Wood element is the Liver and Gall Bladder.

bruising easily is a sign of weak Spleen function. and hair on the skin. Corresponding to the element of Earth is the Spleen and Stomach pair. The pair corresponding to the Metal element is the Lungs and Large Intestines. The Kidneys store Jing. Related to the Water element are the Kidneys and Urinary Bladder. The Kidneys also produce marrow. or Sanjiao. and descending and dispersing Chi throughout the body. development. Thus. The Stomach breaks down and ripens the food and then transports it downward. The main functions of the Lungs are breathing. Sadness is the related emotion. The Pericardium surrounds and protects the Heart. pores. The Spleen transforms and transports food into usable food essence (the waste is transported to the intestines). and balance body fluid metabolism. or excessive thinking. and controls muscles. opens to the mouth. . These are functions rather than organs. and reproduction. form the brain and spinal cord. and the Pericardium. The Large Intestines excrete wastes from the body and absorb water.Introduction To Chinese Nutrition ~ 9 Also related to the Fire element are the Triple Heater. The related emotion is fear. are responsible for growth. The Lungs open out to the nose and control the skin. regulating water metabolism. The Triple Heater is responsible for communication between the three cavities in the trunk and helps with fluid metabolism in the body. open to the ears. The related emotion is worry. The Urinary Bladder stores and excretes urine. produces blood. control bones. Reference made to the Spleen in the Chinese system also includes functions of the pancreas. It is also responsible for keeping blood in the vessels.

p.10 ~ The Tao of Nutrition Five Elements A basic theory in the Chinese view of the universe is the Five Elements Theory. (See Chart 3: Five Energetic Transformations. Fire. There is a useful relationship between food colors and the elements and corresponding body systems. Earth. This cycle occurs in nature as well as within our bodies. green foods nourish the Liver. Metal. the inner relationships of change. and the interconnectedness of all things. Earth corresponds to late summer and the time between seasons. Thus. In nature the Five Elements can be correlated to the seasons as follows: Wood corresponds to spring. The five elements. In nature. 221. In the creation cycle. yellow and orange foods nourish the Spleen and Stomach. The cycle is circular. connect in that sequence for what is called the creation cycle. rub two pieces of wood together and create fire. fire burns to ash and becomes earth. should include plenty of the yellow and orange foods such as sweet potatoes . Wood. In ancient times. if the son is weak or deficient. Metal corresponds to autumn. a person with weak digestion. If there is not enough Fire (corresponding to the Heart). White foods nourish the Lungs. these correspondences were made by observing that nature and our bodies work similarly. from earth we dig up metal. red foods nourish the Heart. melt the metal to liquid and make water. put a seed into the water and it germinates a tree and creates wood. we can tonify or nourish the mother and thereby benefit the son. or the Five Energy Transformations. the creator element is the mother who gives birth to the son element. and Water. Thus. Fire corresponds to summer.) This view gives us a helpful framework for understanding the ever-changing world. and Water corresponds to winter. a Spleen weakness. we would strengthen the Wood organ (the Liver) with the proper foods or herbs. black and dark blue foods nourish the Kidneys.

It goes like this: we take wood. fire melts down the metal. The creation and control cycles occur as natural phenomenon. water puts out the fire. red eyes and a headache. The Five Tastes The physical sensation of taste has its significance in Chinese medicine. Taste is classified into five flavors. There- . the sweet taste by the Spleen and Stomach. which falls under the sour category. the bitter taste by the Heart and Small Intestines. When a substance such as a food or an herb goes into the gastrointestinal tract to be digested. as red corresponds to the Fire element. (See Chart 3. whose roots grow into the earth. pg. If the Wood element (Liver) becomes excessive and manifests as hypertension. and salty. However. metal makes the ax that cuts the wood. and the salty taste by the Kidneys and Urinary Bladder.Introduction To Chinese Nutrition ~ 11 and winter squashes. as these are the colors that correspond to the Earth element. we take earth and build a dam to control water. when anyone of the elements is either too strong or too weak. for example a tree. keeping life in balance. and astringent. 221). bitter. we may want to strengthen or tonify the Metal element (Lungs) to control the Wood. the sour taste is said to be absorbed by the Liver and Gall Bladder. the pungent taste by the Lungs and Large Intestines. disharmony results. These five tastes are: sour. although in the text below you will actually find seven. pungent. Keep in mind as you use the Five Elements Theory that there are always exceptions to the rule. which falls under the sweet category. Another relationship that occurs within the Five Elements is the control cycle. sweet. The other two are bland. Someone with Heart weakness would do well to eat more red foods such as tomatoes and hawthorn berries.

tumors. irregular and/or painful menstruation. so bitter . Examples of pungent tasting foods are ginger. Often bitter also clears heat. The pathological condition of stagnation can be seen as local pain. It functions in stopping abnormal discharge of body fluids and substances as in the condition of excessive perspiration. diarrhea. • Pungent is a taste that has functions of dispersing. invigorating. blood and body fluids. Examples of sour foods are Chinese sour plum. consumption of foods with various tastes will benefit those organs that correspond to these tastes. and promoting circulation. • Bitter substances have the action of drying dampness and dispersing obstructions. that are actually slightly sweet and strengthen the weakness of Spleen and Stomach. Thus. seminal emission. The pungent taste. Chinese medicine utilizes foods. garlic and mint. foods and herbs with different energies and tastes are assimilated into the body to nourish different organs. foods that have this pungent taste will promote and invigorate circulation of Chi. disease is the result of stagnation. and enuresis. Its function of invigorating is to promote circulation of Chi. lemon and vinegar. such as we see in common colds and flu. therefore. blood and body fluids. spermatorrhea. Its function of dispersing is mainly used to disperse pathogens from the exterior of the body.12 ~ The Tao of Nutrition fore. Take the example of someone with digestive difficulties as in a weakness of Spleen and Stomach. and astringent func- tions. Contrary to Western medicine. such as yam or winter squash. • Astringent taste falls under the sour taste category and its actions are very similar to that of the sour taste. • Sour taste has absorbing~ consolidating. because of its dispersing quality also acts to open the pores and promote sweating. in which those with digestive weakness are advised against sweets intake. In Chinese medicine. He or she often likes to eat sweets. This is a way to expel the pathogen from the body. edema. and so on.

Yin or Yang. which means to relax. This is why one is drawn to sweets when he or she is experiencing low energy. such as insufficiency of Chi. masses. • Bland taste falls under the sweet taste category. • Sweet taste has the action of tonifying. in cases of constipation. one can drink salt water to lubricate the intestines and promote evacuation. • Salty taste has the function of softening and dissolving hard- enings. a representative of salty food. Also. The Eight Differentiations In order to more clearly understand the energy of the patient and the nature and location of the disease. which is treated by seaweed. blood. nodes. It is used in conditions of acute pain to help relax and hence. Sweet taste is also used to decelerate. It also moistens and lubricates the intestines. Body symptoms such as lumps. An example can be seen in goiter. corn and rice. Its function of dispersing obstruction can be utilized for a cough due to Chi stagnation and so forth. Examples of sweet-tasting foods are yams. Examples of bitter-tasting foods are rhubarb. harmonizing and decelerating. the Chinese have developed the Eight Differentiations system of diagnosis. It tends to be diuretic. Specific organs may suffer from weakness as well. Internal and external serves to locate the area of disease. and cysts can be softened and dissolved by salty substances. promotes urination and relieves edema. An example of a bland-tasting food is pearl barley. apricot kernels. Sweet foods and herbs can harmonize as an antidote or counterbalance undesirable effects from some herbs. and kale. ease the pain. In cases of fatigue or deficiency.Introduction To Chinese Nutrition ~ 13 aids conditions like dampness and edema. Deficiencies may occur in different aspects of the body. sweet substances have a reinforcing and strengthening action. Deficiency and excess determine the relative strength of the patient or .

Yin and Yang give the overall picture of the condition. Cold and hot give indications of the nature of the individual and/or the pathogens. there are weak spots in this shield and external factors can penetrate into the body. however. In the Chinese perception of disease. If one's immune system is strong. A practitioner of Traditional Chinese Medicine would make an evaluation based on the tongue and pulse readings and the presenting signs and symptoms. In a healthy person this shield is strong and without gaps as a barrier of protection should be. For example. Diseases can also arise as a result of internal factors. one does not catch the pathogen. In Western thinking. some people have the AIDS virus and show no symptoms of it. and wind. we would put viruses and bacteria in this category. That in itself does not cause disease. It is impervious to external factors. dryness. This shield is part of the immune system. If. dampness. Together these eight differentiations can provide an accurate picture of both the individual being treated and the disease at hand. anger. Just below the surface of the skin lies a layer of energy that acts as a protective shield. external causes of diseases include the following environmental conditions: cold. The Eight Differentiations provide a basis for understanding seeming contradictions in the symptoms. heat. and fear. the cause of disease is said to be of an external or internal source. These include the emotions: joy (mania). A mixture of symptoms can be confusing. others catch it and soon die. summer heat. Causes of Disease In Traditional Chinese Medicine. That is the difference between strong Chi and weak Chi.14 ~ The Tao of Nutrition the disease. However. grief. when emotions are very intense or long . These reflect the mental state induced by one's environment. melancholy. depression. we have disease. worry.

Either too much or too little exercise can cause disease. Improper activities include excessive sex. a good example is tumors. Isolation and inability to express emotions is very destructive to one's health. These people built up frustration. the store-house of our Jing. such as too much raw. be it exercises such as tai chi chuan or chi gong. burns. and overexertion. improper activities. An interesting survey done in China on a group of cancer patients showed that 95% had been physically or mentally tortured during the Cultural Revolution (1965-1975). Mental attitude is very important for good health. Other causes of disease include traumatic injury. acupuncture. improper exercise. Excessive sex is particularly injurious to the Kidneys. These activities can help to regulate emotions and promote more inner peace. disharmony or disease can result. breathing techniques. Traumatic injuries include accidents. or eating too much of the wrong foods. . It is important to recognize the role of emotional balance in maintaining good health. and improper diet. many physical problems disappear. or walking. By calming one's mind. Stagnancy of the blood and mucus cause blocks in the energy pathways. and animal or insect bites. We must have a channel to release excessive emotions. overworking. intellectuals were tortured. even husbands and wives betrayed each other for the sake of the Communist Party. and anger. greasy. meditation. sprains. depression.Introduction To Chinese Nutrition ~ 15 lasting. incisions. During that harsh period. stagnant blood or mucus. Improper diet can be eating too little for proper nourishment of the body. and these destructive emotions in turn became cancer. You could not trust anyone with your innermost feelings and thoughts. cold. overeating. or spicy foods.

A study conducted from 1983-1988 of 6. and the Environment were published in 1990 as Diet. Lifestyle. both in Beijing. Chinese Academy of Preventive Medicine. The results suggested that the healthiest diet would contain a minimum of 80-90% plant foods. By chewing food slowly and properly. the United States leads the world in both protein consumption per person and the incidence of cancer. and osteoporosis. and Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences. The findings of the China Project on Nutrition. had low incidence of heart disease. We frequently overeat because we do not know how to eat and tend to eat very fast. colon cancer. showed the impact that regular exercise and a low-fat. the body will naturally tell us when to stop. People also reach out to food and use it as an escape.16 ~ The Tao of Nutrition Overeating is a very common imbalance and can cause many diseases. another significant contributor to disease. An over consumption of meat protein will also result in a high percentage of fat in the diet. Health. Statistically. who get only about 10-15% of their calories and 7% of their total protein from animal products. the first group had five times more tendency toward spontaneous cancer. in collaboration with researchers from Oxford University. high-fiber diet have on maintaining good health. It has been found in animal experiments that if one group is allowed to eat as much as desired and another group is starved every second day. Eating in a relaxed frame of mind is essential to good digestion and assimilation of nutrients. but an excessive amount causes problems. Meat companies have led us to believe that we need far more protein than is really healthy. Those in the Chinese countryside. This project was under the direction of T Colin Campbell of Cornell University.500 people from 65 regions across China. Protein is needed. The . Moderation is essential to good health. This was the largest study of its kind to date. and Morality in China.

Fasting or light eating is sometimes recommended during an illness. In many traditions throughout the world. soupy grain porridge. including proper diet. on the other hand. weakens the immune system. diseases increased. The Chinese way supports the body and lets it do the killing of the pathogen. The body can heal itself if given the chance although we may need to give it assistance through proper nutrition or herbal medicine. this group often shows the longest life expectancy including many total remissions. Supporting the body with tonification reinforces the body's healing energy. is given during illness. In many instances. makes one prone to illness. This is the Chinese approach to disease. or congee. such as a cold. herbs. There are many supportive measures that can be taken with food and herbs. For cancer patients in some hospitals in China.Introduction To Chinese Nutrition ~ 17 study showed that when the rural dweller moved to the city and adopted the city lifestyle and higher fat diet (30%). we need to support the body while concurrently detoxifying or sedating it. causes the immune system to become lazy. This is very easy to digest. The antibiotic route. a thin. thus driving the disease deeper into the body. and thus the body can draw on its resources to heal. Some hospitals treat cancer patients solely with Chinese medicine. chi gong exercises and acupuncture. doctors combine the killing aspects of chemotherapy and radiation with the supportive measures of Traditional Chinese Medicine. . The Western approach to diseases is to kill bacteria and suppress the symptoms. and generally interferes with the natural healing process. so digestion of heavy foods will not detract from the body's healing process. This has produced a longer life expectancy than the conventional killing approach alone.

The tonic herbs are further categorized into Yin. which were eaten as a part of the diet for general nourishment. such as soups. Written 2." Doctors were considered to be teachers who taught their patients how to be healthy and spiritually upright. . prolong life. herbs have been used to preserve good health and prevent disease. The first Chinese Materia Medica. Success was measured by vibrant health. restore youth.000 years ago. categorizes herbs into three groups. and lend themselves well to preparations with foods. The use of herbs as food has a long history in China. and become more responsible for our health. The first group was called food herbs. Later sections of this book describe some of these food herbs. Shen-Nong Herbal Classic. Chinese nutrition stresses prevention of disease. and prevention of disease.18 ~ The Tao of Nutrition Prevention of Disease As we increase our awareness of health. we can maintain a state of balance within the body. They often used them as the main part of their diet. Too often we suffer from our inappropriate actions and thoughts. Yang. Incorporating the appropriate herbs into the diet on a regular basis can provide great benefit to health. stew and porridges. We as individuals choose to be one kind of doctor or the other. refer to the Bibliography at the end of this book. Traditionally. maintenance of health. "A doctor who treats a disease after it has happened is a mediocre doctor. But a doctor who treats a disease before it happens is a superior doctor. nuts and seeds. The Yellow Emperor's Classic of Internal Medicine says. Taoist hermits called these herbs immortal foods and described them as producing effects that rejuvenate health. For additional reading on food herbs and recipes. Many of the tonifying herbs are used for this purpose over a long period of time. and increase clarity.000-3. along with some fruits. Blood and Chi tonics.

stewing (boiling. As we nourish body. as in soups). relax and slowly chew your food for optimal digestion and assimilation. such as sesame seeds. mind. As The Yellow Emperor states. by a traditional Chinese medical professional. stir-frying in water. A few basic guidelines. while meats and other proteins take more time to digest. however. The sages of ancient times emphasized not the treatment of disease. Frame of mind is of utmost importance at mealtime. Would these actions not be too late? Guidelines for a Balanced Diet As every body is unique. should be ground before eating. there will always be variations according to individual needs. or baking. exercise. Preventative maintenance is the most sensible route to take. Remember. Foods that are difficult to thoroughly chew. and spirit we maintain a state of balance. Prevention of disease includes proper nutrition. environment and medical condition. which were dispensed to patients in an individual formula based on each patient's constitution.Introduction To Chinese Nutrition ~ 19 The other two groups of herbs were called medicinal herbs. your stomach does not have teeth. Steaming . particularly of the starches. The preferred ways of preparing foods are steaming. emotional balance. Fruits digest quickly. Digestion. and nourishing our spirit. To administer medicine to disease that has already developed and to suppress revolts that have already begun is comparable to the behavior of one who begins to dig a well after he has become thirsty or one who begins to forge weapons after he has engaged in battle. begins in the mouth. but rather the prevention of its occurrence. Chewing is a major part of digestion. are appropriate as we seek a way of eating that creates balance and harmony. The dinner table is not the place to discuss the day's problems.

eating just before retiring is not a good idea. if oil is desired. The best utensils for cooking in are glass. So. such as ice cream and iced drinks. Neither should we consume foods that are so hot that they burn the mouth or stomach. Foods should never be eaten cold because cold foods put out the digestive (ire. put it on after the food is cooked. One should avoid cooking in aluminum or copper. Foods should be eaten in their wholeness. Search out organically grown foods to avoid the toxic chemical residues of commercial growing processes. are very unhealthy. Only peel fruits or vegetables if the peel is hard to digest or contaminated with chemical sprays. The food one eats should follow the seasons and should be grown locally. these metals can easily leach into the food. This will not only result . This is particularly upsetting to the female menstrual cycle as the stomach sits right beside the liver which is responsible for storing blood. To clean foods thoroughly. The fruits and vegetables that ripen in the summertime tend to be on the cooling side. one should eat the last meal at least three hours before going to bed. Cooling off the stomach can lead to a stagnant blood condition and a difficult menstrual period. if possible. Most vegetables should be at least lightly cooked because raw vegetables tend to be difficult to digest. Also. earthenware. one may wash them in salt water. while baking creates more heat and would be the best method for cold conditions. Even the best quality oils become difficult to digest when heated. In wintertime we will tend toward a more warming diet.20 ~ The Tao of Nutrition leaves the food in its most natural state. Also. or stainless steel. so to speak. Frozen foods. one should eat a wide variety of foods for good balance. Nature has the perfect plan for providing the appropriate foods in each given season. It is best to stop eating before becoming full. when possible. Also avoid irradiated or microwaved foods.

Fruits can be a great snack or sweet treat. You may use up to ten parts water per one part grain. Late eating also tends to be stored as unwanted pounds. oats. etc. barley. Freshly prepared vegetables including dark leafy greens. so make breakfast a very nutritious meal. amaranth. Always avoid highly processed foods and keep meals as simple as possible. This group of foods will account for about 40% of the diet. root vegetables. celery. etc. quinoa. . Small beans like lentils and peas tend to be easier to digest than large beans like lima or kidney beans. This is the meal that provides us with the fuel or energy for much of the day. One should wake up with a good appetite for breakfast. grinding them into powder makes them easier to digest. Because most people do not chew nuts well. it is best to cook grains soupy with additional water and cooking time. For a person with particularly weak digestion. broccoli. This group of foods will account for about 40% of the diet. Nuts and seeds contain a large proportion of oil and should be eaten as fresh as possible and kept refrigerated.Introduction To Chinese Nutrition ~ 21 in better digestion. wheat. A balanced diet would consist of the following on a regular basis: Whole grains including rice. but also a more restful sleep. always discard the soaking water and cook them in fresh water. Beans should be soaked prior to cooking for at least a few hours. Fresh fruits will be consumed when in season but generally no more than 10% of the diet. millet. corn. cabbage. rye.

vegetables and fruits constitute the base of the pyramid and majority of the diet. lentils. fish. Seaweeds As strictly as possible. peanuts. It is very similar to the food group proportions used in Chinese Nutrition. almonds. and arame. The United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) has adopted a Food Pyramid that shows food proportions for a healthy diet. walnuts. tofu. while meat and dairy foods. . beans. hiziki. meat. kombu. colorings and flavorings.22 ~ The Tao of Nutrition including peas. and eggs. dulse. This shows people how to make changes in their dietary habits and ways of looking at food. MSG. This is a valuable mineral source. poultry. and of particular value to those vegetarians who refrain from eating dairy foods. fried or greasy foods. avoid consuming the following: chemical preservatives. sunflower seeds. coffee. including nori. eaten in small proportions. Grains. This group will account for about 10-20% of the vegetarian diet and a lesser portion of the meat-inclusive diet. Attempt to locate growers who do not use drugs or inhumane practices on the animals. additives. Legumes/seeds/nuts Animal products include dairy foods. wakame. are at the top. ice cream and excessive sugar. They should be no more than 10% of the diet if one chooses to include them. beans. consumed in small amounts (a small handful dry). etc.

Section Two Foods .

Please note: In this section. food is frequently measured in grams. Twenty-eight grams = one ounce .

3. candidiasis. bloating. skin lesions Folk Remedies: boil tea and drink three times daily. benefits Liver and Gall Bladder. Headache . skin itch. High cholesterol . bitter. 4. Yeast infection/candidiasis .eat a steamed artichoke daily for 2 weeks 3. dries dampness Conditions: headache. high cholesterol. dispels dampness.make tea by boiling one whole artichoke with 1/2 cup fresh peppermint leaves in 4 cups water for 20 minutes. melancholy. Skin lesions .Vegetables Alfalfa Sprouts Nature/Taste: cool and slightly bitter Actions: benefits Spleen and Stomach. Eat a bowl daily. constipation. Make sure lid is tightly covered. Constipation . clears Liver heat. change poultice 3-4 times daily.apply mashed alfalfa sprouts. lubri- cates intestines Conditions: swelling. 25 . sliced ginger and 1/2 head of cabbage. Swelling - Artichoke Nature/Taste: sweet. 2. Liver problem/jaundice . abdominal pain. promotes diges- tion. Strain and drink 1 cup of tea 3 times a day.make tea by boiling 1/2 cup artichoke leaves in 4 cups water for 30 minutes. diarrhea Folk Remedies: 1. dysbiosis.eat raw alfalfa sprouts. Drink a cup every 3 hours until headache is relieved 2.make soup with diced artichoke hearts. high blood pressure. indi- gestion. cooling Actions: regulates Liver Chi. 1. gas.

hypertension. Eat plenty of bamboo shoots. stomach distention and fullness due to greasy foods. diarrhea. promotes blood circulation. high blood cholesterol. promotes diuresis.blend bamboo shoots and celery juice. and arteriosclerosis- drink one glass daily of pureed asparagus juice. resolves mucus. Breast cancer . arteriosclerosis. hypertension. or liver disease - drink tea of bamboo shoots and winter melon skin. Bamboo Shoots Nature/Taste: cool and sweet Actions: strengthens the stomach. warm up and drink one cup twice daily. cuts or emulsifies fats. indigestion. detoxifies. relieves food retention. including the pulp. clears lungs Conditions: constipation. dysentery. . High cholesterol. add one teaspoon of honey. Diarrhea. manifesting in skin lesions. and rectal prolapse . 3. Swelling due to kidney. 2. dysentery. 3. Folk Remedies: 1. heart. cancer. Constipation . drink the liquid and apply the solids to the area. eases thirst caused by measles Conditions: diabetes.boil asparagus with dandelions. edema Contraindications: not to be used after giving birth as they may trigger the cleansing of an old illness. 2. lightly steamed. rectal prolapse.cook bam- boo shoots with rice. bronchitis Folk Remedies: 1.26 ~ The Tao of Nutrition Asparagus Nature/Taste: cool. Diabetes . relieves alcohol intoxication. sweet and bitter Actions: clears heat.eat asparagus with cabbage.

drink beet top tea. dandelions.do a three-day fast with vegetable broth* and beet top tea. heart weakness. food retention.make beet soup. lubricates the intestines. tonifies the Heart. Blood deficiency . frostbite Folk Remedies: 1. irritability. 3.Vegetables ~ 27 4. removes stagnant food. . 4.make green pepper tea. promotes blood circulation. Stomach distension and fullness .make tea from bamboo shoots. Bell Pepper Nature/Taste: slightly warm. or combine with dandelions and make tea. cleanses the liver Conditions: anemia. swelling. restlessness. pungent and sweet Actions: strengthens stomach. calms the spirit. habitual constipation. 2. Beets Nature/Taste: cool and sweet Actions: nourishes blood. Herpes .cook beets with black beans and peanuts. improves appetite. celery. Constipation . asparagus. and squash. or combine beets with cabbage. decreased appetite. Folk Remedies: 1. ginger and orange peel and drink. Indigestion and food retention . herpes. Liver cleansing - * Basic vegetable broth for detoxification can be made by simmering carrots and carrot tops. reduces swelling Conditions: indigestion. liver intoxification from drugs or alcohol Contraindications: not for someone with a history of kidney stones due to the oxalic acid content.

mix bell pepper with black pepper and dry fry (no oil). pungent and sweet Actions: clears heat. brightens eyes. and drink the tea.eat pickled bok choy. clears summer heat problems. difficult urination. 2. 3. Decreased appetite and anorexia . removes stagnant food.wash affected area in bell pepper and cinna- mon tea. Constipation .combine broccoli with Chinese cabbage and make soup.28 ~ The Tao of Nutrition 2. . 3. 2. Bok (hoy Nature/Taste: cool.eat lightly steamed broccoli. diabetes Folk Remedies: 1. 3. Conditions: conjunctivitis. 4. Urinary difficulty . This vegetable is weak in action. irritability Folk Remedies: 1. Food retention . promotes diuresis. indigestion. Or lightly fry chunks of bell pepper with oil.boil tea or soup from bok choy and orange peel. Frostbite . Thirst . Indigestion . lubricates the intestines. constipation. quenches thirst. Clear heat . promotes digestion Conditions: food retention.cook bok choy with beets. Broccoli Nature/Taste: cool and sweet Actions: clears heat. Conjunctivitis (pink eye) .drink carrot and broccoli tea. nearsightedness.drink bok choy and cucumber juice.

frostbite Folk Remedies: 1. Folk Remedies: Conjunctivitis (pink eye) . 3. or add apricot kernel.wash the area in cabbage and green onion tea. Common cold . sore throat. 2. 2. stops cough Conditions: constipation.make cabbage tea and add two teaspoons of honey to lubricate the lungs.Vegetables ~ 29 Burdock Root (Gobo) Nature/Taste: cool. mumps Contraindications: not to be used in cases of diarrhea. Cabbage.combine 114 head cabbage and three green onions.drink burdock tea and sweat. measles. conjunctivitis. . Common cold and measles . Red or Green Nature/Taste: cool and sweet Actions: clears heat. lubricates intestines. boil 10 minutes and drink the liquid. com- mon colds. whooping cough. Whooping cough . 1.boil tea and expose eyes to the steam. apply locally and drink the tea. Mumps .make burdock and dandelion tea. hot flashes. and sweat. 3. dispels wind. then drink the tea. pungent and bitter Actions: clears heat. Frostbite . brightens vision Conditions: common cold of the wind-heat type.

Cauliflower Nature/Taste: cool and sweet Actions: lubricates the intestines. 6. water chestnut. Cancer . Skin lesions or eye weakness . relieves measles. strengthens Spleen and Stomach. Conditions: constipation. It goes away after completely erupting. 3. Constipation .eat lightly steamed cauliflower with bell pepper and celery.30 ~ The Tao of Nutrition Carrots Nature/Taste: cool. 2. Diphtheria with sore throat . 5. lubricates the intestines. benefits the eyes. strengthens all internal organs. Weak digestion . This vegetable is weak in action. 4. benefits blood . lowers blood pressure. Celery Nature/Taste: cool. Indigestion . promotes diuresis. detoxifies. Also drink carrot top tea. 2.drink lukewarm carrot juice. strengthens Spleen.make tea or juice from carrots and carrot tops. clears heat. stops bleeding. sweet and slightly bitter Actions: tonifies Kidney.make tea from carrots. Night blindness .make carrot tea and add a teaspoon of brown sugar or maltose.to prevent. sweet and pungent Actions: clears heat.drink carrot top tea. Measles . and cilantro to induce eruption. cook liz stick carrot with Chinese black mushrooms and consume daily.eat raw cauliflower in salad. promotes digestion Folk Remedies: 1. weak digestion Folk Remedies: 1.

4.make Chinese cabbage soup. 2. skin lesions Folk Remedies: 1. 2. benefits blood Contraindications: dysentery. and sweat. Insomnia . . three days in a row. Common cold.Vegetables ~ 31 Folk Remedies: High blood pressure. Diabetes .drink celery and beet tops tea in the evening. drink three cups lightly boiled celery juice daily. Constipation or difficulty urinating . 3. Chard Nature/Taste: neutral and sweet Actions: clears heat. boils. hypertension . 1. Dysentery .mix with aloe vera juice. drink a warm glassful at 5am and 7pm. constipation. Boils .eat celery regularly. Chinese Cabbage (Napa Cabbage) Nature/Taste: cold and sweet Actions: clears heat. detoxifies. two hours prior to bedtime. promotes diuresis and sweating Conditions: irritability.drink three cups lightly boiled celery juice daily. Whooping Cough -lightly steam celery juice.mix Chinese cabbage and ginger.make a tea from chard and dandelion greens. Or combine celery. simmer into tea. yam and pumpkin to make vegetable pie. wind-cold type . difficulty urinating Folk Remedies: 1. lubricates intestines. 2. add a pinch of salt. restlessness. apply externally.

diarrhea. lack of appetite. are slightly warm and beneficial to digestion. common cold. wet dreams. Common cold of the wind-heat type . regulates Chi flow Nature/Taste: Conditions: measles. 4. Common cold of the wind-cold type . For the above conditions. chest and stomach fullness Folk Remedies: 1.drink cilantro and mint tea. walnuts.drink cilantro and orange peel tea. * Cilantro seeds. Make into paste and take one tablespoon. 2.drink cilantro and mint tea to induce eruptions. bedwetting. Cilantro Leaves (Chinese Parsley) slightly cool.drink cilantro and ginger tea. or coriander. Weak sexual functions - cook Chinese chives with black beans. indigestion. Measles . boil Chinese chive tea for 25- 30 minutes. 3.32 ~ The Tao of Nutrition Chinese Chive warm and pungent Actions: tonifies Kidneys and sexual functions. removes dampness. three times daily. 2. . Chi stagnation . absence of menstrual period Nature/Taste: Folk Remedies: 1. * neutral and pungent Actions: promotes sweating. black sesame seeds. vaginal discharge. warms up coldness Conditions: cold stomachache. strengthens digestion. sour plums and two teaspoons honey.

and gallstones - eat corn regularly and drink fresh cornsilk tea. 3. heart disease Folk Remedies: 1. promotes diuresis.drink cornsilk and pearl barley tea. abdominal fullness Folk Remedies: alternate eating cooked collards. Drink 1-2 glasses daily. kale. Toxin buildup . cough. Bloody urine . detoxifies. benefits gall blad- der.Vegetables ~ 33 Collards (Collard Greens) Nature/Taste: Pungent. Swelling or difficulty urinating . parsley and soybeans.to help the liver detoxify. Hypertension. juice collard greens with kale. agitation. drink cornsilk and dandelion tea. celery and cucumber. cooling Actions: regulates Chi.drink corn and lotus root tea. bone loss. Season to taste but stay low on sodium. carrots. collard. gallstones. cabbage and beets on a daily basis 2. headaches. bitter. detoxifies Conditions: difficult urination. 3. 2. Detoxify and clear heat - . clears heat. High blood pressure . clears Liver heat. mustard greens. hepatitis. Weak bones . hypertension. jaundice.drink cornsilk and chrysanthemum tea. jaundice. Constipation - Corn Nature/Taste: cool and sweet Actions: stops bleeding. 4. builds strong bones Conditions: constipation.make bone-building broth with organic beef bones. strength- ens Lungs. lowers blood pressure. Drink 1-2 cups of broth daily 1. irritability. 5.

epi- lepsy. drink one cup lukewarm. alcohol intoxication. use two teaspoons of dried cucumber meal mixed with rice porridge. conjunctivitis Contraindications: Eating cucumbers to excess will cause dampness. Diarrhea - Daikon Radish (White Carrot) Nature/Taste: cool. avoid consuming them together Folk Remedies: make daikon juice and add two drops of ginger juice. dry cough. or swollen (puffy) eyes . scratchy. coughing of blood. Folk Remedies: 1. sweet and bland . pungent and sweet Actions: removes stagnant food. Epilepsy . Dry cough with yellow sputum . quenches thirst. Cucumber seeds are difficult to digest. sore throat.take warm daikon and water chestnut juice with one teaspoon honey. diarrhea. painful urination. quenches thirst. jaundice.peels are bitter Actions: clears heat. pro- motes diuresis Conditions: swelling of the extremities. sore throat.boil tea from cucumber vines. relieves alcohol intoxication Conditions: bronchitis. 2. leave on 20 minutes. 4. Hot. three times daily. Bronchitis or sore throat - .apply grated cucumber packs to closed eyes. food retention Contraindications: daikon radish neutralizes the effects of ginseng root. excess of mucus. moistens lungs. resolves mucus. 1. 2. relieves irritability. Swelling of the extremities and jaundice - boil tea from cucumber skins.34 ~ The Tao of Nutrition Cucumber Nature/Taste: cool. 3.

Liver heat rising. 2.Vegetables ~ 35 3. detoxifies. 4. anal bleeding. change poultice hourly. Dandelion Greens Nature/Taste: cool. Conjunctivitis (Liver heat rising) . hepatitis. 3. painful urination. anti-tumor. reduces swelling. benefits liver func- tion. Eggplant Nature/Taste: cool and sweet Actions: relieves pain. frostbite. fresh leaves.make tea or juice. conjunctivitis (pink eye). . virus. and fungus. promotes urination. Common cold . hot diarrhea. snake and scorpion bites. dysentery. mint and licorice.drink daikon juice before and after drinking alcoholic beverages. removes blood stagnation Conditions: abdominal pain. Alcohol intoxication . bitter and slightly sweet Actions: clears heat. canker sores. beginning stages of common cold Folk Remedies: 1. Burns . jaundice Contraindications: not to be used for cold-type problems.make tea from fresh dandelions (the whole plant).apply dandelion and ginger poultices. It is considered to be a natural antibiotic similar in action to goldenseal root (Hydrastis Canadensis). Toxic skin lesions - apply crushed. Breast lumps and tumors . poison oak blisters. 4.apply grated daikon alone or mixed with aloe vera gel. insect bites. diuretic Conditions: toxic skin lesions. promotes the flow of bile. Dandelion has been found to be extremely effective inhibiting bacteria.

mash 3-5 raw cloves. Canker sores .36 ~ The Tao of Nutrition Folk Remedies: 1. Antidote for crab poisoning . .cook garlic with crabs or other sea foods. and coughing of blood Contraindications: not to be used with hot or dry eye disor- ders. Garlic Nature/Taste: hot and pungent Actions: anti-viral. removes stagnant food and stagnant blood. 5.apply fresh to absorb toxins.charcoal eggplant and apply locally. take one teaspoon in warm water three times daily. Dysentery .dry the eggplant and grind to a meal. 8 ites . 4.eat eggplant and rice three times daily for one week. infections. 5.soak area in eggplant tea. Jaundice and hepatitis . drink every two hours. Frostbite . Vomiting . cool to lukewarm. 3. vomiting. also known as rushing spring point (Kidney 1).apply crushed. reduces abscess Conditions: cancer. detoxifies meat and seafood. boil a bulb of garlic. 4. peeled. Vaginal infections 2. 2. dysentery.cook together a bulb of garlic and three slices ginger. anti-fungal. kills worms. change the poultice every four hours. then douche with the liquid. Folk Remedies: 1. Swelling and edema . Coughing or vomiting of blood . mix with warm water. diarrhea. raw garlic to the soles of both feet at the depression behind the ball of the foot. mix with a teaspoon of honey and some water. mouth sores or tongue ulcers. high blood cholesterol. 3.

2. 7. boil down to one cup and add two teaspoons honey. descends Chi. frequent colds and flu . neutral tonifies Spleen and Lung Chi. azuki beans and a pinch of cinnamon powder. replenishes Yin Conditions: hepatitis. Whooping cough - Jerusalem Artichoke Nature/Taste: Actions: sweet. diabetes. back pain due to kidney weakness Nature/Taste: Folk Remedies: boil Vz cup green beans and 6 grams licorice in 1Vz cups water.make soup with green beans. three times daily with lukewarm water. 3. Drink the liquid. Earache or ear infection . Take Vz teaspoon. Back pain . promotes digestion. fatigue.put a few drops of garlic oil or juice in ear several times daily. whooping cough. jaundice.dry-fry green beans with fennel and then grind into powder. resume eating three hours later. chest fullness and discomfort. Hernia in children . hypoglycemia. hernia in children. chronic diarrhea. indigestion. Chronic diarrhea . Also can be applied as a paste (green beans and fennel) to the navel with black pepper. tonifies Kidneys. night sweats. benefits Chi Conditions: burping.Vegetables ~ 37 6. 4. 1.steam green beans with rice. Intestinal worms . Green Beans warm and sweet Actions: warms Spleen and Stomach. regulates blood sugar. black beans.eat cooked garlic on an empty stomach.

2. Lettuce Nature/Taste: Actions: neutral and bland* invigorates Chi. Eat artichoke gratin instead of starchy foods. and softens hardening. This vegetable is mild in action. and drink one cup of lukewarm lettuce juice. Remove and cut into thin slices. Diabetes and blood sugar imbalance - Kale Nature/Taste: Actions: warm and slightly bitter strengthens stomach.take V2 glass warm kale juice before each meal. abdominal pain.make artichoke soup with generous amounts of garlic and onions and eat daily during flu season. postpartum abdominal pain due to blood stagnation 1. Susceptibility to colds/flu . sores with pus - Conditions: Folk Remedies: apply mashed lettuce. promotes re-growth of tissue stomach or duodenal ulcers Conditions: Folk Remedies: 1. removes stagnation. stops pains. * The more bitter varieties of lettuce such as romaine or endive are cool and drying. .make poultice and juice with dandelions. breast abscess. Skin lesions. Breast abscess . 1. insect bites. skin lesions.38 ~ The Tao of Nutrition Folk Remedies: make artichoke gratin by peeling and boiling artichoke until soft. reduces swelling. Ulcers . Drink the juice and apply with gauze pad externally. Bake in baking pan until slightly brown. changing poultice three times daily. three times daily. 2.

boil tea from button mushrooms and drink one cup three times daily. consume while lukewarm. 2. 3.make tea of lotus root and bamboo leaves. Infectious hepatitis.2 cup of lotus root starch with V2 cup rice porridge until jelly-like consistency. relieves irritability. hypertension. resolves phlegm. anti-tumor Conditions: infectious hepatitis. cools the blood Conditions: difficult urination. gastritis. cook with poi and drink the broth.eat but- ton mushrooms in the diet or in tea. Measles . stops bleeding. detoxifies. nosebleed. blood in stool or urine. Mushroom (Reishi. promotes diuresis. stops diarrhea. clears heat. low appetite Folk Remedies: 1. Ling Zhi) Nature/Taste: warm and bland Actions: nourishes the Heart. diarrhea. cough with copious mucus. decrease in white cells . fortifies the Chi and blood . strengthens stomach. measles. Gastritis and colitis - Mushroom (Button) Nature/Taste: slightly cool and sweet Actions: induces measle eruptions. quenches thirst. Blood in the urine . Or. colitis Folk Remedies: 1. Ganoderma. 4.Vegetables ~ 39 Lotus Root Nature/Taste: cool and sweet Actions: very healing. 2. vomiting blood. improves appe- tite. Vomiting or defecating blood . calms the spirit. Nosebleed and hypertension - drink lotus root juice daily. drink diluted lotus root juice.cook 1.

basil. detoxifies. blend with the soak water. excessive dreaming. lowers cholesterol Conditions: tumor. three times daily. chronic hepatitis. slow healing. high cholesterol. This can also be used as a preventative to stomach and cervical cancer. continuously. strain through filter. coronary heart disease.make tea of Ling Zhi.boil tea from black mushrooms and drink 2. Chronic bronchitis . fatigue. High blood pressure. One can also add a little ginger. anxiety. restlessness. this remedy is believed to prevent metastasis (spreading) of tumor cells. anti-tumor. 3. coughs. promotes healing. Mushroom (Shitake.concentrate the Ling Zhi tea.make tea from Ling Zhi and licorice root. Chronic hepatitis . then wash nose with the tea. diabetes. Black)* Nature/Taste: neutral and sweet Actions: strengthens stomach. and peppermint. heat like soup and take on an empty stomach.make a tea of Ling Zhi and lily bulbs. 5. 4. high cholesterol Folk Remedies: 1.soak some Chinese black mushrooms. To clean toxins in the intestines . Used post surgery. Allergic asthma . Allergic rhinitis . low white blood cell production Folk Remedies: 1. asthma. high cholesterol . . blood deficiency leading to insomnia. * These are also known as Chinese mushrooms. lowers blood pressure.Ling Zhi mushroom is usually consumed in powder or tea form on a daily routine. high blood pressure. Tumors . 2.40 ~ The Tao of Nutrition Conditions: Heart Chi deficiency. high blood pressure. hypertension.

Folk Remedies: use white mushrooms and cornsilk to make soup or tea regularly. Dysentery .make raw mustard greens juice. coughing of blood. 1. and other summer heat problems. Difficulty urinating - . Mustard Greens Nature/Taste: warm and pungent· Actions: relieves common colds. Summer heat problems . ventilates Lungs. summer irritability. loss of voice. Tumors . 3. Coughing of blood . High blood cholesterol or hypertension - * This is the common supermarket variety of mushroom. copious white sputum Folk Remedies: make tea from fresh mustard greens and drink frequently. dysentery. dissolves mucus. detoxifies Conditions: hypertension. promotes urination. 3. increases appetite Conditions: difficulty urinating. anti- tumor. mix with some lukewarm water and drink gradually. drink twice daily.eat raw mushrooms in salad. 2.charcoal mustard plant roots and grind into meal. Mix six ounces of meal with water and add one teaspoon of honey. allergies or cold stomach.Vegetables ~ 41 Mushroom (White)* Nature/Taste: cold and sweet Actions: clears summer heat. 2. sore throat.make mushroom soup or tea daily and drink three cups daily. Seek out mushrooms that are grown without chemicals. 1. tumors Contraindications: white mushrooms should not be used by those with skin problems. lowers blood pressure. strengthens and lubricates intestines.

3. Then extract onion juice and soak two cotton balls in it. Insert into nostrils. Onion. .mash onion and steam it. mucus.before bedtime rinse nasal passages with saline solution.mash and mix with vinegar and apply to lesions.rub onion juice on baby's upper lip. 5. cilantro and green onions and try to sweat.mash onion and mix with 1-2 tablespoons sesame oil and eat on an empty stomach twice a day for three consecutive days. Copious white sputum . resolves phlegm. Leek* Nature/Taste: wann and pungent Actions: promotes sweating.drink tea of mustard greens. Intestinal worms in children . or vaporize the room with steam from onion tea. certain types of boils and lesions Folk Remedies: 1. Common cold and sinus congestion in infants . difficulty urinating. and upper respiratory infection . allergies. cover to keep warm and leave on for 20-30 minutes. Cough. 6.make tea from chopped onion and a 2. intestinal worms. or eat the onion alone. Difficulty urinating .drink mustard seed tea. 4. then apply poultice to the abdomen below the navel (CV4) as a hot compress. one at a time. Or steam the sliced onion and apply warm as a poultice to the chest area. Chronic or acute sinus infection .42 ~ The Tao of Nutrition 4. 7. * The properties of onion also apply to leeks. Common cold (wind cold type) . Common cold . acute or chronic sinus infection. few slices of fresh ginger root.put slices of onion over the nose like a mask and inhale the aroma for 30 minutes. under the nose. diuretic Conditions: common cold. 5. upper respiratory infection. and leave there for five minutes each. Boils .

if possible. induces measles eruption. . and dry ginger to make a tea. dizziness. tetanus Folk Remedies: 1. measles. 2. Arthritis of the wind-cold type - combine parsnip. Parsnip Nature/Taste: warm and pungent Actions: promotes sweating. indigestion. cinnamon. relieves pain. diuretic Conditions: food retention.make juice from V2 pound parsley. dispels wind and dampness.Vegetables ~ 43 Parsley Nature/Taste: slightly warm and pungent Actions: promotes digestion. and fullness . ingestion. * Charred parsnips used as tea are used to stop bleeding such as coughing blood or nosebleeds. fresh jalepeno pepper or dry jalepeno mixed with some ginger tea. and drink. headache. dried orange peels. Seek naturally grown parsley. regulates flow of Chi.make tea of parsley. arthritis. Common cold (wind-cold-damp type) - make parsnip and ginger tea. 3. seafood or meat poisoning Contraindications: Over-consumption of parsley is not ben- eficial for the eyes. Breast abscess . apply either mashed. To be taken with warm wine. Measles - Parsley is a strong food that is eaten in small amounts. divide into three portions. drink and mix the tea with wine to be used as an external wash. black pepper. make parsley tea. and unsprayed. removes stagnant food. hawthorn berries. Folk Remedies: 1. 2. daikon radish. Food retention. Externally. stops bleeding (when charred) * Conditions: common cold of the wind-cold type. stomach and abdomi- nal fullness. muscle ache.

change every three hours. butternut. lubricates intestines. heals inflammations Conditions: stomach and duodenal ulcers. Genital eczema . benefits diabetes. strengthens Spleen. Swelling . 1. harmonizes Stomach. ulcerations of the lower extremities. spaghetti. exuding sores . Eczema or other damp. Winter Squash Winter squashes are the hard-skin varieties like acorn. reduces fever. swelling. the feeling of steaming bones*. Make fresh daily. Ulcer pain or constipation - Pumpkin. eczema. repeat for three days. mix with a small amount of honey. eczema. antidote for opium Folk Remedies: 1. tonifies Chi. stomachache. stops dysentery.apply raw grated potato at night. . skin lesions. diabetes. promotes diuresis. small physical stature Contraindications: Do not eat sprouted or green potatoes because they are slightly toxic.apply raw grated potato locally with gauze. Folk Remedies: make raw potato juice in the blender. intestinal worms. relieves pain. Take two tablespoons every morning on an empty stomach. constipation. Burns - apply fresh pumpkin alone or mixed with aloe vera gel. buttercup. change six times. and kabocha Nature/Taste: cool and sweet Actions: dispels dampness. 2. stabi- lizes hyperactive fetus. 4. the seeds kill worms and parasites Conditions: dysentery. 3.44 ~ The Tao of Nutrition Potato Nature/Taste: cool and sweet Actions: relieves ulcer pain.make tea of grated potato and cucumber.

Breast cancer . * The sensation of heat deep in the body as if there is //steam in the bones!/ is part of a condition of Yin exhaustion.make tea from the pumpkin stem and cap.take one teaspoon pumpkin seed meal three times daily on an empty stomach. Not to be used for heat stages of common cold. Lower limb ulcerations - 3. The tumor is considered to be some type of stagnant blood. characterized by fever. yam. 5. induces sweating.make tea by lightly boiling scallions for five minutes. Scallion (Green Onion) Nature/Taste: hot* and pungent Actions: expels external pathogens.Vegetables ~ 45 2. and antibacterial Conditions: common cold. and yellow sputum. Folk Remedies: 1.take one teaspoon pumpkin ash in sweet rice porridge. extreme thirst. Take one teaspoon of the powder in one shot of rice wine twice daily. nasal congestion. 6. dispels wind and cold. Can also add basil. Chi. and potato. Hyperactive fetus . Other symptoms include insomnia/ irritabilitv flushed cheeks/ heat (especially severe in late afternoon or evenings)/ night sweats/ thirst/ feverish sensation in the palms and soles. 4. measles. abscesses. Intestinal worms . antiviral. Common cold . Childhood vomiting . The alcohol is a useful agent for increasing circulation and removing stagnancy. Diabetes .charcoal the cap and grind to powder. or mucus. arthritis of the cold-type Contraindication: Not to be used for the heat-type arthritis. apply dried pumpkin meal. 7. .eat a slice of pumpkin with every meal or bake pie with pumpkin.

these can be rolled into pills. There are many varieties of seaweed that can be easily incorporated into soups. lumps. protects from radioactivity. Measles - * The white part is hotl the green part is warm. 3. 4. l l . edema. Abscesses . apply mashed. promotes diuresis. mashed scallions to the navel to draw out the measles. low thyroid Folk Remedies: 1. The variety of seaweed that would be the least cold is nori. fibroid tumors. yellow. Arthritis pain . lung abscess with thick. change poultice every four hours.incorporate seaweeds into the diet for at least two months. make poultice of seaweed. and dandelion and apply locally. cancer.mix raw scallions with egg white and apply.make soup from dried (preferably green) orange peel. cystic breasts. Scallion and clove tea is also good to drink. benefits the thyroid gland. cough. Goiter . 2.46 ~ The Tao of Nutrition drink scallion tea and apply raw. A delicious healthful appetizer can be made with soaked hiziki or arame (looks like thin black noodles). odoriferous mucus. benefits the lymphatic system. nodules. 3. carrots. clears heat. detoxifies. peach kernel and green orange peels to take internally.make tea from seaweed. beriberi. Lymph tuberculosis . nodules. 4. and seaweed. stir-fry dishes etc. provides many minerals Conditions: swollen lymph glands. a little soy sauce honeYI and rice vinegar. cooked scallions to painful area. and tumors . 2. ginger.powder seaweed and mix with honey.make scallion tea and soak painful area. Seaweed Nature/Taste: cold and salty Actions: softens hardenings. Lumps. Externally. goiters. Cough and lung abscess .

spasms Folk Remedies: boil tea for four hours.eat only steamed soybean sprouts for three days consecutively without eating anything else. promotes diuresis. clears heat Conditions: food retention. lower abdominal distention and fullness.cook snow peas in sweet rice and eat it with every meal until relieved. quenches thirst .Vegetables ~ 47 Snow Pea Nature/Taste: cold and sweet Actions: strengthens middle warmer.consume steamed snow peas frequently. lubricates intestines. dysentery. Stomach heat. drink lukewarm. 2. 2. detoxifies. drink V2 cup twice daily. promotes lactation. 3. Diabetes . Warts . Diarrhea . drink 1Iz cup twice daily. daily over a period of one month. blocked lactation. diabetes. Hypertension - Spinach Nature/Taste: cool and sweet Actions: strengthens all organs. relieves vom- iting. difficulty urinating. then blend juice. 4. ventilates the chest. vomiting Folk Remedies: 1. 1. make juice from fresh snow peas. quenches thirst Conditions: chronic diarrhea. Hypertension - Soybean Sprouts Nature/Taste: cool and sweet Actions: promotes diuresis.cook snow peas. swelling. arthritis. relieves belching. promotes urination. Poor lactation . stops dysentery.

alcohol intoxication. night blindness. edema.48 ~ The Tao of Nutrition Conditions: constipation. Also. drink one cup twice daily. Burns . See IIPumpkin II for properties of winter squash Nature/Taste: cool and sweet Actions: clears heat. thirst Contraindications: not to be used in beriberi or scabies. . diabetes Contraindications: not to be used with diarrhea or a history of kidney stones. relieves restlessness Conditions: skin lesions. Summer (Zucchini) Summer squash includes all the soft skin varieties. tightness in chest. 2. urinary obstruction. drink the liquid. difficulty urinating. quenches thirst. 4. thirst. Folk Remedies: simmer spinach and chrysanthemum flowers. inability to urinate. spinach does not mix well with tofu or dairy products due to the unhealthy combination that results from the oxalic acid in the spinach and the high calcium foods. Acute Conjunctivitis - Squash. summer heat. headache .make fresh spinach juice. drink one cup three times daily. This can lead to crystallized stones in the kidneys. Night blindness . 3. irritability. Diabetes . 1. 2.cook squash with vinegar until soggy and eat on empty stomach or make tea from squash skin. promotes diuresis. detoxifies.drink spinach soup.boil tea from spinach and chicken gizzard. Folk Remedies: 1. Edema in the extremities or the abdomen .preserve cut up squash until it becomes liquid (usually 6-12 months) and apply the liquid to the burn. if one is so predisposed. Constipation.

7.eat squash as a salad. detoxifies.mash yam or sweet potato with honey and apply. Poison insect bites . one cup three times daily. 4. night blindness. tonifies Chi. Summer heat and irritability . Folk Remedies: 1. ascites. cook yam or sweet potato with animal liver (preferably goat). 6. indigestion. Cirrhosis of the liver and accompanying edema in the abdomen .cook yam soup with squash and pearl barley. raw yam locally or mix in a pinch of borax. . heartburn. ' Eczema (particularly genital eczema) . jaundice. 4. Jaundice .apply to the navel a mixture of mashed sweet potato and brown sugar. diarrhea. diabetes. skin lesions Contraindications: Overeating sweet potatoes will cause gas. clears heat. Jaundice . Sweet Potato. breast abscess. 3. change hourly. increases the production of milk Conditions: bloody stools. 5. Diabetes . Night blindness - 2.mix sweet potato powder or yam powder with honey. edema. Sprinkle afterwards with natural talcum powder.Vegetables ~ 49 3.apply grated. Shingles and breast abscess . Bloody stools . boils. constipation.drink tea made from squash skin.cook soup with winter melon.make tea with sweet potato and a pinch of salt and bathe the area. Yam Nature/Taste: neutral and sweet Actions: strengthens Spleen and Stomach function. abdominal distention and acid regurgitation. 8.

Externally. dries dampness. Turnip Nature/Taste: warm. transforms phlegm . sciatica. reduces swelling. heat up the paste and apply. Externally for infections such as pleurisy. scrofula. externally for pain from tendonitis. goiters. then take equal parts of water chestnuts and jellyfish and boil into tea. Take the liquid and mix with the taro root powder. joint pain. grind to powder. and tuberculosis -dry taro root. regu- lates digestive system Conditions: swollen lymph glands. mix with sesame oil and apply to blister. traumas. an antidote for this would be to apply fresh ginger juice.50 ~ The Tao of Nutrition Taro Root Nature/Taste: neutral. and bug bites . roll into pills the size of mung beans. Apply to the affected area and cover with a cloth. take two tablespoons of pills three times daily with warm water. 4. nodules. taro root can cause food retention and stomach pains.mash taro root with a pinch of salt and apply locally. appendicitis. Snake bite. sprains. goiter. arthritis . peritonitis.charcoal taro to ash. can cause allergic reaction in some people. it is slightly toxic raw. back pain. sweet. Swollen lymph glands. During winter.mix peeled taro root and ginger together with flour and water until a paste is formed. Folk Remedies: 1. 3. promotes digestion. sweet and pungent Actions: clears heat. bee stings Contraindications: If you eat too much. snake bites. Blisters that contain fluid . 2. Also. Change daily and always apply a fresh mixture. bitter and pungent Actions: regulates Chi. benefits Spleen. nodules. bees sting.

dice 1 turnip and boil in 4 cup of water with 3-4 pieces of tangerine or orange peel and 5 slices of fresh ginger root for 30 minutes. 2. Drink 2-3 cups a day. Water Chestnut Nature/Taste: cold and sweet Actions: clears heat and stops bleeding Conditions: dry cough due to heat in the lungs with thick.make tea from fresh water chestnuts and honeysuckle flowers. tenacious mucus. antidote for lead and copper poisoning Folk Remedies: 1. powder them and take with rice wine. jaundice.consume daily 1 pound of fresh water chestnuts with Y4 pound of peach kernels. mix with 1 cup barley flour and water. excessive uterine bleeding. Indigestion and gas . drink 3-5 cups daily. Strain and drink 3 cups of liquid daily right after each meal. bloody stool. Bloody stools . Lead and copper poisoning . season to taste and put in cake pan and steam for an hour in a double boiler. 3. Excess uterine bleeding .charcoal the water chestnuts. cough . . heaviness Folk Remedies: 1.juice fresh water chestnuts and mix with equal amount of rice wine and drink three times a day on an empty stomach. 3. 2.juice raw turnipl and mix with honey and warm water. Results should be seen within three days. diar- rhea. bloating. Bronchitis. pneumonia. 4. Diarrhea and malaise .make steamed turnip cake by grating 2 turnips.Vegetables ~ 51 Conditions: indigestion. wet cough. Productive cough . Eat 1/4 slice each day. excess gas.

dispels dampness. promotes urination. no salt 3. added.make tea of winter melon skin and drink. quenches thirst. ascites (edema in the abdomen). quenches thirst.drink fresh. sore and dry throat. Yam (see Sweet Potato) . Folk Remedies: 1. Thirst.cook winter melon with poi.boil tea from watercress and apricot kernels (or almonds). Heatstroke . Promote lactation . 6. skin lesions. heatstroke Folk Remedies: 1. 2. Chronic nephritis . relieves irritability. lubricates lungs. irritability.52 ~ The Tao of Nutrition Watercress Nature/Taste: cool and bitter Actions: clears heat. cough with yellow sputum Contra indications: not to be used in cases of diarrhea. raw watercress juice. detoxifies.drink the fresh juice with honey.make tea from winter melon rind and grapefruit seeds (remove shells or crush seeds) and drink constantly. Drink one cup three times daily. 4. promotes diuresis Conditions: thirst. 5.cook winter melon rind with trout. Difficulty urinating . restlessness. irritability. Cough .make winter melon soup and drink three times daily. sweet and bland Actions: clears heat. Remove the apex of the apricot kernel. Hives . Winter Melon Nature/Taste: cool. antidote for seafood poisoning Conditions: boils. Summer heat with continuous high fever . difficult urination. 2. which is toxic. and sore throat .

apple juice. sweet and slightly sour Actions: strengthens Heart. cough Contraindications: too much injures bones and tendons and produces mucus. Diarrhea . Indigestion .eat a fresh apple on an empty stomach. hypertension. 53 . indigestion. sweet and sour Actions: regenerates body fluids. Folk Remedies: 1. Apricot Nature/Taste: slightly cool. For problems of a cold nature. alleviates thirst.take two teaspoons of powdered. resolves mucus Conditions: dry throat. quenches thirst. lubricates lungs.eat fresh apricots (no more than 5-10).Fruits Apple Nature/Taste: cool. 6. and beet top tea. reduces dryness. bake the apples to decrease their cooling properties.fast one day a week on apples. 2.drink apple juice.eat three apples a day. General cleansing . 5. The apples contain pectin that acts as a broom in our intestines. chronic diarrhea Folk Remedies: 1. Not good to eat too many during pregnancy. detoxifies. Cough with yellow sputum .eat an apple after each meal. constipation. dried apple three times daily on an empty stomach. Hypertension . thirst. clears heat. Summer thirst and dehydration . 3. quenches thirst Conditions: dehydration. dehydration. 4. in children this can cause skin rashes. tonifies Chi. Constipation .

adding a bit of honey. constipation/dry stools. palpitations. which is toxic. Menopausal hot flashes .make tea from one teaspoon of ground apricot kernels. low- ers blood pressure. Anemia and palpitations . helps alleviate alcohol intoxication Conditions: constipation. One should remove the apex of the kernel. lubricates intestines. 1 banana. Cough . Hemorrhoids and constipation . cool Actions: nourishes Yin and blood. hypertension. lubricate intestines. Retest to monitor progress. cough. The inner kernel of the apricot seed is used to ventilate lungs. dry cough. 1/2 cup of yogurt with 1 cup of almond milk.54 ~ The Tao of Nutrition 2. dry skin. Folk Remedies: 1.make avocado ice cream with soymilk by blending 1 avocado with I cup of soymilk until smooth and put in freezer. diabetes. descend rebellious Chi. alcohol intoxication Contraindications: not to be used in cold conditions. skin and intestines Conditions: anemia. Eat one scoop each day until hot flashes abate. 3. Drink for breakfast. relieve constipation.eat a banana every day on an empty stomach. Avocado Nature/Taste: sweet. Banana Nature/Taste: cold and sweet Actions: clears heat. thirst. hemorrhoids. relieve cough and asthma. 2.eat 1/2 an avocado daily for one month. lubricates lungs. moistens lungs.make a shake with 1/2 avocado. menopausal hot flashes Contraindications: diarrhea Folk Remedies: 1. . Constipation and dry skin .

do not cook the honey. slows agmg process Conditions: poor concentration. ulcers. Melons may upset stomach if eaten with other food and should be eaten alone. pine nuts. diarrhea. heart disease. If honey is substituted. warm Actions: tonifies Kidneys.cook banana with a bit of sugar. irritability Contraindications: not for cold conditions. 2. Poor concentration/ADD: incorporate 1/4 cup of either fresh or frozen blueberries into breakfast daily for 2-4 weeks 2. relieves summer heat problems. Hypertension - Blueberry sour. astringes Chi. sweet. goji/lycii berries and pumpkin seeds 3. Memory decline: make trail mix of equal portions of dried blueberries. this may not be appropriate of Americans who already consume about 120 pounds of sugar a year. frequent urination. To induce vomiting - Folk Remedies: take dried. quenches thirst. Cough . ground cantaloupe seeds in warm water. . history of coughing or vomiting blood. Note. kidney weakness. raisins and figs and eat a handful Cantaloupe Nature/Taste: Actions: cold and sweet clears heat. nourishes blood. 1. walnuts. memory decline.Fruits ~ 55 drink organic banana peel tea. anemia Nature/Taste: Folk Remedies: 1. 3. Anemia and Kidney weakness: mix together dried blueberries. lung abscess. eases urination Conditions: summer heat thirst. or weak stomach.

2. rejuvenates. Chinese Dates (Red or Black Jujube) Nature/Taste: Actions: neutral* and sweet strengthens Spleen.drink red date tea. Hernia pain . diarrhea. Folk Remedies: Blood in urine . 4. Burns .apply locally. This injures the bones and tendons. cough. prolongs life Conditions: measles. tonifies blood.56 ~ The Tao of Nutrition Cherry warm and sweet Actions: benefits skin and overall body. Enlarged thyroid or goiter . blood in urine. strengthens Spleen. then apply locally. distended stomach. 1. mash to powder. stops involuntary seminal emissions. premature ejaculation Contraindications: eaten in excess will cause nausea. diarrhea.fry cherry pits with vinegar. harmonizes within the body or within an herb formula. regenerates fluids. 3. Measles . skin lesions and cause a person to feel hot. Nature/Taste: Folk Remedies: 1. stops diarrhea. stimulates appetite. tonifies Yin. . weakness. lubricates lungs. take one teaspoon per dose. vomiting. thirst. nourishes the body. bruises. For example. Conditions: Yin deficiency. quenches thirst. nervous hysteria Contraindications: too much creates mucus. and is hard on the teeth.drink fresh warmed cherry juice. stops dysentery and diarrhea. anemia.soak cherry pits in vinegar until they disintegrate. dysentery. weak digestion. night sweats. stops coughs. dates and licorice can reduce the harshness of a food or herb and unite the combination into action. burns.

* Black dates are slightly warming. for both prevention (as before a trip to a third-world country) and treatment. Summer heat irritability .make tea with prunes and black pepper. Chinese Prune These prunes are made from half ripened plums and have a sour flavor. Intestinal worms . to dissolve a fish bone. They are more beneficial therapeutically than the sweet variety that is made from fully ripened plums. Fish bones stuck in the throat . consolidates the Lungs. . 4. kills worms. promote body fluids. activates heart function Conditions: weakness.brew concentrated prune tea and add an equal part of rice vinegar. drink slowly. drink the juice and eat the meat of V2 coconut. Spontaneous sweating . kills worms. stops bleeding. stops cough. The herb clematis. Worms - every morning on an empty stomach. 2. reduces swelling. Dysentery - Folk Remedies: Coconut warm * and sweet Actions: strengthens the body.boil tea from ten red dates and ten preserved plums. quenches thirst. The sweet prunes quench thirst. nosebleeds. stops diarrhea. Nature/Taste: Actions: warm and sour astringes intestines. wait three hours before eating anything else. and moisten the intestines. promotes body fluids. 1. 3.drink prune juice. brew prune tea and take before meals on an empty stomach. intestinal or skin worms Nature/Taste: Folk Remedies: 1. powdered and mixed with rice vinegar could be given in an emergency.Fruits ~ 57 2.

Bladder infection - drink 1 cup cranberry juice (preferably unsweetened and diluted) along with 1. cooling Actions: promotes urination. longan fruit. kidney stones. stop diar- rhea Conditions: dry cough. Lung-heat symptoms - make tea from figs (preferably fresh). strengthens Kidneys and reproductive system Conditions: frequent urination. prolapse of the rectum Folk Remedies: 1.drink plenty of coconut JUICe. Lung heat. relieves painful urination. If symptoms persist beyond 3 days or lower back pain begins. Avoid high oxalate foods such as spinach. * The milk inside of the coconut is neutral and sweet. infertility Contraindications: gastric acid reflux Folk Remedies: 1. Cranberry Nature/Taste: Sour. . vitamin C every 3-4 hours a day. Kidney stones and bladder infection prevention - drink 1 cup of unsweetened cranberry juice along with 8 glasses of water daily. Fig Nature/Taste: cool and sweet Actions: clears heat. indigestion. walnuts. Infertility . dry throat. see your doctor immediately.make a fertility-enhancing trail mix consisting of equal parts of dried cranberries. chard and beet greens. lubricates lungs and intestines. Kidney weakness. Drink an additional 5-6 cups of water daily. 2. Edema due to weak heart . painful burning urination. hemorrhoids. sesame seeds.000 mg. and cashews.58 ~ The Tao of Nutrition 2. constipation. 3. incontinence.

sunflower seeds. anemia. common cold and flu Folk Remedies: make vision enhancing trail mix with equal parts of dried goji berry. .traditional Chinese blood tonic recipe calls for making chicken soup with 1/4 cup of dried goji berries. dang gui root. Asthma . red jujube date. strengthens the Lungs. painful urination. diabetes Contraindication: fevers.blend fig juice and drink three times daily. Also. Tinnitus . 3. hepatitis.make tea by boiling 1/4 cup dried goji berries and 1/2 cup chrysanthemum blossoms in 4 cups of water for 15 minutes. Strain immediately and drink 3 cups daily. Eat a small handful daily as a snack. 3. tinnitus. chronic dry cough. ben- efits Liver and Kidney. anemia. neutral Actions: nourishes blood and Yin. Eat daily until anemia improves. lower back pain. jaundice. relieves irritability Conditions: cold type arthritis. Vision decline or diabetes - Grape Nature/Taste: warm. flu Contraindications: Wine should not be combined with fatty foods because it can result in phlegm and heat that rises to the heart and can cause strokes and heart attacks. Hernia . Goji Berry (Lycium Berry or Gou Qi Zi) Nature/Taste: sweet. 1. sweet and sour Actions: very tonifying (particularly the red or purple varieties). nourishes blood. stop cough Conditions: vision decline. excessive consumption of grapes leads to constipation or diarrhea. Hemorrhoids . improves vision. Impo- tence. astragalus root and fresh ginger root. sour.bathe area in fig tea. plums. Anemia . tonifies Chi. 4. promotes diuresis.Fruits ~ 59 2.drink fig and fennel tea. pistachios and pine nuts. 2. harmonizes Stomach. tendonitis. strengthens bones and tendons.

make tea from about 20 grapefruit seeds. statin drugs. Folk Remedies: 1. 2. Hepatitis and jaundice . circulates Chi. 3. 2. Flu . The moderate use of wine can be of benefit in cold environments and cold conditions.make grape vine tea and add some wine. green tea leaves. alcohol intoxication.make tea from aged grapefruit peel.60 ~ The Tao of Nutrition Folk Remedies: 1. 5. Jaundice and stomach distention . Chronic cough . Gastritis or inflammation of the stomach . Anemia .eat raisins. detoxifies alcohol intoxication Conditions: decreased appetite. 4. drink all day. sweet and sour Actions: strengthens stomach. and drugs that decrease anxiety. dry cough Contraindication: grapefruit and grapefruit juice can interfere with certain medications including anti-hypertensives.drink grape juice. antihistamines. and two slices of fresh ginger. drink three times daily. aids digestion. Grapefruit Nature/Taste: cold.make grape tea. adding a bit of honey. Dry cough . Frostbite . Consult with your doctor or pharmacist before consuming grapefruit if you are taking any medications. stomach fullness.char and powder grapefruit peel. * take a teaspoon with warm water three times daily.cook four grapefruit slices with either pork or cabbage. Arthritis (cold type) and tendonitis .wash or soak area in grapefruit peel tea. weak digestion. . 4. 3.

benefits Liver Conditions: sore throat. invigo- rates blood. Litchi Fruit (Lychee) Nature/Taste: warm. stomach distention and scratchy throat. drink once daily. ten fresh water chestnuts. abdominal pain. regulates Chi . poor appetite. 1. regu- lates Chi. relieves stagnant Chi. cough Folk Remedies: Hypertension . Child with no appetite - Lemon. soothes Liver. dry dampness. Regulate Chi. removes stagnant food. calms spirit. absence of menstruation due to blood stagnation.make tea from one peeled lemon. sweet and astringent Actions: nourishes blood. high cholesterol Folk Remedies: give berries or tea daily.Fruits ~ 61 * Grapefruit peel is warming and can be used to dispel cold.drink lemon tea with honey. harmonizes Stomach. resolve sputum.2 cups of water. quenches thirst. bloody stools. regulate Ch/~ aid digestion. dissolves sputum. benefit Liver . and aid wind-cold cough. aids digestion Conditions: food stagnation (especially meat). Hypertension . 3. 2. Sore throat . and 21.squeeze a half lemon in warm water and drink every morning. stomach distention. dry mouth.drink tea daily. Limes Nature/Taste: cool and sour Actions: regenerates body fluids. hypertension. 2. 1. Hawthorn Berry Nature/Taste: slightly warm. Make tea from the dried peel. sweet and sour Actions: strengthens Spleen.

take dried litchi with the kernel. vomiting boilloquats to make tea. stops cough. Bleeding after birth or abortion . sweet and sour lubricates dryness. charcoal powder and take with warm water.62 ~ The Tao of Nutrition Conditions: hernia. reduce to one cup. drink three times daily until the bleeding stops. grind the litchi kernel. calms the Liver Conditions: dry mouth. burping. Or. Weak conditions. thirst. irritability. dry cough. mash and boil with two cups of water. 2.eat ten dried litchis daily. Hernia . thirst. irritability. harmonizes Stomach. feverish sensation. 3. Not to be used in any type of heat condition.take seven dried litchis. mix with rice wine and take every morning on an empty stomach. bake and grind to powder. vomiting. Bedwetting . Cough . nausea. take dried litchi and black jujube date (seven of each) and boil tea. Vomiting and nausea - Folk Remedies: . 5. 4. weak and deficient conditions.eat fresh loquats. blood deficiency - Contraindications: Folk Remedies: 2. 1. restless heart over-consumption can lead to nosebleed. Nausea.take litchi kernel. Loquat Nature/Taste: Actions: neutral. drink daily. take one teaspoon on an empty stomach daily. descends rebellious Chi. 1. and belching .

detoxifies. Cough - Orange Nature/Taste: cool. Weak digestion . anemia. strengthens stomach Conditions: cough. stops thirst. stops cough. lubricates lungs. 1.Fruits ~ 63 Mango Nature/Taste: neutral. nausea Contraindications: Overeating mangos can cause itching or skin eruptions. Insomnia . diabetes. blurred vision Folk Remedies: take two teaspoons of mulberry syrup twice daily. lymph node enlargement. alcohol intoxication. irritability. relieves constipation. poor digestion. 2.drink mango juice. promotes urination Conditions: thirst. 1. enlarged prostate. constipation. Enlarged prostate - Mulberry Nature/Taste: slightly cold and sweet Actions: quenches thirst. thirst. increases appetite. 3. quenches thirst. promotes body fluids Conditions: thirst. Constipation .boil mulberry tea and drink Vz cup. resolves mucus. stagnant Chi. sweet and sour Actions: regenerates body fluids.drink mulberry juice. The syrup can be made by cooking mulberries on low flame until they dissolve. tonifies Kidneys. nourishes blood. dehydration. dry mouth. calms the spirit. 2. strengthens Spleen. then adding honey and cooking down to a thick syrup. Folk Remedies: boil mango peel and seed into tea. back pain due to Kidney weakness. sweet and sour Actions: lubricates lungs. hernia .

3. aids irritability. lubricates lungs. aids digestion. kills worms. 2.peel and steam papaya. * Orange peel is warm. intestinal worms. dry cough.apply fresh papaya. Peach Nature/Taste: very cool. intestinal worms Folk Remedies: 1. increases milk production Conditions: cough. Cough with copious mucus .cook papaya and eat with or after meals. Stomachache and indigestion .make tea from unsprayed. stomachache. bitter and pungent. clears summer heat. clears heat. Cough . promotes body fluids. Dried papaya is warm. sweet and sour. Intestinal worms . dried orange peeL * 3.cook the orange and eat it. sweet and slightly sour Actions: lubricates lungs.64 ~ The Tao of Nutrition Folk Remedies: 1. Skin lesions . and take two teaspoons on an empty stomach every morning. stops cough. aid digestion. stagnant Chi. and resolve dampness. Chi stagnation. aids diabetes. then add honey. skin lesions. induces sweating Conditions: diabetes. 4. Increasing lactation . Papaya Nature/Taste: neutral. sweet and sour Actions: strengthens Stomach and Spleen. vaginitis . chest fullness or distention. prostate enlargement and hernia - make tea from orange seeds. Stuck mucus. indigestion.put fresh papaya in fish soup. powder. eczema. 5. It is used to invigorate and activate the channels. and is used to invigorate the movement of Chi and dry dampness. 2.sun dry green papaya.

make tea from the innermost seed. dry throat. retina pain. 5. belching . 2. Pear can also be cooked with scallions. descends Chi and stops cough Conditions: cough due to heat in the lungs. 4. not to be used by pregnant women. steam about 30 minutes and eat completely. excess mucus. steam. calms the Heart. Vaginitis . Folk Remedies: 1. promotes urination. Also. Nausea. Inducing sweating or killing worms . lubricates the throat. 3. manifesting as cold extremities or diarrhea. dissolves mucus. difficult urination. Folk Remedies: 1. hoarse throat.eat fresh peaches. Pear Apple (Asian Pear) Nature/Taste: cold and sweet Actions: regenerates body fluids.Fruits ~ 65 Contraindications: not to be used with damp and cold condi- tions. 3. Promoting blood circulation . the kernel. lubricates lungs. 2. and fill with 3 grams powdered fritillaria bulb (Chuan Bei Mu) and a little rock sugar or brown sugar.core the pear and insert 1h gram of ephedra. Whooping cough .core the pear and insert 10-15 cloves. or in cases of anemia.core pear. then remove the herb and eat the pear. Cough and bronchitis .douche with peach leaf tea. Acute voice loss . Dry cough . irritability. steam. 4. quenches thirst. clears heat. adding two teaspoons of honey.peel and juice 2-3 pears.core the pear and steam it. then remove the cloves and eat the pear. relieves restlessness. skin lesions. thirst. alcohol intoxication Con tra indica tions: not to be used with cold stomach and Spleen. eat 3-4 times daily. .drink peach leaf tea. detoxifies. constipation. Cough with yellow phlegm .

5. powdered persimmon in warm water (about a tablespoon of the powder). 4. Persimmon Nature/Taste: cool. . Bleeding ulcers and lower intestinal bleeding . dissolves sputum. charred persimmon powder in warm water. charred. Vomiting or coughing blood . 6. stops diarrhea. persimmon in rice wine for ten minutes. Alcohol intoxication . clears heat Conditions: pain in the throat due to heat. Domestic pear has the same properties as the Asian pear but is milder.cook a partially ripened 2.drink pear juice or tea to prevent hangover.drink persimmon juice or tea. dysentery. Nausea and vomiting . cough.add dried persimmon to water to make a mush.apply a combination of charred persimmon powder and black pepper.66 ~ The Tao of Nutrition 6. thirst. or make persimmon cap and cloves tea.drink three glasses of unripened persimmon juice daily.take dried. strengthens Spleen. sweet and astringent Actions: lubricates lungs. Hypertension . vomiting blood. eat the persimmon. quenches thirst. Ulcerated skin lesions . Alcohol intoxication . Folk Remedies: 1. because the combination produces extreme diarrhea. Another remedy is to take dried. stops cough with heat. alcohol intoxication Contraindications: Do not eat persimmons along with crabs. steam it and take two tablespoons three times daily for 3-4 days or until condition ceases. 3. Cloves could be a good addition.

sweet and sour Actions: stimulates appetite. poor digestion.Fruits ~ 67 Pineapple Nature/Taste: warm. 2. 3. indigestion. Chi stagnation. so not to be used in those conditions. Plum Nature/Taste: slightly warm. softens or soothes the Liver. Heat stroke and irritability - drink fresh pineapple JUice. Yin and fluids . astringent. Folk Remedies: 1.boil tea of pineapple. dispels summer heat Conditions: heatstroke. 4.boil tea of pineapple and add honey. diar- rhea Contraindications: Pineapples are slightly toxic. Pineapple is also said to generate dampness. Folk Remedies: 1. removes stagnation of Chi. regulates body flu- ids. removes the feeling of steaming bones (see pg. this can be neutralized by washing with salt water. sweet and sour Actions: aids digestion. stops diarrhea. drink freely throughout the day. nourishes blood. thirst.make tea from peeled pineapple and reed roots. irritability. 44) Conditions: dehydration. Pomegranate Nature/Taste: Sour. Nephritis (kidney inflammation) . stops thirst. thirst. Bronchitis . aids digestion. stops diarrhea. Dysentery - drink plum skin tea. slightly warming Actions: Astringes intestines. erratic energy flow. dysentery Contraindication: Too many plums are not good for the teeth. Dysentery .

charcoal and grind to powder. incontinence. It is generally taken as tea.68 ~ The Tao of Nutrition Conditions: chronic diarrhea. Diabetes and excess thirst - Raspberry Nature/Taste: slightly warm. Alternatively.mix equal portions of pomegranate and cranberry juices and drink 2 glasses daily 3. skin lesions. Don't drink sweetened pomegranate juice. Diarrhea . . raspberry powder. Impotence and involuntary seminal emission - Raspberry leaf is very strengthening to the female system. 2. involuntary seminal emission. 2.ground dried pomegranates into powder and take 1 tsp with warm water 3 times a day. and can be used throughout pregnancy. constipation Folk Remedies: make fresh pomegranate and cucumber juice with a juicer and drink 1 glass daily. Bedwetting or frequent urination . 1. spermatorrhea. blurry vision.take charcoaled. take three teaspoons every night before bed with some rice wine. take pure pomegranate capsules instead. diabetes Contraindications: common cold. make tea and drink before bedtime every night. 3. astringes essence. and fungus conditions . sweet and sour Actions: tonifies Liver and Kidneys. wash area with this. nocturnal emission. anemia. astringes urination. Eczema. thirst. as well as other phases of a woman's life. frequent urination Folk Remedies: take dry raspberries.boil fresh raspberries to a concentrate. Incontinence . flu. 1. brightens the eyes Conditions: Kidney and Liver deficiency.

abdominal distention and pain . testicular pain . hoarse voice. steam and eat three times daily. sore throat. Take 3-6 grams with warm sake before bed. 2. opens the channels. 1. food retention. chest tightness. Nausea.Fruits ~ 69 Strawberry Nature/Taste: cool. 1. Dry throat. cough.use tangerine fruit combined with rice wine and water to make a tea. pungent and bitteri carminative.take one glass fresh strawberry juice twice daily. stomach discomfort - * Tangerine peel is warm.mash fresh strawberries. strengthens Spleen. difficult urination. grind to powder. sweet and sour Actions: carminative. lack of appetite Folk Remedies: mash strawberries with brown sugar. arrests cough. Chest fullness. 2. . rib pain Folk Remedies: make tea from unsprayed tangerine peels. stops cough Conditions: nausea. Lack of appetite. pain in ribs . 4. food retention. 3. Difficult urination . excess white or clear mucus. strengthens the stomach. vomiting. detoxifies in alcohol intoxication Conditions: dry cough. drink three times daily. vomiting. Dry cough - Tangerine Nature/Taste: warm. sweet and sour Actions: lubricates lungs. Hernia. promotes body fluids.eat five strawberries before each meal. strengthens stomach and resolves phlegm. * fresh ginger root and cardamom seeds. sore throat . add cold water. thirst.roast equal parts of tangerine seeds and fennel seeds. 3.

Hypertension and eye hemorrhage . bloody dysentery. cools blood. every day for one month.eat two raw to- matoes on an empty stomach. 2.70 ~ The Tao of Nutrition Tomato Nature/Taste: slightly cool.boil tea from watermelon seeds or grind into meal and take with warm water. 1.eat at least one raw tomato per day. 4. detoxifies Conditions: sores.eat half or one whole fresh tomato after meals. relieves irritability. summer heat irritability. removes stagnant food Conditions: Liver heat rising. with weak stomach or with excessive urination Folk Remedies: boil tea from the rind and the inner portion. difficult urination Contraindication: Not to be used in cold conditions. aids digestion. sweet and sour Actions: promotes body fluids. calms the Liver. clears heat. promotes diuresis. detoxifies. 3. dehydration.make tea from the skins of watermelon. bloodshot eyes. squash. food retention. Edema from nephritis - . edema. Fluid in the abdomen . Watermelon Nature/Taste: cold and sweet Actions: quenches thirst. strengthens stomach. 3. Kidney disease . and winter melon. dry mouth. 2. Indigestion and food retention . Jaundice . dispels summer heat problems.boil tea from the rind and red beans. hypertension. also avoid spicy foods. indigestion due to low stomach acid. quenches thirst. Constipation . kidney infection Folk Remedies: 1. jaundice.

avoid all gluten-containing grains such as wheat. Steep 1 tbsp. remove and steep in a cup of hot water for 5 minutes and sip for immediate relief of anxiety or before bedtime for insomnia.toast 1/4 cup amaranth in oven until slightly brown. bloating. barley. Fatigue and swelling during summer heat: toast barley. Anxiety or insomnia . fatigue Folk Remedies: boill!2 cup of barley with 5 slices of fresh ginger root in 4 cups of water for 30 minutes. for other grains in your diet. Cook amaranth with brown rice and use them as a staple. combine with an equal amount of green tea. promotes urination. 2.Grains Amaranth Nature/Taste: sweet. 1. soothes irritation in the digestive system and urinary tract Conditions: indigestion. reduces dampness. cooling Actions: tonifies Chi. insomnia. dizziness. warming Actions: tonifies Chi. and drink 3 cups daily. anemia. 1. diarrhea. rye and oats. painful urination. Strain. bloating and gas pain: 71 . bloating. swelling. diarrhea. 2. Indigestion. 3. Fatigue or anemia - Barley Nature/Taste: sweet. reduces dampness. bitter. of mixture in 1 cup hot water and drink 2 cups a day. calms spirit Conditions: fatigue. which is rich in iron. nourishes blood. anxiety Folk Remedies: substitute amaranth. strengthens Spleen. Diarrhea or bloating .

hypertension. Detoxification: take 2 tbsp.72 ~ The Tao of Nutrition 3. high blood pressure.grind roasted buckwheat. strengthens stomach. edema. Strain and drink 3 cups for up to 3 days. dysentery. see your doctor immediately. lowers blood pressure.mix rooster bile with buckwheat meal and roll in pill form. spontaneous sweat- ing. stops dysentery. Leukorrhea and chronic diarrhea .make tea from buckwheat and lotus root. barley greens powder in 1 cup of water on empty stomach daily for cleansing of bowels and general detoxification. strengthens the Stomach and Spleen. diuretic. 3. Take one teaspoon of pills twice daily. roast buckwheat. benefits the Heart. then apply to area. mix with warm water and take two teaspoons twice daily. 4. gallstones . strengthens blood vessels Conditions: chronic diarrhea. stimulates the flow of bile Conditions: weak digestion. 4. If symptoms persist. skin lesions Folk Remedies: boil buckwheat tea and wash area with it. heart disease. grind to powder and mix with rice vinegar to make a paste. Skin lesions - Cornmeal Nature/Taste: neutral and sweet Actions: tonifies Chi. High blood pressure . Or. Buckwheat Nature/Taste: neutral and sweet Actions: descends Chi. 1. 2. Hemorrhoids . Painful urination: boil 114 cup barley. 114 cup mung beans and a handful of corn silk in 4 cups of water for 30 minutes.

Kamut.Grains ~ 73 Folk Remedies: 1. fennel and ginger. strengthens Spleen and Stomach. may add fresh ginger.make a soupy porridge with corn- meal.eat cornmeal regularly and drink corns ilk tea. Weak digestion . promotes urination. This is an easy to digest meal for recovery from the flu or cold. clears heat.incorporate kamut into diet as a daily staple 2.eat kamut cereall!2 hour before exer- cising or exerting muscle 3. Millet Nature/Taste: cool and sweet Actions: stops vomiting. hypertension . cooling Actions: tonifies Chi. diarrhea. as well as spelt. soothes morning sickness Folk Remedies: 1. relieves diarrhea. Muscle fatigue . . underweight Folk Remedies: 1. regu- lates Chi. muscle fatigue.cook kamut with tangerine peel. consolidates or astringes the stomach and intestines. reduces bloating Conditions: low appetite. 2. Morning sickness and vomiting . difficult urination. abdominal distention and fullness.eat millet porridge as a regular staple. Edema. but those sensitive to gluten should avoid kamut. Fresh corn and corns ilk are cooling and more diuretic than dried cornmeal. Underweight . is an ancient cousin of wheat that tends to create less allergic reactions. Abdominal distention . Kamut Nature/Taste: sweet.

abdominal distention and fullness.boil tea from millet and add Y2 teaspoon brown sugar. 3. Obstructed urination . indigestion. 4. 3. Postpartum urinary and bowel obstruction . jaundice. strengthens Spleen.boil sprouted oats or sprouted barley tea and drink one cups three times daily. For quitting coffee . diarrhea. clears heat. carminative. Hepatitis . drink one cup three times daily.make tea from sprouted oats and dried orange peels. swelling Folk Remedies: 1. Coix) Nature/Taste: cool and bland Actions: promotes diuresis. eat Y2 cup three times daily. tonifies and regulates Chi. take two teaspoons three times a day with lukewarm water. . dysuria Folk Remedies: 1.cook oats and azuki or mung beans to a mush. Or. Diabetes . tumors. Swelling . dysentery. Pearl Barley (Job's Tears. detoxifies Conditions: swelling.roast sprouted oats.substitute roasted barley tea for coffee. indigestion. Diarrhea . stops lactation (sprouted form only) Conditions: lack of appetite. 2. 4. grind into meal. Oats Nature/Taste: warm and sweet Actions: strengthens Spleen. use barley malt as a sweetener in the diet.steam millet with yams and jujube dates. Stop lactation .74 ~ The Tao of Nutrition 2. har- monizes Stomach. benefits gall bladder.roast millet until aromatic.

relieves irritability. Swelling . strengthens Spleen. weak digestion. Coix has a stronger taste and is more diuretic. Leave on overnight and wash off with water on the morning. 6. low resistance to colds. eat daily. apply every night before bed. quenches thirst.blend barley and water. warming Actions: tonifies Chi. Fatigue or obesity . Heat conditions and skin lesions . Skin lesions with pus discharge . Acne .mix pearl barley powder with aloe vera gel to make a facial mask.eat pearl barley soup. Quinoa Nature/Taste: sweet. add 1 tbsp bee pollen. lemon juice from 1/2 of a lemon and 1 tbsp of honey into daily quinoa cereal in the morning Rice. nourishes Stomach. and drink the liquid. astringes intestines. Heat and damp conditions . 5.Grains ~ 75 2.sprinkle pearl barley powder locally. obesity. stops diarrhea .make a soupy porridge of mung beans and pearl barley. 3. loose bowels Folk Remedies: 1. Frequent colds . boil. relieves internal coldness Conditions: fatigue. Brown Nature/Taste: neutral and sweet Actions: strengthens Spleen. steep in hot water with 3 slices of ginger and a pinch of cardamom 3.substitute quinoa for all other grains except amaranth 2.toast 2 tbsp quinoa until slightly brown. 4. warms Yang. Pearled (hulled) barley-the common variety found in supermarketsis smaller and milder than the Chinese herb variety. Weak digestion and diarrhea .to strengthen resistance.

roast rice until overdone (brownish-black). charcoal and take 1-2 teaspoons each time. vomiting. 6. frequent uri- nation.cook brown rice with a persimmon cap. Anemia.cook sweet rice porridge with red dates and pearl barley and eat regularly.grind rice. lung tuberculosis . Obesity . eat the rice. Diarrhea . Rice. diabetes.eat sweet rice cake (mochi). astringes urine Conditions: stomach pains due to cold. a small amount is very filling. 3. 2. Anorexia and digestive weakness .consume rice porridge continuously for one month. Difficulty urinating . Sweet Nature/Taste: warm and sweet Actions: warms Spleen and Stomach. Child regurgitating mother's milk . tonifies Chi.2 cup over-done rice (bottom of pot) mixed with cardamom. 5. nausea.dry-roast sweet rice and wheat bran. 3. fennel and orange peel. Digestive aid . 2. 4. three times daily.make tea from malt and sweet rice sprouts.1. obesity. grind into meal. add water and cook. diarrhea. summer heat irritability Folk Remedies: 1.eat fermented rice cake after each meal. Spontaneous sweating . take one tablespoon three times daily.76 ~ The Tao of Nutrition Conditions: indigestion. . Bloody dysentery . anemia Contraindications: Eating too much will cause indigestion. 4. and cooked into porridge. give the child the fluid. Folk Remedies: 1. Indigestion .

Rice Bran Nature/Taste: neutral and sweet Actions: dispels dampness. then bring rice to a boil. diuretic. 3.wash rice thoroughly. clears heat. Chinese red dates. White Nature/Taste: slightly cool and sweet Actions: moistens Yin. followed by a liquid diet. This will produce a loose stool and reduction of the stomach distress. nose- bleeds.consume rice porridge. lotus seeds. and a pinch of pepper. nausea Folk Remedies: 1. diuretic Conditions: mild edema in legs and feet.make sweet rice porridge with yams. Food retention . add aloe vera juice and drink the liquid. Rice. Chronic gastritis . 2. swelling. vomiting of blood. Vomiting due to febrile disease . reduces swelling Conditions: febrile diseases.burn rice. Stomach pains due to cold. High cholesterol . powder it and take twice daily with ginger tea before meals for three consecutive days. high cholesterol Folk Remedies: 1. Rye Nature/Taste: neutral and sweet Actions: arrests perspiration due to weakness. avoiding cold. diarrhea . raw and oily foods. fortifies Chi .add rice bran to a grain dish every day for at least two months. strengthens stomach.Grains ~ 77 5.

restlessness.make tea from the entire rye plant and raspberry leaves. calms spirit. pro- motes diuresis. strengthens Spleen. quinoa and amaranth and take fiber supplements 2. difficult urination. relieves restlessness. Drink throughout the day. swelling. clears dampness. 1. irritability. lethargy. fetal retention (baby has died but is not yet expelled by mother) Folk Remedies: 1. calms spirit Conditions: tiredness. add molasses and drink the liquid.78 ~ The Tao of Nutrition Conditions: fatigue. of chamomile for 3-5 minutes. obesity.toast 1/4 cup of spelt until slightly brown and steep in 1 cup of hot water with 1 tbsp. 2. this is an ancient cousin of wheat that tends to create less allergic reactions than wheat. Restlessness . burns . activates blood. slightly bitter. menopause. restlessness Contraindications: gluten-sensitive patients may react to spelt.eat spelt and oat bran cereals and eliminate all refined starch from diet 3. and drink as much as possible. Folk Remedies: switch to whole grains like spelt. High cholesterol - Wheat Nature/Taste: slightly cool and sweet Actions: clears heat. stops sweating Conditions: dry mouth and throat. night sweats. warm Actions: tonifies Chi. However. night or day sweats due to weak- ness. Weakness type perspiration . spontaneous sweating.boil whole rye for 15-20 minutes. Spelt Nature/Taste: sweet. insomnia. Obesity . high cholesterol. Feta I retention . diarrhea. quenches thirst.

and 15 Chinese black dates. Spontaneous sweating . licorice root and Chinese jujube dates.make a paste of charcoaled wheat meal and sesame oil and apply locally. moves stool Conditions: agitation. restlessness - Wheat Bran Nature/Taste: slightly warm and sweet Actions: calms the spirit. This could explain the high incidence of allergies to modern day wheat.add wheat bran to diet regularly.make tea from wheat and pearl barley. 2. Swelling. swelling. Insomnia. Drink one cup three times daily. . 4. resolves dampness. constipation Contraindications: not for use in colitis. Wheat absorbs ten times more nitrates (often in chemical fertilizers) than any other grain. Folk Remedies: make tea from one cup wheat.make tea from wheat. Drink three times daily until symptoms are relieved.make a tea of wheat bran. Restlessness and emotional instability . high cholesterol.Grains ~ 79 Contraindications: Always use organically grown wheat. 2. difficult urination . Constipation . can be irritating Folk Remedies: 1. Psyllium seed products will also provide excellent bulk laxative action. being sure to drink plenty of water too. 1. 3. crushed oyster shells and Chinese red dates. Burns (Initial stages) . menopause. 12 grams licorice.

80 ~ The Tao of Nutrition Wheat Germ warm and sweet Actions: relieves restlessness. Ideally. arrests diabetes Conditions: emotional agitation. Nature/Taste: Folk Remedies: 1. Diabetes - make bread from 60% wheat germ and 40% whole-wheat flour with an egg added in. consume up to 1Vz pounds of wheat germ per day. Rancid oil will cause a burning sensation in the throat. diabetes Con traindica tions: Always buy wheat germ fresh and store in the refrigerator. Due to the high oil content of wheat germ. it can become rancid if it not properly stored. .

strengthens and nourishes blood. Bedwetting . boil two hours. benefits Kidney Nature/Taste: Conditions: mumps. and % cup rice wine. This is a good winter tonic. promotes urination Conditions: lower back pain. 2. knee pain.slowly cook (for about 2 -3 hours) V2 cup black beans. frequent urination.after soaking red beans. Beriberi - Folk Remedies: cook black beans with carp. nourishes the Yin. counteracts toxins. edema 1. excessive thirst. ear problems. Black Bean Nature/Taste: Actions: warm and sweet tonifies Kidney. benefits diabetes.add kombu seaweed to the above winter tonic.mash sprouted red beans and apply. Red) neutral. either alone or mixed with dandelion. 81 . D i a betes . 3. Low back pain. Mumps . Spontaneous menopausal sweating - black bean juice. blurry vision. excretion of fluids. seminal emissions. infertility. V2 cup water. 5.include black beans in the diet regularly. reduces dampness. hunger. Kidney stones . 4. drink Folk Remedies: the liquid three times daily. make boiled 2. weak knees. brightens eyes. and other Kidney weakness symptoms . sweet and sour Actions: strengthens Spleen. difficult urination 1. diabetes.Beans and Peas (Legumes) Azuki Bean (Aduki. leukorrhea.

tonifies Chi. and squashes Kidney Bean Nature/Taste: neutral and sweet Actions: strengthens digestion. basil and chives 3. constipation. promotes elimination.82 ~ The Tao of Nutrition Garbanzo Bean (Chickpea) Nature/Taste: sweet. diuretic Conditions: swelling. clears dampness. slightly warm Actions: strengthens Spleen. calms spirit. Constipation . then cook with rice water (the soaking water) to make a tea. diarrhea. 2.eat hummus made from garbonzos as a snack between meals. cooked down to one cup. Lentil Nature/Taste: slightly warm and sweet Actions: harmonizes digestion. restlessness. You can use it as a dip for vegetable sticks like carrots. dysentery . vomiting. Chronic diarrhea . turnip.make hummus with garbonzos as well as herbs like parsley. clears summer heat Conditions: cholera. Swelling due to nephritis .regularly eat garbonzo bean soup cooked with beets. anxiety.roast kidney beans. descends rebellious Chi. diarrhea Folk Remedies: 1. Low energy . difficulty urinating. 2. Anxiety and restlessness .make a strong soup with % cup beans to five cups of water. promotes bowel movement Conditions: low energy. celery and jicama sticks instead of crackers or pita bread. lack of concentration Folk Remedies: 1. strengthens stomach.

quenches thirst. dysentery. Drink 3 cups daily. cool Actions: tonifies Chi. clears heat. anemia Folk Remedies: puree lima beans with roasted garlic and fresh basil and eat in between meals. promotes urination. Allergic reaction to sulfites . hives. dehydration. calms spirit Conditions: tiredness. counteracts toxins Conditions: edema. . sinus allergies. 2. restlessness. dysentery - grind lentils into meal and mix with rice porridge and eat.make broth from boiling equal portions of lima and mung beans. Females should avoid mung beans if trying to get pregnant. 2. food poisoning from spoiled food. rashes. diabetes. nourishes blood. high cho- lesterol. strengthens Lung. carbuncles Contraindications: not for cold conditions. constipation. insomnia. reduces swelling. Summer diarrhea. Lima Bean Nature/Taste: sweet. 3. detoxifies. and difficult urina- tion . summer heat conditions. Heatstroke with fever. heatstroke. anxiety. promotes bowel movement.eat cool lentil soup.Beans and Peas ~ 83 Folk Remedies: 1. conjunctivitis.eat soup for dinner made from lima beans with other calming foods like turkey and sage. resolves dampness. Insomnia . 1. Tiredness and anemia - Mung Bean Nature/Taste: very cool and sweet Actions: clears heat. aids edema in the lower limbs.

Eat a bowl daily. and rice.84 ~ The Tao of Nutrition Folk Remedies: 1.take five parts mung beans to one part black pepper. mung bean sprouts clear heat and toxins as well as generate fluids.make soup from mung beans. blood sugar imbalance.incorporate navy beans and other beans into diet to help balance the blood sugar level. and chopped parsley. 3. nourishes blood. black beans and kidney beans and seasoned with rosemary. 2. Usually one will notice results in 6 -12 hours.make a brain tonic bean soup by cooking equal portions of navy beans. thyme and tumeric. Summer heat conditions . ground chicken.take two tablespoons mung bean powder in warm water twice daily. activates blood. grind to a powder and take one tablespoon three times daily.cooked up a hearty white chili with navy beans. barley. Diabetes . . Hives and bad skin lesions . 2. Eat daily. memory decline. Breast abscess and boils . high cholesterol. warm Actions: tonifies Chi. The black pepper acts as an antibacterial agent. Sweet and cold. Navy Bean Nature/Taste: Sweet. removes stagnation. 3. 4. Dysentery . Memory decline .make mung bean juice in a blender and drink raw. calms spirit Conditions: anemia. improves memory. Anemia . fatigue Contraindication: gout Folk Remedies: 1.

eat hummus made from pinto beans. eases urination. Anxiety . provides an excellent protein source Nature/Taste: .roast peas until dry. Season with herbs and spices. 2. insomnia. detoxifies. strengthens Spleen and Stomach. Indigestion . sulfite allergies. High cholesterol .make broth from boiling pinto beans with cabbage for 1/2 hour. promotes urination. powder and take with warm water. Pinto Bean sweet. nourishes blood. warm Actions: tonifies Chi.blend peas into a juice and take with meals. anxiety Nature/Taste: Folk Remedies: 1. edema. 3 times a day until swelling improves. lubricates lungs and intestines. Edema and swelling . strain and drink 1 cup of broth. edema. lubricates intestines Conditions: indigestion.incorporate pinto beans and other beans into your regular diet that are high in fiber and contain rich folate that lowers cholesterol 2. calms spirit Conditions: fatigue. lima beans and garbonzos beans reguarly Soybean cool and sweet Actions: clears heat. constipation Nature/Taste: Folk Remedies: 1. clears heat. high cholesterol. anemia. 3. but avoid adding salt to the broth. Edema .Beans and Peas ~ 85 Pea neutral and sweet Actions: strengthens digestion. resolves dampness.

until the egg white has soaked into the tofu. lubricates dryness. sweeten to taste.combine tofu and the herb. Heat conditions - Tofu. stir-fry tofu with vinegar. take three hours prior to the onset of symptoms. cook and eat daily for one month.take frozen tofu that has been thawed. 4. intense appetite. Soymilk is easily made by blending soaked soybeans with a larger volume of water. Habitual constipation . anemia. Conditions: Folk Remedies: drink soymilk or eat tofu. leukorrhea. promotes body fluids. or lemon juice. Chronic dysentery 2. 1. malaria. Lung tuberculosis .86 ~ The Tao of Nutrition Lung and Stomach heat. detoxifies. they cannot be digested. mix with egg white. dry skin. 3. 2. 1. Diarrhea . stomach or mouth ulcers. nigari. and eat the tofu. take one teaspoon three times daily. Soybean Curd Nature/Taste: Actions: cool and sweet clears heat. irregular menstruation stir-fry tofu with vinegar. swollen gums. curdle the soymilk with calcium sulfate. lung tuberculosis. strain and press the solids into a block. strain off the milk and bring to a boil for about twenty minutes. Alismatis rhizome (water plantain tuber). diarrhea. Malaria - Folk Remedies: . To make tofu. constipation. strengthens Spleen and Stomach Conditions: chronic dysentery. Take daily for two months.charcoal soybeans and grind to a powder.boil tea from soybeans and drink four times daily. Anemia . boil. 3. general heat problems Contraindications: Do not eat soybeans raw.

lamb. press out the extra water. Irregular menstruation due to coldness . This would be more suitable for conditions of cold or dampness.steam tofu and brown sugar. Baked tofu is widely available in Asian and health food markets. then bake. Leukorrhea . marinate with ginger and garlic.stew together tofu. and ginger. To reduce the cool nature of tofu. 6.Beans and Peas ~ 87 5. .

infertility.make curry cashews by dry roasting cashews in a pan and sprinkle with curry powder for a couple of minutes on high flame. sweet and salty Actions: tonifies Kidney. dissolve two tablespoons in water. osteopenia. constipation. nourishes blood. low libido. fatigue.ground cashews into powder.make a libido and fertilityenhancing trail mix consisting of equal parts of dried cranberry. trans- forms phlegm. strengthens bones.Nuts and Seeds Almond Nature/Taste: neutral and sweet Actions: ventilates Lungs. honey into a cup of hot water and drink on empty stomach upon waking each morning. Mix 1 tsp. relieves cough and asthma. Infertility or low libido . walnut. Cough and asthma . cashew powder and 1 tbsp. Chestnut Nature/Taste: warm. promotes bowel movement Conditions: lower back pain. constipation Contraindications: dampness. asthma. 2. Cashews Nature/Taste: sweet. sesame seeds. frequent urination. warm Actions: tonifies Kidney. diarrhea Folk Remedies: 1. 3. Eat a handful a day. dizziness. Constipation . Lower back pain . add fructose. arrests cough 88 . longan fruit. moistens Yin.grind almonds to a fine meal. fortifies the Chi. lubricates intestines Conditions: lung conditions. cough Folk Remedies: 1. strengthens digestion. and cashews. boosts Chi. Remove promptly and do not burn the cashews.

nausea. back or leg pain. involuntary seminal emission. diarrhea . bronchitis . then consume the porridge. lack of appetite Folk Remedies: 1. frequent urination. back pain. chew thoroughly. Diarrhea . 2. sores .eat steamed chestnuts and drink chestnut leaf tea. Hazelnut Nature/Taste: neutral and sweet Actions: fortifies Chi. Splinters. nutritive tonic Conditions: Kidney weakness. burping. 5. Diarrhea .grind raw filberts into a meal. chronic bronchitis. Chronic cough. one in the morning and one at night. astringent. diarrhea Folk Remedies: 1. Lack of appetite . 4. take one teaspoon twice daily with tea made from citrus peel. 3. gastritis .eat two raw chestnuts daily. take one teaspoon twice daily with jujube date tea. hiccups. weak lower extremi- ties.mash raw chestnuts and apply to the affected area to draw out a splinter or pus. Filbert.grind chestnuts to flour and boil for 10-15 minutes. frequent urination. hiccups. Lotus Seed Nature/Taste: neutral and sweet Actions: strengthens Kidney.charcoal and powder the membrane (not the shell) of the chestnut and cook about 1Y2 -3 grams into rice porridge. cough. traumas. strengthens digestion Conditions: diarrhea. Kidney weakness. Nausea. reduce pain and stop bleeding. 2.Nuts and Seeds ~ 89 Conditions: weak Kidney Chi.roast filberts and grind into meal. frequent urination . asthma.

aids in lactation Conditions: edema. Hypertension . lower back pain. jujube dates. low libido. mash. diarrhea . involuntary seminal emission. Chronic nephritis . lubricates lungs. strength- ens Kidney. drink three times daily for at least twenty days. blood in urine. make tea and drink twice daily. Lack of milk . and honey. diarrhea . strengthens Spleen.take peanut shells and boil tea or grind into powder and take with warm water. Pecan Nature/Taste: sweet.combine peanuts. and pearl barley. 5. strengthens Lung.cook lotus seeds and cubes of sweet potato in a rice porridge.90 ~ The Tao of Nutrition Folk Remedies: 1.boil peanut tea. constipation Contraindications: dampness.combine peanuts and red dates. stops cough. drink in the evening. slightly warm Actions: tonifies Chi. Nutritive tonic . promotes bowel movement Conditions: fatigue. difficult lactation.a delicious winter tonic soup can be made by boiling together lotus seeds. 4. azuki (red) beans. Peanut Nature/Taste: neutral and sweet Actions: improves appetite. chronic cough. Insomnia . 3. promotes diuresis. Edema . lack of appetite Folk Remedies: 1. add a dash of honey before serving.steam peanuts. frequent urination. 6.drink peanut tea for seven consecutive days. insom- nia. Frequent urination. 2. 2. regulates blood. erectile dysfunction. and add to soupy nee. Take for one week. make tea and eat the solids. Chronic cough .

swelling. add honey and slowly cook over low flame until thick. raisin. Eat a small handful daily. diuretic Conditions: intestinal worms and parasites. Lower back pain . and pistachios. or any mucous conditions. lubricates intestines. take two teaspoons with warm water. 1. Or eat a large handful of pumpkin seeds 2-3 times a day. Intestinal worms - roast and powder pumpkin seeds.and fertility-enhancing trail mix consisting of equal parts of goji berry. relieves cough. Erectile dysfunction or low libido . Eat a small handful each day. 1. Chronic cough - Pine Nut Nature/Taste: warm and sweet Actions: lubricates lungs. Drink 2-3 cups daily. Mix 1 tbsp. diabetes. constipation Contraindications: not to be used with diarrhea.Nuts and Seeds ~ 91 Folk Remedies: ground pecan into powder. 3. 2. Folk Remedies: grind pine nuts and walnuts. involuntary seminal emission. each of pecan powder. pecan.make a libido. Dry cough - Pumpkin Seed Nature/Taste: cold and sweet Actions: anti-parasitic.eat pine nuts with rice porridge. prostate problems Folk Remedies: 1.soak pecan in sherry or port for one week or more. Constipation . 2. apricot seed/kernel powder and honey into 1 cup of hot water. then mix with honey and take twice daily. promotes production of body fluids Conditions: dry cough. .

premature graying. lubri- cates intestines. weakness. 3. restores hair color. blood in the urine. Sesame Seed. joint inflammation. Brown Nature/Taste: slightly warm and sweet Actions: nourishes Liver and Kidney. about 6 grams each. Weakness conditions.eat a large handful of pumpkin seeds twice daily. 2. cough Folk Remedies: 1. constipation . chronic arthritis. Prostate problems . benefits skin Conditions: backache. tonic for older people. take two teaspoons twice daily. Swelling after pregnancy. Dry cough and asthma . mix with honey to make a paste. blackens gray hair. blurry vision. weak knees Contraindications: Always grind seeds because the tough cell wall makes whole seeds indigestible.92 ~ The Tao of Nutrition 2.make a tea from roasted pumpkin seeds. promotes lactation Conditions: chronic constipation. lubricates intestines. Sesame Seed. Take one teaspoon three times daily. premature balding or graying. diabetes . Black Nature/Taste: neutral and sweet Actions: tonifies Liver and Kidney. dry cough. . grind to a meal and add ginger juice and honey.roast sesame seeds. Take one ball three times daily with rice wine. dizziness. ringing in the ears. harmonizes the blood. constipation. Chronic constipation - grind into a meal and mix with honey and form small chewable balls. nourishes Yin. Folk Remedies: 1.grind sesame seeds to a meal. overall body tonic.

reduces cholesterol Conditions: Kidney deficiency. lubricates intestines.grind equal parts black sesame seeds and apricot kernels. Sunflower Seed neutral and sweet Actions: subdues Liver. Premature balding or graying . impotency. frequent urination. Hypertension . dizziness. sexual dysfunctions. 3. cough. back and leg pain. resolves pus. 3. take one teaspoon with warm water three times daily. cook with rice milk. bloody dysentery. infertility. . intestinal worms Nature/Taste: Folk Remedies: 1. Take once daily for at least three months.cook the seeds with water of one hour. 2. Headache or dizziness . aids erratic or rebellious Chi. asthma . drink the liquid and eat the seeds. relieves dysentery. lowers blood pressure. constipation. strengthens back. Chronic cough. stones in the urinary tract. add honey. Bloody dysentery . astringes Lung. Walnut slightly warm and sweet Actions: tonifies Kidney. relieves asthma. liver-fire rising. Impotence and Kidney weakness - eat twenty wal- nuts a day for one month. moistens intestines Conditions: headache.Nuts and Seeds ~ 93 2. neurasthenia Nature/Taste: Folk Remedies: 1.grind the seeds and take with honey and warm water before bed.grind both black sesa- mes and black beans to a meal.take sunflower seed meal with celery JUlCe.

Winter Melon Seed Nature/Taste: cool and bland Actions: promotes diuresis. constipation . 4. 5. constipation. and dried mulberries.take 120 grams walnuts. Neurasthenia . roast with sesame oil. resolves mucus. Edema and leukorrhea - . Kidney stones . constipation. Coughing of blood. mash together to a paste. Back pain and cold type arthritis . Take two tablespoons daily with warm water. grind seeds into meal and take one teaspoon with warm water three times daily.94 ~ The Tao of Nutrition 2.cook soup with winter melon peel (purchased dry).make tea from the seeds.take equal portions of walnuts. clears heat.grind walnuts into meal and mix with honey. 2. 3. pearl barley and fresh lotus root. leukorrhea Folk Remedies: 1.take walnut meal with warm wine (preferably red wine). edema.make tea from winter melon seed. sesame seeds. roll into small pills and take three pills three times a day. and intestinal abscess . mung beans and pearl barley. Cough. detoxifies Conditions: coughing of blood. 3. stops cough. intestinal abscess. Coughing blood . Edema in the summer . 4. grind to a meal and add 120 grams brown sugar. winter melon seed. Take V4 of the mixture four times a day.

the more mercury accumulates. Chi. 1. weak back and knees.seafoodwatch. drink the liquid. Eating fish that comes from around the world helps avoid mercury exposure. Folk Remedies: take cooked ground beef and soak it in hot water for 10 minutes. deficient Stomach and Spleen Contraindications: not to be used with any type of skin lesions. Deficiencies of blood. which are sma'" have very little mercury. swordfish and shark have been found to have larger amounts of mercury.stew beef in water for two hours.org. Seek producers that treat animals humanely and do not use drugs. abdominal distention and fullness.Meat. The larger the fish. drink the juice. poultry and eggs should always be properly cooked and never eaten raw. Fish. dispels dampness. Fresh sardines. Edema or chronic diarrhea . Beef Nature/Taste: warm and sweet Actions: tonifies Chi and blood. Pregnant women should eat no more than 2-3 servings of fish per week. strengthens Spleen and Stom- ach. strengthens bones and tendons Conditions: edema. tuna. Spleen - 95 . For example. Poultry and Animal Products Meat. as eating fish from a variety of locations diminishes your risk of repeated exposure to the same toxins. fish. For complete lists of safe fish to eat. 2. visit: www. relieves edema. Try not to eat fish from the same region in the same week. or any kind of kidney inflammation. hepatitis.

In general. nourishes blood. cold-type arthritis. weakness after illness or blood loss Contraindications: Do not eat chickens that are force fed chemical pellets and injected with steroids and antibiotics. and 61h cups water. benefits Spleen and Stomach Conditions: postpartum weakness. Weakness or anemia . tonifies blood. Simmer together for one hour. and extreme thirst. early female puberty. lubricates dryness Conditions: dry cough. These chickens can cause a variety of health problems. chicken is not to be consumed by those with heat type cancers such as leukemia. to name a few. The darker meat birds such as the Chinese black chicken are the most tonifying. Also. or when there are heat symptoms such as red tongue. including sterility. do not eat fried or raw eggs.cook one chicken with 30 grams dang gui (Angelica sinensis). dysentery. fever. male impotence. Turkey is also warm but not as tonifying as chicken. aids Kidney deficiency. .96 ~ The Tao of Nutrition Chicken Nature/Taste: warm and sweet Actions: tonifies Chi. disharmony in the menstrual cycle. stabilizes hyperactive fetus. blood and Yin deficiency. hoarse voice. Chicken Egg Nature/Taste: cool and sweet Actions: nourishes Yin. hyperactive fetus Contraindications: Eating too many eggs is not healthy. Folk Remedies: 1. weakness in old people.

salty. 4. Fish. regulates blood.make salad with shredded duck breast meat. Weak lungs with dry cough - Fish Nature/Taste: Actions: warm * and sweet strengthens Spleen. cucumber. 3. swelling due to kidney weakness Contraindications: Folk Remedies: duck tends to be greasy and hard on people with weak digestion 1. aids diarrhea from Spleen weakness Conditions: low energy states. Yin and blood deficiency - steam the eggs and eat. Hyperactive fetus . Kidney weakness with edema . celery and sweet onions 2. itching or exuding damp type skin lesions Contraindications: Do not eat fish raw as it is often loaded with parasites. ginger or onion to neutralize potential toxins.cook eggs with rice vinegar. 2. .eat a hard boiled egg daily. fatigue. Duck sweet. Postpartum fatigue and weakness - cook duck with ginger. tonifies Chi. nourishes Yin. lily bulbs and Asian pears 3. Pain of dysentery . Poultry and Animal Products ~ 97 Folk Remedies: 1. neutral Actions: tonifies Chi.eat eggs with green onions. postpartum weakness. hemorrhoids. scallions and black beans make duck soup with apricot seed/kernel. Postpartum .Meat. nourishes Kidney and Lung. postpartum excessive bleeding. moistens dryness. Always cook fish with garlic. removes dampness. relieves edema Nature/Taste: Conditions: dry cough.

dry skin and hair. postpartum blood loss. Kidney deficiency and back pain . nourishes blood. condition hair with goat milk by rubbing a cup of goat milk into hair and body in the shower and let it remain for 10 minutes before washing off. Clams and crabs are cool. leukorrhea . strengthens Kidney and builds strong bones. anemia. Metabolic syndrome or blood sugar imbalance - substitute goat milk and goat yogurt for cow milk and ice cream. Many ocean fish are considered neutral. oysters are neutral. Goat's Milk Nature/Taste: sweet.once a week.make bone-building hummus with black beans and goat milk yogurt. diabetes. cold conditions. Eat as a snack in between meals regularly. moistens dryness. impotence. insomnia. metabolic syndrome. 2. warm Actions: tonifies Chi. strengthens and nour- ishes Chi and blood. salty. aids lactation Conditions: Kidney deficiency causing back pain. nervousness Contraindications: fevers Folk Remedies: 1. Lamb Nature/Taste: hot and sweet Actions: tonifies weakness. Osteopenia or osteoporosis . lack of milk.cook fish with chicken. * Ocean fish are energetically cooler than freshwater fish. Shellfish can cause rashes and other allergic reactions. Dry skin and hair . deficiency conditions. promotes appetite. 3. calms spirit Conditions: fatigue. dispels cold.98 ~ The Tao of Nutrition Folk Remedies: 1. weak bone health. and shrimp is warm.

anemia. Anemia. malaria. meats are traditionally prepared with such herbs as dang gui.drink a glass of warm milk. astragalus. It is not to be consumed in conditions of edema.cook lamb with ginger and dang gui (Angelica sinensis). As an occasional food used moderately. or in cases of diarrhea. Fish. Allergic reactions usually include diarrhea and bloating. blood deficiency . ginger. lubri- cates dryness Conditions: nutritional deficiency. Milk and Milk Products Nature/Taste: neutral and sweet Actions: strengthens weakness. malnutrition .Meat. malnutrition. constipation. or ginseng for problems of weakness and coldness. weakness. In general not to be used by adults or those who are healthy as dairy products can cause mucus and other disorders. In general. Allergy is common with this food since many adults lose the ability to digest milk sugar after infancy. Pork Nature/Taste: slightly cold and sweet Actions: moistens and nourishes organs. however. dairy products should not cause a problem. toothache and any type of heat conditions. they are not to be used daily. Weakness. weakness. dryness Contraindications: not to be used with damp or cold conditions. scallions. jujube date. common cold. Poultry and Animal Products ~ 99 Contraindications: Lamb is generally not consumed in sum- mer because of its hot nature. Folk Remedies: 1. tonifies Chi. Folk Remedies: 1. strengthens digestion . nourishes Chi and blood.

of clear alcohol like gin or vodka. infertility. eat the eggs cooked. stroke victims. or those with diarrhea. resolves dampness. salty. activates blood and removes stagnation Conditions: fatigue. Infertility or inadequate sperm - . Quail Egg Nature/Taste: sweet. Memory and focus issues .cook pork in a rice porridge. hypertension. improves vision. Drink before bedtime daily for 1 month. 2. warm Actions: tonifies Chi. dry cough. emacia- tion Contraindications: not to be taken by overweight people. cataract. restores Jing.) 2. Vision decline . age-related macular degeneration. Constipation. car- rots and lily bulbs. warms Yang. If alcohol is not preferred.scramble quail eggs with spinach and carrots for breakfast daily 3. those with deficient Spleen and Stomach. emaciation . Folk Remedies: 1. loss of concentration. dry cough - make soup with pork. blood clots. arthritic inflammation Contraindications: people with egg allergies Folk Remedies: 3 fresh quail eggs in a shot glass mixed with 1 oz. memory decline.100 ~ The Tao of Nutrition Conditions: internal dryness. constipation. Weakness.eat hardboiled quail eggs regularly 1. (Note: alcohol is necessary to prevent salmonella.

relieves food stagnation. Folk Remedies: 1. constipation. Rice malt syrup is neutral and sweet and has properties similar to barley malt/ except that rice malt is preferred for food stagnation caused by rice products. belching. beriberi.Miscellaneous Foods. add brown sugar and take with rice wine. Basil Nature/Taste: warm and pungent Actions: induces sweating. stops vomiting Conditions: hernia. strength- ens stomach. Stomach pain due to coldness 2. Barley Malt Syrup Nature/Taste: neutral and sweet Actions: promotes digestion. epigastric fullness and distention. abdominal pain.drink barley malt in warm water until condition resolves. harmonizes Stomach. regulates Chi flow. Herbs and Beverages Anise Nature/Taste: warm and pungent Actions: strengthens stomach. harmonizes Stomach. undesirable lactation Folk Remedies: 1. charcoal anise and grind to powder. antidote for seafood poisoning 101 . stops lactation Conditions: food retention caused by wheat products. cold stomach Contraindications: not to be used in any type of heat conditions. Hernia - make anise tea and add some wine. back pain and coldness. distention and gas. Food retention and stopping lactation .

and hemorrhoids . promotes blood flow. Diarrhea. Hypertension. seafood poisoning Folk Remedies: 1. abnormal uterine bleeding. and drink.make tea from black fungus and peach kernel. food poisoning . dispels internal cold. especially uterine.boil tea from black fungus and Chinese dates.boil tea from basil. Black Fungus (Wood Ears) Nature/Taste: neutral and sweet. lubricates dryness.add honey to some black fungus and dried persimmon. 2. slightly toxic when raw Actions: nourishes Stomach. antidote to food poisoning Conditions: stomachache due to cold. Black Pepper Nature/Taste: hot and pungent Actions: warms digestion. hypertension Contraindications: not to be used by pregnant women. bloody stools. diarrhea. calms spirit. and eat once a day. vomiting. Dysentery . 4. cook. seafood poisoning . Abnormal bleeding. 2. removes stagnation Conditions: blood stagnation such as tumor. vomiting. Tumors of the viscera and female organs . and green onions. ginger. anemia . Folk Remedies: 1. diarrhea. Common cold . bloody stools.boil basil tea. hemorrhoids.102 ~ The Tao of Nutrition Conditions: wind-cold. constipation.take 10 grams fresh black fungus with warm water twice daily. 3.

diarrhea. coldness not to be consumed in excess. can lead to mucus and dampness in the body.Miscellaneous Foods. Dry cough. vomiting. Turbinado Nature/Taste: Actions: warm and sweet strengthens digestion. Refrigerate overnight. ulcer pains . poor digestion. then consume the next day.mix a spoonful of brown Contraindications: Folk Remedies: sugar into warm water and drink to arrest pain. Herbs and Beverages ~ 103 Folk Remedies: 1. invigorates the flow of Chi. stops cough. .grate carrots and mix with brown sugar. abdominal distention and fullness 1. Apply sugar to the lesion and re-bandage every 3-5 days. ulcerations and burns. warms up the body Conditions: dry cough. The same contraindications for brown sugar apply to white sugar. Cardamom Seed warm and pungent Actions: warms digestion. 1. White sugar is sweet and coldi it lubricates the lungs and treats dry coughi it can be used externally to promote the healing of bed sores. Stomach pains. sore throat . Food poisoning - mix one teaspoon black pepper with rice porridge and grated ginger and drink as much as possible. Stomach and duodenal ulcers - Folk Remedies: drink cardamom and fresh ginger root tea on an empty stomach every mornmg. Brown Sugar. lubricates lungs. nausea. stomach ulcers. stops vomiting Nature/Taste: Conditions: dampness. resolves dampness. 2.

twice daily. pungent and sweet strengthens stomach. Nausea and diarrhea .104 ~ The Tao of Nutrition 2. 2. low back pain Contraindications: not to be used in pregnancy. . including lower abdominal pain and bloating prior to menstruation . Gas pain in stomach area .stir one teaspoon cardamom powder into one cup warm water and drink three times daily. Premenstrual syndrome. 3. abdominal pain due to cold stagnation.make tea from cinnamon and hawthorn berries. cloves and orange peel. use powdered carob pods. Postpartum abdominal pain - Folk Remedies: boil tea with cinnamon and brown sugar. 1. Carob Pod warm and sweet Actions: soothes and calms the spirit Nature/Taste: Conditions: used as an alternative to chocolate. lack of appetite due to cold stomach. stops pain Conditions: common cold. 3. and for caffeine addiction Eating carob to excess will cause agitation. Abdominal pain and distention . Contraindications: Folk Remedies: 1. warms any coldness in the body.take V2 teaspoon cinnamon powder with lukewarm water. Drink three times daily.make tea from car- damom. Chocolate substitute - Cinnamon Nature/Taste: Actions: hot.

abdominal discomfort. reverses rebellious Chi. Herbs and Beverages ~ 105 Cloves Nature/Taste: warm and pungent Actions: warms the middle of the body. Toothache . cinnamon. dis- pels cold. belch- ing. black pepper. . Hernia - boil tea from fennel seeds. stops pain. and orange peel. nausea. insomnia. Coffee is easier on the stomach if taken with milk or soymilk. Coffee Nature/Taste: warm. hiccupping. strengthens stomach. Avoid during pregnancy. cold- ness is the stomach.place clove above or below the affected tooth on the gum until pain is relieved. Always exercise moderation in its use. dispels internal cold. mental cloudiness. Externally apply warming liniment along with a heating pad. Avoid in high blood pressure. hernia. conditions that require stimulation Contraindications: This beverage is a very addictive sub- stance. vomiting. stops pain Conditions: stomachache due to cold. 2.Miscellaneous Foods. nausea. diuretic. Fennel Nature/Taste: warm and pungent Actions: unblocks and regulates Chi. belching . stimulates peristalsis Conditions: stomachache. constipation. leth- argy. hypersomnia. colic in babies Folk Remedies: 1. promotes elimination Conditions: mild swelling. sweet and bitter Actions: stimulating. warms Kidney. toothache Folk Remedies: 1. and stomach ulcers or acidity.drink one teaspoon clove powder in warm water. Vomiting. nervousness.

cold sores Contraindications: not to be used in diarrhea or conditions of dampness or phlegm. drink tea made from dried ginger and cloves. cough due to coldness (clear or white mucus). Baldness . drink ginger tea. Burns . . Diarrhea . hoarse voice. and hoarseness - mix honey with water and/or almonds. harmonizes.mix honey and ginger juice and take on an empty stomach every morning. constipation. vomiting - 2. diarrhea.rub fresh ginger on painful areas and drink tea (not for heat-type arthritis). dry cough. 4. Colds. ulcers. anti-toxin. constipation. 3. 3. expels pathogens Conditions: common cold. lubricates dryness. then it is warm and sweet Actions: nourishes Yin. Dried ginger is hot and pungent and should be used to dispel coldness. Honey Nature/Taste: neutral. Nausea . Arthritis . 5.106 ~ The Tao of Nutrition Ginger Root [Fresh] Nature/Taste: warm and pungent Actions: promotes sweating. vomiting.squeeze ginger juice into some water and sip slowly until nausea is reduced. cough.apply ginger plaster to the belly. 2. burns. Cough. unless heated. nausea. antidote to drugs. benefits Lung and Stomach. cold-type arthritis Folk Remedies: 1. tonifies weakness. antidote for seafood poisoning.apply locally. Ulcers .rub fresh ginger on the scalp. strengthens Spleen Conditions: diabetes (small amounts). Folk Remedies: 1. For stomach or abdominal pain.

Molasses Nature/Taste: Actions: warm and sweet tonifies Chi. take two teaspoons three times daily. mix with molasses and leave it overnight.boil cinnamon and licorice tea. Stomach or duodenal ulcers .take fifty black. laryngitis. cough 1. 3.dice carrots. Cough . Take 2-3 tablespoons three times daily. Sore. dehydration. dysentery. adding two teaspoons of molasses. The lighter honeys are better for upper body problems. promotes production of body fluids. strengthens Spleen. stops cough Conditions: stomach and abdominal pain. lubricates lungs. detoxifies. Chi deficiency.eat olives regularly. Cough and dry conditions . quenches thirst. 2.Miscellaneous Foods. sour and astringent Actions: clears heat. Folk Remedies: 2. sweet. Bedwetting . .take two teaspoons of Folk Remedies: molasses in lukewarm water to stop pain. dry throat and laryngitis . thirst 1. swallowing slowly. Olive neutral. Herbs and Beverages ~ 107 Avoid heating honey unless a warming nature is desiredi heating lowers the nourishing and beneficial effects. heat over a low flame. The darker honeys are more tonifying and tend to sink to the lower parts of the body. pit- ted olives with 3-4 cups of honey. benefits the throat Nature/Taste: Conditions: whooping cough. sore throat. clears lungs.

Burns . drink twice daily. hives.make ginger tea. malaria. invigorates blood circulation. inhibits growth of bacteria. Nausea and vomiting . intestinal worms. Acute arthritis . fungus infestation. hepatitis. acute arthritis. add rice vinegar and brown sugar. astringent. 6. nausea.soak peanuts in vinegar.soak apple-pear in vinegar. .mix equal parts rice vinegar and water and drink.boil two cups rice vinegar down to one cup. 4. Malaria . teaspoons baking soda. lung abscess.take rice vinegar with water on an empty stomach. S. Intestinal worms . lung tuberculosis. add green onions and boil another five minutes. Gum disease . eat twenty peanuts every morning. Hepatitis . 7. bronchitis Contraindications: not to be used at the onset of a cold as it will trap pathogens inside of the body. Hives . Lung tuberculosis . Fish bones in the throat . take one clove twice daily. and then eat a hard bread crust. hypertension. take two hours before the episodic attacks of chills and fever. 10. 11.slowly drink one cup vinegar. bones caught in the throat. prevents invasion from external pathogens.1OS ~ The Tao of Nutrition Rice Vinegar Nature/Taste: warm and sour Actions: detoxifies.soak garlic in rice vinegar for 2-7 days. vomiting. 5. 3.apply undiluted. Hypertension . Folk Remedies: 1. Soak gauze pad and apply to sore area twice daily until condition improves. eat daily. closes pores Conditions: preventative for common colds. 9.mix 2-3 tablespoons of rice vinegar with two 2. gum disease.rinse mouth often with undiluted vinegar. burns.

one cup vinegar. anemia. fortifies bones. clears heat toxins from Liver Conditions: low energy. Salt cold.gargle with warm salt water several times a day. tendons and teeth. night sweat. take two tea spoons three times daily. eat 1-2 cloves daily. brightens eyes.wash area with salt water or apply salt. hepatitis. Lung abscess 13. kidney weakness. Itchy. combine ten mashed garlic cloves. lower back pain.for immediate relief. banana and goat spirulina or chlorella yogurt. sore throat 1. and two teaspoons brown sugar.Miscellaneous Foods. nourishes Yin and blood. strengthens Kidney (in small amounts). indigestion Nature/Taste: Folk Remedies: 1. strengthens Kidney. roast salt and Folk Remedies: take with warm water which will cause vomiting to relieve condition. weak knees. Sore throat . Low energy and anemia - make a shake from 1 tbsp with raspberry. detoxifies. agitation. cool Actions: tonifies Chi. Drink daily . salty and slightly sweet Actions: harmonizes and promotes digestion. Kidney weakness from lack of sodium in the diet. used as a natural preservative Nature/Taste: Conditions: food poisoning. Food poisoning . Bronchitis - boil garlic in vinegar. Herbs and Beverages ~109 12. irritability. 3. liver toxicity. 2. inflamed skin . Spirulina/Chlorelia salty.

11 0 ~ The Tao of Nutrition

2. Liver toxicity - make vegetable juice from chard, kale,

spinach, beet and carrot greens, carrot, apple and 1 tbsp of spirulina or chlorella. Consume 1-2 glasses daily 3. Kidney and low back or knee weakness - eat a rich breakfast cereal by cooking together any of the following: black beans, kidney beans, adzuki beans, chestnuts, walnuts, sesame seeds, amaranth, guinoa, millet. Sprinkle 1 tbsp. spirulina or chlorella and 1 tbsp. flax seed meal to a bowl of this cereal daily.
Tea
Nature/Taste: cool, bitter and sweet Actions: clears the head, refreshes the mind, relieves thirst and

restlessness, resolves phlegm, diuretic, promotes digestion, detoxifies, reduces cholesterol Conditions: headaches, blurry vision, thirst, restlessness, foggy head, hypersomnia, food retention, dysentery, difficulty urinating, overweight Contraindications: Avoid or use minimally with insomnia. Due to tannin, better not to drink tea on an empty stomach.
Folk Remedies:
1. For the conditions listed above - prepare tea leaves

(preferably green tea) and drink as needed.
White Fungus (Silver Ears)
Nature/Taste: neutral and sweet Actions: clears Lung heat, strengthens Spleen and Stomach,

promotes body fluids, tonifies Chi, invigorates blood, lubricates intestines, relieves alcohol intoxication, nourishes Yin Conditions: cough, dry lungs, bloody sputum, irregular menstruation, arteriosclerosis, hypertension, alcohol intoxication, blood stagnation, constipation

Miscellaneous Foods, Herbs and Beverages ~ 111 Folk Remedies: 1. Lung problems, constipation, bloody sputum - soak

white fungus for twelve hours, add honey, and steam. Drink the liquid on an empty stomach. This is known as silver ears soup.
2. Arteriosclerosis, hypertension, eye hemorrhage -

drink silver ears soup before bedtime.
3. Weakness after long illness or loss of blood - slowly

stew white fungus, ten Chinese dates, and either pork or chicken.
Wine
Nature/Taste: warm, pungent and sweet Actions: promotes circulation, enhances the effect of circula-

tory herbs, temporarily stops pain
Conditions: arthritis, traumas, bruises, painful conditions Contraindications: wine can be a very addictive substance. In

case of allergy to alcohol, avoid it completely. Wine is not recommended for heat conditions. Avoid during pregnancy. Do not mix wine with fatty foods.
Folk Remedies: 1. Arthritis (cold-type) with numbness and stiffness, neuralgia - stir-fry dry black beans until the bean splits

and they slightly burn; soak in good quality rice wine overnight. Filter and drink a small amount twice daily. 2. Trauma and pain - drink warm sake (rice wine), or other good quality wine for temporary relief. 3. Menstrual pain - drink wine that was prepared with the herb Motherwort (Leonorus cardiaca) prior to the onset of menses; the menstrual period will probably be a little heavier than usual.

Section Three
Remedies for Common Conditions

dandelions. winter melon. aloe vera. Apply plain. 2. beet tops. apply externally. 3. leave on for twenty minutes then wash off. carrot tops. carrots. raspberries. and acne is commonly a condition of heat in the lungs. then apply to area. Drink lukewarm water with two teaspoons of honey every morning on an empty stomach. brown rice. cucumbers. cherries. watermelon. Boil raspberries to a concentrate and wash area with it. 8. 10. mung beans. Blend a cucumber. cover area with pearl barley powder overnight. alfalfa sprouts. Drink dandelion and beet top tea. pear. celery. leave on for twenty minutes then wash off. the Chinese approach to this condition is to cool the heat. If one does not evacuate the intestines regularly. Eat watermelon or drink watermelon juice. 6. mulberry leaf. It can occur at any point throughout the lifetime and is often related to a hormonal imbalance. the skin is controlled by the lungs. millet. grind to a powder and mix with rice vinegar into a paste. cleanse the lungs.Conditions Acne This condition is characterized by skin blemishes or pimples. This effectively lubricates the intestines. Thus. 4. persimmon. wash off with water. In Chinese terminology. Rub watermelon rind on the acne. toxins either accumulate in the liver or erupt on the skin. Roast buckwheat. or mix pearl 115 . Apply aloe vera. Recommendations: squash. lettuce. plenty of water Remedies: 1. potato. papaya. 5. cabbage. 9. 7. low fat organic yogurt. For oozing acne conditions. buckwheat. and externally promote the healing process.

ginkgo nut. apricot kernel. wild yam. bamboo shoots. neuropathy and wasting away. all stresses. washing with chemicals or soap (wash with cool water) *. carrots. Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) AIDS is a chronic retro-viral infection with the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) in a susceptible host. 11. Aggressive infections like pneumonia and candidiasis can prove to be life threatening when AIDS compromises the immune system. which produces severe defects in the cells. apply a dandelion poultice to the area. Chinese cucumber (Trichosanthes). pumpkin seed. The HIV virus is transmitted via sexual contact. dairy foods. lotus root. red meat. Avoid: fried foods. jujube date. egg yolk. water chestnut. then wash off with water. black bean. shiitake mushroom. yams and lotus seeds. then wash with cold water. shellfish. fatty or oily foods. sugar. white mushrooms If the face is dirty. dandelion greens. smoking. This leaves the patient vulnerable to many opportunistic infections and unusual cancers.116 ~ The Tao of Nutrition barley powder with aloe vera gel into a paste and leave on area overnight. alcohol. lotus seed. exposure to infected blood. bitter melon. mung bean. coffee. There is a reduction of part of the immune system called the HelperT cells. ice cream. yam. makeup. For infected acne. Prominent symptoms include diarrhea. hawthorn berry Remedies: 1. sweating. mung beans. chocolate. pumpkin. weight loss. white and black fungus. loquat. garlic. perinatal exposure or infected breast milk. 12. . and beet tops. ling zhi (ganoderma) mushroom. spicy foods. green tea. Recommendations: pearl barley. Make brown rice porridge with pearl barley. squash. daikon radish. Drink tea made from carrot tops. constipation. steam it with hot water to induce sweating. brussel sprouts. soft drinks.

onions. pumpkin seeds. nori seaweed. lotus root. sneezing. cold and raw foods. Liquify fresh ginger root and aloe vera leaf (use only the soft center. Avoid: dairy. alcohol. carrots. coffee. smog. peeling away the hard outer part). leafy greens. Drink ginger tea to induce sweating. or certain food substances. cardamom and a pinch of salt. Boil for ten minutes in the soaking water. fatty or fried foods. Use generously as seasoning over vegetables and grains. garlic. 5. tearing. Soak dried shiitake mushrooms and/or white fungus. Make tea from Chinese cucumber and jujube dates by simmering for thirty minutes. Grind together apricot kernels. Consult a Chinese herbalist/acupuncturist for a Chinese herb formula. chlorine. 3. bell peppers. coughing. . shellfish Allergies An allergy is an acquired hypersensitivity to a substance that does not normally cause a body reaction. The allergenic substance may be pollen. dandelion greens and fresh ginger. and ling zhi mushrooms overnight.Conditions ~ 117 2. Recommendations: ginger. This condition is characterized by nasal congestion. highly spiced foods. certain chemicals in the air. eggplant. which sometimes elicit a violent body response. tomato. beets. beet top tea. yams. Make juice with fresh water chestnuts. 4. 7. Drink three cups per day. Drink one cup daily. organic chicken gizzards. dust. itching. Drink on empty stomach daily. skin rash and eruptions. 6. Then liquify in blender along with organic carrot tops. dizziness and nausea. black fungus. wheezing. sugar. ling zhi mushrooms Remedies: 1. cab- bage. sesame seeds. bamboo shoots.

yam. corn. potatoes. such as persimmons. Drink beet top tea as a water source. barley. potatoes. 5. dry fry bell pepper and black pepper. usually by vomiting. chocolate. fatigue. shellfish. For anorexia. cloves. Closely related to anorexia is bulimia. redness. eggs. dairy products. Chinese medicine differentiates the following four . potatoes Remedies: 1. give foods that bring rebellious Chi down. There is usually an extreme loss of weight. and constipation Anorexia and Bulimia Anorexia is medically defined as a lack of appetite for food or a hysterical avoidance of food. barley or vegetables. 2. yam. cinnamon or ginger. corn. 3. a condition in which one binges then purges. For anorexia. Arthritis Arthritis is an inflammation of the joints characterized by pain. pumpkin. and hypoglycemic patterns. and mineral herbs such as oyster shell or mother of pearl shell tea. garlic. green onions. For anorexia. cinnamon. polluted meats. cessation of menstruation. polluted air. Recommendations: bell pepper. prepare soupy rice. beans. garlic. to warm the stomach and stimulate digestive juices. For bulimia. prune or plum tea. citrus fruits. Emotional factors playa large part in both of these conditions. prepare soup from pumpkin. stiffness and hot sensation in the joints. swelling. depression.118 ~ The Tao of Nutrition 2. prepare tea from green onions. 4. mustard greens. rice. This condition is particularly prevalent among young women obsessed with being thin. potatoes. persimmons. beans. For anorexia. ginger. cilantro. Avoid: wheat.

The pain is relieved by heat such as a warming liniment. cold weather elements 2. Rub rice wine on the painful areas and drink one small glassful in the evening. Usually. . Make tea from parsnip. ginger. choose foods that aid each condition and are not contraindicated for either type. damp and hot. Or moxa could be burned on a slice of ginger over the painful areas. Herbal therapy can be of great benefit in clearing joints. black pepper. a small amount of rice wine if the individual does not have hypertension. although progress is sometimes slow. Often we observe two or three types of arthritis occurring simultaneously. parsnips.Conditions ~ 119 types of arthritis: cold. green onions. lamb. such as cold and damp types together. and 10-20 minutes of fresh air and sunshine daily Remedies: 1. grapes. Acupuncture is one of the most effective treatments for arthritis. and reducing pain. sunshine. cinnamon. Wind Type Arthritis This type of arthritis is characterized by pain that shifts locations. stabbing pain in a fixed location and coldness in the joints. Recommendations: garlic. and dried ginger. 4. 1. sesame seeds. Cold Type Arthritis This type is characterized by sharp. and sometimes causes dizziness. Avoid: cold foods. Drink grape vine tea added to red wine. 5. black beans. mustard greens. wind. 3. spicy foods. chicken. or a heating pad. 2. Rub garlic or ginger on the painful areas. pepper. Drink scallion tea and rub on the painful areas. comes and goes suddenly (much like the wind does). In such cases. raw foods. cold type individuals have a pale complexion. improving circulation.

hot joints. Cook together barley. green onions. scallions. cabbage. grape vine and mulberry vine tea. painful. Damp Type Arthritis This type is characterized by heavy feeling extremities. Recommendations: barley. smoking. Avoid: spicy foods. mung beans. shellfish. mung beans and red beans. 2. most grains. Avoid: cold foods. Most obese people tend to be damp.120 ~ The Tao of Nutrition Recommendations: nonpoisonous snake meat. alcohol. sugar. mung beans. and all types of stress Asthma Asthma is characterized by wheezing or difficulty breathing due to the bronchials (branches) of the lungs becoming clogged . and dairy products 4. changing every two hours. winter melon. swollen. cornsilk tea. grapes (not wine). black beans. and plenty of leafy vegetables lants Avoid: meats. and all stimu- 3. stiffness. smoking. Heat Type Arthritis This is characterized by red. general disability and usually an acute onset. Apply poultices of crushed dandelion greens. dan- delion. swelling. Recommendations: plenty of fresh fruits and vegetables. red beans. millet. sweet rice wine with meals. soybean sprouts Remedies: 1. dull aching pain that lingers and sluggishness. diuretic foods and herbs Remedies: 1. alcohol. mustard greens. raw foods. Drink cornsilk tea freely.

In this case there will also be edema and bruising as well. 3. and the cold type characterized by white. sunflower seeds. basil. In the case of a weak heart. 2. fill with molasses. Remedies: 1. loofa squash. the heart is not strong enough to push the blood through the lungs to be oxygenated. mustard greens. honey. Cut the top out of a small winter melon. yellow. and steam. molasses. sticky mucus. tangerines. clear. sesame seeds. and pale face. air pollution. litchi (lychee) fruit. pumpkins. Only those from a healthy mother source are desirable. daikon. Since it is very strong tasting. and red face. loquats. During times of remission from asthma attacks. or constriction due to spasms. one would seek to nourish the lungs and kidneys. two after meals. or foamy mucus. mental or physical fatigue. figs. . Asthma may be triggered by an allergy to food. emotional disturbance. winter melon. Consume daily for seven days. three times daily. it is best taken in gelatin capsules. cold air. previous lung damage. heart weakness. mashing them until the oil comes out. separate the egg yolk oil. walnuts. This is made as follows: take 20 hard-boiled egg yolks. or hormonal imbalance. coarse breathing. Egg yolk oil.Conditions ~ 121 with waste products. Chinese medicine divides asthma into two types: the hot type characterized by rapid. carrots. placenta * and umbilical cord * * These substances are not easily obtainable in the United States. Close the top with cheesecloth. Mix V2 cup fig juice with Vz cup lukewarm water and drink daily. fever. almonds. or swelling of the bronchials. The remedies listed would be useful for either type. Recommendations: apricot kernels. Continue this remedy for 15-30 days. When the yolk has blackened. slowly heat in a dry pan. cold extremities. and the blood flows back into the lungs. remove the seeds.

pierce with a chopstick and roast until the peel blackens. When the body is irritated over a long period of time. pearl barley. or body fluids. Drink apricot kernel tea. or by strong emotions. mulberries. these methods also harm healthy cells. mucus or body fluids. Recommendations: seaweed. papayas. mung beans. However. Bake squid bone until crisp. bananas. asparagus. taro roots. watermelon. dandelion greens. salads. Take an unpeeled orange. blood. cold weather. litchi (lychee) fruits. 6. Drink fresh fig juice three times daily. burdock. grind to a powder and take 1 teaspoon with honey daily for seven days. and especially ice cream Cancer According to Chinese Medicine. mucus. 7. 5. grains. dairy products. garlic. white fungus.122 ~ The Tao of Nutrition 4. figs. Strong emotions lead to Chi stagnation which in turn can lead to stagnation of blood. mung beans. sea cucumbers. at certain point the cell growth becomes abnormal and uncontrollable and cancer cells result. beet tops. The Western approach to cancer is to kill the cancer cells with harsh chemicals. licorice. walnuts. it reacts to the irritant by producing cells to protect itself. salty foods. plenty of fresh fruits and vegetables . The stagnation can be caused by an external irritant such as cigarette smoke or chemical-laden foods. pumpkins. fruits. Because cancer is considered to be a toxin in the body. radiation. cold foods. Remove the peel and eat the fruit. The Chinese approach to cancer is to support the body so that it can combat the cancer cells by itself. However. Avoid: mucus producing foods. all shellfish. a detoxifying diet is also utilized. or surgery. carrots. cancer is an abnormal growth of tissue that results from stagnation of Chi. shiitake mushrooms. one orange daily for seven days.

you may also add beet tops or carrot tops. 3. pearl barley. chicken. peach kernel and green orange peels. For breast tumor. long-term use of antibiotics which severely weakens the immune system. For breast cancer. For externally visible tumors. 10. Make tea from seaweed (any variety). Make blender juice from a mixture of fresh vegetables and drink warm. This makes a delicious dessert that will aid appetite and sustain energy level. 4. Drink this as the regular beverage every day. burdock. 6. stress. Blend shiitake or ling zhi mushrooms and white fungus. azuki beans. moldy foods. make a poultice from seaweed. Boil together mung beans. anise. 9. and figs. 5. and chrysanthemum flowers.Conditions ~ 123 Remedies: 1. and apply locally. 11. Eat garlic and seaweed. charcoal the pumpkin cap into powder. make tea from asparagus and dandelion and apply poultice to breast. 2. take one teaspoon of powder in one small glass of rice wine twice daily. and all irritations Candida Yeast Infection This condition is becoming fairly common in modern society. 8. constipation. primarily due to the widespread. Make tea from dandelion. only when disharmony . coffee. Always wash commercially grown fruits and vegetables in salt water to neutralize chemicals. a little fish can be eaten). chemical additives. spicy foods (except garlic). slightly stir-fried in water. boil and drink the soup three times daily. cooked oils. Everyone has candida yeast living in our bodies. dairy products. cinnamon. Drink carrot and celery juice. high-fat foods. ginger and dandelion. Avoid: meat (if patient cannot tolerate a vegetarian diet. 7. pepper. smoking.

cloves. headaches. In the case of AIDS. Exercise the eyes regularly and get plenty of oxygen into the bloodstream. rice vinegar. Recommendation: dandelions. yams. . fatigue. vagina. 5. Do this three times daily. and yeast containing foods. 4. excessive sex. spinach.124 ~ The Tao of Nutrition and weakness occur do systemic yeast infections develop. Cook spinach with no spices and eat daily. Steam the eyes over boiling spinach. Grind cloves into a very fine powder and add a little milk to make an ointment. goji berries. citrus fruits Avoid: sugar. mung beans. fermented foods. excessive fruits. soy sauce. pro- cessed foods. chronic infections (primarily in the skin. barley. Apply to eyes 3-5 times daily. vertigo. and lower back pain. or stress. bloating. The symptoms include chronic fatigue. The lens of the eye becomes cloudy and visual acuity is decreased. beet tops. When the immune system is weakened because of overwork. Remedies: 1. candida infection can become life threatening. alcohol. carrot tops. and poor digestion. diarrhea or constipation. 3. Recommendations: chrysanthemum. garlic. the candida flares up and the body can no longer control it. Make fresh water chestnut juice and use as an eye drop. cilantro. and throat). It may be accompanied by dizziness. water chestnuts. bladder. black beans. 2. caffeine and constipation Cataracts This condition usually affects older people. Western medicine treats cataracts by surgically removing the lens. smoking. cheese. Stuff nose with fresh cilantro and inhale the aroma. bowels.

loquats.Conditions ~ 125 6. 6. constipation Chronic Bladder Infection This is a common condition in women. onions. garlic. celery. 2. cantaloupe. and chrysanthemum. 5. ginger. Make tea from clam shells. Mash together black beans. Women are prone to chronic bladder infections because of the short length of their urethras. Avoid: heavy proteins. and walnuts. sesame seeds. plenty of water. lotus roots. If this condition occurs in a man it is a warning sign of something more serious such as venereal disease or cancer. carrots. orange peels. Drink blended mung bean juice. alcohol . Remedies: 1. Drink fresh strawberry or unsweetend cranberry juice. goji berries. salt. Recommendations: watermelon. Drink three times daily for at least two weeks. Drink cornsilk tea freely. meat. fever and low backache. 4. Drink carrot and celery juice three times daily. red beans. squash. 3. mung beans. cooling and diuretic foods in general. pears. Eat steamed lotus root and water chestnuts twice daily. Drink tea made from wheat and pearl barley. cornsilk. scallions. wheat. millet. water chestnuts. S. dairy products. barley. cranberry. Then add a little honey and eat one tablespoon of the mixture twice daily for one month. blueberry. black pepper. the feeling that urine remains in the bladder after urinating. characterized by painful or burning urination. 7. Avoid: any type of spices (very important). eye- strain. grapes. In Chinese terminology it is a condition of damp heat. strawberries. 7. Eat squash soup for at least seven days. Drink watermelon and pear juice three times daily. yams. corn.

Peel a papaya. pumpkins. mulberry leaves. lily bulbs. . eat before bed every day for one month. Blend together jellyfish and water chestnut to make soup. honey. Mash together ginger. 4. pears. Take white fungus and rock sugar. 7. Add some honey and drink 2-3 times daily. Eat 2-3 tablespoons twice daily for at least two weeks. walnuts. drink before meals for immediate relief. add some honey. winter melon seeds. chrysanthemum. Recommendations: carrots. lotus root. Remove cores of 2-3 pears and fill with honey. 3. seaweed. water chestnuts. pine nuts. taro. Eat three times daily for one month. jellyfish. 10. It often occurs during winter and spring. persimmons. reduced to one cup. betel nut. Eat 2-3 times daily for relief within one week. Chinese red or black dates. and walnuts. basil seeds. sweet potatoes. mucus. steam and eat 2-3 times daily for one month. add honey and make into small pills. Cook carrots and apricot kernels in rice porridge. daikon radish. apricot kernels.126 ~ The Tao of Nutrition Chronic Bronchitis This is a common condition in older people. and steam. loquat leaves. white pepper. 9. white fungus. Grind seaweed into powder. steam and eat. Take one teaspoon of pills 2-3 times daily after meals. Remedies: 1. add rock sugar. often due to a lowered immune system. shortness of breath. yams. 8. ginko nuts. Always try to keep warm. Boil three dried persimmons in two cups of water. 6. and a feeling of fullness in the chest. peach kernels. Add maltose to daikon radish and steam. 2. Main symptoms include cough. pine nuts. Make juice from pineapple and lemon. apricot kernels. papaya. ginger. 5.

Avoid: overworking. and dried orange peels. headaches. Drink two cups daily.Conditions ~ 127 11. pineapple. Drink raw eggplant juice (especially good for blood in the mucus). spinach. and general depression. Use seed from such vegetables as daikon. . ginger. 12. Boil tea from betel nuts. black beans. sweet potatoes. Make a tea from carrots. soybeans. Warm one tablespoon each of honey and sesame oil. 17. resting more. drink as your water for one month. in a pan and take for immediate relief. getting chilled. Conditions like herpes. sore throat. candida and hypoglycemia compound the situation. and often become overwhelmed by life's simple demands. Recommendations: winter melon. Most chronic fatigue patients are observed to have undergone prolonged stress. chestnuts. watermelon. Take one tablespoon molasses and 1/2 tablespoon raw ginger juice with warm water 2-3 times daily. Mash cooked taro root and add honey. 15. white pepper. alcohol. The patient is advised to seek lifestyle corrections such as reducing stress. strawberries. azuki beans. adding honey. repeated infections. cold drinks Chronic Fatigue Syndrome This syndrome consists of a set of variable symptoms including chronic or recurrent fatigue. 16. basil. caffeine. Cut banana into small pieces and cook with rock sugar until sugar melts. and make tea. Often the patient has flu-like symptoms that extend for a long period of time. 14. 19. Use fresh. lima beans. spicy foods. pumpkin seeds. 18. stimulating foods. take regularly. 13. muscle pains. Eat 1-2 pieces of banana every evening for one week. yams. pumpkins. smoking. tender lymph nodes. yellow chrysanthemum flowers and boil into a thick juice. and gentle exercise.

lotus root. lotus seed. shellfish Chronic Sinus Infection This condition is due to an acute inflammation of the nasal passages over a long period of time. Make soup from cabbage. 4. 3. and green onion. sometimes dryness of the nostrils. 2. eggplant. white fungus. garlic. scallions. mulberry leaves. sugar.128 ~ The Tao of Nutrition papaya. Remedies: 1. tomato. chrysanthemum flowers. Make soup from lotus seed. Eat frequent. egg white. pears. parsley and diced yams. bell pepper. garlic. Get plenty of fresh air. and ringing in the ears. coffee. pearl barley. Make buckwheat and rice porridge with chestnuts and longan fruit (Euphoria longan). onions. Drink three times daily for at least one week. and carrots. scallions. figs. Chop garlic finely and stir-fry with egg white. ginger. Drink soup or cook rice porridge with the broth. difficulty breathing through the nose. 5. 2. magnolia flower. daikon radish. 7. There is often drainage or congestion. Juice and drink daily: fresh water chestnut. 6. black mushrooms. Recommendations: ginger. Avoid: dairy products. green onions. carrots. Make chicken soup with garlic. Combine magnolia flowers and eggs. pear. watermelon. onions. ginger. fatty or fried foods. jujube dates Remedies: 1. . alcohol. apricot kernels. small meals and drink more liquids. mung beans. ginger and daikon radish. cold and raw foods. organic chicken. headaches. bananas. basil. cook and eat. buckwheat. overly spicy foods. Make tea from magnolia flower. azuki beans. winter melon and pumpkin. cabbage. white fungus and figs.

coffee. inhale the steam through the nose. then slowly use a dropper to put drops in the nose. superficial stage. mustard greens and seeds. When the pathogens are at this initial. smok- ing. garlic. stress. parsnip. headache. three times daily for at least two months. 7. these pathogens enter the skin. soak cotton balls and alternately put in nostrils after having washed them with salt water. Cook black mushrooms into a concentrated soup. With a weak immune function. body ache. grapefruit peel. 5. The symptoms could include chills. A hot bath or dry sauna could be beneficial to begin the sweating process. no sweating. polluted air and smog Common Cold There are two basic types or stages of colds. cinnamon. soupy rice porridge. and eating as little as possible so as not to burden the body with a lot of digestion . fever. Boil tea of mint. While boiling the tea. Wind cold type This type often occurs during a change in the weather or when one is exposed to wind and cold. stiff neck. basil. Make tea from mulberry leaves and chrysanthemums. picking the nose. Avoid: extremes of exposure to weather elements. Recommendations: ginger. and ginger. 1. This is often the first stage of a cold.Conditions ~ 129 3. we seek to sweat them out. cilantro. 6. 4. soak cotton balls with mixture and alternately put in nostrils after having washed them with salt water. basil. scallions. Mix garlic juice and olive oil. They have different symptoms and different treatments. In Chinese terminology they are the wind cold type and the wind heat type. Mash green onions. then cook rice porridge in the tea. and clear copious nasal discharge. adding apricot kernels.

chrysanthemum flowers. Drink mint. Drink cilantro and mint tea. 2. or cinnamon. cabbage. We should evacuate at least once daily. chrysanthemum and dandelion tea. and hot foods Remedies: 1. meats and all vinegars. Drink the tea. Make tea from mustard greens. and yellow nasal discharge or sputum. Wind heat type This type of common cold is characterized by high fever. 5. go to bed and prepare to sweat. vinegar. cilantro. 4. dandelion. cough. drafts. mustard.-7:00 a. ci. bitter melon. Lightly boil for five minutes the following: garlic. Make tea from parsnip and ginger. 6.130 ~ The Tao of Nutrition Remedies: 1. Make tea from dried grapefruit peel. 5. abdominal hardness. and bad breath. green onion. drink plenty of fluids and get plenty of rest Drink cabbage broth freely. ginger. basil. II 2. pears. Vinegar closes the pores and "traps the thief in the house.m. body ache. Avoid: Constipation Constipation is a lack of regular evacuation of the bowels or difficulty in defecation. Drink mint. apples. abdominal pain. some chills. 2. shellfish. The longer the . Drink scallion and basil tea. sore throat. Recommendations: mint. 3. Drink burdock tea.1antro and green onion. Avoid: shellfish. 4. meats.m. heavy proteins and fats. headache. 3. dandelion and licorice tea. Drink cilantro and ginger tea. sweating. burdock root. The resulting symptoms may include bloating. with the optimal times energetically being from 5:00 a.

followed by a glass of water. Avoid: stress. honey. apples. the drier it gets and the more difficult to pass. Drink mulberry juice. 9. beets. milk. It is best to set a certain time for evacuation and train the body to respond accordingly. Drink blended beets and cabbage on an empty stomach. spicy foods. bok choy. fried foods and meat . Food takes about 6-8 hours to go from the mouth to the intestines. grapefruit. Eat 5-10 figs on an empty stomach. alfalfa sprouts.Conditions ~ 131 waste remains in the intestines. potato. walnuts. cauliflower. Breathing with the mouth open is also beneficial in stimulating a bowel movement Recommendations: bananas. pine nuts. 3. Chinese cabbage. salt water Remedies: 1. followed by a glass of water. Make beet soup. Eat lightly steamed asparagus and cabbage at night before retiring. Eat a fresh apple on an empty stomach. figs. Drink a glass of lukewarm water with 2 teaspoons of honey on an empty stomach. 4. azuki beans. Strained evacuation leads to hemorrhoids. pears. peaches. Eat two bananas on an empty stomach. 7. on an empty stomach. apricot kernel. yams. yogurt. Regular enemas or colonics are not a healthy solution to the problem. mulberries. cabbage. 8. sesame seeds. tension. spinach. Drink a glass of lukewarm water with 2 teaspoons of salt. 5. 2. This remedy should be used as a last resort when nothing else has worked and should not be used by those with edema or hypertension. 6. Rubbing the belly in a clockwise direction 100 times can stimulate peristalsis.

jellyfish. Cook tea from white or button mushrooms and Chinese black dates. celery. other sprouts. sunflower seeds. obesity. black fungus. and smoking. Typical symptoms with coronary heart disease are dizziness. wheat. 5. green tea Remedies: 1. mung beans. Cook into a porridge and consume every morning. hypertension. bananas. garlic. Drink twice daily for one month. mung sprouts. watermelon. peanuts. brown rice. chest fullness. black sesame seeds. cassia seeds. diabetes. thereby causing heart attack. 6. soy sprouts. lotus roots. 3. then steam one hour. pain in the chest area. Take three grams American ginseng and cook with one cup brown rice and some rock sugar. eat before bedtime. sea cucumber. lotus seeds. 4. chrysanthemums. vertigo. spontaneous sweating. pearl barley. ginger. Recent research has attributed the cause of coronary heart disease to faulty diet. mental fatigue. Steam together the following: sea cucumber. Make tea from seaweed. seaweed. irregular heart beat. Soak 10-15 peanuts in rice vinegar for 24 hours and consume both the peanuts and the rice vinegar in the morning.132 ~ The Tao of Nutrition Coronary Heart Disease This is a condition in which the arteries that supply the heart become hardened and clogged. water chestnuts. peach kernels. Recommendations: American ginseng. cassia seeds. Chinese black dates. Soak black fungus and black mushrooms overnight. . Drink the tea and eat the seaweed and lotus root twice daily for at least one month. palpitations. 2. hawthorn berries. continuous stress and tension. wheat bran. low thyroid function. buckwheat. hardness in the lips and tongue. vinegar. persimmons. and lotus root. eventually leading to deprivation of oxygen and nourishment to the heart. Chinese black dates. shiitake mushrooms. shortness of breath. Eat every morning on an empty stomach. and angina pain when there is an obstruction.

alcohol. Take black fungus. 16. 9. simple carbohydrates (sugar. salt. Recommendations: pumpkin. Drink one cup three times daily for at least twenty days. 14. Proper exercise is of utmost importance in stimulating normal glandular functions. Drink two cups daily for at least one month. pearl barley. water chestnut. Avoid: fatty foods.taoofwellness. and rice vinegar. tension. peas. Symptoms include excessive thirst. white flour). lack of sleep Diabetes Diabetes is characterized by a high level of sugar in the blood and urine. chi gong or the Taoist Eight Treasures are particularly valuable (visit www. Drink at least two cups green tea every day. safflowers. Combine jellyfish. 15. mung beans. and make tea. worrying.com for DVDs and books). 13. smoking. 17. spicy foods. Grind betel nut and hawthorn berries. Cook celery and yellow squash soup and eat once a day for at least twenty days. The Chinese refer to this condition as exhaustion syndrome. stress. Make tea from chrysanthemum flowers. add rice flour. exercises such as tai chi chuan. pears. and urination. 10. yams. stimulating foods. stir together and steam. 8. Take one tablespoon honey three times daily.Conditions ~ 133 7. spinach. Sprinkle on vegetables or porridge. celery. cook together into a soup. 12. hawthorn berries. wheat. winter melon. hunger. coffee. Go on a watermelon fast for three consecutive days. Slightly roast wheat and oat bran with black sesame and sunflower seeds. soy- . sweet rice. and cassia seeds. hawthorn berries. emotional stimulation. Steam soy and alfalfa sprouts together and add some rice vinegar. 11. Take peach kernels. Eat often. and dried orange peel and boil into a soup.

squash. . carrot. Dysentery. organic pig or chicken pancreas Remedies: 1. blueberries. 6. Cook rice porridge with lotus seed and yam or with barley. ginger. add sesame oil and slices of raw squash. cabbage. Drink daikon. and spinach juice. charcoaled bread. yam. Prepare soup from cabbage. biological imbalance. litchi. 9. and in general is a chronic condition. cinna- mon. caf- feine. bacterial infections. Drink chrysanthemum tea whenever thirsty. spicy foods and most raw fruits Diarrhea This is characterized by the frequent passage of abnormally watery stools. peas. Recommendations: garlic. sugar. guava peel. is caused by an infectious condition. 7. This differs from dysentery in that diarrhea is generally due to digestive weakness. usually caused by increased peristalsis. molasses. Make pumpkin and yam pie with no sweeteners. black pepper. Eat a slice of pumpkin with each meal.134 ~ The Tao of Nutrition beans. parasites. and barley. peas. drugs. 4. burned rice. 2. Make soup from mung beans. lotus seeds. yams. fresh fig leaves. cool to room temperature. winter melon. irritation of the intestines through improper diet. Avoid: sweets. or worms. mulberries. 3. alcohol. apples. raspberry leaves. tofu. Steam millet with yam and a few dates. smoking. sweet potatoes. buckwheat. 5. pearl barley. Eat non-sweetened sweet rice cake or mochi between meals. Steam tofu. unripe prunes Remedies: 1. on the other hand. basil. and lentils. honey. 8. daikon radish. celery.

Make tea from ginger. squash. Take two bulbs of garlic. watery diarrhea with foul smelling. cherries. scallions. 10. 7. basil. garlic. Eat burnt rice or bread. bake until black. overeating Dysentery Dysentery is a condition of intestinal inflammation characterized by abdominal pain. intense. and Chinese black dates. 6. sweet potatoes. 8. Make tea from guava peel. lotus roots. corn. Sometimes the person also has vomiting. taro root. dry mouth. winter melon. Dysentery is considered to be contagious and is usually transmitted through unsanitary food or water. pineapples. pumpkins. hawthorn berries. most fruits. bloody or mucous feces. Make tea from dried litchi and Chinese black date. peas. tea. bitter melon. Then boil in water and drink the tea. thirst. 11. mung beans. Cook rice porridge with ginger and black pepper. 5. Drink black tea. brown rice. To prevent dehydration. fennel. figs.Conditions ~ 135 2. The person will sometimes defecate 30 or 40 times daily. guavas. three times daily on an empty stomach with warm water. urgent. Eat sweet rice porridge. oats. and decreased urination. Take two tablespoons dried apples. raw foods. cel- ery. carrots. juices. 4. green pepper. 3. plenty of fluids should be consumed. watermelon. Make tea from unripe prunes. soy products. olives. honey. Avoid: cold. cantaloupe. water chestnuts. Recommendations: buckwheat. daikon radish. Chinese prunes. 9. pears. persimmons. chicken eggs (only if chronic) . ginger. Food poisoning can be a possible cause. sunflower seeds.

lunch. 6. 9. Steam black fungus with a little sugar in about 1. 11. This remedy is only appropriate for chronic cases of dysentery. garlic. watermelon . chicken eggs (in acute cases of dysentery) Eczema This is a common skin condition that often affects extremities. powder it. Consume eggs cooked with rice vinegar. eggs. azuki beans. cold foods. fried foods. The skin lesion is characterized by a raised spot that turns into a blister and eventually erupts. incorporate into regular diet. broccoli. 3. corns ilk. mung beans. Stir-fry ginger. Cook brown rice with persimmon cap and consume the rice. high-fiber foods. and green tea. Make sweet potato and pumpkin mush and have three times a day. Drink plum peel tea. Soak Chinese prunes in rice wine for three days. It can cause extreme itching and pain. take 10 prunes twice daily. 12. 2. Eat four persimmons daily. Charcoal dried ginger. raw foods. as well as other parts. genitalia. 7. hard to digest foods.136 ~ The Tao of Nutrition Remedies: 1. Avoid: dairy products. pearl barley. Take carrot juice mixed with a little ginger juice. Recommendations: potatoes. Make mung bean soup and drink throughout the day. celery and peas together. seaweed. Drink sour prune tea before meals on an empty stomach. and dinner. fish. water chestnuts. S. 4. for breakfast. 5. drink one cup daily.liz cups of water. 10. winter melon. meats. and take one teaspoon with soupy rice. ulcerates and then forms a scab which is later sloughed off. honey. dandelion.

Apply honey to area. coconuts. Externally. 6. winter melon skin. 9. celery. Make tea from azuki beans. changing every four hours. The treatment is chosen to promote diuresis and ease urination. spinach. Abdominal edema can cause ascites and is usually related to liver dysfunction. wash with equal portions of salt and borax. beef . wash area 2-3 times daily. squash. for three days. drinking at least once a day for ten days. seaweed. Mash fresh potato and apply locally. Apply mashed daikon radish to area. such as cirrhosis of the liver. 4. cold. tangerines. Chinese black dates. lower extremities. Make tea from lily bulbs. Make tea from mung beans and pearl barley and drink. dryness. heat. millet. fish. Edema/Swelling Edema is a condition of swelling due to abnormal accumulation of fluids in the cells. and lungs are the organs that may be involved. 7. 2. Drink tea and eat the solids three times daily. however. peaches. garlic. ginger skin. Boil soup from seaweed and winter melon. corn. Make tea from dandelion and corns ilk. bamboo shoots. Heart. dissolved in warm water. 3. pearl barley. Recommendations: red azuki beans. chemical exposure. winter melon. watermelon. kidney. Avoid: external stimulation such as extreme weather conditions of wind.Conditions ~ 137 Remedies: 1. oats. dampness. avoid soap. and abdomen. and mulberries. green onions. apples. excessive sun exposure. and cornsilk. wheat. pearl barley. 8. water chestnuts. 5. carrots. Use clean water to bathe. It can occur anywhere in the body. the common places that edema occurs are face. mulberries. drink three times daily for at least ten days. black beans.

The sufferer often complains that lights have halos around them. 12. Its onset can be either acute or chronic. grapefruit. Eat plenty of watermelon in the summer. 7. oranges. carrot. Cook oats and mung beans to a mash and consume until swelling subsides. fatty foods. garlic. shellfish. Daily diet should be bland and should include plenty of vegetables and fish. vomiting. and cook into soup with azuki 2. stimulating foods. mul- berries. 6.138 ~ The Tao of Nutrition Remedies: 1. nausea. pepper. Boil tea made from ginger skin. The condition can progress to a point in which the pressure causes atrophy of the optic nerve. Take fish. betel nuts. mint. black sesame seeds. Recommendations: chrysanthemum. cook and eat three times daily. and azuki beans into a soup. beet tops . goji berries. 10. salty foods. and greasy foods Glaucoma This is a disease characterized by an increase in the pressure inside of the eye. there may be pain. lamb. 9. 5. Drink coconut juice daily. Cook together pearl barley. Use ten cups of water and cook down to one cup. carrots. and green onion twice daily. During the onset. Consume soupy pearl barley. consume only the liquid. headaches. Drink tea made from watermelon rind. and blurry vision. 4. 11. wine. consume three times daily. oyster shells. Take winter melon rind and azuki beans and enough water to cover. beans. beets. leading to blindness. mung beans. You may also add black beans to this soup. 3. preferably carp. Avoid: rich foods. Drink beef stew broth. 8. Drink blended juice of apple. lemons. cassia seeds.

salt. buckwheat. mental stress. Make tea from chrysanthemum flowers. and eye strain. carrots. oyster shell. and black sesame seeds. 4. then dry head afterwards. drink and try to sweat. Drink green tea. Steam aching portion of head over mint and cinnamon tea that is cooking. drinking too much water Headache There are many different types of headaches. Boil tea from betel nut. orange peels. oyster shells. Avoid: Self-treatment is not recommended due to the seriousness of this condition. beets. and goji berries. mint. Avoid visual stimulation. add a little honey. green onions. 2.Conditions ~ 139 Remedies: 1. cassia seeds and drink. smoking. avoiding drafts. 5. Boil tea from cassia seeds. drugs. stimulating foods. drink twice daily. ginger. Make tea from chrysanthemum and mint. Make buckwheat meal into a paste and apply to painful area until it sweats. Boil tea from mulberries. 3. common cold. Seek professional guidance for close observation of the condition. then use the tea to cook rice porridge. drink three times daily. prunes. hypertension. drink twice daily. 4. pearl barley. coffee. Recommendations: chrysanthemum flowers. hormonal changes. . peach kernels Remedies for headaches due to common cold or flu: 1. 2. Each type of headache has a corresponding treatment. boiling for five minutes. alcohol. such as migraines and headaches caused by muscular tension. 3. Make tea from ginger and green onions.

please see section on Premenstrual Syndrome (PMS). eye strain. mix with rice wine and lightly roast it. With dry stools. squirt carrot juice into left nostril. slowly boiling the shells for 1 V2 hours. spicy or fried foods. 3. Hemorrhoids can be due to over-consumption of alcohol. gradually increasing the temperature to hot. 5. squirt into both nostrils. if only right side. Hemorrhoids This common condition is related to constipation. Remedies for headaches due to high blood pressure. or chronic constipation. take two tablespoons three times daily. Avoid: spicy food. alcohol. stress For menstrual-type headaches. Take lemon juice and V2 tablespoon baking soda mixed in a glass of water and drink. then adding the flowers for the last 30 minutes. Sometimes it can cause bleeding. mint. If headache is on left side. Eat while hot. then get under covers and sweat. if both sides are painful. excessive stimulation. or migraines: 1. the person strains to move the bowels which causes friction on delicate rectal tissues. 6. sitting or standing too long. too much sex. squirt into right nostril. . Make tea of Chinese prunes. 2. Rinse head with warm water. smoking. Make rice porridge and add garlic and green onions. Make carrot juice. and green tea. lack of exercise.140 ~ The Tao of Nutrition 6. pregnancy. A hemorrhoid is a varicose vein in the rectum and can be very painful. menstrual cycles. 4. lack of sleep. Make tea of oyster shells and chrysanthemum flowers. Mash peach kernels and walnuts. emotional stress or tension.

Conditions ~ 141 Recommendations: sea cucumber. Wash hemorrhoid with winter melon tea. Take black fungus with rice every morning for breakfast on an empty stomach. Insert a raw potato suppository after each bowel movement. cucumbers. until it becomes soggy. 6. Bath should be warm enough to induce sweating and done daily. Soak lower body in a warm bath to which has been added the tea of either mugwort (Artemsia argyi). black fungus. soak the area. winter melon. Cook black fungus with brown sugar. persimmons. water chest- nut. Boil papaya tea for two hours. fish. 8. Eat three bananas with some honey on an empty stomach every morning. guavas. squash. 5. buckwheat. add honey and steam again several times. bamboo shoots. figs. 11. carrot tops or figs. 2. consume every day. boil with dandelion greens and wash area with the tea. tofu. plums. Grind mung bean powder. The following remedies are used for bleeding hemorrhoids: 1. without the skin. bananas. Roast and grind black sesame seeds. 9. Steam figs. black sesame seeds. Eat a banana every day on an empty stomach. take with warm water and honey every night before retiring. tangerines. Eat a fresh squash before breakfast and after dinner everyday for two weeks. 10. 3. taro. 7. Steam dried persimmons and eat. 4. Steam sea cucumber without salt or spices and eat for immediate pain relief. consume daily. do this for one month. . 3. cooling foods Remedies: 1. prunes. mung beans. 2.

4. fever. then cook into rice or millet porridge. tender liver area. dandelion and beet greens. Bed rest is necessary in the initial stages. Avoid: stimulating foods. Soak grapefruit and peel in rice vinegar overnight. 3. malaise. Upon examination of the blood. grapefruit. Make mung bean soup with pearl barley. pears. Mash fresh plums and take with lukewarm water three times daily. orange. Change cotton ball every hour. cornsilk. Make tea from cornsilk. cucumber. rice vinegar. smoking. Drink regularly as a beverage. squash. carrot. millet. azuki bean. Cook lotus root and puree. anorexia. 5. the liver enzymes are abnormally high. Make taro root soup and eat regularly until bleeding stops and hemorrhoid heals. water chestnut. as well as by numerous viruses. beet greens. 5. Viral Hepatitis A is generally transmitted via the fecal-oral route. lotus root. spinach. then take one teaspoon in one cup of warm liquid. dandelion greens. then apply a cotton ball that has been soaked in garlic juice. lack of exercise. celery. celery and pears. and flu-like symptoms. winter melon. ling zhi mushroom. Hepatitis Band C can become chronic. barley. 2. alcohol. Wash area with hot water. pineapple. vomiting. watermelon Remedies: 1. cabbage. consti- pation. apple. 6. Recommendations: rice. nausea. standing or sitting too long Hepatitis Hepatitis is a liver condition that can be caused by many drugs and toxic agents. stress. pearl bar- ley.142 ~ The Tao of Nutrition 4. The manifestations include jaundice. . whereas viral Hepatitis Band C is transmitted via blood and sexual fluids. spicy foods. Juice watermelon.

fatty and fried foods. litchi. Charcoal grapefruit peel and take Y2 teaspoon with rice water after every meal.Conditions ~ 143 6. Eat the ginger and papaya twice daily for at least ten days. ginger and rice vinegar until vinegar dries up. Take cucumber juice on empty stomach every morning. shellfish Hives Hives is a skin condition which is characterized by an intermittent attack of extreme itching which results in welts. bell peppers. black sesame seeds. back and face. Drink two tablespoons on an empty stomach every morning. mung beans. Chinese black dates. . hawthorn berries. 9 grams hawthorn berries. rubbing salt on the hives. Avoid: dairy products. Boil a thick tea from fresh maple leaves for an external wash of hives. Cook together papaya. ginger. 3. shiitake mushrooms. Recommendations: winter melon rind. take a sea salt bath. licorice. This condition in Chinese Medicine is considered an invasion of wind. dried prunes. pearl barley. mint Remedies: 1. 9. some winter melon rind and chrysanthemum flowers. drink tea made from 15 grams gypsum. Mix honey with rice wine and steam. primarily on the arms. Make soup from winter melon and kabocha squash. vin- egar. soybeans. These elevated spots can spread throughout the entire body with scratching. cold and raw foods. Hives may be brought on by an exposure to an allergen or after consumption of shellfish. alcohol. sugar. cornsilk. papaya. 4. 5. peach kernels. coffee. Internally. 60 grams black beans. Add some honey and drink three times daily. Externally. 7. overly spicy foods. legs. maple leaves. 8. Make tea from ling zhi mushrooms and jujube dates. chrysanthemum. tomato. eggplant. 2. black beans.

apples. 2. kidney dysfunction. honey. garlic. black beans. seaweed. lotus root. Eat two raw tomatoes on an empty stomach every day for a month. Make tea of licorice. 8. add some brown sugar and drink three times daily. corn. peas. tinnitus. It is commonly caused by hardening of the arteries. blurry vision. Cook together black sesame seeds. jellyfish. chrysanthemum. cassia seeds Remedies: 1. add water and boil fifteen minutes. Then strain and drink one cup twice daily. Take equal portions of mung and soybeans. watermelon. Avoid: shellfish. lemons. spinach. allergic foods Hypertension Hypertension. tomatoes. water chestnuts. 9. Drink warm celery juice three times daily. 7. is characterized by a wiry and rapid pulse. insomnia. and gypsum. mung beans. mung beans. or liver dysfunction. fatigue. sunflower seeds. hawthorn berries.144 ~ The Tao of Nutrition 6. headache. tofu. plums. eggplant. 12. chest tightness or fullness. and Chinese black dates and eat at least once daily. bamboo shoots. drink three times daily for at least three days. 10. Eat 2-3 dried prunes daily. Recommendations: celery. palpitations. dizziness. bananas. 11. vertigo and numbness of the extremities. or high blood pressure. . Make tea of lotus seeds and Vz teaspoon pearl powder. The normal range of blood pressure is between 100135 mmHg for the systolic measurement and 70-85 mmHg for the diastolic measurement. Make tea of dried litchi. Make tea of cornsilk and pearl barley and drink twice daily for at least ten days. grind into powder. mushrooms. persimmons. vinegar. buckwheat.

16. in general for hypersensitive individuals. water chestnuts. 15. The taste buds start the functions of many physiological processes. 12. cool to room temperature. Make mung bean soup. Make soup from abalone and seaweed. . 9. 4. 5. 17. 11. Make lotus root tea and drink three cups daily for one month. The capsules have the advantage of not overly stimulating the taste buds in the warming direction. add vinegar. Sleep on a pillow of chrysanthemum flowers to draw heat out of the head. boil down to one cup and drink every night before bed. tomatoes and four cups water. the spicy flavor can be too stimulating. 7. Take daily for about two months. During the summer months. 14. drink three cups daily for two months. and sesame oil. Make tea from chrysanthemum flowers and cassia seeds and drink daily. Steam or bake jellyfish about twelve minutes. Take garlic oil capsules to clean out the arteries. Drink hawthorn berry tea continuously for a long period of time. mugwort. Drink water. Take celery. 13. 18.Conditions ~ 145 3. Drink cornsilk tea. This can be combined with soupy rice for a nutritious breakfast. add vinegar and sesame oil. Steam tofu. and mulberry branches. 8. 10. 6. Make tea from watermelon rind. Drink chrysanthemum and spinach tea regularly. white onion (sweet). garlic. Steam white fungus for two hours and take before bedtime. make watermelon juice or eat watermelon every day. soy sauce. vinegar and honey regularly.

overeating. Avoid: smoking. Mix pig bile and mung bean powder. Drink organic banana peel tea. constipation. and all stimulants . walnuts. 23. chicken. fatty or fried foods. brown rice. make tea made from shells (oyster. maple syrup. regular meal schedule. potatoes. light-headedness. smoking. 22. coffee. yams. Hypoglycemia is characterized by low blood sugar. Drink three glasses daily of unripened persimmon juice for one week. 24. take one teaspoon daily for at least eight days. black beans. waking at night hungry. 21. Make tea from one peeled lemon. nervousness. fructose. fish. potatoes. Eat three apples daily. depression and difficulty concentrating. salty foods. honey. tofu. mild exercise. and 2 Y2 cups water. shakiness. headaches. fatigue when hungry. caffeine. sweet fruits (eat very sparingly). Make soup using seaweed. Recommendations: sweet rice. nuts (a good snack between meals). mood swings. chronic fatigue. 4-5 small meals daily Avoid: simple carbohydrates such as white flour and sugar. spicy foods. night sweats. abalone. corn. ten fresh water chestnuts. pork. alcohol. pearl barley and a little honey.146 ~ The Tao of Nutrition 19. stress. eat every day for five days. sweet cravings. all stimu- lants. irritability or faintness if a meal is late. coffee. Hypoglycemia This very common condition is due to a stressful lifestyle and a heavily sugar laden diet. mother of pearl) or fossils (dragon bones and teeth)i strain and drink. soybeans. vegetables. strong emotions. 20. fatty or fried foods. 25. and low levels of calcium * in the body * For low calcium levels. Eat soup of black or white mushrooms daily.

pearl barley. shrimps. insomnia. Tonifying foods are needed. black sesame seeds. 6. sea cucum- ber. shake bottle daily. Add 50 grams of chopped ginseng to Y2 bottle of white liquor (like vodka or gin). 8. rooster. then grind into a powder.Conditions ~ 147 Impotence This is a weak condition. Cook together scallions. knee pain and fatigue. kidney beans. frequent masturbation. Seal bottle. excessive dreams. 7. and egg. Eat with a shot of white liquor. physical fatigue. 4. tension. Make tea from walnuts. low appetite. Steam rooster with ginger. Drink the broth and eat the lamb. goji berries. 2. sea cucumber. back pain. Eat with Vz glass of red wine. Roast and grind bitter melon seeds. black fungus. lotus seeds. 3. lotus seeds. and preserve for one month. bitter melon seeds. shrimp. Dry roast dried shrimps. Take one teaspoon three times daily with rice wine. most likely due to a nervous weakness. . Make cake from black sweet rice. lamb. walnuts. Drink three times daily. Impotence is characterized by not being able to have an erection when there is a desire to have intercourse. yams. and black beans. Drink one shot every night with dinner for at least twenty days. Make lamb stew with daikon radish and Chinese black dates. worrying. scallion seeds. excessive stress. Take one teaspoon three times daily with rice wine. Other symptoms may include dizziness. Recommendations: scallions. lower extremities weakness. thus many of the remedies include meat. and there may be premature ejaculation. ginseng. Chinese black dates and goji berries. maintaining composure. 5. and fennel. however impotence does not have to be treated with meat. or excessive indulgence in sex. Remedies: 1. black beans.

Eat a leaf of fresh mugwort. Boil tea and take after meals or simply suck on the peel for indigestion. Dry and age orange peel for about one month. sweet pota- toes or yams. Eat sweet potato cooked with brown sugar and water. Eat papaya twice daily. 5. resulting in abdominal fullness or distention. 6. add some rice wine. dairy products. apples. papayas. or eating too fast. This causes a stagnation of food in the stomach. lack of digestive enzymes. Consume Y2 cup of overdone rice (from bottom of pan) mixed with cardamom. lemon. or orange juice after meals. bloating and sometimes diarrhea due to insufficient digestion. Roast black sesame seeds with salt and take with warm water. 2. 4. parsley. In the last three minutes of cooking this mush. 3. 8. It is important to eat slowly and chew the food properly because digestion begins in the mouth. in any form. Remedies: 1.148 ~ The Tao of Nutrition Avoid: obscene visual stimulation. or blend into a juice. fatty foods. tension and stress while eating. masturbation. fennel and orange peels. reading the newspaper or watching television while eating as this takes energy away from digestion . too much sex Indigestion This is a condition of poor digestion due to a weak stomach. 9. Eat regularly for two weeks to improve digestion. Blend daikon radish juice and take after meals. Make tea from sweet rice sprouts and malt. black sesame seeds. overwork. Drink apple. or eat an apple after each meal. daikon radish. sweets. Avoid: rich foods. Recommendations: hawthorn berries. oranges. 7.

growth. ginger. Kidney Yin deficiency In this condition there is not enough water to cool the fire so it manifests as heat symptoms. premature ejaculation. It also includes storing the essence of life (sperms and eggs). lamb. damp palms. damp soles of the feet.Conditions ~ 149 Kidney Weakness This common ailment is characterized by weakness and lack of energy. 1. walnuts. low back pain. scallions. lentils. insomnia. bone marrow and the brain (called the sea of marrow). knees. low back pain. the Kidney system involves much more than just filtering water. soybeans. These may include irritability. swollen extremities. black beans. night sweats. In Chinese medicine. fish. baked tofu. producing blood. Kidney Yang deficiency This is characterized by impotence. maintenance. cold fruits. lotus seeds. a little wine. diarrhea. Weakness of the Kidneys often manifests as problems in the back. The adrenal function is included in the kidney system. chicken. sesame seeds. red tongue. Recommendations: warming foods. ringing in the ears. involuntary seminal emissions. low afternoon fever. fatigue. low sexual drive. coldness. swollen face. and reproduction. cinnamon bark tea Avoid: cold foods. knee pain or weakness. raw foods 2. controlling the bones. and opening to the ear. Kidney function (and resulting problems) can be divided into Kidney Yang and Kidney Yin. dry mouth. frequent urination. low energy. and blurry . ears. and a general feeling as though the fire of life is about to be extinguished. pale face and tongue. deafness. The Kidney is of great importance to health and longevity. red cheeks. eggs. or reproductive functions. ear ringing. infertility. thus adrenal exhaustion is Kidney exhaustion.

and licorice. alcohol. soy sprouts. 2. As the condition progresses. dandelion. and strong emotions Mastitis This is an inflammation of the mammary glands. Recommendations: cooling foods such as cabbage. condensing to a syrup and add to rice porridge. lotus root. It is important to keep the affected breast clean. changing 2-3 times daily. fever. pears. take egg white mixed with green onions and apply to the area. chrysanthemum flowers Avoid: hot foods. cucumber. swollen and painful lymph glands in the armpits. 6. 3. and dandelions to make a poultice for external application. mint. Make tea from malt (sprouted oat). often occurring 3-4 weeks after delivery. lettuce. Remedies: . drink three times daily for at least five days. swelling. Boil dandelions into tea. There may be distention of the breast. malt. spicy foods. Kidney Yin deficiency often occurs in thin people since yin corresponds to substance. It is a very common condition. 1. the symptoms may worsen and the patient may have chills. soybeans. 5. Make tea from dandelion and honey. apples. fresh vegetables. Drink tea and apply the solids locally. smoking. Recommendations: cooling foods. reed root. tofu. pus and ulceration of breast. redness on the surface. mung beans. stress. drink three times daily. lettuce.150 ~ The Tao of Nutrition vision. 4. and fever. resulting from an obstructed mammary duct and is accompanied by a bacterial infection. mulberries. Make tea from honeysuckle. honeysuckle. Combine cabbage. increase in white blood cell count. Eat three times daily for five days. Externally. peaches.

Conditions ~ 151
Avoid: spicy, stimulating foods, coffee, smoking, alcohol, dairy

products (especially if there is pus), breast feeding

Menopause

This is the time when a woman stops menstruating completely, usually occurring between 45 and 53 years of age. It may occur slowly or suddenly. Symptoms may include hot flashes, weakness, depression, emotional instability, anxiety, lack of concentration, irritability, headaches, insomnia, night sweats and dryness.
Recommendations: black beans, sesame seeds, soybeans, wal-

nuts, goji berries, mulberries, yams, licorice, Chinese black dates, lotus seeds, chrysanthemum flowers.
Remedies:

1. Cook black beans with rice into porridge. Eat twice daily. 2. Roast sesame seeds and add to rice porridge for breakfast. 3. Steam chicken with goji berries and yam. 4. Make tea from chrysanthemum and cassia seeds and drink three times daily. 5. Take walnuts, lotus seeds, and sunflower seeds and make a porridge with rice. 6. Stew millet, mulberries, lamb and goji berries. 7. Make tea from licorice, Chinese black dates, and wheat. This will help extreme mood swings and depression.
Avoid: stress, tension, stimulants

Morning Sickness

This is characterized by nausea and vomiting and affects some women during the first few months of pregnancy, usually clearing up after the third month. It occurs particularly in the morning, although in serious cases, it may last all day. Accompanying

152 ~ The Tao of Nutrition

symptoms may include headache, dizziness, and exhaustion. One should seek treatment right away because this condition will affect nourishment to the fetus.
Recommendations: lentils, grapefruit peel, carp, ginger, orange

peel, bamboo shavings, persimmon cap, millet
Remedies:

1. Grind lentils into powder then take two tablespoons with rice porridge, three times daily. 2. Make tea from ginger and grapefruit peel, drink three times daily. 3. Steam carp with ginger and cardamom for thirty minutes. Eat daily for at least one week. 4. Make tea from ginger, orange peels, and a little bit of brown sugar. 5. Make persimmon cap tea, drink three times daily. 6. Make fresh scallion juice and fresh ginger juice and add a little sweetener. Take 2-3 teaspoons three times daily.

As soon as the morning sickness stops, discontinue the remedies.
Avoid: overeating, heavy meats

Mouth Sores (Ulcers)

This condition includes herpes simplex, fever blisters and canker sores. It is basically an ulceration on or in the mouth. One may also experience pain, heat sensation, irritability, insomnia, headache, dizziness, palpitations, and bad breath.
Recommendations: mung beans, daikon, carrots, lotus root,

persimmon caps, mint, honeysuckle flower
Remedies:

1. Make juice from carrots and lotus root and rinse the mouth 3-4 times a day for at least four days. 2. Take 5-6 persimmon caps and boil tea. When cool, rinse mouth 4-5 times a day. 3. Apply honey to local area to help heal faster.

Conditions ~ 153 4. Char eggplant into ashes, powder and mix with honey. Apply to the sores. 5. Boil mung bean soup and eat on an empty stomach. 6. Grind mung beans into powder, mix with honey; apply to area. 7. Rub sea salt on the sores three times a day for two days. Also rinse mouth with salt water.
Avoid:

spicy foods, stimulating foods, smoking, stress, alcohol, coffee, chocolate, constipation

Nephritis (Acute)

This is an acute kidney infection. This condition is characterized by some type of infection that precedes the condition, such as laryngitis, tonsillitis, scarlet fever, or mumps. There may be swelling beginning in the face area then spreading throughout the body in about two days, followed by blood in the urine, hypertension, headache, dizziness, fatigue, malaise, low appetite, nausea, vomiting, and scanty urination.
Recommendations:

black beans, mung beans, azuki beans, pearl barley, garlic, carp, winter melon, watermelon, watermelon rind, reed root, cornsilk, sweet rice, lotus root, water chestnuts

Remedies:

1. Cook soup with azuki beans, winter melon rind, watermelon rind and cornsilk. Drink at least 3-4 times daily. 2. Make tea from lotus root; drink four large glasses daily. 3. Do a watermelon fast or eat lots of watermelon. 4. Cook soup with carp, azuki beans, winter melon, and green onions. Start with five cups water and cook down to three cups. Drink the soup and sweat. 5. Make tea from cornsilk, cooking for one hour, then strain and cook again until almost dry, then add some fructose powder. Then take one tablespoon three times daily dissolved in warm water.

154 ~ The Tao of Nutrition

6. Cook rice porridge with pearl barley, black beans and water chestnuts. 7. Make juice from carrots, celery, cucumbers, and squash.
Avoid: stimulating (sour, spicy, salty) foods, alcohol, caffeine, smoking, overworking, high protein foods

Nephritis (Chronic)

This can result from acute nephritis that is not properly treated, ora low immunity causing kidney infection. The symptoms include swelling, hypertension, hyperprotein urea, fatigue, headache, dizziness, and achiness. If this condition does not get proper treatment, over a long period of time it can cause damage to the kidney, leading to uremia.
Recommendations: ginger, Chinese black dates, sweet rice, soybeans, winter melon, carp, yams, mung beans, black beans Remedies: 1. Make rice porridge and add ginger, cinnamon, and Chinese black dates. Eat for breakfast and dinner. 2. Remove the internal organs of a duck and stuff it with 4-5 garlic cloves, then cook in soup. Do not add salt. Drink the broth and eat the duck every other day. 3. Cook carp with soybeans, winter melon and green onions into soup. Eat once a day for at least twenty days. 4. Cook rice porridge with yams and eat for breakfast and dinner. 5. Steam together crab, garlic, and white wine. Eat once daily for fifteen days. 6. Boil tea from corns ilk, winter melon rind, watermelon rind, and azuki beans. 7. Crush entire watermelon and rind, and slowly cook to a thick syrup. Take two tablespoons syrup in warm water three times daily.

Conditions ~ 155
Avoid: stimulating (sour, spicy, salty) foods, alcohol, caffeine,

smoking, overworking, high protein foods
Premenstrual Syndrome (PMS)

PMS is a condition that occurs after ovulation or before menstruation, due to hormonal fluctuations. It may be characterized by abdominal cramps, bloating, backache, headache, tension, irritability, low energy, and mood swings. A healthy woman should have little or no discomfort during this time; however, approximately 70% of American women suffer from these symptoms. This is partially due to the large consumption of cold foods and drinks that can cause the blood to stagnate. In Chinese terminology, PMS is a condition of disharmony in the blood: either stagnant blood, not enough blood, or heat in the blood; and stagnation of Chi. Acupuncture, acupressure, herbs, diet, and Chi gong exercises are all very beneficial for relieving the symptoms and correcting the disharmony.
Recommendations: At least one week prior to the usual onset

of PMS symptoms, consume some of the following: ginger, green onions, fennel, orange peel, spinach, walnuts, hawthorn berries, cinnamon, black pepper, Chinese dates, Dang Cui (Angelica sinensis)
Remedies:

1. Make tea from ginger, green onions, fennel, black pepper, and orange peel, boiling for ten minutes. Drink three times daily, starting at least one week before usual onset of PMS symptoms. This is a good remedy for those who feel cold. 2. Make spinach soup, boiling for 30 minutes. 3. Make hawthorn berry and cinnamon tea.
Avoid: cold foods, raw foods, excessive consumption of fruit,

vinegar, all shellfish, coffee, stimulants, sugar, dairy products, and smoking

rich foods. sex and eating meat late in the day Psoriasis This is a common skin condition. accompanied by various degrees of itching and discomfort. The skin may become very rough and scaly and may temporarily improve. and smoking. Recommendations: pumpkin seeds. garlic. It can affect any part of the body. although it is usually a chronic type of condition. Avoid: dairy products. tension. beet tops. When the scaling takes place one can also see reddish dots under the skin. vinegar. cucumber. As the man ages the prostate can become swollen and the urethra and bladder become less elastic. and cornsilk. slowly sim- . Roast pumpkin seeds or boil into tea and incorporate into the diet. pearl bar- ley. winter melon seeds. litchis. characterized by pink or dull red lesions with silvery scaling. usually genetically inherited. Recommendations: Chinese prunes. sunflower seeds. cherries. squash. anise. peach kernels. tangerines. caffeine. drink three times daily. dandelion greens. one large handful twice daily. and is usually worse during the wintertime. 3. figs. guava skins. walnuts. 2. Thus symptoms usually include difficulty urinating or dribbling. Take fifteen peeled and sliced water chestnuts and one cup vinegar (preferably aged rice vinegar).156 ~ The Tao of Nutrition Prostate Enlargement This condition generally affects older men over forty. Boil fig tea. all stimulants such as alcohol. pearl barley. Make tea from rhubarb root. In Western medicine there are few treatment options for psoriasis. mangos and seaweeds Remedies: 1. azuki beans. fatty foods. stress. mung beans Remedies: 1.

and rice. Make porridge from lily bulb. weakness. smoking. Then mash into a paste and seal in a jar. alcohol. remove pits. serious conditions may take two weeks. 5. Recommendations: lotus seeds. or fatigue. 2. cool showers daily. palpitations. Take mashed walnuts. Take peel from guava. then condense into syrup. lethargy. black beans. 4. Take dried Chinese prunes. caffeine. leg pain.Conditions ~ 157 mer in a non-metal pot for twenty minutes until water chestnuts absorb most of the vinegar. seaweeds. The first type happens when one has a dream and then ejaculates during sleep. shrimps. mix with sesame oil into a paste and apply twice daily for one week. also known as a wet dream. dried ginger. Spread evenly on a gauze pad and apply to affected area. gypsum. Avoid: spicy food. . sea cucumber. Mild cases should show improvement within five days. Eat once daily for at least ten days. The other type is when one has ejaculation without a dream. 3. 6. shortness of breath. These symptoms point to a weakness which if not dealt with can lead to degeneration. back pain. three times daily if serious condition. scallions. changing daily if not too serious. One may also have dizziness. yams. stimulating food. use cotton to absorb the oil. either during sleep or during waking hours. changing twice daily for one week. char and powder it. pearl barley. three times daily. Apply mashed garlic to the affected area. excessive sun exposure Seminal Emission (Spermatorrhea) There are two types of this condition. and simmer into a tea. apply the pulp three times daily. Take two tablespoons in warm water.

158 ~ The Tao of Nutrition
Remedies:

1. Steam scallions with shrimp and rice wine. Eat daily for at least fifteen days or until condition improves. 2. Cook soup from sea cucumber, seaweed, and black beans. Walnuts can be added also. 3. Cook sea cucumber with rice porridge and eat for breakfast every morning. 4. Cook pearl barley, black beans, walnuts, and scallions to make a porridge. Eat every morning for breakfast. 5. Make tea from ginseng, Chinese black dates, and lotus seeds. Drink three times daily.
Avoid:

spicy foods, stimulating foods, overworking, obscene visual images, masturbation, sleeping on one's back (sleep on the side instead)

Sore throat (Laryngitis)

Sore throat can be caused by various factors including common cold, flu or eating too much spicy food. There may also be mucus, fever and chills, headaches and so on.
Recommendations:

carrots, olives, daikon radish, celery, seaweed, licorice, Chinese prunes, cilantro, mint. Drink a lot of water, and gargle with warm salt water
1. Make tea from carrots and olives; drink three times daily for at least one week. 2. Make tea from daikon radish and green apples; drink twice daily. 3. Lightly cook seaweed, preserve with brown sugar for three days. Eat daily for one week. 4. Make tea from cilantro, one tablespoon green tea, and a little salt. Steep for about five minutes. 5. Slowly chew and swallow rock sugar and cilantro. 6. For a dry hot throat, take a spoonful of honey in a glass of warm water and drink.

Remedies:

Conditions ~ 159
Avoid:

alcohol, smoking, pollution, sleeping with the mouth open, stimulating or spicy foods, fatty foods

Stones (Gallbladder, Kidney, Urinary Tract)

Various combinations of minerals can calcify or crystallize in the gallbladder, kidney, or urinary tract. These can range in size from the size of a grain of sand to two inches in diameter. Gallstones are a combination of bile and minerals and are characterized by pain in the right upper abdomen or pain in the corresponding area of the back and shooting up to the shoulder blade. Gallstones may also cause poor digestion of fats. If the gallstones obstruct the flow of bile, the result may be jaundice. Kidney stones are formed as the kidneys filter excessive minerals in an acid environment which combine with either excessive calcium or wastes in the blood. These are very painful, with the pain being in the kidney area of the lower back or the corresponding area on the front of the abdomen. There may also be painful urination with kidney stones.
Recommendations:

cornsilk, water chestnuts, seaweed, beet tops, watermelon, celery, watercress, winter melon, pearl barley, walnuts, watermelon rind, winter melon rind, green tea powder, distilled water

Remedies:

Drink watermelon juice. Drink celery, carrot, and water chestnut juice. Drink cornsilk tea for water; 3-5 glasses daily. Drink tea from beet tops, winter melon rind, and watermelon rind. 5. Take two teaspoons ground walnuts in cornsilk tea. 6. Take one teaspoon green tea powder in warm water three times daily.
After consuming any of the above diuretic remedies, do some mild jumping exercise to help break up the stones.

1. 2. 3. 4.

160 ~ The Tao of Nutrition
Avoid: spicy foods, fried foods, oily foods, coffee, hard water,

spinach, citrus, tomatoes, spinach combined with tofu or dairy products
Tinnitus (Ear Ringing)

This is a common problem that has two major causes. The first is a local problem in which there may be a local obstruction or infection, nerve damage, or drug interference. The second problem stems more from a systemic condition such as coronary heart disease, hypertension, or kidney weakness. Along with ringing in the ears, one may also complain of headaches, irritability, restlessness, dizziness, red face, sore back, vomiting, or nausea.
Recommendations: black sesame seeds, black beans, walnuts,

grapes, celery, oyster shells, pearl barley, azuki beans, Chinese black dates, yams, lotus seeds, chestnuts, chrysanthemum. Get plenty of sleep, massage the neck and head area, and try to live in a quiet, peaceful place if possible.
Remedies:

1. Make tea from lotus seeds and chrysanthemums. 2. Make juice from celery and grapes. Drink one cup 2-3 times daily. 3. Cook azuki beans and black beans with rice porridge and eat at least once daily. 4. Boil Chinese black dates, walnuts, and lotus seeds with rice porridge and eat once daily.
Avoid: loud noise, stress, tension, stimulating foods, spicy

foods, smoking, alcohol, coffee
Ulcers (Stomach or Duodenum)

Ulcers can occur anywhere along the food pathway, from the mouth to the stomach to the intestines. Ulcers can also occur in the vagina. The most common places for ulcers to occur are the stomach and duodenum (first part of the small intestines).

Conditions ~ 161 Ulcers are characterized by burning pain. In the stomach, pain is usually worse on an empty stomach. If the ulcer is further down, there will be pain after meals. There may also be nausea. If the stools are black (digested blood), the ulcer is in the stomach or higher. If stools are red, the ulcer is lower than the stomach. If the red blood is mixed in the stool, the ulcer is in the small intestines. If red blood is on the stool, then the ulcer is in the lower intestines or a result of a hemorrhoid.
Recommendations:

potatoes, honey, cabbage, ginger, figs, papayas, squid bone, peanut oil, kale, persimmons, licorice tea

Remedies:

1. For mouth ulcers, apply the ash of charcoaled eggplant. 2. Drink potato juice daily on an empty stomach for at least two weeks. 3. Drink warm kale juice or cabbage juice on an empty stomach to help heal the ulcer. 4. Take two teaspoons peanut oil every morning on an empty stomach to help close the wound. 5. Drink fig juice. 6. Bake squid bone until crisp, powder it and take one teaspoon daily with honey. 7. Take blended papaya and milk or soymilk. Note, this remedy would not be good for a person with a lot of mucus, dampness, or allergies, unless soymilk is substituted for milk. 8. Take two tablespoons steamed honey on an empty stomach in the mornings. 9. Cook ginger (an amount the size of the thumb) with rice and have for breakfast every morning on an empty stomach. 10. Dry and charcoal persimmon and grind into powder; take one tablespoon in a glass of warm water.
Avoid:

spicy foods, hot foods, stimulants, shellfish, coffee, smoking, alcohol, fried foods, and stress

162 ~ The Tao of Nutrition

Worms

This condition is most common among children. It can manifest in such symptoms as decreased appetite, abdominal pain, nausea, diarrhea or constipation, vomiting, anal itching at night and malnourished appearance. There are many types of worms including roundworms, pinworms, tapeworms, and hookworms.
Recommendations: pumpkin seeds, papaya seeds, coconut,

garlic, hawthorn berries, sunflower seeds, Chinese prunes, ginger, vinegar, black pepper, walnut leaf
Remedies:

1. Make tea from ten Chinese prunes, 6 grams black pepper and three slices fresh ginger. Drink two cups, an hour apart in the morning on an empty stomach. Do this every day for one week. 2. Take one tablespoon raw pumpkin seeds and grind to a powder. Mix with warm water and drink. Do this twice daily in the morning an hour apart, every day for one week. 3. Eat two tablespoons sunflower seeds every morning on an empty stomach. 4. Make tea from hawthorn berries and betel nuts and drink two cups in the morning on an empty stomach, one hour apart. 5. Charcoal black pepper, grind to a powder, take V2 teaspoon three times daily with warm water. 6. Make tea from betel nuts and pumpkin seeds. Eat pumpkin seeds then drink the tea and within 4-5 hours expect diarrhea and excretion of the worms. 7. Take the white part of a green onion, make into juice and add 1-2 teaspoons sesame oil. Take twice daily on an empty stomach for three days. 8. Take coconut juice and 1;2 of a coconut every morning on an empty stomach; wait three hours before eating. 9. Take garlic on an empty stomach every morning.

12. Mash garlic and mix with Vaseline. This will attract the worms to the anal area. apply around anus every night for three days. raw foods . Mix raw garlic juice and rice vinegar with an equal part water and take on an empty stomach three days in a row. Avoid: unsanitary foods. changing cotton each day. do this three days in a row. 13. Or do a rice vinegar enema and hold in all night. Soak cotton with rice vinegar and plug up anus at night for three days. Take one teaspoon ground papaya seeds with warm water every morning on an empty stomach for seven days. uncooked meats or fish.Conditions ~ 163 10. 11.

.

Section Four Simple Vegetarian Recipes .

.

Some of the recipes call for tamari. Always choose foods according to what is seasonally available. Seaweeds come in a wide variety of shapes and sizes. Sea vegetables (also known as seaweeds) should be included in the diet regularly for they are an excellent source of nutrients. aged soybean and grain paste. and are delicious with vegetables or tofu. particularly the minerals. purify the blood. Couscous is a grain product that comes from the heart of durum wheat and is sweet in flavor. This is a naturally aged soy sauce. Many of the recipes use sea vegetables such as kombu. Feel free to make substitutions in the recipes with this in mind. To do it well one must be creative. Kuzu and arrowroot are thickening agents. used for seasoning. Wakame and kombu are good soup additions. The adventuresome may wish to try arame or hiziki. Miso is a salty. nori. these look like thin black noodles. wakame. or hiziki. Soy foods such as tofu. Also used for seasoning is Bragg's Liquid Aminos. and neutralize radioactive matter. They are also known to alkalinize the body. Let your taste buds guide you in the appropriate seasonings and combinations of dishes. similar to cornstarch. Ideally. soymilk and wheat gluten can provide good alternatives to the animal products. tempeh. 167 . this is a low-salt soy liquid available in health food stores.Simple Vegetarian Recipes T to serve as a guide to those wishing to move away from a heavily meat-based diet. help dissolve fat and mucous deposits. HESE RECIPES ARE PROVIDED Cooking is an art. Agar flakes can be used to make a gelatin-like dish called kanten. meat should comprise no more than 1/10 of the diet. paying attention to how the combinations look as well as how they taste. Kombu added to beans increases digestibility and decreases cooking time. The thin sheets called nori can be used to wrap grains or vegetables. One of the most flavorful sea vegetables is the red-leafed dulse.

goji berries (Gou Qi Zi. is cup (8 fluid ounces) . a person with candida yeast infection should leave out the tamari and miso (fermented foods) and substitute herb salt or some other seasoning. Those with hot type conditions may need to leave out the warming seasonings and so forth.168 ~ The Tao of Nutrition In general. The following common abbreviations are used: t. such as scallions. and jujube dates. The typical way of using these food herbs would be in soups. For example. is teaspoon T is tablespoon (3 teaspoons) c. Imbalances can be well addressed by the addition of therapeutic herbs to the diet. also called lycii berries). The rich colors and textures add a great deal to the dish. Many of the herbs in the Chinese pharmacopeia were actually recognized as foods prior to their use as medicines. Many delicious varieties from northern Pacific waters are available in larger health food or grocery stores. Dried seaweeds are always available in Asian markets. In the recipes that follow. substitutions may be needed to folIowa specific remedial diet. garlic. Chinese Dioscorea yam. Someone with a cold type condition may need to add more warming foods to the recipes. sea vegetables (except nori) need to be rinsed and soaked prior to using. washing is sufficient. ginger. For more information on cooking with Chinese herbs and specific recipes read 101 Ikgetarian Delights by Lily Chuang and Cathy McNease. A few of the really delicious ones are lily bulbs. stews or grain dishes. or pepper. For soups. and Chinese Ikgetarian Delights: Sugar and Dairy-Free Cookbook by Lily Chuang.

Add the onion. which has been dissolved in a small amount of broth. Serves 4. Summer Vegetable Soup 1 onion 2 carrots 1 clove garlic 1 zucchini 2 tomatoes 1 handful green beans 1 c. diced 1 butternut squash (or other winter squash) 1 small onion or bunch of scallions Few chopped leaves of Chinese cabbage 1 small piece of wakame seaweed. tamari or Bragg's Liquid Aminos 3 T. Garnish with a sprig of cilantro. Serves 4. fresh corn 1 c. heat until warm. or Bragg's Liquid Aminos and garnish with finely chopped cilantro and chives.Soups Sweet Squash and Seaweed Soup 1 stalk celery. add to 2 quarts water. garbanzo miso (or other light miso) Begin with 2 quarts water. When the vegetables are tender. Peel and dice the butternut squash and simmer in water. celery and cabbage. tomato sauce. Cook until tender then add 1 c. tamari. 169 . tomato sauce Herb salt to season Tamari or Bragg's Liquid Aminos Chop vegetables into small pieces. adding the wakame. add the tamari or Bragg's Liquid Aminos and garbanzo miso. cut in small pieces 2 T. Season to taste with herb salt.

onions. and red bell pepper. . Use the vegetables in some dish.inch pieces kombu seaweed 6 Chinese mushrooms 1 carrot 1 stalk celery 1 onion Add all the above ingredients to 2 quarts water and bring to a boil. Serves 4. perhaps a soup.170 ~ The Tao of Nutrition Soup Stock 4 six. It will store well in the refrigerator for about a week. add garlic. During the last 20 minutes of cooking. ginger juice 112 red bell pepper 2 T cilantro Soak beans overnight. Garnish with cilantro. Strain and use the liquid for making soups or grains.to eight. You may need to add more water. Blend for a creamy sauce to pour over grains or steamed vegetables. finely chopped 2 garlic cloves 3 T tamari 1 t. Black Bean Soup or Sauce 1 c. Discard soak water. black beans 1 four-inch piece kombu 1 small onion. Then simmer for 1 hour. Mix tamari and ginger juice in at the end. cover with fresh water and cook beans and kombu for about an hour.

Return to flame and simmer for 20 minutes to mix flavors. Blend vegetables with the cooking liquid. chopped 1 t. oregano. and umeboshi plum paste. To make into a sauce. olive oil. basil. add arrowroot dissolved in 114 c. . basil. umeboshi plum paste Cook vegetables with 3-4 cups water until tender. Serves 4-6. oregano.Soups ~ 171 Beet Soup or Sauce 5-6 carrots 2-3 large beets 2 onions 2-4 stalks celery 3-4 cloves garlic 2 T miso 2 T olive oil 1 t. chopped 1 t. Add the miso. Serve sauce over noodles or steamed vegetables. water to the mixture and heat until thick and smooth.

about 25 minutes. Season with chives. sliced very thin 1 red bell pepper. sliced very thin 1 small yellow squash. tofu noodles or finely sliced baked tofu 1 t. vegetable broth 3 c. soaked with stems removed and sliced very thin 6 white mushrooms. Then add the following: 3 T. . tamari 1 t. chopped 1 T. Serves 4. winter melon. tamari. tamari Cook together until tender. sliced into small pieces Put vegetables into 2 quarts water or vegetable broth and cook until tender. and peanut oil.172 ~ The Tao of Nutrition Chinese Noodle Soup 8 Chinese mushrooms. chopped 3 green onions. Winter Melon Soup 3 qt. cilantro. peeled and chopped 2 carrots 2 celery stalks 1 onion 12 Chinese mushrooms. sliced 1 small piece wakame. chives 1 t peanut oil 1 T. peanut oil or toasted sesame oil 1 small handful bean threads (mung bean noodles) Remove from fire and let sit covered for 5 minutes. Serves 4. stems removed 6 oz.

put in blender with the tamari. paprika. . coriander seed Pinch nutmeg Cook peas and kombu until soft. Add the vegetables and cook another 15 minutes. coriander seed powder. soy milk. green split peas 3 c. When vegetables are done. curry powder Y2 t. paprika Y2 t. tamari 112 c.Soups ~ 173 Creamy Split Pea Soup 1 c. and nutmeg. water 1 six-inch piece kombu 1 carrot 1 celery stalk 1 small onion 1 t. soymilk (or almond milk) 1 T cilantro % t. Serves 4-6. cilantro. curry powder.

lay out cooked rice. and red bell pepper. Serves 2. chopped finely 3 scallions. toasted and crushed Toast sheets of nori seaweed briefly over stovetop flame until it changes color from brown to green (this take about 15 seconds) or use sushi nori that has already been toasted. chopped 14 red bell pepper. steamed carrot slices. chopped green onion. chopped finely Cook brown rice as usual with water. Roll up like a burrito. 174 . Nori Burritos Sheets of nori seaweed Cooked rice Carrots. pickled ginger. and crushed. The edge can be moistened with tamari or Bragg's Liquid Aminos for added flavor. moistening the edge to make it stick. Cook another 20 minutes or until water is all absorbed. After about 25 minutes. water 1 carrot. scallions. toasted sesame seeds. add the carrot. On one end. sliced and steamed Pickled ginger Sesame seeds.Grain Dishes Fancy Rice 1 c. dry brown rice 2 c.

water V2 c. stir in the jicama. . When done. tempeh 2 small carrots 1 leek 1 celery stalk 5 Chinese mushrooms.Grains ~ 175 Vegetable Pie Crust: 1 c. soaked with stems removed Cook brown rice in water for 30 minutes. grated 1 t. Garnish the top with chopped cilantro. then add couscous and cook another 10-15 minutes or until water is absorbed. Press into a pie pan and add the filling ingredients. chives. jicama root. curry powder 1 t. basil Y4 t. chives V2 t. tamari or Bragg's Liquid Aminos Filling {finely chopped}: 6 oz. Serves 4-6. brown rice 2V2 c. couscous 1 c. curry powder and tamari. Steam the pie for 30 minutes. basil.

. clean out the seeds and strings. tamari Cover with lid and bake at 350 degrees for 1V4-11h hours (until fork easily goes into pumpkin). Serves 4-6. 1 T.4 c. Stuffed Pumpkin Cut the top off a small pumpkin. toasted sesame seeds. grated carrots 1 T.176 ~ The Tao of Nutrition Millet Patties 1 c. tamari Cook millet in water for 30 minutes. basil 3 scallions. or until water is absorbed. chopped 1 onion. sage 1h t. carrots and tamari and mix well. crushed 2-3 stalks celery. finely chopped 1 T. water h 1h t. Bake at 325 degrees for 20-30 minutes. They should be crisp on the outside. save the lid. thyme 1 t. rosemary . Serves 4-6. Add basil. scallions. Form 2inch wide patties and put on an oiled cookie sheet. finely chopped 1. parsley 1 t. Fill with the following mixture: 3 c. millet 21 c. cooked rice or barley 1 T.

spinach for the chard. 2. Press into a pie pan and top with chopped walnuts. Substitute 1 c. This is an very portable dish and easy to pack for lunch. boiling water or broth 6 Chinese mushrooms. grated or mashed 1 small leek 2 chard leaves 112 red bell pepper Chopped walnuts Soak grains in the water 15-30 minutes until soft. Substitute 1 c. Steam 40 minutes over medium flame. Substitute 1 c. fresh corn kernels for the red bell pepper. 3. couscous % c. Mix with vegetables. grated carrot for the squash. soaked and sliced 1 c.Grains ~ 177 Simple Couscous Pie 1 c. . all finely chopped. Serves 6. winter squash. Variations: 1. amaranth or quinoa or millet (presoaked a few hours) 1Vz c.

5. Substitute walnuts for the chestnuts 2. barley for V2 c.2 c. 1. soybeans 1 T sesame or sunflower seeds Soak above in 3 c. dried chestnuts 1/3 c. Pour into a bowl and steam over low flame for 2 hours. or honey or rice syrup.2 c. brown rice (or 112 barley. Variations: Substitute black or azuki beans for the soybeans. brown rice or sweet rice Soak together the above with 3 % c.2-2 hours. Season with ginger or cinnamon. Pour into blender and blend well. Chestnut Rice 1. Variations: 1. millet for 1.178 ~ The Tao of Nutrition Basic Protein Cereal 1 c. Substitute 1.2 brown rice) 1/3 c. Substitute 1. until chestnuts are tender. brown rice. or nut butter. Put into a bowl and steam for 11. rice . Substitute walnuts or pecans for the sesame seeds. raw peanuts 1 c. Serves 4.2 c. 2. 4. stirring occasionally. Serves 4. Substitute raw peanuts for the soybeans. 3. water overnight or in hot water for several hours.2 c. 1. water overnight or in hot water for a few hours.

2. Mix grains and water and steam for 1lIz-2 hours over a medium flame. 2. Add steamed peanuts. Serves 2-4. Add dates or raisins and cinnamon for seasoning. barley. 3. Variations: 1.Grains ~ 179 Simple Grain Dish 1 c. Add steamed peanuts. whole grains (brown rice. Y4 c. The Fastest Cereal: Couscous Pour 1 c. 3. water Preparation: 1. Garnish with scallions and cilantro. Let sit for 5 minutes. couscous. boiling water over % c. millet. Variations: 1. Add brown rice syrup or maple syrup. water to cook grains in pot with lid directly on stove (as opposed to steaming) for 45-50 minutes or until the water is absorbed. couscous. grain to 2-2l1z c. or a mixture of these) 2 c. . covered. sweet rice. Add V2 c. Serves 2-4. raisins and a pinch of cinnamon. Use 1 c. Omit the scallions and cilantro and add a grated apple. grated carrots and a pinch of ginger. 2.

Add a pinch of each: cinnamon. 2. Variations: 1. ginger. Add Y4 c. or pineapplecoconut juice) 1 medium banana 1/3 c. coconut. Pour into a pie plate and steam 30 minutes over medium flame. Serves 6. Add the rest of the ingredients and mix well. and nutmeg. Substitute 1 c. grated apple (or chopped fresh pineapple) 2 c. oatmeal (or millet flour or brown rice flour) 1/8 c. coconut milk (or soymilk.180 ~ The Tao of Nutrition Steamed Corn Bread 1 c. whole wheat flour 1 c. It is done when a chopstick inserted in the center comes out clean. . grated carrot for the apple or use V2 carrot and V2 apple. or almond milk. 3. goji berries or raisins (optional) Blend the liquid with the banana. cornmeal V2 c.

powdered brown or black sweet rice and 2 c. Form a small ball. Steam for 11h hours on medium flame. a little at a time. Then put in blender.Grains ~ 181 Mochi* Preparation: 1. water. coconut. or toasted soybean flour. brown or black sweet rice in 2 c. baked tofu and seasoning. sesame.com. Chinese Vegetarian Delights: Sugar and Dairy-Free Cookbook available at www. Next. Soak 2 c. Use wet hands to handle the rice paste. carob powder. 2. Let the rice paste cool. covered.taostar. Continue until all is blended. * This recipe is reprinted courtesy of Lily Chuang from her cookbook. nut butter. close the patty and form a ball. . Roll it over one of the following: sunflower. black. Serves 4-6. or cashew meal. water. cooked Chinese mushrooms. or mung-good in summer). Open and stir well about 1h hour before it is done. and put a small amount of one of the following fillings in the center: a combination of chopped. seaweed. or raisins. fill with bean paste and honey or rice syrup. This makes an excellent dessert. bean paste (azuki. flatten between hands. For a sweeter variety. Mix together well. Combine 2 c.

or on the stove for 2V2-3 hours on low. barley flakes V2 c. brown rice % c. Serves 4. raw skinless peanuts 10 Chinese jujube dates· 1 slice fresh ginger root Cook all ingredients with 5 c. water in a crock-pot overnight. . stirring occasionally.182 ~ The Tao of Nutrition Sweet Breakfast Porridge % c.

Bean and Tofu Dishes
Tofu and Mushroom Casserole

2 lb. plain tofu, lightly steamed 12 large Chinese mushrooms, soaked until soft, thinly sliced 2 c. pea pods 1 bunch scallions 2 T tamari or Bragg's Liquid Aminos 3 T kuzu (or arrowroot or cornstarch) Slice tofu into 1/2 inch slices and put in bottom of rectangular baking dish. Lightly simmer mushrooms then add pea pods and scallions for last 5 minutes. Put these vegetables on top of the tofu. Use the vegetable cooking water plus enough water to make 3 c. liquid. Add tamari. Dissolve kuzu in a small amount of liquid; add to the rest of the liquid, simmer, stirring often, until the liquid thickens. Pour this gravy on top of the tofu and vegetable mixture. Garnish with crushed, toasted almonds and finely chopped cilantro. Serves 4.
Azuki Bean and Squash Casserole

1 c. azuki beans, soaked overnight Two 6-8 inch pieces of kombu 1 small butternut squash or other winter squash Cover beans and kombu with water and simmer about one hour, adding water if needed. Peel and cube the squash and add to the beans. Cook until tender, about liz hour. Stir in a pinch of sea salt or 1-2 teaspoons tamari. Serves 4.

183

184 ~ The Tao of Nutrition

Clinton's Savory Azuki Beans with Chestnuts

1 c. azuki beans, soaked overnight 114 c. dried chestnuts, soaked 1 hour 4 six-inch strips kombu seaweed 1 t. tamari or pinch sea salt 1 t. goji berries (optional) Soak azuki beans overnight; discard soak water. Place kombu in pot then add chestnuts and beans. Cover with 2 inches water and bring to a boil. Simmer 2-3 hours, adding enough water to keep beans covered. Add tamari and the goji berries to-15 minutes before cooking is done. Serves 4.
Tofu Skins and Mushrooms

12 strips dried tofu skins (available at Asian grocery stores) 6 Chinese mushrooms, thinly sliced, stems removed 8 white mushrooms, sliced Red bell pepper, sliced 4-6 c. water 2 T. tamari 1-2 T. kuzu (or arrowroot) Soak the dried tofu skins and Chinese mushrooms in 4-6 cups water and tamari for at least 4 hours. Then tie each strip in a knot, and simmer for 20 minutes. Add the white mushrooms and the red bell pepper and continue to simmer another 10-15 minutes. Pour off the liquid and thicken it with kuzu (do this in a separate pan, heating until thick). Pour the sauce over the tofu and mushroom mixture and serve over steamed greens. Serves 4.

Bean and Tofu Dishes ~ 185

Steamed Peanuts

1 c. raw peanuts 2 c. water

Soak peanuts in water overnight or in hot water for a few hours. Steam using the soaking water for 1V2-2 hours over medium flame. This makes a delicious, nutritious addition to cereals, vegetable dishes and grains.
Scrambled Tofu

V21b. tofu 2 stalks celery 6 white mushrooms 1 tomato 1 t. tamari Chop vegetables finely. Saute in 114 c. water or 1 T oil. When almost done, add crumbled tofu. Let heat 5-10 minutes. Season with tamari. Variations: 1. Substitute one beaten egg for V2 of the tofu. 2. Substitute one small zucchini squash for the mushrooms.

186 ~ The Tao of Nutrition

Tofu with Seaweed

1 package baked tofu, sliced or 1f2 lb. plain tofu, cubed 1 handful hiziki or arame seaweed, soaked in hot water 20-30 minutes 1 large carrot, diced V2 c. jicama, diced 1 small onion, chopped 4 Chinese mushrooms, presoaked and sliced Stir-fry carrots, onions, mushrooms and lastly jicama in small amount of water (or mushroom soak water). When almost done, add the tofu and seaweed. Cover and let steam for 5-10 minutes. Season with tamari and toasted sesame oil.

Variations: 1. Substitute wakame or kombu for the hiziki. These need to be presoaked for 1-2 hours. 2. Add diced burdock root (gobo) at the beginning with the carrots. 3. Use white mushrooms instead of the Chinese ones.
Tofu Dressing

lh lb. plain tofu
1;4 c. oil

1 T lemon juice 1 t. honey or rice syrup 1 t. rice or apple cider vinegar V2 t. tamari 1 T sesame tahini Blend all the ingredients until creamy. Use on salads, vegetables or sandwiches.

Variations: 1. Add 1;4 c. poppy seeds. 2. Add l1f2 t. prepared mustard. 3. Add 1f2 t. basil and V4 t. garlic powder. 4. Add two whole green onions.

Herbal Dishes
For vegetarians, use vegetable broth instead of chicken broth in the following recipes, and substitute baked tofu for meat or fish. Note: 28 grams = 1 ounce
Basic Herb Soup

1-3 oz. (30-90 grams) herb combination V2-11h lb. meat or fish (optional) V2 c. grain % c. beans, presoaked (optional) 1-3 c. chopped vegetables 6-8 c. water or broth Cook herbs, meat, beans, grains and hard vegetables (like carrots, potatoes) about 1 hour, until done. Add soft or leafy vegetables and finish cooking for 15-30 minutes. Season to taste with miso, tamari, soy sauce, rice vinegar or sea salt. The soup could be prepared in a crockpot on high heat for 3-4 hours.
Dang Gui Cornish Hen Stew

1 Cornish hen (or 3 chicken legs) 10 grams Dang Cui (Angelica sinensis) 2 parsnips, chopped 2 carrots, chopped 1 onion, chopped 2 celery stalks, chopped 1 handful wakame or dulse seaweed 8 c. water Put all ingredients together and simmer for 1 hour. Remove the Cornish hen (or chicken legs). Remove bones, chop meat, and return to the soup. Cook for an additional 15 minutes. Season to taste with miso or soy sauce and chopped cilantro (or parsley). This soup will nourish Chi and blood.
187

Usually 3 parts water to 1 part oats. Season to taste with coriander seed and sea salt. water for 1 hour. chopped 1 carrot or sweet potato. Season to taste with sea salt. .188 ~ The Tao of Nutrition Shan Yao Longevity Stew 10 grams Chinese Yam (Shan Yao) 10 grams goji berries (Gou Oi Zi. Then add 6-8 c. Black Bean Stew Simmer V2 c. cumin seeds and brown rice vinegar. Goji Berry (Gou Qi Zi) Oats Add a small handful of goji berries (also called lycii berries) and a small handful of almonds (or walnuts) into Scotch oats and cook until soft. This stew strengthens Spleen and Kidney. This will tonify Chi and blood. goji berries (Gou Oi Zi) 1/2 oz. Long Yan Rou (longan fruit) 1 fennel root. white or brown rice 8 c. black beans with 3 c. chopped Vz c. soaked and sliced Simmer the whole dish for 1 hour. water (include the shiitake soaking water) Put all ingredients together and simmer for 1 hour. chopped 6-7 shiitake mushrooms. Shan Yao (Chinese yam) 1 oz. also called lycii berries) 10 grams lotus seed (Lian Zi)-presoaked 5 shiitake mushrooms-presoaked 1 onion. This will tonify Chi and blood. chicken broth and the following herbs and vegetables: 1 oz.

basil 1 t. chopped 1 handful wakame seaweed 1 oz. sliced Combine the sauteed ingredients and the blended ones together with the following seasonings: 1 t. Bragg's Liquid Aminos or soy sauce. than blend all ingredients until smooth with the cooking water In a separate pan saute in olive oil: 1 purple onion. lily bulbs (Bai He) Enough water to cover vegetables Cook the above ingredients together until the squash are soft. to taste . chopped 2 celery stalks. Remove the butternut squash peel.Herbal Dishes ~ 189 Butternut Mushroom Soup 1 butternut squash. chopped 12 fresh shiitake mushrooms. oregano Sea salt.

Chinese yam (Shan Yao) lily bulb (Bai He) goji berries (Gou Oi Zi) longan fruit (Long Van Rou) Simmer for 45 minutes. chopped 1 fennel bulb. Remove from flame and season with: 1 T lemon juice 1 t. This soup is both tonifying and calming. Return to pan and add the chopped vegetables and the following presoaked herbs: 1 oz. 1 oz. coriander powder 1h t. chopped 1 red bell pepper.190 ~ The Tao of Nutrition Sweet and Spicy Pumpkin Soup 1 kabocha squash (Japanese pumpkin) 1 onion. 1 oz. 1 oz. . ginger juice 1h t. chopped Cook squash in enough water to cover until soft. then blend with the cooking water. curry powder Sea salt or soy sauce to taste Garnish with chopped cilantro.2 t. cinnamon 1.

green beans. Use as a garnish for a strong nutty flavor. etc. Basil and cilantro are particularly good with vegetables. or your favorite cooking herbs. broccoli. cauliflower. S. 4.Miscellaneous Recipes Sesame Seed Garnish Wash 2 c. Stir-fry in a small amount of water or broth. 5. brown sesame seeds.e. sea salt in dry skillet until the chlorine gas is removed (you will smell it). nori. soy sauce (or Bragg's Liquid Aminos). Then mix together sesame seeds and salt and grind in blender or in mortar and pestle.) When the last vegetables go in. Add chopped green onions at the end. whole. then add the faster cooking vegetables (i. Variations: 1. season to taste with oil. kombu. Basic Vegetable Stir-Fry Use a variety of vegetables.). 191 . diced or sliced.e. heat V2 t. you can add tofu or gluten pieces. Add Chinese mushrooms (presoaked) at the beginning. 2. etc. jicama. the slower cooking vegetables and presoaked seaweed first (i. zucchini. When the vegetables and seaweed are cooked. covered. Toast in dry skillet. herb salt. Store in the refrigerator. Separately. kelp powder may be substituted for salt. Salt can be omitted if desired. Add steamed peanuts or almonds. carrots. Add one garlic clove at the beginning. stirring often until seeds can be easily crushed between the fingers. Add finely grated ginger toward the end of the cooking.

diced 2 leeks. broccoli. add the zucchini and red bell pepper and cook another 5 minutes. diced 5 white mushrooms. Lastly. Add the mushrooms. almonds 1f2 t. Serves 2-4. Cover and cook 5 minutes. Garnish with toasted sesame seeds. Serves 2-4. . carrots. sliced 1 T peanut oil % c. Pour out any remaining water into a bowl. and tamari. chopped 1 red bell pepper. broccoli. Stir-Fry Over Noodles 2 c. Add arrowroot and stir until dissolved. and water or broth. Put in skillet with about % inch water. Stir in almonds and toasted sesame oil. Serve over whole wheat or tofu noodles. chopped 1 carrot. white mushrooms V2-% c. Cover and steam until vegetables are tender. Season to taste with basil. cilantro. sliced 2 garlic cloves 1 zucchini. toasted sesame oil 1 T arrowroot (or cornstarch) Chop vegetables into small pieces. pour back into vegetables and heat briefly until liquid thickens. water or broth Heat peanut oil and saute the garlic and leeks.192 ~ The Tao of Nutrition Almond Nut Stir-Fry 1 small yam 1 small head cauliflower 1 leek or onion 2 summer squash 1 handful green beans % lb.

strain and put the solids back in the blender and repeat the process two more times. Combining all of the strained milk there should be a total of 6 cups. . water Y2 t. Soybean Milk Soak soybeans at least 8 hours. Blend and mix back into the other liquid. Soymilk can be used plain. Put some of the liquid back in the blender with the vanilla. Put the pulp back in the blender with more water and repeat the process until you have 1Y2 quarts of soymilk. Bring to a boil and simmer for 1520 minutes. vanilla or almond extract 2 T honey or maple syrup Pinch cinnamon Soak almonds for at least 4 hours. squeezing out the milk.Miscellaneous Recipes ~ 193 Almond Milk 1 c. stirring often to prevent sticking and boiling over. then strain through a cloth. or as long as three days in the refrigerator. water. honey and cinnamon. Blend soaked beans with 3 c. or blended with fruits such as papaya or banana (cool soymilk before mixing with fruit). Grind in blender with water. Store in the refrigerator and use within a few days. This same procedure can be used to make other nut milks like cashew or sesame milk. Almond milk can also be sweetened by grinding in 5-6 dates or a small handful of raisins. mixed with carob powder and rice syrup. raw almonds 2 c.

then mix with soymilk. rice syrup (or maple syrup) 1 bar agar seaweed Rinse agar. Flavor with 1. Substitute almond milk for the soymilk and garnish the top with 1/4 c. 3. pecans. pecans or walnuts 1/4-1/3 c. maple or brown rice syrup 3 T arrowroot (or kudzu or sweet rice flour) 2 T carob powder Blend all ingredients well. walnuts. Add 1h c.194 ~ The Tao of Nutrition Protein Pudding 3 c. almonds when almost firm. sunflower seeds. Pecan Pudding 2 c. soymilk 1/2 c. raisins or chopped dates. . Heat over low flame until thickened. Serve warm. Pour into dishes and let firm. or cashews. Stir in syrup. stirring constantly. Cook together until agar is dissolved. vanilla or 3 T carob powder. 4. Variations: 1. soymilk 1/3 c. Add 1/2 C.2 t. 2.

For tender gluten. oregano 1 t. Let sit one hour. ginger. water Tamari to season Mix flour and water until it forms a stiff dough. Add to the tomato mixture. Pour off the starchy white water and repeat the process until the water is clear. drop small pieces into boiling water for 30 minutes. . dried) V2 t. Tamari. garlic and onion until tender. and onions make a good marinade. Mix arrowroot with a small amount of water. garlic. chopped tomatoes 1 bell pepper. and heat stirring often until thick. onion powder and tamari. Then cover with water and knead with both hands. Basic Tomato Sauce 3 c. Then put in blender with the basil. oregano. Remove from water and season with tamari. cover the finished gluten with water and let stand for 1-2 days before using.Miscellaneous Recipes ~ 195 Wheat Gluten (Wheat Meat) 2V2lbs. Gluten can also be marinated before or after cooking. gluten flour (or unbleached white flour or whole wheat flour) 1 qt. Return to pan when well blended. chopped 1 garlic clove 1 small onion. Gluten can be used whenever a "meaty" textured food is desired. To cook. chopped 2 T fresh basil (or V2 t. bell pepper. This will take many washings and much kneading. onion powder 1V2 T tamari 2 T arrowroot (or kudzu or cornstarch) Cook the tomatoes.

2 c. garlic or onion powder Blend the oil and vinegar by whisk.2 c. Add 1. basil to the oil and vinegar mixture. Serve over mixed greens or grains. Add 1. shaker or blender.2 t.2 t. roughly chopped 1 T shallots or chives. chopped Salt and pepper to taste Blend together until smooth. brown rice vinegar liz bunch cilantro. sauteed white mushrooms. add 1. vinegar. Serve over noodles or steamed spaghetti squash. zucchini 3. olive oil Y4 c.196 ~ The Tao of Nutrition Variations for Basic Tomato Sauce: 1. Coriander Vinaigrette 2 T coriander seeds Y2 c. Simple Oil and Vinegar Dressing 1. For an Italian dressing. You may add the optional ingredients. oil Y2 c.2 c. . oregano and 1. 2. rice or apple cider Lemon juice (optional) 1 T tamari or Bragg's Liquid Aminos (optional) Y4 t.

Dijon mustard 1h c. chopped crystallized ginger 1 T coriander or fennel seeds % c. sesame oil 1h c. honey 1h t. chopped sweet onion 1h c. each: finely shredded cabbage. Pecan Dressing 1h c. olive oil Blend together until smooth. Serve over dark leafy greens for a Liver benefiting effect. whole with seeds removed 1h c. salt 2 c.Miscellaneous Recipes ~ 197 Lemon Vinaigrette 1 clove garlic 1h lemon. red wine vinegar 1h t. coconut milk 3 T lemon juice 2 T honey Salt to taste Blend the above ingredients together and serve over the following cole slaw: 1h c. chopped . lemon juice l1h t. toasted pecans 1h c. pepper 1h t. cilantro. fennel and carrots 1/3 c.

At the end of the growth period.Sprouts Sprouts are easy to grow and very nutritious. mung beans and lentils. Whole peas or whole wheat may also be added to this mix. Sprout these in the same fashion as above. Pour off the soak water and rinse twice daily. dark place for 3-5 days remembering to rinse twice daily. The nutritional value of sprouts is increased manifold over the unsprouted seeds. Store in a warm. These can be eaten raw or lightly sauteed. 198 . A jar with a screen on top is very handy for growing sprouts. Light Mix This blend is alfalfa seeds. These sprouts can be eaten raw as a garnish in salads and sandwiches. Soak seeds (together or separately) overnight. put in sunlight for 30-60 minutes for the leaves to produce chlorophyll. red clover seeds and daikon radish seeds (optional). Rainbow Mix This is a blend of azuki beans.

199 . Soy Burger Combine cooked soy and garbanzo beans. and celery. green onions and cilantro. cabbage. rice syrup. shredded red cabbage. garlic and lemon juice. Rainbow Sprouts Lightly saute the following in water or oil: mung.Sandwich Fillings These fillings can be used with any whole grain bread or pita (pocket) breads or rolled inside whole wheat tortillas (chapatis). Mash and mix with sesame tahini. finely chopped tofu. grated carrots. grated carrots. grated apple and a pinch of ginger or cinnamon. Colorful Sandwich Steam beets and carrots. Mash and mix with sauteed. and enough cornstarch or arrowroot or flour to hold together. sliced mushrooms. soaked hiziki seaweed and grated ginger. Steam for 15-20 minutes over medium flame. Garbanzo Spread Cook garbanzo beans until soft. or cashew butter. garlic powder and a pinch of salt. Eggplant Spread Steam eggplant until soft. Sweet Treat Combine almond butter. Nut Butter Blend almond butter. sesame butter. azuki and lentil sprouts. Mash and mix with sesame tahini. lemon juice. Garnish with alfalfa/clover sprouts and tomato slices. grated carrots.

The finished congee can be mildly seasoned with sea salt. and good for people with weak digestion. brown. water (depending on how thick or thin you want the dish to be) Cook for about 4-6 hours on a low flame or overnight in a crock pot. 200 . Congees are highly digestible.Congee Recipes A congee (also known as jook. sweet. miso or honey. Traditionally cooked with rice or millet. cornmeal. easily assimilated. rice (white. and guinoa. basmati) 5-10 c. It may be used for other meals by those who are weak or chronically ill. porridge or gruel) is a soupy grain dish typically eaten for breakfast. fatigue. Basic Congee Recipe 1 c. medicinal herbs. congees can be cooked with other grains. and spices. or poor appetite and those who are convalescing from surgery or illness. or a combination of grains. including barley. The basic recipe can be modified with the addition of therapeutic foods.

turmeric powder to activate the blood and relieve pain 1h c. Job's tears or pearled barley (Yi Yi Ren) to promote urina- tion. chopped walnuts. chopped parsley. aduki beans % c. dried seaweed such as wakame. the last 10-15 minutes: % c. 10 grams Chinese yam (Shan Yao) and 5 shiitake mushrooms to benefit the immune system (remove the astragalus at the end of cooking as it remains woody) % c. mung beans to clear heat and toxins % c. goji berries (Gou Oi Zi) to benefit the eyes and nourish blood and Yin 10 grams astragalus (Huang Oi). bloating and indigestion % c. chopped almonds to descend the Lung chi and stop cough Congee variations to be added at the end of the cooking. reduce hypertension 1 chopped carrot to promote digestion and strengthen the Lung 1 t. nori or dulse to reduce yellow phlegm 2 t. reduce damp and heat 2 chopped celery stalks to clear heat. chopped scallions and 6 slices of fresh ginger to relieve chills and nasal congestion . almonds. chopped mint to promote sweat and relieve fever and sore throat % c. pine nuts or sesame seed to promote a bowel movement 1 chopped pear % c.Congee Recipes ~ 201 Congee variations to be added at the beginning of the cooking process: % c. to promote digestion and relieve food stagnation. fennel seeds or coriander seed to relieve gas and bloating 5 pitted Chinese dates (Da Zao) and 3 slices fresh ginger to harmonize the Stomach and relieve nausea or vomiting V4 c.

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Section Five Sample Meal Plans .

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we tend to eat lighter and include more fresh fruits and cooling foods. lentils and rice. Lunch is usually lighter because of the typical time frame within which we have to eat at midday. O 205 . they may be substituted for tofu or other soy products for up to 10% of your diet. or black bean soup with corn bread. Breakfast should sustain us through the first portion of our productive day. eggs. Examples are soybean milk over oatmeal. If your diet includes fish and meat.Sample Meal Plans ur meal plans are intended to provide some direction in nutritional meal planning. Dairy products. They are not meant to be a rigid regimen. nuts and seeds are also used to complement grain or bean protein. Moister foods will be needed during the hot and dry season. As a vegetarian. each meal will be constructed around a grain food with fresh vegetables and fruits. Thus we will need to eat more baked and warming foods during the cold season. those too can be substituted as protein sources. rather a framework within which to plan your meals. Dinnertime is usually more leisurely. Fall/winter meals need to provide extra fuel to sustain our energy and keep us warm. If your diet includes eggs or dairy products. although this is an ideal time for the biggest meal of the day. so don't skimp on it. In the spring/summer. it is important to eat a variety of bean foods also to provide a more balanced protein than grain alone. Feel free to make substitutions to suit your individual needs. and allows for more creativity in the kitchen. In general. Try not to overeat before bedtime.

Spring/Summer Meals Monday BREAKFAST • Cream of rice or wheat with raisins and cinnamon • Steamed apple LUNCH • Winter melon soup with tofu* • Rice cake with nut butter DINNER • Stir-fried vegetables with tofu and gluten * • Brown rice * Tuesday BREAKFAST • Scrambled tofu with tomato and zucchini • Brown rice with pecans LUNCH • Chinese noodle soup* • Couscous with steamed peanuts* • Papaya slices DINNER • Fancy rice* • Brown rice * Please note: Those dishes that are marked with an asterisk (*) are listed in the recipe section. 206 . Detailed preparation instructions are included.

Meal Plans ~ 207 Wednesday BREAKFAST • Apple/banana or carrot corn bread * • Soybean milk* LUNCH • Fruit salad with soy yogurt and almonds • Brown rice drink (amasake) DINNER • Tomato-mushroom sauce over whole-wheat noodles and tempeh cubes* • Steamed broccoli Thursday BREAKFAST • Couscous with grated apples and raisins * • Almond milk * LUNCH • Nori rolls with rice. steamed carrots and stir-fry cilantro * • Brown rice drink (amasake) DINNER • Vegetable tofu stir-fry* • Machi rice balls * .

raisins.208 ~ The Tao of Nutrition Friday BREAKFAST • Steamed pineapple corn bread* • Almond pudding* LUNCH • Pita bread with rainbow sprouts and carrots* • Green salad with tofu dressing* DINNER • Tofu skins and mushrooms* • Brown rice* • Steamed eggplant Saturday BREAKFAST • Simple cereal with dates. and sunflower seeds LUNCH • Summer vegetable soup* • Chapatis with avocado and sprouts DINNER • Couscous-corn pie* • Green salad with sesame garnish * Sunday BREAKFAST • Scrambled tofu with egg* • Couscous pie* • Soybean milk * LUNCH • Garbonzo spread on whole-wheat bread * • Apple slices DINNER • Vegetable stir-fry* • Protein cereal with peanuts and pecans* .

raisins. soy sauce.Fall/Winter Meals Monday BREAKFAST • Basic protein cereal with azuki or black beans • Steamed tofu with ginger. and nut meal LUNCH • Stir-fry vegeta bles with tofu and seaweed * • Simple grain dish * DINNER • Tofu skins with Chinese mushrooms* • Rice/barley/couscous* • Steamed broccoli Tuesday BREAKFAST • Simple cereal with dates. and peanuts* • Steamed corn bread with sesame butter and rice syrup* LUNCH • Soyburger sandwich * • Vegetable soup DINNER • Couscous-corn pie* • Azuki beans and chestnuts* • Steamed spinach 209 .

scallions. and miso * • Steamed broccoli and green beans • Soy milk * LUNCH • Nori burritos * • Black bean soup * DINNER • Tofu-mushroom casserole* • Stuffed pumpkin * • Pecan pudding * Thursday B REAKFAST • Steamed corn bread with black bean spread and sliced banana * • Soy milk with carob * LUNCH • Vegetable pie * • Steamed greens DINNER • Cashew stir-fry* • Millet and rice * • Protein pudding* .210 ~ The Tao of Nutrition Wednesday B REAKFAST • Simple cereal with ginger.

mushrooms. beets. and spinach • Pita bread sandwiches with mochi * • Cinnamon soy milk * LUNCH • Stir-fry vegetables over noodles* • Sweet squash and seaweed soup* DINNER • Azuki bean and squash casserole* • Sweet brown rice and couscous* • Cauliflower Saturday BREAKFAST • Simple cereal with tempeh. and celery* • Steamed apples LUNCH • Creamy split pea soup* • Millet patties* DINNER • Beet sauce over noodles* • Tofu and Chinese mushrooms* Sunday BREAKFAST • Chestnut rice with peanuts* • Steamed carrots LUNCH • Chapatis with rainbow sprouts and carrots* • Steamed yam DINNER • Black bean over rice* • Vegetable stir-fry* .Meal Plans ~ 211 Friday BREAKFAST • Steamed corn.

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Section Six Appendix .

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Chart 1: Energetic Properties of Foods Vegetables Cold Cool Neutral Warm Hot Chinese cabbage Mung bean sprouts Seaweed Snow peas Water chestnut White mushrooms Alfalfa sprouts Asparagus Bamboo shoots Beets Bok choy Broccoli Burdock root Button mushrooms Cabbage Carrot Cauliflower Celery Cilantro Collards Corn Cucumber Daikon radish Dandelion greens Eggplant Endive lettuce Lotus root Potato Pumpkin Romaine lettuce Soybean sprouts Spinach Summer squash Turnip Watercress Winter melon Winter squash Zucchini Chard Jerusalem artichoke Lettuce Shitake mushrooms Sweet potato Taro root Yam Bell pepper Chinese chives Ganoderma mushrooms Green beans Kale Leek Mustard Green Onion Parsley Parsnip Garlic Scallions 215 .

Energetic Properties of Foods (continued) Fruits Cold Cool Neutral Warm Hot Banana Cantaloupe Grapefruit Mulberry Pear Pear-apple Watermelon Apple Apricot Avocado Cranberry Fig Lemon Limes Orange Peach Persimmon Strawberry Tomato Chinese date Coconut milk Goji berry Loquat Mango Olive Blueberry Cherry Chinese prune Coconut Dried papaya Grape Hawthorn berry Litchi (lychee) Papaya Pineapple Plum Raspberry Tangerine G ra in s Barley Kamut Millet Pearl barley White rice Wheat Buckwheat Brown rice Corn meal Rice bran Rye Amaranth Oats Ouinoa Spelt Sweet rice Wheat bran Wheat germ 216 .

Energetic Properties of Foods (continued) Seeds and Beans Cold Cool Neutral Warm Hot Pumpkin seeds Mung beans Lima beans Soybeans Tofu Winter melon seeds Almond Azuki bean Black sesame seed Filbert Kidney bean Lotus seed Peanut Pea Sunflower seed Black bean Brown sesame seed Cashew Chestnut Garbonzo bean Lentil Navy bean Pecan Pine nut Pinto bean Walnut Animal Products Pork Chicken egg Clam Crab Dairy products Duck Fish (ocean) Gelatin Oyster 217 Beef Chicken Fish (freshwater) Goat's milk Ouail egg Shrimp Turkey Lamb .

Energetic Properties of Foods (continued) He rbs Cold Cool Neutral Warm Hot Bamboo shavings Mulberry leaf American ginseng Oyster shell Cilantro Cassia seeds Chinese cucumber Reed root Corn silk Kudzu Chrysanthemum (pueraria root) Goldenseal root Mint leaf Gypsum Honeysuckle flower Lily bulb Mother of pearl shell Motherwort leaf Chinese yam Licorice root Loquat leaf Lycii (goji) berry Poria mushroom Peach kernel Persimmon cap Anise seed Fresh ginger Black pepper Basil Hawthorn Cinnamon berry bark Cardamom seed Longan fruit Dry ginger Carob pod Mugwort Citrus peel Oriental ginseng Squid bone Clove Coriander seed Dang gui Fennel seed Mis cellaneous Salt Vitamin C White sugar Tea (green) Spirulina ChIarella Barley malt Rice malt Black fungus Honey White fungus 218 Brown sugar Coffee Molasses Rice vinegar Wine .

Stomach Pericardium. Large intestine Pungent Smell/nose White Sadness Crying Skin and body hair Coughing Po Chi (physical Chi) Jin (mucous secretions) Dryness Autumn Kidneys Bladder Salty Hearing! ears Black Fear Groaning Bone Shivering Ching Chi (creative Chi) Sexual fluids Cold Winter Flavor Sense Color Emotion Voice Physical manifestation Mode of action Sweet Touch/ skin Yellow Worry Singing Flesh Hiccuping Yuan Chi (primal Chi) Saliva Humidity Late summer and between seasons Twitching Internal energy Hun Chi (psychic Chi) Body fluid Bile and tears Climate Season Wind Spring . Heart.Chart 2: Five Elements Correspondences Wood Organ Fire Earth Metal Water Liver. Small Intestine. Sanjiao Pancreas Bitter Taste/ tongue Red Joy (mania) Laughter Blood vessels Itching Shen Chi (directing Chi) Blood and swea t Heat Summer 2 19 Lungs. Gall bladder Sour Sight/eyes Green Anger Shouting Muscles and tendons Spleen.

Five Elements Correspondences (continued) Wood Orientation Development Negative drive Corrupting influence Attributes of mind Moral trait Fire Earth Metal Water East Birth Hostility Competition Rationality Benevolence South Growth Greed Sex Spirituality Humility Center Maturity Ambition Mind Tranquility Trustfulness West Harvest Stubbornness Money Sentimentality Rectitude North Storage Desire Alcohol Desire Wisdom 220 .

Chart 3: Five Energetic Transformations The Creation Cycle The Control Cycle 221 .

Chart 4: Translations of Food & Herb Names Name alismatis root abalone shell American ginseng apricot kernels astragalus bamboo shavings betel nut black fungus black sesame seed burdock root cardamom seed Pin Yin ze xie shi jue ming xi yang shen xing ren huangqi zhu ru bing lang hei mu er heizhi rna niu banggen bai dou kou sha ren jue ming zi ji nei jin Latin Other Rhizoma Alismatis Concha Haliotidis Radix Panacis Quinquefolii Semen Armeniacae Amarum Radix Astragali Caulis Bambusae in Taenia Semen Arecae Auricularia Auricula wood ears Semen Sesami Nigrum Radix Arctii gobo Fructus Amomi Rotundus Fructus Amomi Villosum Semen Cassiae cassia seeds chicken gizzard Endothelium Corneum Gigeriae Galli Chinese cucumber tian hua fen Radix Trichosanthis Chinese date da zao Fructus Jujubae Chinese date (black) hei zao Fructus Jujubae hongzao Chinese date (red) Fructus Jujubae Chinese prune wumei Fructus Mume shanyao Rhizoma Dioscoreae Chinese yam juhua Flos Chrysanthmi chrysanthemum Pericarpium Citri citrus peel chen pi Reticulatae cinnamon bark rou gui Cortex Cinnamomi Radix Clematidis clematis wei ling xian cloves ding xiang Flos Caryophylli Stigma Maydis cornsilk yu mixu dandelion pu gongying Herba Taraxaci Radix Angelica Sinensis danggui danggui fennel seed xiao hui xiang Fructus Foeniculi fritillaria bulb chuan bei mu Bulbus Fritillariae Cirrhosae ganoderma reishi Ganoderma mushroom ling zhi Rhizoma Zingiberis sheng jiang ginger root (fresh) Rhizoma Zingiberis ginger root (dried) gan jiang Semen Ginkgo baiguo ginkgo nut 222 .

Translations of Food & Herb Names (continued) Name Pin Yin Latin Other lycii goji berry gou qi zi Fructus Lycii shigao Gypsum Fibrosum gypsum hawthorn berry shan zha Fructus Crataegi Flos Lonicerae honeysuckle jin yinhua kudzu Radix Puerariae gegen licorice gan cao Radix Glycyrrhizae ling zhi mushroom (See ganoderma mushroom) litchi kernel Ii zhi he Semen Litchi loquat leaf Folium Eriobotryae pi pa ye lotus root lian gen Rhizoma Nelumbinis lian zi Semen Nelumbinis lotus seed Litchi chinensis li zhi lychee Fructus Lycii lycii berry gou qi zi Bulbus Lilii baihe lily bulb Arillus Longan longan fruit longyan rou Saccharum Granorum yi tang malt syrup Concha Margaritae mother of pearl shell zhenzhu mu Folium Leonuri motherwortleaf yi mu cao Fructus Mori mulberry sang shen Folium Artemisiae argyi ai ye mugwort Semen Phaseoli radiati mung bean lu dou Radix Ginseng Oriental ginseng ren shen Concha Ostreae mull oyster shell tao ren Semen Persicae peach kernel Semen Coicis pearl barley yi yi ren persimmon cap poria mushroom prunes (unripe) pumpkin seed raspberry reed root squid bone walnut white fungus winter melon seed shi di fu ling! fu shen wumei nan gua zi fu pen zi lu gen hai piao xiao Calyx Kaki Poria Fructus Mume Semen Cucurbitae Fructus Rubi Rhizoma Phragmitis Endoconcha Sepiae kuzu litchi goji barley malt coix Job's tears hu tao ren Semen Juglandis bai mu er. yi er Tremella donggua ren Semen Benincasae silver ears 223 .

an entity that denotes the functional aspect of the body in Chinese Medicine. Carminative .accumulation of fluids in the abdomen. and for the purpose of maintaining health and curing disease. substance that relieves gas from the gastrointestinal tract.substance that has a constricting action or causes contraction of orifices. Chi gong (qi gong) . feverish condition with cooling foods or herbs. Clears heat . Arteriosclerosis .a set of breathing exercises for strengthening and balancing the energy (Chi). Colitis .to remove or neutralize pathogenic heat from the body.energy or life force. Examples of astringent action are to stop sweating or stop diarrhea.inflammation of the colon. the sepals of a flower. usually due to cirrhosis of the liver. to soothe a hot. relaxing the mind.hardening of the arteries. usually due to aging or high consumption of fatty foods over a long period of time. A persimmon cap is the green papery calyx at the stem end of the orange fruit.substance that promotes normal flow of energy and removes obstructions. Cap .calyx. Ascites . 224 . Chi (qi) .Glossary Astringent .

a condition caused by cold.condition of weakness or lack of either energy or substance due to illness or improper lifestyle.one who frequently tends to feel cold. .e. Conjunctivitis . and application of warmth (i. elicits a cooling response from the body.e. Deficiency .a food that has a counteracting effect to heat in the body. or mental attitude.. characterized by heaviness. and turbidity. heating pad) and is aggravated by cold. be pale-complexioned.one of the external causes of disease that disturbs the normal flow of energy and particularly the digestive functioning of the Spleen and Stomach. specifically in the Liver. one of the six pathogenic factors in the environment. Descend . Consol idate (the lungs) . food of a Yin nature. food that lowers metabolism. stagnation. Cooling food . according to Chinese Medicine. Dampness .inflammation and infection of the mucous membranes of the eyelids as a result of too much heat in the body. lack energy. tend toward loose stools. fluid accumulation due to impaired water metabolism. It is benefited by warming foods and herbs.Glossary ~ 225 Cold type condition . Cold type person . diet. i.to strengthen the lungs in conditions of chronic cough. Diaphoretic . asthma and shortness of breath.a substance that induces perspiration in order to expel pathogenic factors and toxins. or simply the result of insufficient fire (Yang) in the body.to move energy in a downward direction in the body.

Edema . Dysentery . constipation.abnormal accumulation of fluids in the body.painful or difficult urination. dry cough and emaciation. the fifth being the center or balance.a food or herb that promotes urination in order to . and the brain and stored in the Kidneys. scanty concentrated urine. Dryness .an ancient philosophical concept to explain the phenomena of energy transformation and the composition and relationships of the natural world and the human body. provides for growth. found in eggs. dry mouth and throat. For a more thorough understanding of the Five Element Theory. sperm. This can also be due to internal imbalances in the body.one of the six pathogenic factors in the environment. The Subtle Universal Law by Hua-Ching Ni. Diuresis . fever. A further refinement of the concept of opposites (Yin and Yang) into four degrees.a process that promotes smooth urination and reduces edema. Five Element Theory . Diuretic . Dysuria .226 ~ The Tao of Nutrition imbalance or disease or lack of healthy Disharmony - function. swelling. relieve swelling or discomfort in urination.extreme diarrhea and tenesmus due to bacterial or viral infection. marrow. development and reproduction throughout one's entire lifetime.the source of life. Disorders with dryness are associated with thirst. please refer to Tao. Essence (uJingU) . .

be red in face or tongue. headache. Liver heat (or fire) rising . sweat freely. polyuria.. i. ringing in the ears and insomnia.restore general balance. emotional instability. photophobia and insomnia. It is benefited by cooling foods and treatment. Hot type condition . Neurasthenia . fits of anger.inflammation of the stomach. Harmonize . tinnitus.nervous exhaustion characterized by fatigue. Gruel (congee or porridge) .e.hampered milk production or secretion due to physical or functional obstruction.a condition in which an excessive amount of heat in the Liver rises to the upper part of the body causing red painful eyes.white or yellow mucous discharge from the cervix or the vagina. one of the six pathogenic factors in the environment. be thirsty. sweating. dizziness. or a lack of water (Yin) to counterbalance the fire (Yang) in the body. infections. have an excess of energy. to bring together into smooth functioning. fevers and boils.grain that has been cooked with extra water and cooking time to the point of being soupy.a condition that is usually caused by heat. flushed cheeks. Leukorrhea . excess condition.Glossary ~ 227 Gastritis . . Hypertension .one who frequently tends to feel hot. and aggravated by heat. Hot type person . fear. headache.high blood pressure. This is usually an acute. Lactostasis . weakness. dizziness.

or body fluids. Shen . Tonify . dryness. coughing. Stagnancy .a microorganism or substance capable of producing a disease. headache. dampness.228 ~ The Tao of Nutrition Pathogen . fever. Chi. summer heat) and emotions. Qi (see Chi) Qi gong (see chi gong) Rebellious Chi -energy that moves upwardly when it normally should be going down. The connected movements somewhat resemble a graceful dance.spirit.an ancient Chinese exercise for harmonizing the mind. restlessness and sweating Summer heat Tai Chi Chuan .poisons. In Chinese Medicine.to strengthen or build.to disperse energy stagnation in the lungs and to soothe breathing and help relieve cough and asthma.A painfully urgent but ineffectual attempt to urinate or defecate. Toxins . cold. body and spirit. Ventilate (lungs) . it refers to anything that may cause imbalance within the body including environmental factors (wind. Tenesmus . heat. vomiting and hiccuping. . thirst.a sluggishness or impeded circulation of blood.e. i. in Chinese Medicine this term often refers to the presence of bacteria or virus. one of the external causes of disease characterized by irritability.

negative. a lack of energy to balance bodily substance. night sweats. passive.internal organs. Symptoms are high fever. diarrhea with watery stools. dry cough. head and body ache. characterized by coldness. Internal wind can disrupt the balance and manifest such symptoms as dizziness. Wind heat .one of the external causes of disease. sweating and thirst. fiery. no sweat. Yang . convulsions. positive. energetic side of life or nature of a person. watery. Chi deficiency. or pain that moves around (like the wind).relating to the female.relating to the male. dry throat and insomnia. Warming food . Wind cold .a lack of the coolness or water (Yin) within the body to counterbalance the fire (Yang). substance side of life or nature of a person. food that raises metabolism.common cold or flu caused by the invasion of wind and cold. fainting. Symptoms are severe chills.one that reduces coldness in the body or is of a Yang nature.common cold or flu caused by the invasion of wind and heat. Yang deficiency . Yin deficiency . numbness. a lack of bodily substance to balance energy. tiredness. and sinus congestion. mild fever. Wind . active. body and headache. usually resulting in heat symptoms such as irritability. a syndrome characterized by fever. tremor.a lack of heat or fire (Yang) within the body to counterbalance the water (Yin). cool. head and body ache.Glossary ~ 229 Viscera . sore throat. red cheeks. . Yin . mild chills. chills.

Tietao. WI: Lotus Press. Chinese nutrition. Medicine in China: History of Pharmaceutics. Ni. L'Orange.2008. Maciocia. Daoshing. 2000. and the Taoist healing arts. New York: Avery (Penguin Group). Edinburgh: Churchill Livingstone. Ancient Roots. Those books marked by an asterisk (*) supply additional information on Chinese herbs. New York: Random House Publishing (Ballantine Books). The Tao of Fertility. New York: Collins (HarperColllins). we suggest the following books. Maoshing. Between Heaven and Earth: A Guide to Chinese Medicine. Boston and London: Shambhala. Secrets of Self-Healing. 2000. Maoshing. The Yellow Emperor's Classic of Medicine. Harriet and Efrem Korngold. Many Branches. Paul. Practical Diagnosis in Traditional Chinese Medicine. 2005. 2008. Ted J. 1986.Bibliography For further reading on the subjects of Traditional Chinese Medicine. Ni. Traditional Chinese Medicine *Beinfield. 230 . The Foundations of Chinese Medicine. The mb That Has No maver. California: University of California Press. Giovanni. Darlena with Gary Dolowich. *Unschuld. New York: McGraw-Hill. Twin Lakes. 1995. Ni. Second Edition. 1991. New York: Elsevier (Churchill Livingstone). Deng. Kaptchuk. 2002. Berkeley.

. Staying Healthy With the Seasons. Chinese System of Food Cures. 2002.. Henry C. Shanghai. Chinese Natural Cures. New York: Ballantine Books. Colbin. Chinese Nutrition Campbell. Bob and Honora Wolfe. 1988. China: Publishing House of Shanghai College of Traditional Chinese Medicine. 1986. Henry C. 2005. Food and Healing. Berkeley. Brookline. Haas. 2004. Berkeley. Dallas.Bibliography ~ 231 Xinnong. Jilin and Gordon Peck. Lu. Elson. Pitchford. Paul. California: Celestial Arts. Liu. Campbell II. 2006. Lu. London. Prince wen Hui's Cook: Chinese Dietary Therapy. England: Churchill Livingstone. 1986. The China Study. Chinese Nutrition Therapy: Dietetics in Traditional Chinese Medicine. New York: Thieme. Massachusetts: Paradigm Publications. Annemarie. 2004. Chinese Dietary Therapy. 1987. Kastner. Chinese Medicated Diet. New York: Sterling Publishing Co. 1983. TX: BenBella Books. Bejing: Foreign Language Press. Healing with Whole Foods: Asian Traditions and Modern Nutrition. 2003. Joerg. T Colin and Thomas M. Cheng. Flaws. New York: Black Dog and Leventhal Publishers. Chinese Acupuncture and Moxibustion. California: North Atlantic Books. Zhang Enqin.

Third Edition. Steven Clavey. Henry. Chinese Medical Herbology and Pharmacology. Harrar. New York: Bantam Books. MA: Shambhala. 1997. Ni. Freedom. Emmaus. and Tina T Chen. 2003. Peter with Jing Wang. Daniel. Paramus. Boulder. Lesley. Chinese Herbology Made Easy. & Erich Stager. Ron. New York: Grand Central Publishing. City of Industry. 1986. . Seattle: Eastland Press. CA: Art of Medicine Press. Healing with Chinese Herbs. PA: Rodale Press. The Traditional Chinese Medicine Materia Medica Clinical Reference and Study Guide. Herbal Healing Secrets of the Orient. Medicinal Mushrooms. Holmes. The Ancient Wisdom of the Chinese Tonic Herbs. Woman's Book ofHealing Herbs. 2004. Ancient Herbs. Teeguarden. Han. Darlena. Los Angeles: SevenStar Communications. Chinese Herbal Medicine: Materia Medica. Glenn E. A Handbook of Chinese Healing Herbs. John K. 1995. 2004 Chen. and Nancy Deville. Santa Cruz. Maoshing. Modern Medicine. CA: Botanica Press. 2000. CO: Snow Lotus Press.232 ~ The Tao of Nutrition Chinese Herbs Bensky. Boston. Hobbs. 1998. Miller. 1999. NJ: Prentice Hall. Dan. Tierra. L'Orange. 1995. Christopher. Sari and Sara Altshul O'Donnell. Reid. 2002. CA: The Crossing Press.

Tierra. 1983. Scholar warrior: An Introduction to the Tao in Everyday Life. . Hua Ching. Ni. Los Angeles: SevenS tar Communications. Tao. Berkeley. Da. Ni. ~stern. San Francisco: HarperCollins. Ni. Vol. Maoshing. Hua Ching. New Jersey: T'ai Chi Foundation. CA: The Crossing Press. 1998. Taoist Health Exercises Book. Jr. Maoshing. Healing with the Herbs of Life. Ming-dao. 2003. 2006. Alan Keith with Nai-shing Hu Tillotson and Robert Abel.Bibliography ~ 233 Tierra. Liu. Secrets of Longevity: Hundreds of ways to Live to Be 100. Michael. Tillotson. San Francisco: Chronicle Books. Maols Harmony Tai Chi. San Francisco: Chronicle Books. Dr. New York: Perigee Books. The way of Chinese Herbs. Ni. Deng. The Subtle Universal Law and Integral way of Life. 2006. 2003. 1. The Tao ofT'ai Chi Ch'uan: way to Rejuvenation. 8000 Years of Wisdom: Conversations With Taoist Master Ni. New York: Pocket Books. 1990. 2001. 1995. 1983. Tsung Hwa. and Ayurvedic Herbal Treatments. New York: Kensington Publishing. Taoist Healing Arts Jou. Los Angeles: SevenS tar Communications. Piscataway. Lesley. Hua Ching. The One Earth Herbal Source Book: Everything You Need to Know about Chinese.

Colorado: Blue Poppy Press. Chinese Meatless Cooking. Chuang. The Book of Whole Meals.. Stella Lau. & Detox Plans. Tofu Cookery. Annemarie. The Book ofJook. 1987. The New Detox Diet: The Complete Guide for Lifelong Vitality with Receipes. 1985. New York: Clarkson Potter. Louise. Summertown. Tennessee: The Book Publishing Co. Eat Well Feel Well. Fessler. . Berkeley/ Toronto: Celestial Arts. Cookbooks Colbin. Haas. Ying Chang. Hagler. 101 Vegetarian Delights. Natural Foods Cookbook: Vegetarian Dairy-Free Cuisine. Mary. 2004. Conrad. 2007. Lily. Los Angeles: SevenS tar Communications. New York: Penguin Putnum. Compestine. 1985. 2002. Menus. New York: Signet Books. Los Angeles: SevenStar Communications. Elson M. Boulder. Chinese Vegetarian Delights: Sugar and Dairy Free Cookbook. 1983. 1992. 2008. Secrets from a Healthy Asian Kitchen. New York: Ballantine Books. Flaws. Lily and Cathy McNease. Kendall. Estella.234 ~ The Tao of Nutrition Companion Cookbooks The following book is a companion cookbook to The Tao of Nutrition that utilizes the principles of Chinese nutrition and includes recipes with Chinese food herbs: Chuang. New York: Japan Publications. Bob. 2006.

Daverick. Frances Moore. Baltimore. Vegetable Soups from Deborah Madisonls Kitchen. Trumbull. California: Ten Speed Press. Maryland: Agora Health Books. New York: Avery. Amazing Grains: Creating Vegetarian Main Dishes from Whole Grains. FaXiang. Barbara with Christopher Styler. Unleashing the Power of Food: Recipes to Heal By. Robertson. California: Ten Speed Press. Lappe. 2001. England: Meridian Press. 2003. New York: Workman Publishing. New York: Ballantine Books. CT: Weatherhill. New York: Broadway Books. Friendly Foods. 1999 Lin. California: H. Diet for a Small Planet. Colorado: Shambhala. Berkeley. Madison. Kafka. 2006. Carol Flinders. Florence Lin IS Chinese Vegetarian Cookbook. and Brian Ruppenthal. Penelopy. Boulder.J. Tiburon. Saltzman. The New Laurefs Kitchen.Bibliography ~ 235 Hou. Brother Ron. . Kramer. 1986. 1983. Laurel. Piekarski. Deborah. The Chinese Herbal Cookbook: Healing Foods for Inner Balance. 1994. Jacobs. 1990. Cooking with Seitan: The Complete Vegetarian IIWheat-Meat ll Cookbook. Vegetable Love. 1991. Recipes for Self-Healing. Leggett. Ody. Barbara and Leonard. Berkeley. 2005. Totnes. 1991. Joanne. Florence.

1996. VT: Healing Arts Press. The Book of Tofu. 2001. Rochester. The Healing Cuisine of China. Zhao. Berkeley. . California: Ten Speed Press. Lisa. 1998. Marcea. Rochester. California: Prism Press. Meals That Heal. Turner.236 ~ The Tao of Nutrition Shurtleff. Newberry Park. Whole Meals. Weber. William and Akiko Aoyagi. 1983. Vermont: Healing Arts Press. Zhuo and George Ellis.

Or.com www. CA 93023 (805) 798-1107 Email: cathymcnease@hotmail.Sources for Chinese Food & Herbs Some ofthe foods and herbs mentioned are only available from Asian markets. WA 98026 Best Blends Herbs PO Box 1329 Ojai. Ste. 200 Los Angeles.com Wing Hop Fung 727 N. The following stores are potential sources for the Chinese foods and herbs recommended in this book: www. CA 91411 (818) 988-7899 99 Ranch Market 22511 Highway 99 Edmonds. CA 90066 www. Broadway Los Angeles.. you may find sources by searching online for Chinese food or Chinese herbs. health food stores or specialty food stores. Broadway Los Angeles.asianfoodgrocer. CA 90012 (213) 628-83333 TinBo Co. You can also look in the yellow pages of your local telephone directory. Van Nuys. Broadway Los Angeles.taostar.com Tak Shing Hong 835 N. Chinatown in any large city will have the foods and herbs mentioned. Sepulveda Blvd. CA 90012 (213) 680-3395 Traditions of Tao Herbal Supplements 13315 W Washington Blvd. 841 N.99RanchMarket.com (includes a directory of over 25 stores) 99 Ranch Market 6450 N. CA 90012 (213) 626-7200 237 .

.

101.44.INDEX Please n.60.lungs: abscess) abortion 62 acid 49. 159 acne 75.217 milk 193 aloe vera 31.117 amaranth 71. 46. 123 anxiety 40. 106. antibacterial) bacterial infection 134.41. 162 abscess 36.111. 76. 84.59. 147. they refer to the organ system in Chinese medicine.21 baldness 93. 222 astringent 11.58. 142 antibacterial 35. 157 bacteria 6 (See. 50. 142.71. 117 almond 88. 121. 111. 77.35. 54. 120 heat type 120 pain 46. 7~83.98. 67.216 azuki beans (See beans.109. 201.218 anorexia 28.15. 93. 59.35.104. 131. 148 pain 25.199. 131. 110. 89. 105.215 allergies 40. 150 balanced diet 19. 216. 110 alfalfa sprouts 25. 69. 119. 75. A AIDS 116. 215 ascites 49.54.96. 151 appendicitis 50 appetite 27. 71. 59.63. and Kidneys are capitalized. 108. 81. 28.97 asparagus 26. 137. When Llvet.54.219.79.55. 99. 108. 49. 61. Spleen.219 avocado 54.6~69. 115. 124. 70. 118-120 wind type 43.94. 82.14. 48. 109 anger 5. 133. 85.84. 149. 45.216 apricot 53. 224 arthritis 106. 108 antibiotic 35. 222 arteriosclerosis 26.224 autumn 10.91. 58. 224 Asian pear 65. 60.119 damp type 43.ote: A listing in boldface means the page contains a major heading.65.99. 215 asthma 40. 78. 116.3~ 104.216 anemia 27. 92. 63. 48. 115-116 acupuncture 15. 119 artichoke 25 Jerusalem 37-38. 94 (See breast. 106 239 . 155 agar flakes 167 alcohol intoxication 26. 12. 115. 124 ADD 55 abdominal cramps 155 distention 33. 83.34.208.8~96.42. 118 appetizer 46 apple 53.8. 66. Heart. 135. 88. 88. 177.75.110. 100. 198. 89. 45.228 angina pain 132 anise seed 101. Lungs. 83. 118 cold type 45. 120 astragalus 59.63. 102. 17. azuki) B Ba Gua xiii back pain 37. 118.56.60. 130. 61.

57. 71. 205.215 beriberi 46. 124. 66. 181. 101. 199 sprouts 47. 148. 132. 143.43.216 flour 51 malt 74. 125. 117.102 blisters 50 bloating 25. 163. 62. 118.217 recipes 183. 215 sprouts 198 bedwetting 32. 122.218 pearl 33.81. 116. 146. 157. 81. 55. 131. 126.110. 188. 145.223 recipes using 168. 199.217 red 70. 104. 180. 125. 37.162. 32.170. 141.158. 125. 99 loss 111 nourishes 27. 37. 120. 127. 98. 97. 181. 65. 151.94 deficiency 27. 138.121. 116. 8. 207.51. 184. 84.217 beets 27.167. 62. 148. 73.82. 79. 74. 139.216. 171. 160. 137. 110.94. 118. 116. 188 garbanzo 82. 128. 138.215 belching 48. 40. 50 bitter taste 11. 153. 172. 81. 127.33.218 beans azuki (aduki) 37. 109. 13.96 .154. 141. 49. 105 bell pepper 27. 107 bee sting 49. 62.216. 36.144. 39 circulation 26.160. 208 in recipes 178.137 soy 33.154. 110.97. 137. 54.218 bladder infection 58. 97. 129. 138 bleeding 30. 138. 101.66.199.219 black bean (See beans. 43. 125.216.217 pinto 85. 135.223 sprouts 84. black) mushroom 30. 134.156. 132 pepper 28. 136.205. 150. 115. 13. 68.50 beef 95.39. 125. 210. 50.199. 49. 81. 184 black 27. 142. 85. 130. 143.85. 201. 155 blood 7.85.74.217 lima 83.217 mung 72. 12. 124. 154. 62.223 lycii (See goji berries) betel nut 126.120. 140151.125.142.218. 84.84. 138. 139.217 recipes 170.217 kidney 82. 147. 30. 63.84.141.211. 81. 59. 142. 133.25. 105. 108 coughing 41. 102. 222 beverages 101 bites 35. 105.158. 101 berries goji 55.. 40. 27.215 banana 54.202 hawthorn 61.240 ~ The Tao of Nutrition bamboo shavings 218. 116.222 shoots 26. 125 bland taste 11. 198. 143. black) date 57. 160 fungus (See fungus. 147.83.217. 122.190. 48.145. 120.217 milk 193. 144.89.216 barley 71. 144. 154. 93. 65. 38. 91.215 navy 84. 59.66. 122. 60 71.223 powder 75 sprouted 74 basil 101. 131. 138.218.

125.215 napa (See Chinese.44. 115.215 white 34 cashews 88. 97. 139.33.49. 103.56.222 burns 35.65. 89.127 canker sores 36.125. 158. 160 in recipes 169-201 chard 31. 158 bruises 56. chestnut) . 116. 128. 126 broth 27. 134. 123. 135. 134.28.36. 108. 67.216 bulimia 118 burdock root 29. 117. 126. 199.88. 102 blueberry 55.128. 116.51. cardamom and spices & seasonings) carminative 69.49. 141.145. 187 brown rice (See rice. 147. 130. 94.Index ~ 241 blood (continued) pressure 30. 161.134. 123. 122. 152. 125. 108 weak 33 bowel obstruction 74 bowels 72.136.40. 132.84 cancer (See cancer. 116.128. 140 breast abscess 38.44.83. 38. 34.215 bones 33. 123.152. cassia) cataracts 124 cauliflower 30.84 bok choy 28.85. 215. 192. 64.74. 136. 152 cantaloupe 55. 194 cassia seeds (See seeds.110. 131. 186. 93. breast) lumps 35 broccoli 28. 112. 108. 155 sugar 37. 154.96. 111 buckwheat 72. 123 cervical 40 candida (candidiasis) 25. 142.69. 144 tightness 48.40.33.136. cabbage) cancer 26.98.89 C cabbage 25.216 cap 46.215 bronchitis 34.49.79. 75. 154.218 carrot 27. 130.67 stuck in the throat 57.51. 197.215 red or green 29.59.85. 69. 224 carbuncle 83 cardamom (See seeds. 144.95.27.76.48. 144 chestnut (See nuts. 74. 138. 72. 144. 150. 98 bloody stools 49. 101. 45.216 boils 31. 130.26.216 chest fullness 32.42.69.123. 110. 30.39. 131.66.215 Charts 215-223 cherry 56. 108 burping 37.215 causes of disease 14 celery 27.106.144.43.33.65.46. 125 breast 26. 191. 140.215 juice 26. 133. brown) brown sugar 30. 148.62. 30.149 steaming 44-45.224 carob 104.30. 33. 131. 82. 130. 144 stagnant 15. 199.58.

156. 144. 33.211.117.63. 62. 215 congee 17.51.199. 136.71.222 coconut 57.215 bread 180 meal 72.28. 137 citrus peel 89. 31. 72 clears heat 26. 108.225 cooling food 3.83. 224 collards 33.54. 26.33.43. 106. 216 silk 41. 32.192.75 colds 14 common 29. 65.134.123.70. 64.46.222 dates 135.222 yarn 168. 151.139. 100.218 in recipes 173.34.35.107. 35.73. 190.222 cilantro 30.141.168.42.218 in recipes 169-199 cinnamon 28. 222 chlorella 109. 45. 30.48. 137.58.73. 5.179.188. 53.48. 140.215.119. 14. 142. 105. 129 frequent 38. 133.227 recipes 200-201 (Also see porridge) conjunctivitis (see pink eye) 29.222 clam 98.17.162. 124. 4.218. 105. 130 cold sores 106 cold type condition 225 cold type person 4.46. 78. 86. 34.153.232 parsley 32 prunes 57. 129 wind heat type 29.218. 127.41.108.82.222 herb 75.206. 116. 5.50. 118.155.43.230.42. 26.218 coix 74.74.150. 197. 77. 216. 79. 38. 33. 225 colitis 39. 88.155.32. 79. 102. 145.224 chive 82 (See Chinese.59. 190.216. 157.138. 196. 27. 40.94.96. 64.188. 162. 146 chrysanthemum 33. 120. 159 coronary heart disease 132 (See heart disease) .39.217 egg 96 pox 62 chickpea (See garbanzo bean) Chinese cabbage 31. 93.224 rebellious 54. 125. 75 wind cold type 31.222 tea 33.78. 82. 134.218 chocolate 104. 92. 122. 73. 127. 30.201 corn 33. 91. 153 cholesterol. 67. 20. 104. 118. 224 cloves 36.48. 125. 160. 155 chigong 15.216 milk 216 coffee 74.218 cirrhosis 49. 28.35. 118. 105. 85 chronic fatigue 124.37.215 chive 32.242 ~ The Tao of Nutrition chi 7.29. 129.56.201. 139.40.49.58. 218. 215 cucumber 117.70.130.217 cleansing 27. 31.218. 118 stagnation 32.47.218.190. 53.218. chive) chicken 96.44.169. 125. 140.226 constipation 25. 9. 143. 130 coriander 32.32. 30. 42. 107. 25. high 25. 130.

20.130. 63. 102.103 whooping 29. 96.114. 144. 82.31. 74. 103. 15. 147. 135. 88. 86.151.226 dizziness 43.150.63.220.98.115.137.63. 107. 43. 38.58.88.82. 50. 76.73.218. 98. 60. 97.44. 47. 61.219.53. 14. 98. 99. 69.85. 42.88. 59.62.31. 68.187.81. 106. 158 D daikon radish 34.57.64. 160 Earth Element 9.91. 67.36.229 dehydration 53.38.48.41. 35.110. 117. 102.105. 97. 65.138. 136 genital 44 edema 36.54. 82.74.Index ~ 243 cough 51.133 diaphoretic 225 diarrhea 26.217 cramps 155 cranberry 58.33. 67. 226 (See urinary difficulty) E ear 81 infection 37 ringing 149.95. 77. 34.215 sea 122. 71.143. 91. 32. 132.226 diuretic 35. 49.90. 44. 94.30.226 bloody 93 dysuria 74.215.68. 102. 110 diabetes 26. 134. 84.45. 47. 29. 37. 95.32. 103. 141.60. 134-135 digestion 10. 90. 75.62.217 duodenal ulcers 38. 127.154. 97. 100.52. 226 diuresis 26.73.10. 65. 30.123. 146.65. 60. 61.225 detoxification 27. 72.226 duck 97. 34.70. 70.91. 76. 43. 98 dryness 52.141.48. 64.53.97. 124.59.222 tea 31.75. 44. 154. 28. 86. 225.137.97. 72.68. 33. 89. 27.84.93.201 diphtheria 30 disharmony 96.154. 215 . 83.62. 160 dressing.215 dairy products 99. crab 36. 67.66. 151 descend 37. 91 dry 34. 19.99. 49. 106.217 dampness 25.34. 221 eczema 44. 89. 77.120. 107 chronic 60. 99. 92. 97. salad Coriander Vinaigrette 196 Lemon Vinaigrette 197 Oil and Vinegar 196 Pecan 197 dry skin 5. 65 with yellow phlegm 51.200.217 quail 100 yolk oil 121 eggplant 35-36.226 egg chicken 96.47. 124. 117.216 cucumber 34. 68.75. 51. 83.55. 118.159. 106.37. 83. 62. 154. 107 dysentery 26. 100. 222 Dao-In xv (See Books on the Integral Way) deficiency 27. 86.137 dang gui 59.106. 225 dandelion 26. 107 depression 8. 72. 75.31. 116.

27. 43.83. 69.33. 221 fish 64. 159 ganoderma mushroom (See mushroom.217 bones 57.138 swollen 34 vision decline 100 weakness 30 F facial mask 76 Fang Zhong xv fasting 17. 118. 101.95. blister 152 scarlet 153 fig 58.8.11. 187. 11 gall bladder 25. 148 epilepsy 34 erectile dysfunction 90-91 essence 7. 221 control cycle 11. 71. 45.117. 14. 126. 129. 79. 98. 123. 8. 10-11.217 Fire Element 8-9. 133. 109. 14 eyes bloodshot 70 blurry vision 138. 10. 102-103.145. 88. 121.68. 133. 9. 13~ 140. 215 energy 7. 19. 144. 128. 229 external source 13. 8.215 Energetic Properties of Foods (Chart 1) 3. 121.60. 97 fever 44. 28.60 fruit 53-70 Fu Shi xiii. 49 pain 64.219. 146. 84. 75.223 G Gall Bladder 5. 74 gallstones 33.96. 80. fennel and spices & seasonings) fetus 14. 211 exercise 133. 14. 83. 110 frostbite 28. 9.218. 108 Five Elements 8. 15. 127. 14. 149. 109. ganoderma) garlic 36. 123.228 endive lettuce 38.227. 153 fatigue 37. 149 hemorrhage 70. 135.244 ~ The Tao of Nutrition Eight Differentiations 13-14 Eight Trigrams xii emotion 5. 97. 159. 124. 90.226 Five Energetic Transformations (Chart 3) 10. 221 creation cycle 10.98.40. 128. 119.215 . 150. 130. 168. 27. 53. 158 food colors 10-11 poisoning 83.219 fennel 105 (See seeds. 157.29. 146. 38. 48. 68.151. 149.222 white 110-111. 155 muscle 73 fear 9. 129. 121.161. 221 Five Seasons 10 Five Tastes 13-15 flu 38. 122. 119. 72. 135 retention 26.121. 111 night blindness 30.139. 118. 21.123.216 filbert 89. 70. xiv fungus 35. 15.220. 145. 144. 87. 125.73. 154.126.211 Correspondences (Chart 2) 219220 Theory 10.59.97.68 black 102.156. 140.219. 77.142. 4. 13. 162.36.218. 142. 16.

106.222 Oriental 218 223 glaucoma 138' gluten.157. Fancy 174 Vegetable Pie 175 grapes 59.217 ginkgo 116. 143. 108.40.2 (See spices & seasonings) JUlce 92 tea 27. Steamed 180 Couscous Cereal 179 Couscous Pie 177 Grain Dish. 97. 172. 120.62.73.35. 75.222 ginseng 34.218. 44. 83 hemorrhoids 54. 77. Simple 179 Millet Patties 176 Mochi 181 Nori Burritos 174 Porridge. 167. 130. 104 gastritis 39. 158 gruel (See congee) gums 86. 199 tea 61.109.31. 138. 133. 227 ginger 5. 60.50. goji) goldenseal root 35.155. 36. 92. goat's milk 98. 77. 99.25. 67.34. Stuffed 176 Rice. 130.119. 103 gelatin 121. Chestnut 178 Rice. garbanzo) gas 25.223 H hangover 66 harmonize 13.43.59. 11 heart disease 33 40 55 72 132 160 "'" heartburn 49 (See indigestion) heat (See summer. 106. 133.39.72.74.59. 71.51. 215 onion 29.42. 101 hawthorn berry 61. ~2. 89.218. 116. 142 herbal recipes 187-190 Goji Berry Oats 188 soups Basic Herb 187 Butternut Mushroom 189 Sweet and Spicy Pumpkin 190 . 102.211 stomach 44.71-80 grain recipes 174-182 Cereal.216 grapefruit 60.218 grain 21.74.144.162.45. 145. 71.119. 73. 139 144 152. 158 American 132.42. 128. 140.78 167 195 ' . 73.40.59. 101.46.217 gobo 29. 56. 56 goji berry (See berries. 143 152. 8-9. 75. 139. 93.216 ' green beans 37.50. 99.49. 147.12. 186.61. 102. heat) heatstroke 52.108 gypsum 143.218. 82.216 headache 25.32. 186 goiter 46. 130. 71.118. 50. Breakfast 182 Pumpkin. 142.51.Index ~ 245 garbanzo bean (See beans.60. 14~ 155. common cold 139 emotional stress 140 Heart 5. Basic Protein 178 Corn Bread. 110. wheat 71. 154 ' .141 hepatitis 36.

126. 63. 8. 105 children 37 pain 56.52.144. 160 infertility 58. 158. 130.146. 222 hot flashes 54. 28. 152 hiccups 89.76.111.5.33. 150.219 high blood pressure (See hypertension) hives 52. 133.108.93.64. 116.71. 15. 38. 151 (See menopause) hot type condition 211 hot type persons 4. winter) kale 33.219 J jaundice 25.69 herpes 27. 118.212 hypertension 26. 132. 149 insect bites (See bites) insomnia 31. 197 honeysuckle 51. 35.63. 100.148 93. 100. 15. 47.99.3~49. 93. 9. 133. 58. 153. 128. 143 hoarseness 65. 62. 34.88. 120. 125. 33. hernia 56.61.79.218. 127. 123.45. 65. 27.39. 136. 110.109. 125. 106 honey 27. 154. 9. 117. 79. 111.215 Jin body fluids 7 Jing 7.162.227 hypoglycemia 38.53. 168.63. incontinence 58. 126. 144 Jerusalem artichoke 37. 116. 29. 127. 137. 105.96.147 indigestion 27. 146 hysteria 56 infection 25. 101. 106. 33. 55. 158 jellyfish 50. 36.14. 28.59. 142.97. 34.160 Yang deficiency 149 Yin deficiency 149 .52. 128. 181.61. 108. 136. 36. 70.246 ~ The Tao of Nutrition herbal recipes (continued) stews Black Bean 188 Dang Cui Cornish Hen 187 Shan Yao Longevity 188 herbs 55. 143. 14~ 152.59. 226 Job's Tears 74 joints 50.69. 42.82.149. 39. 143 K kabocha (See squash.44 intoxication (See alcohol intoxication) irritability 5.149.33. 101.85.62. 215 kamut 73. 30. 50. 53. 69.216 Kidney 5. 28. 186. 99. 30. 152 intestines clean toxins in 40 lubrication of 25.75. 218 in recipes 178. 127. 83. 68 impotence 68.31. 144. 27. 84. 118-120 jook (See congee) joy 8. 32.41. 149 Jing 7-8 weakness 32.155 itching 25. 74. 64.93.70.6~ 70.71. 150.49. 131. 49. 7.219 jujube 56. 152.90.67. 90. 64. 51. 60. 146. 148. 161. 37.57. 89.102. 127. 89. 193.110.

190.92. 144. lentil) lesions 30. 99. 216 in recipes 186.79. 109.90. 159 knees 81.147. 142.125. 148. 81. 108.197.196. 13~ 14~ 152. 105. 110 longan fruit 58. 227 licorice 36.55.218.8.59.9. 144 cleansing 27. 153.97. 153.25.218.64. 158 low blood sugar 132.138.121. 135. 144. 94. 168.212 toxicity. 127. lily bulb 40.223 lima bean (See beans. 150 M malaria 86. pain 147.190. 110.128.134. 49. 61.217 pea 85 peanut 27.189.90. 121. 161.218. 190. 38. 142. 81 kntil 82. 94.218. 133.195. 88. 98. 9 leek 42. 72. 158. 212 heat rising 35.69.33 liver 6. 144. 158 Large Intestine 5.109 heat 58. 154 stones 27.161.223 Liver 5. 64. 188. 140. 20.83. 147. 97. 217. 223 leaf 218 lotus root 39.223 loquat 62. 160. 223 tea 33.101.10.54. 90. 216 mania 8. 151. 13. 153. 95.Index ~ 247 kidney bean (See beans.223 mango 63. goji) lychee (See litchi fruit) lymph 46. 128. 185 lemon 61. 132.151.223 tea 107.150. 128. 108 malnutrition 99 malt syrup 101.151.116.119.33 deficiency 67 disease 26 fire rising 93. 72 (See skin. 188. 126.215 legumes 22. ling zhi) litchi fruit (lychee) 61.48. 157. 14 mastitis 150 . 153. 157 kttuce 38. 86.56. 149 kudzu 194. 35. 111 abscess 46. 63. 146 low energy 5. lima) lime 60 ling zhi mushroom (See mushroom. 66.37. lesions) lethargy 78.217 laryngitis 107. 130. 199 lentil (See legumes. 109.89. 146. 109.223 seed 77.223 l lactation 47. 156. 150.52. 149. kidney) disease 70 infection 139.74.116. 94. 82.90 lungs 5.41.216. 125.216. 81. 136 lactostasis 227 lamb 98. 110 lycii berry (See berries. 137. 155 Lung 37. 50.215 romaine 215 leukocytopenia 39 leukorrhea 72.11. 100.215.58.

168. 153 memo~ 55.248 ~ The Tao of Nutrition meal plans 205-211 Spring/Summer 206 FalllWinter 209 measles 29. mung) mushroom black 40 button 39. 145. 193 milk products 99 millet 73.223 mulber~ 63. 107.200 molasses 78.86.78.215 N napa cabbage (See Chinese.98 production of 49 rice 93 soy 54. 56 meat 36. 118. 89.84.70. 129.45. 134. 127. 46. 159 dry 61.53. 140 milk 99. 123. 99.99.216 in recipes 176. 180. 105. 177. 134. 131. 110. 215.218 miso 167. 158. 161. 139. 126. 90. 117. 129.39. 179 mint 32.64. 82.215 soup 195 white 41.223 mumps 29. 218. 16~ 179. 120.41. 130. 153. 155 and headache 140 cessation of 33. 66. 131. cabbage) nausea 62. 121. 140. 148. 193 coconut 58. 116. 151 mother of pearl 118. 147. 69. 43. 227 nocturnal emissions 68. 62. 30. 57. 120.122. 90 acute 153 chronic 52. 223 mouth 131.42.121. 223 poria 218. 162 nephritis 67.211. 106.63.135. 179.216. 81.215 mustard greens 33. 154 nervous 56. 223 reishi 39. 196 dai~ 85 goat's 98 in recipes 173. 222 shitake 40. 50 nosebleed 39. 221 migraine 139. 122. 104.34. 127. 130.123. 180. 142. 56. 111 premenstrual syndrome 104. 222 ling zhi 39. 146.100 menopause 79. 118 irregular 86-87 pain 104. 169. 35.218. 70. 96. 94.69. 143. 108. 32.210. 10. 117.220. 124. 151 hot flashes 54 menstruation 61.98. 40.219.161 almond 54. 39. 152 ulcers 161 mucus 15. 150. 14~ 147 neuralgia 111 neurasthenia 93. 218 morning sickness 73. 171. 223 motherwort 111. 77 .21~218. 143 nodules 46. 95. 116.36. 151.149 sores 36. 105. 218. 148. 200.215 ganoderma 39. 155 mercu~ 95 meridians 7 Metal Element 9. 161 mugwort 141. 43. 126. 194 lack of 90. 153 mung bean (See beans.26. 144.

217 walnut 32. 76. 144. 126. 140. 157 rib 69 palpitations 54. 131. 16. 158 arthritis 46 gas 71 hernia. 128. 50. excessive 12 (See sweating) phlegm 39.188. 63 oxalic acid 27.199. 43.140.38. 133.217 inrecipes 178. 162. 44.215 in recipes 187 pathogen 12. 84. 51.42.201 p pain 34. 104.50. 132 olive 107.218 .215 parsnip 43. 140. 102. 151.216. 47.201 cashews 58. 43. 128. 35. 160. 127.8. 216 peel 27. 125. 138. 143.35.209. peanut) pecan 90.42.223 peanut (See legumes. 136. 48 oyster 217 shells 79. abdominal 25. testicular 69 leg 89. 78. in recipes 183. 134 persimmon 66. 160.156.217. 88. 126. 51. 152. 124. 110. 194.191.88. 194 pericardium 9 peristalsis 105.216 onion 29.216 in recipe 188 obesity 75. 77. 228 pea 77.Index ~ 249 nuts almond 88.215 in recipes 169-197 orange 63. 75. 121.91. 106. 93.12.30.188.223 perspiration.99.77. 46.152. 119.13. 146. 97. 66. 76. 158. 123. 14.59.216 parsley 32. 74. 192. 105.211 filbert 89.47. 134 papaya 64. 43.9.29. 120. 17.69.85 peach 64 kernel xvix.193.193. 102. 148. 155 organs 5.37. 199 chestnut 88. 119.217 pine 55. 130. 145.110 yellow 65 o oats 71. 138. 104.218.184. 123.217 in recipes 181. 132.140. 148.59.138. 135. 129. 130. 33. 102 osteoporosis 98 overeating 15.161. 88.110. 91. 33. 82. 148.217 hazelnut 89 peanut 90 (See legumes.218.49. 116. 152. 106.216 apple (see Asian Pear) pearl barley (See barley.223 inrecipes 178. 157 pancreas 9. pearl) pecan 90. 93. 148.194. 132. peanut) pear 216 Asian 65.

161. 104 potato 44.223 soup 176 pungent taste 11.217. 139. 149. 91. 77.125.111. 158. 159 pomegranate 67 pork 60. 137. 129.200.79. 147. 45.51. 142. 160.83. 137 premature ejaculation 56. 126. 128.130. 116. 101 rhinitis 40 rice 12. 150 Q Qi (see chi) quail egg 100. 150.180. 149 premenstrual syndrome (See menstruation) prevention of disease 18 prolapse 26. 153. 139.55. 127.215 poultry 95 pregnancy 53. 103. 177. 143.48.144. 141. 142.216 plum 57. 158. 121.31.85. retention. 156 protein 16. 157. 149. 110. 37. 137. 136. 92 enlargement 63. date) reed root 67.194 raspberry 68.80. 110. 103. 200 (See congee) postpartum 97 bleeding 97 fatigue/weakness 96.218. 91 .193.216. 118.92. 128. 128. 65. 76.194 prune 57.99 porridge 34.215 seed 45.250 ~ The Tao of Nutrition pineapple 67. 75. food 69. 154.226 respiratory infection 42 restlessness 27. 216 PMS 140 (See menstruation) poison 36. 73.91. 140.179.67.217 quinoa 75. 70. 109.49.223 raw food 5. 150. 129. 39. 223 reproduction 9.40.59. daikon 34. 58 prostate 91.146. 143. 160.104. 20.43. 106. 182. 89. 97 obstruction 74 pain 38. 216 R radish. 126. 137. 198 raisin 55. 134. 141. 118. 119. 142. 101. 134. 135. 135 induce vomiting 109 oak 35 seafood 102 pollution 6. 83. 100.78. 151. 155 recipes 169-201 bean and tofu dishes 183 congee 200 dressings 196 grains 174 herbal 187 miscellaneous 191 sandwich fillings 199 sprouts 198 soups 169 vinaigrettes 196-197 red dates (See Chinese.43. 77. 133.105.118. 126. 117.68. 36.154. 120.223 psoriasis 156 psyllium seed 79 pudding reci pes protein 194 pueraria root (See kudzu) pumpkin 44. 12 PungTzu xiv pus 38. 126.62. 26.64. 147. 75.110. 116.82. 78.78.60.83.

215 sore throat 34. 186. 174.215 sciatica 50 scrofula 50 sea cucumber 122 . 144. 157 sex 15.152. 141.148.147. 147.209. sinusitis 42. 132 . 194. 93. 76.216 ringing in ears 93. 75. 13~ 13~ 143.32. 172. 155. 134.73 anise 101. 42.222 cassia 132. 86.218 cardamom 103.36. seaweed 22. 141 .126. 120.123.46.217 in recipes 178.216 s sadness 9.148 shellfish 98.26. 91. 107. 191. 158.178. 130. 125 shen 7.31. 68 . 181. 133. 144.181 oil 127. 133. 125.77.116.156 Small Intestine 5 8-9 snake ' bite 35. 109. seeds) seeds (continued) pumpkin 91. 128. 153. 105.218 (See spices & seasonings) salty taste 11. 162. 167-168.50 meat 120 snow pea 47.61. 90. basic 195 scallion 45. 151 218.187 sunflower 59. 138. 136. 160 rye 71.117. 146. 162. 187.130.52. 81 . 127. 108.217 silver ears 110 soup 111 sinus infection. 8. 13 sandwich fillings 199 Sanjiao 9 sauce recipes beet 171 black bean 170 tomato.211 seeds 22.217. 150.142.216 brown 71.48. 194 winter melon 26. 117. 145. 151 .119.218. 139.222 ' fennel 69. 128. 130. 201 black 92. 197.217 garnish 191 in recipes 176.222 ' lotus (See lotus. 116 sesame 78-79 .93.219 salt 31. 131. 218 white 77.38. 143.51. 216 malt syrup 101 sweet 47.118. 215 in recipes 169.158.83. 158 soup recipes 169-173 .Index ~ 251 bran 77.57. 216 vinegar 46.222 brown 92. 123. 89 . 125. 223 seminal emission 56. 157. 146. 116. 109. 158. 181.30. 189. 184. 128 skin dry 5. 98 itchy 109 lesions 25.201. 116. 147. 199. 149. 106.217.94. 161 shells 125. 118. 103. 157. 149. 228 Shen Nung xiv Shen-Nong Herbal Classic 18 shingles 49 shrimp 98. 72.49.67. 170. 139.201 218.

86 inflammation 60 stomach (continued) .58. 14~ 14~ 146. 61. 28.9. 12.199 alfalfa 25. 177.70. 60.218 Spleen 37. light mix 198 mung bean 85 rainbow 198.160 ache 32. 116. 86. 96 stews. 74. 141.49. 134. 78. 75. 74. 37.96. 228 stagnant food 27.44. 121 spelt 73.102.252 ~ The Tao of Nutrition Beet 171 Black bean 170 Butternut Mushroom 189 Chinese Noodle 172 Creamy Split Pea 173 Summer Vegetable 169 Sweet and Spicy Pumpkin 190 Sweet Squash and Seaweed 169.5. 111.110 splinter 89 sprains 50 spring 10. 71. 43. 70 steroids 6.44. 12~ 12~ 128. 155. 124. 183.53.132. 66. 133. 9.198.72.100. 192 summer 48.118.61. 128. 10.25. 34. 73.100. 158 spinach 47.56.145.76.62.30. 131. 151.101. 134. 43. 100. 76.105 distention 27. 125. 25.69. 78. 215 squid bone 122.95. 216 sperm 100 spermatorrhea (See seminal emission) spices & seasonings 101-106 anise 101 basil 101 black pepper 102 cardamom 103 cinnamon 104 cloves 105 fennel 105 ginger 106 salt 109 spicy food 70.97. 70. 189. 66.20.215 in reci pe 177 spirulina 109. 190.211. 60 heat 47. 199 soybean 47.160. 38. 40.49. 131. 12 soybean (See beans. 36 Spring/Summer Meal Plans 206 sprouts 115.61.61. 11. 56.155. 39.75.143.26. 11.64. 10.44.107.96.64.63. 36. 69.215 winter 44.148. 119. 136 reCIpes Almond Nut 192 Basic Vegetable 191 Over Noodles 192 Stomach 5. 111 squash 27. 90.45. 110.42.215 in recipes 169.211 stock 170 Winter Melon 172 sour taste 11. 161. herbal black bean stew 174 dang gui cornish hen stew 173 shan yao longevity stew 174 stir-fry 46. 61 fullness 32.30.95. 120.172.59. 201 stomach 19.63. soy) spasms 47. 12.50. 218 stagnancy 45. 121 sputum 34. 60. 82. 106.

132 sweet taste 11.44. 90. 127.91.211 tendonitis 50.56. 45. 59.83.69. 109. 141. 146 tempeh 167. 154.188. 44.32.76. 60 tendons 50.215 taste. 20. 148. 13.40.82. 78.213 sweating 57.134.84.81.55.53.84. 75. 124. 199 tamari 167.109 tenesmus 228 thirst 4. 125.132.49.228 tahini 186.Index ~ 253 pain 77. 74.74.52.117.150. 128. 218 white 218 sulfites 83 summer 10. 101.175.65. 37.137.216 stroke 59. 134.52.95. 144.28.90. 79. 71. 146.143. 158. 17.97. 100 heat 67. 67.69. 79. 103.83 sugar 22.153 T Tai Chi diagram xiii taichichuan 15.27. 103.216 tannin 110 Taoism xiii taro root 50. 48. 21 sweet potato 10.228 toothache 99. 47.133. 136. 109.199. 168 brown 30. 168 tangerine 51. 105. 76. 89.dry 52. 144.28. 101.94. 148.59. 76. 39. 109.73. 152. 106. 195-196 tonk 59.228 Translations of Food & Herb Names (Chart 4) 222-223 .122.69. menopausal 81 night 37.57.58.41. 148.71.106.118. 146.114. 49. 73.218 teeth 56.215 sweeteners barley malt syrup 101 brown (turbinado) sugar 103 honey 106 (See honey) molasses 107 swelling 34. 117. 151 spontaneous 57.67.95. 133. five flavors 11-13 tea 110. 160 tofu 86.92 tonify 10.135 throat.36. 49.56. 104. 78.30.128. 99 heat 14. 120.49. 79.36.26. 105 toxins 33.70 ulcer 103.172 recipes 183-186 scrambled tofu 185 tofu dressing 186 tofu and mushroom casserole 183 tofu skins and mushrooms 184 tofu with seaweed 186 tomato 70.55. 132 tinnitus 59. 216 sauce 169. 105. 107 weak 55.65.45. 64. 109. 146 stones gallbladder 159 kidney 159 urinary 159 strawberry 69.110.107 thyroid 46.34. 65. 56.

142 viscera. 200 digestive 76 wet dreams 32.61. 159. 43.43.33. 154. v vagina 124.22.41. organs 102. 102.216 gluten 167.20.41. 9. 117. 61.31.102.123 fibroid 46 turbinado 103 turkey 83.14. 58. 162 and poison 109 blood 36.116.75.39.72. 88. 96.74. 167 recipes 167-201 ventilate lungs 54. 97. 160 mouth 152 pain 44. 91 trauma 50. 153.42.52.89. 115. 125. 106 duodenal 103.218 virus 6. 135.142. 160 vaginal discharge 32 infection 36 vaginitis 65 vegetable juice 110 vegetables 5.22. 39.163 rice 46. 76.59. 102 130. 82. 99. 61.155.77 childhood 45 induce 55 w walnut (See nuts. 68. 146. 106. 103. 111 Triple Heater 9 tuberculosis 46. 50.229 water chestnut 30. 45.66. 115. 108 tumor 40.154.69. 138.56. walnuts) warts 47 warming food 3.21. 77. 117. 34.86.25-52.217 turnip 50.44. 69. 128.69. 47. 143. 220.5. 11 urinary difficulty 28.221 watercress 52. 77. 10. 103. 73. .215 Water Element 8. 158 wheat 78.229 vision (See eyes) voice loss 65 vomiting 36. 100 after illness 111.4. 51. 42. 108.35. 229 cold 31-32. 123. 72. 92.71. 228 vinegar 48.216 bran 79. 98. 161 stomach 146.74.254 ~ The Tao of Nutrition trail mix 55. 124. 122. 86. 57. 195 white fungus (See fungus. 159 uterine bleeding 51.153. white) whooping cough (See cough.57.216 germ 80.145.133 washing 123 vegetarian 21. 108.54. 102. 78.70.58.216 weakness 55. 101.157.138. 132. whooping) wind 29.46. 215 U ulcers 38. 151.68. 134.9.96.20.48. 160 umeboshi plum paste 171 underweight 73 Urinary Bladder 5.219. 118.225. 62. 126.76 bloody 56 frequent 90 tract stones 93.215 watermelon 70.66.132. 105.

211.77.52. 18-19 Yin xiii. 13~ 151. 64. 211.229 deficiency 229 yogurt 54.185. 7.219 y yam 31. 215 in recipes 169. 6~ 81. 116.147.215 (See Chinese.115.191.49.133.221 wood ears 102 worms 37.162 worry 9.10.11. 196 .111.45.14. 91. 128. 3. 123 Yellow Emperor xiv.111 winter 10 melon 26.211.94. 4. yam) Yang xiii.101. 14.70. 14.Index ~ 255 229 heat 32. 18. 118.131 acne remedy 115 goat 98. winter melon) squash 44 Wood Element 8.62.51.109 soy 207 z zucchini 48.218 rice 45.219. 125.60. 220.42.74.57.49.229 wine 43.45.192. 15~ 192. 229 deficiency 229 yeast infection 25. 4. 18.215 melon seed (See seeds. 3. 108.

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