Festival Guidelines

Pre-Planning Planning Launch Management Event

A guide to making the most of a Festival in support of one of the four central Masonic Charities

First Edition – February 2011

2

Table of Contents
GLOSSARY OF TERMS AND ABBREVIATIONS................................................................7 BACKGROUND AND INTRODUCTION 8 Introduction ........................................................................................................................8 The Charities......................................................................................................................8 Disclaimer ..........................................................................................................................9 Purpose of the guidelines...................................................................................................9 Working Parties..................................................................................................................9 Updating the guidelines....................................................................................................10 Structure of the guidelines ...............................................................................................10 Understanding the Festival system ..................................................................................11 The Festival matrix...........................................................................................................11 PRE-PLANNING .................................................................................................................12 Objective ..........................................................................................................................12 What’s in this section .......................................................................................................13 Definitions ........................................................................................................................14 Appointment of Festival Appeal Chairman .......................................................................15 Financial and legal considerations ...................................................................................16 Relationship between PGM and Festival Appeal Chairman.............................................16 De-brief from the previous Festival Appeal ......................................................................17 Lessons learned from the de-brief....................................................................................18 De-brief – Province X .......................................................................................................18 De-brief – Province Y .......................................................................................................18 The rolling cycle ...............................................................................................................19 The Festival matrix...........................................................................................................19 The importance of Provincial Festival Appeals ................................................................20 What the Province receives from the Charities each year................................................21 The Freemasons’ Grand Charity Annual Contribution......................................................21 Initial contact with the Charity ..........................................................................................22 Consistency of approach from the Charities ....................................................................22 PLANNING ..........................................................................................................................23 Objective ..........................................................................................................................23 What’s in this section .......................................................................................................24 Assessment of the Province.............................................................................................25 Potential responses table.................................................................................................29 Creating the Appeal Committee .......................................................................................30 Creating the Committee – other suggestions ...................................................................31 Creating the Committee – typical structure ......................................................................31 Creating the Committee – area structure .........................................................................32 Creating the Committee – moving forward.......................................................................33 Communications ..............................................................................................................34 Regular liaison meetings..................................................................................................41 Establishing a budget.......................................................................................................42 Decision making processes .............................................................................................43 The role of the Lodge Charity Steward.............................................................................44 Length of Festival Appeal.................................................................................................45 Detailed understanding of the Charity ..............................................................................46
3

Guidance from the Charities ............................................................................................48 Awareness of other appeals.............................................................................................48 Accounting for donations..................................................................................................49 Accounting – cash flow ....................................................................................................50 Target setting ...................................................................................................................51 The target for the Festival Appeal ....................................................................................52 Example target for the Province .......................................................................................53 The target for the Lodge...................................................................................................54 The target for the individual member................................................................................54 Target setting – size of Province ......................................................................................55 Target setting – demographics.........................................................................................55 Target setting – common comparisons ............................................................................55 Involving the Royal Arch ..................................................................................................56 Other Orders ....................................................................................................................56 Jewels and incentives ......................................................................................................57 Merchandise ....................................................................................................................58 Literature and stationery ..................................................................................................59 LAUNCH .............................................................................................................................60 Objective ..........................................................................................................................60 What’s in this section .......................................................................................................60 Planning the launch..........................................................................................................61 Announcing the date and venue for the launch................................................................62 Delegates attending the launch........................................................................................63 Contents of the launch presentation.................................................................................64 Delivery of the message...................................................................................................65 Rehearsing the presentation ............................................................................................66 Funding the launch...........................................................................................................67 Questionnaire review .......................................................................................................67 Information to be given to the delegates ..........................................................................68 Unveiling the targets ........................................................................................................68 Post-launch – cascading the message to Lodge members..............................................69 MANAGEMENT OF A FESTIVAL.......................................................................................70 Objective ..........................................................................................................................70 What’s in this section .......................................................................................................71 Administration – collecting the money..............................................................................72 Administration – robust systems ......................................................................................72 Administration – legal issues............................................................................................73 Administration –Gift Aid....................................................................................................73 Organisation – Appeal Committee ...................................................................................74 Organisation – central enquiry point for all issues............................................................75 Organisation – Jewels, Bars and certificates ...................................................................75 Management information .................................................................................................76 Management information – targets and progress.............................................................77 Operation – visiting Lodges..............................................................................................77 Operation – Lodge procedures ........................................................................................78 Operation – handling objections.......................................................................................78 Operation – wives and partners .......................................................................................78 Operation – use of the Charities ......................................................................................79 Operation – driving the message down............................................................................80 Operation – targeting non-attendees................................................................................81
4

Operation – top-ups .........................................................................................................81 Operation – donations to other Provincial appeals...........................................................82 Mid-term Boost – combating ‘Festival fatigue’..................................................................83 Mid-term boost – re-launching the Appeal .......................................................................85 Mid-term boost – the psychology of giving .......................................................................86 Mid-term boost – releasing the “rainy day fund” ...............................................................87 Mid-term boost – relationships with Provincial Almoners .................................................87 FESTIVAL EVENT ..............................................................................................................88 Objective ..........................................................................................................................88 What’s in this section? .....................................................................................................89 An overview of the Festival Event ....................................................................................90 What form will the Event take?.........................................................................................90 Preparation – Festival Event Committee..........................................................................91 Preparing for the Festival Event – first steps....................................................................92 Procedure and protocol....................................................................................................94 The main guest list ...........................................................................................................94 Guest list considerations ..................................................................................................95 Festival Stewards.............................................................................................................95 Dress code.......................................................................................................................95 The procession ................................................................................................................96 Seat allocations and table plan ........................................................................................96 Agreeing the seating plan ................................................................................................96 Toast list...........................................................................................................................97 Materials required ............................................................................................................97 The Festival List and booklet ...........................................................................................98 Banner .............................................................................................................................99 The menu booklet ............................................................................................................99 Public address system ...................................................................................................100 Briefing...........................................................................................................................100 Brief for guest of honour.................................................................................................100 Flowers ..........................................................................................................................101 Photographer .................................................................................................................101 Media .............................................................................................................................101 First aid and health and safety .......................................................................................101 APPENDIX A – WORKING GROUP TERMS OF REFERENCE ......................................102 APPENDIX B – APPEAL MATRIX....................................................................................104 APPENDIX C – QUARTERLY PROVINCIAL STATISTICS (EXAMPLE) .........................105 APPENDIX D – TYPICAL TEAM STRUCTURES .............................................................106 APPENDIX E – GIFT AID..................................................................................................107 APPENDIX F – THE RELIEF CHEST AND OTHER DONATION SYSTEMS...................108 APPENDIX G – EFFECTIVE FUNDRAISING ...................................................................112

5

APPENDIX H – FUNDRAISING IDEAS ............................................................................116 APPENDIX I – PROMOTIONAL ITEMS – INCENTIVES ..................................................120 APPENDIX J – EVENT CHECK LIST ...............................................................................121 APPENDIX K – EXAMPLE FESTIVAL CHAIRMAN BIOGRAPHICAL DETAILS ............123 APPENDIX L – EXAMPLE OF TIMETABLE FOR THE FESTIVAL EVENT.....................124 APPENDIX M – FINANCIAL DATA ..................................................................................127 APPENDIX N – SPECIMIN JOB DESCRIPTION – FESTIVAL APPEAL CHAIRMAN.....128 APPENDIX O – SWOT ANALYSIS...................................................................................129 APPENDIX P – PREVIOUS FESTIVAL RESULTS...........................................................130 APPENDIX R – EXAMPLE BUDGET ...............................................................................132 APPENDIX S – EXAMPLE LETTERS ..............................................................................133 APPENDIX T – WEBSITE DESIGN CONSIDERATIONS.................................................134 APPENDIX U – PRESS RELEASE...................................................................................139

6

Glossary of Terms and Abbreviations
Term or abbreviation APGM Appeal or Festival Appeal Central Masonic Charities (CMCs) DPGM Event or Festival Event Festival Festival Appeal Chairman Festival Forum Festival President Festival Steward Gift Aid High Ruler Meaning Assistant Provincial Grand Master. The Appeal running over many years in support of one of the four Charities – excludes the Event. The Freemasons’ Grand Charity, Masonic Samaritan Fund, Royal Masonic Benevolent Institution and the Royal Masonic Trust for Girls and Boys. Deputy Provincial Grand Master. The formal closing of a Festival Appeal – often held at a prestigious location where the final total raised for the Charity is announced. The whole Process of a Masonic Festival Appeal, including the Festival Event. The member appointed by the PGM to organise the Festival Appeal for a Province. A meeting of all Provinces currently hosting a Festival in support of the central Masonic Charities. The figurehead for a Festival Appeal, normally the PGM. A traditional rank within the Festival given to those who have, or will have, donated a predetermined amount during the course of the Appeal. Tax relief on money donated by UK taxpayers to registered UK charities. One of the four Active Rulers in the United Grand Lodge of England:, namely: the Grand Master; the Pro Grand Master; the Deputy Grand Master or the Assistant Grand Master. Her Majesty’s Revenue and Customs. The recognition during a Festival of those members who achieve stated levels of contributions in excess of the Steward level. Commonly called Vice Patron, Patron and Grand Patron. Provincial Grand Master. A meeting currently held four times per at which all Provincial Grand Masters discuss matters of shared interest and importance. (The PGMs Forum is not an official body within Freemasonry.) Contributions made by a member either by banker’s order or Direct Debit, usually for a stated amount payable either monthly or annually and for a fixed period, commonly five years. The Royal Arch is the continuation of Craft Freemasonry. Its members, called Companions, meet in Chapters. A way of reviewing strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats to assist in the planning process (see Appendix O). The four Central Masonic Charities (see also CMCs). United Grand Lodge of England. Visiting Grand Officer – a Grand Officer assigned to a Lodge by a Provincial Grand Lodge. The VGO represents the PGM and acts as a conduit for communication between Lodge and Province. Visiting Officer - an Officer of London Grand Rank or higher who performs a similar function to that of a VGO but operates in the Metropolitan area of London. An event, often a dinner, where non-Masons, and ladies, are present. This can often be preceded by an Open Lodge Meeting. Worshipful Master. The leader of an individual Lodge who is elected annually.

HMRC Honorifics

PGM PGMs Forum

Regular donations

Royal Arch SWOT analysis The Charities UGLE VGO

VO

White Table Event WM

7

Pre-Planning

Planning

Launch

Management

Event

Background and Introduction
Introduction
This document provides guidance and practical assistance for planning and running a Festival in support of one of the four central Masonic Charities (the Charities). These guidelines are not intended to be prescriptive but are based on the experience of a variety of sources; the members of the Festival Working Party established to create this document; the staff and officials of the Charities; feedback from the Festival Forum and input from external bodies such as the Institute of Fundraising. Each Province must make its own decisions – this document offers guidance only. The document will be updated regularly. Comments and suggestions, based on your experiences of running Festival Appeals and Festival Events, would be gratefully received. Please send feedback to: festivalguidelines@rmtgb.org The Charities refer to the Freemasons’ Grand Charity (Grand Charity); the Masonic Samaritan Fund (MSF); the Royal Masonic Benevolent Institution (RMBI) and the Royal Masonic Trust for Girls and Boys (RMTGB). Information on the Charities is contained in the booklet: “The Central Masonic Charities – Information for Freemasons and their families” which can be obtained from Letchworth’s Ltd, 60 Great Queen Street, London WC2B 5AZ. The book can also be downloaded from the website of the United Grand Lodge of England (UGLE) UGLE www.ugle.org.uk/charitable-work/

The Charities

Alternatively, visit the Charities’ websites for further information:Grand Charity MSF RMBI RMTGB www.grandcharity.org www.msfund.org.uk www.rmbi.org.uk www.rmtgb.org

For information relating to the Mark Benevolent Fund, please visit: www.markbenevolence.org.uk

8

Pre-Planning

Planning

Launch

Management

Event

Disclaimer

The material available in this document is designed to provide general information only. Whilst every effort has been made to ensure that the information provided is accurate, it does not constitute legal or other professional advice. The purpose of this document is to describe how to initiate, plan, manage and celebrate a successful Festival Appeal for one of the Charities. It is intended as a reference document for use as the Province organising the Festival deems appropriate. It is inevitable that people move on after the completion of a Festival and useful knowledge can become lost. The “constant” in the Festival system is the Charities. This document will help ensure the retention of best practice and the experience of what works and what has not worked in the past. This document will be particularly useful for PGMs, Provincial Grand Charity Stewards or for anyone responsible for launching or managing a Festival Appeal. Following the first Provincial Grand Charity Stewards’ Conference held in 2009, it was agreed that two working parties would be established. The First Working Party was established in January 2010 to produce Guidelines for Festivals under the Chairmanship of Conrad Donaldson, Provincial Grand Charity Steward for the Province of Devonshire. The second Working Party, chaired by Eric McConnell, Provincial Grand Charity Steward for Cheshire, would produce a manual for Lodge Charity Stewards with guidance, examples and best practice for effective fundraising. These two documents should be considered as complementary and will be useful to Provinces both in and out of Festival and to Provincial Grand Charity Stewards. The Charity Steward’s Manual will contain information concerning the day-to-day work of the Lodge Charity Steward, together with the necessary qualifications for the office and especially the duties he will undertake during a Festival Appeal. This document is likely to be published in 2011.

Purpose of the guidelines

Working Parties

9

Pre-Planning

Planning

Launch

Management

Event

Updating the guidelines

The Charities will ensure that these guidelines are updated regularly and republished annually. Two copies of the guidelines are to be sent to each Provincial Grand Secretary. Suggested recipients are either the PGM or the Festival Appeal Chairman and the Provincial Grand Charity Steward. Additional copies will be available on request. Non current copies should be destroyed. The contents of these Guidelines will be reviewed annually by a small Committee comprising representatives from the Provinces and staff from the Charities. The latest version of the Guidelines will be available online at www.rmtgb.org in a downloadable format. The guidelines are divided into five sections, each corresponding to a particular part of the Festival process. The sections are colour coded and are clearly highlighted at the head of each page. The Sections are:-

Structure of the guidelines

• • • • •

Pre-Planning Planning Launch Management Event

Jump to Pre-Planning Jump to Planning Jump to Launch Jump to Management Jump to Event

Normally, Provinces host a Festival once every 11 years with each Province supporting each of the four Charities once over a 44 year period. For the purpose of this document, each Festival will conclude in Year 11. The preparation for the next Festival commences in year zero. Many Provinces elect to hold a five, six or seven year Festival; therefore, the Festival launch will occur in year four, five or six of the cycle. The formal length of a Festival Appeal is decided by the Province in consultation with the Charity. Please consult Table 1 on page 46 for guidance relating to the length of Festival Appeals.

10

Pre-Planning

Planning

Launch

Management

Event

Understanding the Festival system

A total of 44 of the 47 Provinces under UGLE take part in the Festival system. Each year, four of the 44 Provinces will conclude a Festival Appeal in aid of one of the Charities by holding a Festival Event. The Festival Appeal will have lasted several years and have involved a great deal of hard work by the members of the Province. The money raised during a Festival Appeal makes a significant contribution to the income of the designated Charity. Without the income from Festivals, the work of the Charities would be seriously compromised. The Provinces of Jersey, Guernsey & Alderney and the Isle of Man are not included in the Festival system but may participate in periods of fundraising for one or more of the Charities. The Metropolitan Grand Lodge sometimes also holds its own separate Appeals in support of one of the Charities, most recently for the RMBI. Members of the Metropolitan Grand Lodge and other Provinces often make donations, which will also count towards the Appeal. For example, in the case of the RMTGB, donations from members in other Provinces, and London, (given either directly or via a Lodge) will be allocated to the total of the next Appeal which is due to conclude. Historically, some Provinces have found themselves fundraising for the same designated Charity in successive Festival Appeals and some Festival Appeals ran for the full 11 year cycle. The current Festival matrix has been approved by the PGM’s Forum. The current matrix is published on a rolling 11 year cycle. In most cases a Province is in Festival once every 11 years. The current matrix aims to ensure that:• • • • Each Province is in Festival once to each Charity in a 44 year period. Overlap between adjoining Provinces in Festival is minimised. Recognition is made of the sequence of Festivals hosted by the Mark Benevolent Fund. Provinces enjoy significant rest periods between Festivals during which they can concentrate on local charitable priorities if they choose to do so.

The Festival matrix

The current published matrix is included in Appendix B.

11

Pre-Planning

Planning

Launch

Management

Event

Pre-Planning
Description Year Conclusion of previous Festival Appeal Pre-Planning Planning Launch of Festival Appeal Management Festival Event Post Festival Appeal de-briefing 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

The objective of this section is to help prepare for the detailed planning

Objective of this to come. Preparation is essential at this early stage for the successful planning, launch, management and final outcome of the Festival section
Appeal. The final year of the Festival Appeal, during which the Festival Event will take place, and the identity of the host Charity can be found by reference to the Festival matrix at Appendix B. The year that the Festival will conclude will be known at least 11 years in advance so there is nothing to prevent pre-planning at a very early stage.

Each Province must make its own decisions – this document offers guidance only.

12

Pre-Planning

Planning

Launch

Management

Event

What’s in this section

The target audience at this preparatory stage is likely to be the PGM and his Executive. Once appointed, this section will be of particular interest to the Festival Appeal Chairman and his Committee. This section comprises:Definitions ..............................................................................14 Appointment of Festival Appeal Chairman.............................15 Financial and legal considerations .........................................16 Relationship between PGM and Festival Appeal Chairman...16 De-brief from the previous Festival Appeal ............................17 Lessons learned from the de-brief .........................................18 De-brief – Province X.............................................................18 De-brief – Province Y.............................................................18 The rolling cycle .....................................................................19 The Festival matrix.................................................................19 The importance of Provincial Festival Appeals ......................20 What the Province receives from the Charities each year? ...21 The Freemasons’ Grand Charity Annual Contribution ...........21 Initial contact with the Charity ................................................22 Consistency of approach from the Charities ..........................22 After completing this section the Province should be able to commence the formal planning of the Festival Appeal.

“Planning is an unnatural process – it’s much more fun to get on with it. The real benefit of not planning is that failure comes as a complete surprise and is not preceded by months of worry.” Sir John Harvey-Jones

13

Pre-Planning

Planning

Launch

Management

Event

Definitions

For the purposes of this document, the Festival refers to a Masonic Festival comprising the Appeal and the Festival Event or Finale. The Festival Appeal is the process of raising funds on behalf of one of the central Masonic Charities. It includes the planning, launch, execution and administration of an Appeal but not the Festival Event. The Festival Event is the celebration held at the end of the Festival Appeal to mark its conclusion and to announce, for the first time, the total amount raised for the designated Charity. The Festival Event can take many forms although traditionally it comprises a dinner attended by Festival Stewards and their wives or partners.

Festival

Festival Appeal
(Planning, launch, execution and administration of an appeal)

Festival Event
(Celebration or Finale)

The Festival is a partnership between the Province and the relevant Charity, the aim of which is to raise funds for the Charity. The Festival also provides an opportunity to increase the awareness of the work the Charity undertakes and the support it provides to Freemasons, their dependents and, where relevant, non-Masonic charities and individuals.

14

Pre-Planning

Planning

Launch

Management

Event

Appointment of Festival Appeal Chairman

The appointment of a competent organiser as the Festival Appeal Chairman is critical to the success of a Festival Appeal. This appointment will be the responsibility of the PGM. The Festival Appeal Chairman could be a Deputy or Assistant PGM or member of the Province with the right qualifications for the task. The key qualities include charisma, leadership, drive and determination as well as a proven ability of public speaking, motivational and organisational skills. Above all the Festival Appeal Chairman should enjoy the full confidence of the PGM and his Executive. The Festival Appeal Chairman would normally be a senior Mason or a member of the Provincial Executive. A more junior Freemason with exceptional abilities might also be considered. It is crucial that both the PGM and the Festival Appeal Chairman believe in the importance of the Festival Appeal and in the work of the designated Charity so that they can speak with real enthusiasm about the Appeal. The Festival Appeal Chairman needs to be an inspirational character, prudent yet with an entrepreneurial spirit. It is expected that he will remain in office for the duration of the Festival. A key priority will be to establish an effective Committee to assist him in this task. He should define responsibilities and specific roles and identify the right people to occupy them. A specimen job description is included at Appendix N Following his appointment, the Appeal Chairman should maintain regular contact with the relevant Charity.

15

Pre-Planning

Planning

Launch

Management

Event

Financial and legal considerations

The Festival Appeal Chairman and his Committee need to be aware of the financial and legal requirements associated with fundraising and be prepared to co-opt experts in these fields to the organising Committee. It should be noted from the outset that setup and administration costs cannot be taken from monies raised for the Charity. Neither can the Festival Event be subsidised from charitable donations. Later sections of this document deal with some of these considerations but it is recommended that the Festival Appeal Chairman should discuss financial and legal matters at an early stage with the Charity. Please note the disclaimer on page 9. Vital to the success of the Festival Appeal is the unequivocal support of the PGM and his Executive. At an early stage, the Festival Appeal Chairman’s job description should be agreed with the PGM; this will set out the main duties and responsibilities of the office. A specimen job description is included at Appendix N. It is vital that the Festival Appeal is run on best management practices with regular and effective communication between the PGM and Chairman.

Relationship between PGM and Festival Appeal Chairman

16

Pre-Planning

Planning

Launch

Management

Event

De-brief from the previous Festival Appeal

At the end of the previous Festival Appeal, a detailed de-brief should have taken place, the output of which is a comprehensive document. This document with its careful analysis of which practices were successful and which less so, together with recommendations for the future Festival Appeal Chairman, is invaluable as a planning tool. If no de-brief is available the Festival Appeal Chairman will have to rely on the memories and anecdotal evidence of members of the previous Committee, which may not be reliable or comprehensive. It is important to ask all parties involved including the Charity that has benefitted from the Festival; the Charity might have a different opinion of how things went. A good de-brief will provide answers to a series of key questions such as:• • • • • • Was the Festival Appeal a success? Was the duration of the Festival Appeal appropriate? Was the Appeal organised effectively? How could it have been improved? Was there sufficient preparation? Were the honorific levels set appropriately? Could they have been higher? Was the maximum possible amount raised during the Festival Appeal? If not, why not? How could more have been raised? Were there targets for individual members, Lodges or the Province? Were they the right targets? Were they challenging but achievable? Was the launch effective? Did it get the Appeal off to a good start? If not, why not? Were the correct budgets set for the Festival Appeal and Festival Event? Did the Appeal and Event run to budget and how were running costs financed? Could the administration of the Festival Appeal have been better? Was the accounting and collection of monies efficient? Did the Province and the Appeal Committee receive the appropriate level of support from the Charity? Were there any issues regarding the collection of Gift Aid tax relief from HMRC? What was the candid view of the host Charity? Was the Festival Event a success?

• •

• • • • • •

This de-brief should be initiated by either the Province or the host Charity and will usually involve a ‘wind-up’ meeting between the two parties. The output will take the form of a written document which will be invaluable to future Festival Appeal organisers, to the Festival Forum and the future development of these guidelines. The de-brief needs to be a well documented and comprehensive appraisal of all aspects of the previous Festival Appeal.

17

Pre-Planning

Planning

Launch

Management

Event

Once the Festival Appeal Chairman has been appointed, he needs to

Lessons learned read the de-brief document carefully. He needs to approach the previous host Charity and his predecessor to determine the lessons from the delearned from the previous Festival Appeal. He might also wish to brief
contact the PGM or Past PGM and other members of the previous organising Committee. The de-brief should provide an opportunity to reflect on what worked and what didn’t work. It also ensures the Province can identify key lessons for the upcoming Festival Appeal. Below are two extracts from de-brief documents:-

De-brief – Province X

Province X had a high profile launch which set the momentum for the Festival Appeal. However:• • • The qualification for a Jewel was set at a low level. No targets were set. The Province did not appreciate the level of support and advice available from the Charity.

Result: Members thought they had accomplished all they needed to do at the Steward level and initially were not asked to give more. Despite substantial enthusiasm for the Festival Appeal, the total figure raised was less than was hoped for at the outset.

De-brief – Province Y

The preparation for the Festival Appeal of Province Y was excellent with a high profile launch and a clear plan for the full duration of the Festival in place. The following factors contributed to a successful Appeal:• • • A well publicised and accepted target. Excellent communication between the Charity, the Province and between Lodges and their members. A plan in place to prevent a mid-term lull.

Result: The momentum of a high profile launch was maintained by setting a stretching, but achievable, target combined with a plan to prevent ‘Festival fatigue’. The result was a final total which well exceeded the expectations of the Province and the Charity.

18

Pre-Planning

Planning

Launch

Management

Event

When exiting from one Festival and approaching the next, use this

The rolling cycle important time of reflection to:• • • Identify best practices so mistakes are not repeated. Keep records of how the Festival was organised etc. so the experience is not lost for the next Committee. Above all carry out and document a full de-brief for the benefit of the next Committee.

When a Province is out of Festival it is important to continue to promote the culture of giving that has been developed. Ask members of the Province to keep giving on a regular basis possibly through a Grand Charity Relief Chest (at Lodge or Provincial level), through the Benevolent Fund (at Lodge or Provincial level) or through the Blanket Scheme operated by the RMTGB – see Appendix F for further details. The current Festival Matrix is included in Appendix B. Further information on the matrix is contained on page 11.

The Festival matrix

19

Pre-Planning

Planning

Launch

Management

Event

The importance of Provincial Festival Appeals

On average just over 60% of the Charities’ income is derived from Festival Appeals. The Charities are often faced with the misconception that additional donations are not needed due to the income they receive from their endowments (or in the case of the Grand Charity, the annual contribution), however this is not the case. In 2009, the Charities spent over £26m supporting beneficiaries. Income from investments amounted to only £8.7m. This clearly demonstrates that the Charities rely on successful Festival Appeals to continue their life-changing work. Chart 1 shows the ‘funding gap’ between the income the Charities receive from their investments and their total expenditure.
Graph 1 - The 'Funding Gap'
£30m Investment income / total expenditure

£25m

£20m

£15m

£10m

£5m

£0 2005 2006 2007 Total Expenditure 2008 2009

Investment Income

Reducing the funding gap is important to enable the Charities to continue operating without severely depleting their investments. In view of the substantial annual income received from investments, it is vital that the Charities do not allow their core investments to be significantly eroded. Without the funding from Festivals, the Charities’ would be unable to survive in the long-term, or would have to severely limit the assistance they provide. For a detailed breakdown of the income and expenditure, see Appendix M. “The Festival system provides a major part of the fundraising effort for the Charities. Without it we would have to significantly reduce the scope and scale of our life changing support.” Les Hutchinson Chief Executive, Royal Masonic Trust for Girls and Boys

20

Pre-Planning

Planning

Launch

Management

Event

What the Province receives from the Charities each year

Every Provincial Grand Charity Steward and Provincial Grand Almoner should receive quarterly statistics (see Appendix C) from the Charities detailing the total financial assistance given to members of their Province over the previous 12 months and the previous five years. These statistics are a vital tool in demonstrating the tangible assistance provided by the Charities to each Province. The statistics will assist in making the case for supporting the Festival Appeal. “Many of the Brethren thought that they were ‘giving money to London’ during the Festival Appeal without realising that we were a net recipient over the period of the Appeal to the tune of several million pounds. That gap has to be filled by other Provinces in Festival.” Michael Penny, PGM At the re-launch of Devonshire’s Festival Appeal The only permanent commitment to fund any of the Charities is the requirement for each Lodge to make an annual contribution to the Freemasons’ Grand Charity on behalf of each member recorded on the Annual Return. The Freemasons’ Grand Charity uses this annual contribution (currently £14 per annum in respect of each subscribing member) to meet its core objectives, including providing grants to Masons and their dependents in financial distress and supporting the other Masonic Charities. HMRC has ruled that the payment of the annual contribution is not a voluntary gift, hence the annual contribution to the Freemasons’ Grand Charity is not eligible for Gift Aid relief.

The Freemasons’ Grand Charity Annual Contribution

21

Pre-Planning

Planning

Launch

Management

Event

Initial contact with the Charity

Experience suggests that Provinces cannot start thinking early enough about their next Festival. One of the first tasks for the new Committee is to communicate with the designated Charity. It is recommended that the Charity and the Province open up a dialogue at least two or three years before the launch of a Festival Appeal. Early contact gives plenty of time to prepare and plan. It is recommended that the Festival Appeal Chairman should be responsible for making preliminary contact with the Charity early in the 11 year cycle. If the Province doesn’t do this, the Charity will be the first to initiate contact. Following their joint relocation to new offices within Freemasons’ Hall, London, the Charities have continued a process of harmonising their approach to communications with Provinces and Festival Appeal Chairmen. This document is part of that process. There are still, however, some variations in the administration of Festivals amongst the Charities. The Province should always consult with the Charity it is supporting.

Consistency of approach from the Charities

22

Pre-Planning

Planning

Launch

Management

Event

Planning
Description Year Conclusion of previous Festival Appeal Pre-Planning Planning Launch of Festival Appeal Management Festival Event Post Festival Appeal de-briefing 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Objective

The overall objective of this section is to help plan and launch the Festival Appeal.

Each Province must make its own decisions – this document offers guidance only.

23

Pre-Planning

Planning

Launch

Management

Event

This section comprises:-

What’s in this section

Assessment of the Province ...................................................... 25 Potential responses table .......................................................... 29 Creating the Appeal Committee ................................................ 30 Creating the Committee – other suggestions ............................ 31 Creating the Committee – typical structure................................ 31 Creating the Committee – area structure .................................. 32 Creating the Committee – moving forward ................................ 33 Communications........................................................................ 34 Regular liaison meetings ........................................................... 41 Establishing a budget ................................................................ 42 Decision making processes....................................................... 43 The role of the Lodge Charity Steward...................................... 44 Length of Festival Appeal.......................................................... 45 Detailed understanding of the Charity ....................................... 46 Guidance from the Charities...................................................... 48 Awareness of other appeals ...................................................... 48 Accounting for donations ........................................................... 49 Accounting – cash flow.............................................................. 50 Target setting ............................................................................ 51 The target for the Festival Appeal ............................................. 52 Example target for the Province ................................................ 53 The target for the Lodge ............................................................ 54 The target for the individual member......................................... 54 Target setting – size of the Province ......................................... 55 Target setting – demographics .................................................. 55 Target setting – common comparisons ..................................... 55 Involving the Royal Arch............................................................ 56 Other Orders ............................................................................. 56 Jewels and incentives ............................................................... 57 Merchandise.............................................................................. 58 Literature and stationery............................................................ 59 After completing this section you should be able to:• • • • Commence preparations for the formal Launch of the Festival Appeal. Create a strong and effective Committee to run the Festival Appeal through to a successful conclusion. Create the framework for a successful Appeal. Start thinking about the Festival Event.

24

Pre-Planning

Planning

Launch

Management

Event

Assessment of the Province

The first part of the planning process should involve a thorough understanding of the make up of the Province including its demographics, geography, membership and history of charitable giving. The following areas can be considered:• • • • • • • • Membership statistics. Charitable giving within the Province. The psychology of giving. Lodge Charity Stewards. Lodge opinion formers. Wives and partners. Other local Masonic appeals. Lodge cultures.

In more detail:• Membership statistics The geographical distribution of Lodges and clusters of Lodges and an understanding of the socio-economic distribution of the membership will be useful in formulating the fundraising strategy for the Province. It is useful to have information on average attendances at Lodge meetings and to identify non-attendees so that a separate strategy can be put in place for them. This information is also particularly useful when setting Lodge targets. • Charitable giving within the Province The history of past and present charitable giving within each Lodge and within other Masonic Orders needs to be considered. Some Lodges will need considerable assistance from the organising Committee to get into ‘charity mode’ while others will fall into it naturally. This information will help build a picture of how charitable Lodges have been and the extent of their charitable potential for the future. The psychology of giving Whilst it has to be accepted that charitable giving by individual Freemasons is entirely voluntary, experience indicates that some Freemasons do not fully embrace the concept of regular charitable giving citing various objections. It is helpful to be familiar with their objections at the outset and to develop a series of responses before launching an Appeal. Many objections are often based on misunderstandings which can be resolved by providing the correct information – pages 86-87 contain more information about different approaches to charitable giving.

25

Pre-Planning

Planning

Launch

Management

Event

Assessment of the Province
(continued)

The Lodge Charity Steward The Lodge Charity Steward is the key point of contact in the Festival Appeal campaign. His role is crucial to the Appeal as he is in regular communication with his Lodge members and knows their potential for giving from his own first-hand experience. An early assessment of every Lodge Charity Steward is crucial to getting an Appeal off to a good start. Some key questions a Provincial Grand Charity Steward might ask when assessing each Lodge Charity Steward includes:o Does he understand the purpose and practice of Masonic charitable giving? o Is he able to persuade members to give cheerfully and willingly? o Is he proactive, or is he content just to run the draw at the Festive Board? o Will the existing Lodge Charity Steward be the right person for the duration of the Festival? o Is he prepared for the extra work? o What training needs may he have? It is a fact that some Lodge Charity Stewards are more effective than others at raising money. Less effective Lodge Charity Stewards require careful and delicate management during a Festival Appeal as they can, often unwittingly, be a significant block in getting the Provincial and/or Festival messages through to individual members. Sometimes the Provincial Grand Charity Steward can have a discrete word with the WM in an effort to rectify the situation. It must be recognised however that the appointment of a Lodge Charity Steward is the WM’s prerogative and the matter must be approached with great care and diplomacy. Some Provinces write to each Lodge Secretary at an early stage before the launch of an Appeal to ensure they have the right team in place before the launch of an Appeal. Discussions might be necessary with the PGM and his Executive to determine if alternative routes to individual Members can be employed. In some Provinces, the responsibility for raising funds at Lodge level has been delegated to another individual such as a Lodge Festival Coordinator.

26

Pre-Planning

Planning

Launch

Management

Event

Assessment of the Province
(continued)

The Charity Steward’s Manual (to be published in 2011) will cover the duties and responsibilities of the Lodge Charity Steward, both in and out of Festival. • Lodge opinion formers Identifying the key influencers for each Lodge - typically these are Past Masters, Grand Officers or those who can sway opinion - can be beneficial when looking to galvanise support for the Appeal. These members may be invaluable in promoting strategy, getting messages across and persuading other members to support the Festival Appeal. This is especially important in Lodges where the Lodge Charity Steward is unlikely to be effective at maximising donations for the Festival Appeal. Wives and partners Wives and partners often take a great deal of interest in the charitable work of Freemasonry and it is always beneficial to involve them in fundraising activities especially at Lodge functions such as Ladies’ Evenings and White Table events. Once wives and partners understand the activities of the Charity and the nature of the Festival Appeal they are likely to want to get involved and can help persuade their partners (the members of the Province) to support the Appeal. They should also be made aware of the potential impact that their support has on making the Appeal a success. • Other Masonic appeals Other Masonic Orders have their own appeals and it is sensible to be aware of them. The Festival Matrix at Appendix B includes those Festivals for the Mark Benevolent Fund which might be running concurrently with a Craft Festival Appeal. Lodges and Chapters within the Province may also be running local non-Masonic Appeals. Be sensitive to these local appeals but try to persuade the WM and the Lodge that the priority during an Appeal period is the Charity being supported by the Festival. Some Provinces build up funds in between Festival Appeals (or have a permanent Endowment) in order to respond to local nonMasonic needs without detriment to the Festival Appeal.

27

Pre-Planning

Planning

Launch

Management

Event

Assessment of the Province
(continued)

Lodge culture Try to get a feel for the ambiance and philosophy of each Lodge. Some questions to ask include:o Are the members supportive of giving to the Charities and do they have a history of donating generously? o Does the Lodge favour its own local causes? o Are there a high proportion of older Freemasons in the Lodge who are struggling with low fixed incomes? o Is there a different culture in rural Lodges from urban Lodges? o Are there existing demands on charitable funds such as meeting the cost of building repairs? There are sometimes deep rooted misconceptions regarding Festival Appeals such as the perception that ‘money is going to London’ or that the Charities do not need further support or that the money is wasted. Being aware of these issues from the outset enables strategies to be developed which will directly address these concerns.

Summary An honest and objective assessment of the Province before a Festival commences will enable the PGM and Festival Appeal Chairman to have a much clearer understanding of the challenges the Province will face in planning a Festival Appeal and a successful launch. Some of the necessary information will be readily available from Provincial records, whereas some will be documented elsewhere. Some information, however, may only be available through word of mouth and may be largely anecdotal. Assessing a Province’s strengths and weaknesses is a vital part of the planning process because it helps determine the appropriate strategy. A typical SWOT analysis, which may assist in undertaking this assessment, is shown in Appendix O. Building up a responses table, such as that shown overleaf, may be helpful in understanding the Province before it embarks on a Festival Appeal and with troubleshooting once it has commenced.

28

Pre-Planning

Planning

Launch

Management

Event

Potential responses table

Problem
Charity Steward lacks effectiveness at securing donations for the Appeal

Possible solution
Consider training. Use other influential members in Lodge. Speak directly to the WM or Secretary. Ask why they are not supportive? Explain what the Charity does and highlight the merits of its work – a case study may assist. Use Provincial funds to give to local charities and organisations. Direct Lodge giving to the Festival Appeal. Suggest the Lodge nominates another member to attend Encourage the appointment of a Festival co-ordinator in Lodges where the Charity Steward may not be able to travel easily. Explain the benefits that are received by the members of the Province from each of the Charities. Give the statistics over a five and 10 year period.

Comments
Persuasion and tact are required. Demonstrate that the PGM and Executive are on side. Needs to be part of an overall strategy. Agree with the PGM and Executive who will assist and give a lead. Donations to local causes can be a feature of charitable giving out of Festival period.

Members not prepared to give to the Charity

Lodges like to give to their favourite “local causes”

Lodge Charity Steward unable to attend briefings about the Festival

Ensure all Lodges are able to receive accurate and up-todate information about the Appeal.

The Charities are seen as ‘London’ Charities and distant

Persuasive and clear presentations given with conviction should help get the message across. Use the Lodge or Provincial Almoner to add the local touch.

29

Pre-Planning

Planning

Launch

Management

Event

Creating the Appeal Committee

Once the Festival Appeal Chairman has been appointed, the next step is to agree the size and structure of the Appeal Committee – a crucial factor for the future success of the Festival Appeal. Quality, durability, assiduity and real commitment are key requirements from the Committee as well as strong organisational and entrepreneurial skills. Start by identifying roles which require specific skills. The size of the Committee is important and it needs the right balance. Large Committees can sometimes be ineffective but the committee will need to be large enough to share the burden of the work and be representative of the different skills required. An effective Appeal Committee will typically comprise the following members:• • • • • • • • A Secretary to organise meetings, to keep minutes and to promote communication. A Treasurer or Finance Manager to account for money collected and money spent. An individual with experience in organising large fundraising events, for example a Banqueting Manager. An individual experienced in Marketing and promoting Festival merchandise (Ties, cuff links etc.). A media representative to interact with local newspapers, magazines, radio and television. A website editor to create and manage a specific Festival Appeal website. A Gift Aid coordinator (if the Province collects donations itself). A number of Area Managers whose role is to visit Lodges, give presentations, help train the Lodge Charity Stewards and generally assist and motivate the members. The Area Manager’s should be able to ‘sell’ the Festival Appeal to the Lodges. The number of Area Managers will depend on the number of Lodges and the size of the Province.

The Treasurer of the Festival Appeal need not be the Provincial Grand Treasurer but it is a good idea to ensure a continuous audit of the Festival accounts. The Provincial Grand Charity Steward should be a member of the Committee – his knowledge and experience is important and he needs to be ‘on side’. It may also be beneficial to consider appointing previous Provincial Grand Charity Stewards to other positions on the Committee as they will bring relevant experience to the decisionmaking process.

30

Pre-Planning

Planning

Launch

Management

Event

Other suggestions for creating a strong Appeal Committee include:-

Creating the Committee – other suggestions

• •

The Committee may need to be reshuffled and/or possibly changed over time. Turnover in personnel can be good – experiment and don’t be afraid to change. Thank those who are leaving the Committee for their work and contributions. If a Committee member is disruptive or not functioning correctly then he must be replaced. The Committee need not exclusively comprise senior Freemasons. In every Province there will be junior Freemasons with exceptional talents and/or useful skills. Scout for talent to meet existing requirements or think ahead for a future role. In larger Provinces ensure that Committee members are drawn from all regions so that no Lodge or cluster of Lodges can feel they are not represented. Representatives of the other Orders should always be considered particularly at Festival Appeal functions. Representatives of the Royal Arch should be given special consideration. Clearly identify each Committee member’s responsibilities so everyone is aware of their role and unlikely to duplicate tasks.

Select the best team – highly motivated individuals are essential. Never compromise on quality. Appendix D shows a number of typical Committee structures in

Creating the diagrammatic form. Committee – typical structure

31

Pre-Planning

Planning

Launch

Management

Event

Creating the Committee – area structure

In addition to the main Committee, it may be necessary to divide the Province into a number of area committees .The size of the Province will determine the number of Lodges in each area or group. Areas may be managed by Area Managers who are responsible for promoting the Festival Appeal at the local level. Area Managers may report directly to the Festival Appeal Chairman and have, depending on the size of the area, a number of assistants to help them with the task. The duties of the Area Manager (and the Area Committee) are likely to include:• • • • • • • Assisting Lodges and Chapters to maximise funds for the Festival Appeal. Raising awareness of the work of the designated Charity and communicating the importance of a successful Festival Appeal. Facilitating and helping to generate Lodge fundraising initiatives. Encouraging regular donations. Encouraging and explaining the use of Gift Aid - a concept still misunderstood by some members. Acting as a communications channel between the Festival Committee and individual Lodges. Identifying and supporting less effective Lodge Charity Stewards or underperforming Lodges and, together with the Festival Appeal Chairman, developing and executing a strategy to address any concerns. Liaising with the other areas so that there is no clash of major fundraising events. Raising the awareness of the charitable work of Freemasonry amongst the general public wherever possible. Complementing, not undermining, any local non-Masonic charity initiatives within the community. Ensuring that Charity literature and promotional materials, as well as Gift Aid forms and donations boxes, are available in all Masonic centres.

• • • •

32

Pre-Planning

Planning

Launch

Management

Event

Creating the Committee – moving forward

As the Festival Appeal progresses, the shape and composition of the Committee may change. For example:• • • At the outset of the Festival Appeal, there will be a greater need for presenters and communicators. As the Festival Appeal becomes more established in the Province, there will be a need for motivators. From the mid-point of an Appeal onwards, there will be a need for persuasive speakers who are effective at targeting those who may be willing to give, but have yet to do so.

The Chairman should not be reluctant to change personnel as the management of Festival Appeals needs to be dynamic rather than static. Natural turnover of the Committee is inevitable and can be advantageous allowing for a fresh flow of new ideas. Don’t forget that those leaving the Committee can still be very influential within the Province by continuing to act as champions and ambassadors for the Festival Appeal.

33

Pre-Planning

Planning

Launch

Management

Event

The launch will be the first opportunity to communicate the importance Communications of the Festival Appeal, but there are many other forms of communication which need to be planned before the Appeal is launched. Regular communication with members will take various forms including:• • • • • An initial Lodge presentation by a member of the Appeal Committee or an Area Manager. A follow up presentation which may be required at a later date. Events which allow the Province to meet with representatives of the Charity. Talks at Ladies or White Table Evenings. Short addresses by the PGM or his Executive to commemorate a successful fundraising event or to congratulate a Lodge on achieving a memorable milestone (such as achieving Grand Patron status). Letters to individual members enclosing regular donation and Gift Aid forms. Booklets and leaflets from the designated Charity. Provincial newsletters. Website. Use of DVDs. Text messaging. Informal face-to-face communication.

• • • • • • •

All these forms of communication, which are outlined in more detail in the following sections, will need to be planned before the launch to ensure that the Appeal is able to successfully hit the ground running.

34

Pre-Planning

Planning

Launch

Management

Event

Communications The golden rule with any presentation is always consider the audience –
(continued)

Initial Lodge presentation “one size does not fit all”.

An initial presentation to a Lodge or group of Lodges during the early period of an Appeal will need to outline the aims of the Appeal, what the Province is asking from the members and the ways in which the members can support the Appeal. Some guidance on the presentation:• The address is likely to be a PowerPoint presentation and it should be no more than 30-40 minutes in length (including time for questions and debate). When delivering the presentation: o keep the message simple. o keep the amount of text to a minimum and use a consistent format (e.g. the 6 x 6 rule: six lines per slide, six words per line maximum). o use images that relate to the Appeal, the Charity and the Province. o structure the presentation so that it has clearly defined sections and a forceful conclusion. o make sure that everyone in the room can see the speaker and can see the screen if using one. o look directly at the members and speak up. o make sure all the equipment works beforehand. Make sure the Festival is clearly explained – who is being supported? How the money raised will be used? What is the target? What can individual members and Lodges donate or do to support the Appeal? Encourage interesting and profitable fundraising activities. Case studies are a powerful tool and each Charity has many stories available. Sometimes, beneficiaries are prepared to speak about their personal experiences and this can move opinion, especially if the individual is known and respected. Explain how Gift Aid works – there are still many misconceptions about this valuable form of tax relief. Ensure that Gift Aid declaration and regular donation forms are available. Members are more likely to complete and return a form given to them in person than one sent to them in the post. The “willing givers” will take the forms and usually return them to the Charity or to their Lodge Charity Steward immediately. Posters, literature, forms and exhibition stands can be left at Masonic Centres so that they can be available for others to view.

35

Pre-Planning

Planning

Launch

Management

Event

Communications
(continued)

Follow up presentation This may take place several months or possibly a year or two after the formal launch. The format may be the same as the initial presentation, albeit with updated content, but the language and style of presentation will need to be more persuasive because, at this stage, the target is likely to be the “reluctant givers”. For this presentation the following guidance may be useful:• Emphasise the duration of the Appeal and the fact that donations can still be made regularly over a period of years. Gift Aid will enhance these regular donations if the donor is a UK taxpayer. Explain that through Gift Aid the donor and the Charity are getting something for nothing from the Chancellor. Some members, particularly those on small fixed incomes might initially feel that they cannot afford to money to Charity. In these cases it is useful to equate the amount expected of them to something like a newspaper, pint of beer or a gin and tonic a week to reduce the perceived financial impact. Some Freemasons object to wearing a Festival Jewel - they see it as an ostentatious show of generosity. This can become an even more contentious issue when bars are worn to represent higher honorifics. The decision to have a Festival Jewel is for the Appeal Committee in consultation with the PGM and his Executive. The wearing of a Festival Jewel and bar is optional. It is important to stress that it is the donation that is important, not the visible display of a Jewel. It is better for members to give and not wear a Jewel than not give at all. Evidence suggests, however, that Jewels are an incentive to charitable giving; those who object to wearing a Jewel are often those who are reluctant to give. Some Freemasons wish to give anonymously so alternative methods of collection should be discussed such as cash envelopes. Some members have an inbuilt resistance to giving to the Charities. More often than not the same people are ignorant of the good work already being carried out by the designated Charity. It is important to educate this group at the outset to correct many of the deep-rooted misconceptions that they hold.

“The key to our success was good communication to every member of the Province through the volunteer Group Leaders.” Peter Taylor DPGM for Shropshire and Chairman of the 2008 Festival

36

Pre-Planning

Planning

Launch

Management

Event

Communications
(continued)

Talks at Ladies and White Table Evenings These tend to be social evenings comprising mixed (male/female, Freemason/non Mason) audiences. Some important considerations for planning to speak at this type of event include:• • • Plan and rehearse the presentation and don’t make it too long. Keep the message simple and clear. The Charities will each appeal to the natural sympathies of wives and partners. For example: o Grand Charity – Freemasons, their dependents and nonMasonic Charities such as hospices and disaster relief. o MSF – tackling ill health. o RMBI – caring for the elderly. o RMTGB – supporting children. Wives and partners can be very helpful in persuading their husbands/partners to give as well as contributing to the Appeal in their own right. Some Festivals have a Ladies Jewel or brooch which they should be encouraged to wear at Masonic or other social occasions.

Short addresses These are usually given by the PGM, a member of his Executive, the Festival Appeal Chairman or a member of the Appeal Committee often at Lodge meetings or in response to a toast at the Festive Board. A short address or a few chosen remarks may be made to commemorate a successful fundraising event or to congratulate a Lodge on achieving a memorable milestone (such as achievement of Grand Patron status). Some suggestions for these addresses include:• • Always personally thank the Lodge for what has been achieved. Visible and tangible recognition must not be underemphasised. An example might be the presentation of a plaque, a maul or certificate to the WM to congratulate the Lodge for achieving its target or for organising a particularly successful fundraising event. Keep remarks short and mention by name anyone who has made a significant contribution such as the Lodge Charity Steward or the event organiser. Briefly remind the members about the Festival Appeal and total. Thank those who have supported the Appeal. Encourage others to participate. Never criticise a Lodge or an individual openly or in public.

• • • •

37

Pre-Planning

Planning

Launch

Management

Event

Communications
(continued)

Communication between the Lodge Charity Steward and a Lodge member Communication between the Lodge Charity Steward and the members will take various forms depending on the Lodge. Because charitable giving is voluntary, persuasion and tact are essential qualities for a Lodge Charity Steward to possess and they must be careful never to push the message too hard. Examples of effective communications between the Lodge Charity Steward and the members are:• A brief presentation to the members, perhaps following on from a formal Lodge presentation. This might be part of his report at regular Lodge meetings. Personally addressed letters to members asking and encouraging support. Such letters should be short and include a regular donation form and Gift Aid declaration. One to one communication between the Lodge Charity Steward and the individual members. This can either be made face-toface, by phone or by email. Providing help with completing the necessary paper work will greatly enhance the success rate. Absent members must not be overlooked – a letter followed up with a conversation by phone may persuade the non-attendees to contribute to the Appeal.

Letters to individual members These usually take the form of a standard letter sent to all members in the Province or a selection (such as those who have yet to contribute) and signed personally by the PGM and/or the Appeal Chairman. As with all forms of Festival Appeal communication, make the contents brief and get to the point; draft something no more than one or two pages. Include a form for return and make it clear where the reply is to be sent, but, to keep the costs down, don’t include a stamped addressed envelope; if a donor can afford and wants to give, then they will pay for a stamp. Example letters are shown at Appendix S.

38

Pre-Planning

Planning

Launch

Management

Event

Communications
(continued)

Festival brochures It is general practice to produce a launch brochure or other document which is usually posted to every member of the Province hosting the Appeal. These brochures are usually prepared jointly by the Charity and the Province. Such booklets should be in colour and be professionally produced. Typical contents for the Festival brochure might include:• • • A front cover with the appropriate logos prominent and a heart warming picture of some current beneficiaries. An introduction from the PGM explaining the Appeal and the targets. Several pages about the Province and its history, particularly its history of charitable giving, and details of any non-Masonic initiative being supported within the Province (and, where appropriate, the details of any local RMBI home). Several pages about the Charity – its aims, objectives and current work. Case studies detailing support given to beneficiaries in the Province. Remember to obtain permission from the families first. An explanation of what different donation levels might achieve, e.g. £300 - Steward, £1,000 - Patron…etc A tear-off regular donation form and Gift Aid declaration. Details of how the Province has been divided into organising areas. It is important to list all members of the Committee and Area Managers. Photographs of the individuals may enhance this section. A contact list including telephone numbers and email addresses.

• •

• • •

If the Province decides to print its own brochure they should not forget to discuss and agree the contents with the host Charity. For maximum impact, each booklet should be posted individually to each member’s home address, not sent via a Lodge Secretary or the Provincial Office. Be innovative with the brochure. For example, the RMTGB has produced a bilingual brochure for North Wales and a recent MSF brochure was produced in the form of a 12 month calendar to ensure that every page was seen over the course of a year.

39

Pre-Planning

Planning

Launch

Management

Event

Communications
(continued)

Website As a means of communication an effective Festival website should incorporate the following:• • • • • Key information that informs the reader about the Festival Appeal. Good use of colour and attractive visuals. A simple and easy navigation system – don’t overload menus. A blend of facts and helpful information. Use a design which makes it easy for users to access relevant downloads – leaflets, regular donation and Gift Aid forms, PowerPoint presentations and the Charity’s annual review. Web pages that are consistent in design throughout the site. Simple internal links to other relevant pages about the Festival Appeal such as news updates, announcements, key dates and photographs. External links to Provincial Grand Lodge, UGLE and the Charities. The site must be current and up-to-date. Make the internal search engine efficient – nothing is more frustrating than typing in something that is obviously contained on the site and no results being found from the search. Do not overload the site with too much content – keep the information relevant and easy to access.

• •

• • •

Forms and documents must be readily downloadable; some of these may need to be sent by email so do not make the file sizes too large. Some Festival websites enable donations to be made online. If Gift Aid is to be applied to these online donations, the following information is needed:• • The name and address of the donor. A declaration that confirms: o the donation is a freely given gift with nothing expected in return for the donation. o that the individual is a UK taxpayer. o that the individual has paid an amount of tax (within the tax year) that is equivalent to the amount of tax to be reclaimed as Gift Aid.

Information about the design and layout of the website is covered in more detail at Appendix T.

40

Pre-Planning

Planning

Launch

Management

Event

Festival Appeal newsletter Some Provinces include a section on the Festival Appeal in their regular Provincial newsletter. Others produce a separate Festival newsletter. In both cases this allows for publicity to be given to special fundraising events that have or are due to take place. The newsletter should also include some motivational words from the Festival Appeal Chairman together with a review of the fundraising progress to date. Regular meetings between the host Charity and the Province are essential to review progress and provide mutual assistance in running the Festival Appeal. Each Charity has significant experience of successful fundraising and can provide assistance, including training, as and when required. At these meetings wherever they take place, the Festival Appeal Committee and members of the Province can start to get to know the work of the Charity at first hand and a better understanding of where the money raised will be spent. The Charity can assist in situations where the Province is experiencing difficulties such as reluctance by the members to contribute. They will never refuse the opportunity to give a presentation to help promote the Appeal. Arrangements can be made for members of the Province to visit the Charities’ offices at Freemasons’ Hall in London, meet key personnel and discuss the Appeal.

Regular liaison meetings

“At appropriate intervals during the eight year Festival, the CEO and other members of the MSF were invited to visit the Province to reinforce the message to the Brethren.” Peter Taylor DPGM for Shropshire and Chairman of the 2008 Festival

41

Pre-Planning

Planning

Launch

Management

Event

Establishing a budget

The Province will need a budget which includes all aspects of the Festival Appeal and the Festival Event. A template budget which includes many of the items which may be needed for the Festival is shown at Appendix R. Without exception, Festival expenses cannot be taken from charitable donations given in support of the Charity. Possible sources of funds for the Festival Appeal and the Festival Event include the sale of merchandise, for which the initial expenditure must come from Provincial resources. Profits from the sale of this merchandise may then be used to promote, manage, and celebrate the Festival Appeal. The Province should be aware that some merchandise, for example umbrellas, ties and Christmas cards, may require considerable ‘up-front’ expenditure. The Charity and, in some cases the Province, may be able to help minimise the need for income to run the Appeal and the Festival Event. In most cases, support from the Charity includes printed promotional material (such as brochures, leaflets, posters and Gift Aid forms) which can be provided free of charge. The Charity will also provide the final booklet detailing the amounts raised. In terms of managing the donations and the costs involved, some Provinces use their Provincial Office or Provincial Benevolent Fund to administer the Festival Appeal as the personnel involved will be experienced in these issues. However, each of the Charities has well established systems in place to receive, acknowledge and process charitable contributions at no cost to the Province – this is how most Festival Appeals are now administered. Special consideration will need to be made about how the Province will fund the Festival Event – see page 95 for further information.

42

Pre-Planning

Planning

Launch

Management

Event

Decision making processes

All key meetings should be minuted and all important decisions should be documented. The decision making process needs to be clear from the outset. For example:• • • • • What can the Chairman decide on his own? What areas of strategy or policy need to be discussed and agreed with the PGM and his Executive? Who can buy what and how much can be spent? Who is answerable to whom? Who is responsible for approving fundraising ideas? There will be some wacky ones! Which items will need to be discussed with the Charity?

Some of these items may be included in the specimen job description of the Festival Appeal Chairman at Appendix N.

43

Pre-Planning

Planning

Launch

Management

Event

The role of the Lodge Charity Steward

There is a strong correlation between a successful Lodge (in respect of raising funds for a Festival Appeal) and an effective Lodge Charity Steward. Whilst the choice of Lodge Charity Steward is the prerogative of the WM, the Festival Appeal Committee should provide him with guidance on the role and skills required. As the key Festival fundraiser at Lodge level, the Lodge Charity Steward should possess a number of personal characteristics which are essential if he is to undertake his role successfully and it is important to get the best Lodge Charity Stewards in place for the duration of a Festival Appeal. Some key questions to ask when ascertaining the ability of individual Lodge Charity Stewards include:• How effective is the Lodge Charity Steward at persuading members to contribute willingly and on a regular basis? Charitable fundraising is now a professional and competitive business which entails much more skill that just selling raffle tickets at a Festive Board. Is he an active officer or just occupying a seat? Make sure the individual is fully aware of the responsibilities of a Lodge Charity Steward. Does the Lodge Charity Steward understand the Charity and the Appeal? Is he supportive? Will he champion the Festival Appeal to his Lodge? Is the Lodge Charity Steward a good communicator? Or will training be required? Does the Charity Steward have access to email? If not, ask the Lodge Secretary to nominate another member who has access to email to receive and send electronic documents. If applicable, is the Lodge Charity Steward prepared to be a Festival Steward? If not, why not? If the Charity Steward is not prepared to be a Steward, how can he realistically persuade others to become Stewards effectively?

• •

It is important to understand the capabilities of every Lodge Charity Steward. The Provincial Charity Steward, the Area Managers, the PGM and his Executive should be able to assist this assessment. Each Area Manager will need to speak regularly to each Lodge Charity Steward in his area and be prepared to assist as required. Pre-launch communications with the Lodge Charity Stewards provides them with a feeling of inclusion and genuine participation. It is vital that Lodge Charity Stewards feel respected and valued by Area Managers and by the Festival Appeal Committee. They must feel that they are a key part of the process and that they have some ownership of the Appeal.

44

Pre-Planning

Planning

Launch

Management

Event

The role of the Lodge Charity Steward (Continued)

A programme of training for Lodge Charity Stewards is essential, irrespective of experience or ability. Similarly, area seminars for Lodge Charity Stewards are also effective. Sadly, it is often those Lodge Charity Stewards who are already enthusiastic that attend these events rather than those who would really benefit from training or seminars. A strategy for communicating with those who do not attend needs to be put in place. A mixture of regular emails, phone calls and face-to-face meetings should keep the Lodge Charity Stewards informed and motivated.

“In Devon, we undertook an analysis of how many Lodge Charity Stewards had qualified as Festival Stewards for the 2012 Appeal in support of the RMTGB. We found 40 – nearly a third - were not Festival Stewards. Further analysis showed that the majority of their Lodges were failing to reach their targets. There was an 80% correlation between the Lodge Charity Steward not supporting the Appeal and the Lodge underperforming” Conrad Donaldson Provincial Grand Charity Steward, Devonshire In theory it is possible for a Festival Appeal to last for 11 years, but in practice, the majority last between five and seven years (excluding the initial planning and preparatory period which should commence at least two years before the launch). Feedback from recent Festival Forums suggests that the current norm is for a five to seven year Festival. This optimal time period allows for a sensible balance between the Festival Appeal and a period when the Province is out of Festival allowing the members to focus on other, perhaps local, charitable activities. The length of the Appeal is the Province’s choice, but before the Province makes its decision, it is highly recommended that it the implications, both positive and negative, are discussed with the Charity. Table 1 (overleaf) may help the Province to make the appropriate choice – note that an initial pre-planning period of one to two years needs to be factored in to the fundraising strategy.

Length of Festival Appeal

45

Pre-Planning

Planning

Launch

Management

Event

Table 1 Implications to consider when determining the length of the Appeal Length of Appeal (Years) 1-3 Comments
Not enough time to raise sufficient funds. Short period in which to raise funds and the whole Appeal may be rushed. Unless take up is large from the outset, a disappointing total may be raised. The period of planning may need to be longer than two years to ensure a shorter Appeal is successful. A concentrated and intense run at the target which is highly focussed. Sufficient time out of Festival to recharge and allows the Province time to concentrate on other fundraising activities. It is recommended that at least two years of planning precedes the Launch. Whilst this is a comfortable fundraising time frame, there is the real danger of fatigue and loss of focus. There is little time to rest before planning the next Festival. Major issue with weariness, resentment and no time between Festival Appeals. Members feel they are always being asked for money. No time to concentrate on other fundraising activities.

Danger

Risky

4

Optimum

5-7

Risky Danger

8-9

10-11

Detailed understanding of the Charity

A crucial part of the planning process is to develop a detailed understanding of the Charity that will be supported through the Festival Appeal. Each Charity has its own website and produces an Annual Review along with its statutory Report and Accounts. The booklet “The Central Masonic Charities: Information for Freemasons and their Families” is published by Letchworth’s on behalf of all the Masonic Charities. It contains useful summary information on each Charity and can be downloaded from the Freemasons’ Grand Charity website: www.grandcharity.org/pages/downloads Each Charity will also provide training and advice on its activities.

46

Pre-Planning

Planning

Launch

Management

Event

Detailed understanding of the Charity
(Continued)

Once a basic understanding of the Charity has been obtained then the following steps are recommended:• • • Understand the work of the Charity through a detailed review of all published documents and its website. Ascertain how much the Province has benefited in the years since the last Festival Appeal? See Appendix C. Meet the key staff at the Charity, in particular: o The Chief Executive and appropriate members of the Council of the Charity. o The individual who will be the main point of contact. o Case and Welfare Advisers of the Charity. Arrange a tour of the Charity to see how it operates. Attend the Festival Forum and the Provincial Grand Charity Stewards’ Conference. Use Charity personnel to give presentations within the Province to selected audiences. Meet with the Appeal Chairmen of Provinces which have recently concluded, or are in the mid-term with their Appeal to find out about their experiences first hand.

• • • •

Fully understanding how the Charity operates will confirm that each of the Charities is efficient and effective and should help convince the members of the Province that the Appeal is worthy of their support.

47

Pre-Planning

Planning

Launch

Management

Event

Guidance from the Charities

The Charities have a wealth of experience and materials to support Provinces in Festival. If the Province wants to do things differently then this is the Province’s choice, but it is recommended that the views or advice of the Charity is obtained and considered. The best results will be achieved through an effective partnership between the Province and the Charity, with regular meetings, sharing experience and the use of the Charity’s resources, which include:• • • • • • Public Relations and fundraising professionals. Speaker panels. Exhibition materials. Bespoke literature. Advice on mailing, accounting and Gift Aid. Attendance at Appeal Committee meetings.

It is also worth speaking to other Provinces to learn about their experience of working with the Charity; they may also be able to provide contact points. The Festival Forum and Charity Stewards’ Conference also provide excellent opportunities for networking. Please be aware that in planning the Festival Appeal, there may be other demands on the resources/disposable income of the members of the Province. For instance:• • Neighbouring Provinces may be in a Festival, either to another central Masonic Charity or the Mark Benevolent Fund. Some of the members of the Province may be members of Lodges situated in neighbouring Provinces and therefore have additional demands on their charitable giving. There may be local Provincial initiatives still running under the banner of “Freemasonry in the Community”. Festival Appeals for other Orders, principally the Mark. Masonic building funds or other local Appeals. Other Provincial Charities, possibly supporting non-Masonic causes. Other local fundraising initiatives. Appeals for non-Masonic charities, either local, for example hospices, or national, such as Help for Heroes or Macmillan Cancer Support.

Awareness of other appeals

• • • • • •

48

Pre-Planning

Planning

Launch

Management

Event

Accounting for donations

There are a number of ways in which individual donations reach the designated Charity:• • • Directly to the Charity. Through a Lodge or Provincial Relief Chest operated by the Grand Charity. Via a Provincial Charity Fund or Provincial Benevolent Association.

The Province must decide its preferred route and early discussions with the Charity will provide the information necessary to help make this decision. The Charities prefer that donations are made either directly to them, to a Provincial Relief Chest or the RMTGB Blanket Donation scheme, each of which have the following benefits:• • • • The Charity receives the money immediately. The Charities have the staff, the necessary equipment and the systems in place to process the donations. The Charity’s staff will have existing knowledge of charity law and accounting. As an incentive, the Charity is able to offer a preferential rate of notional interest to the Province, currently 1.75% over bank base rate – this equates to 2.25% (31/08/2010).

Staff from the Grand Charity can explain how the Relief Chest scheme operates and staff from the RMTGB can explain how the Blanket Donation Scheme works. If a Relief Chest is to be used, then it is desirable for the monies to be transferred to the Charity on a regular basis, rather than waiting until the end of the Appeal. This provides the Charity with the income needed to meet its immediate commitments. If a Province wishes to collect monies itself, then it must be aware of the following:• • It will need its own accounting systems. It will need staff at its Provincial Office (or Provincial Benevolent Fund) to administer, account and acknowledge contributions received. It will need systems to administer, collect and account for Gift Aid tax relief. It will have to produce annual audited accounts. It must have trustees (because it is a registered charity). It will need to liaise with HMRC.

• • • •

These can be substantial disadvantages, not least because of the onerous nature of compliance, which can be costly in both time and money.

49

Pre-Planning

Planning

Launch

Management

Event

In recent years, there has been a shift towards either using the Charity to collect donations or using a dedicated Relief Chest. Provinces collecting and administering donations directly should regularly transfer the funds to the Charity to assist with the Charity’s cash flow and help meet immediate commitments. Similarly, all donations made to the Festival via Lodge Relief Chests should also be transferred to the Charity regularly rather than waiting until the end of the Appeal. If the Province wishes to collect its donations via a Festival Relief Chest, then the Province must consult and agree this with the relevant Charity and the Grand Charity. Please consult with the Charity before taking the final decision. See Appendix E and Appendix F for further information on Gift Aid giving and using Relief Chests. Each Charity has continuous calls on its funds during the year. Festival donations provide vital income to supplement the difference between income received from investments and the money dispersed to beneficiaries. Cash flow received through Festivals enables the Charity to take a long term view of its investments and this reduces the requirement for the Charity to cover short-term expenditure by disposing of investments. It is essential that the Province transfers the funds raised through the Festival Appeal to the Charity as soon as possible. Further background information about the financial position of the Charities can be found on page 21.

Accounting – cash flow

50

Pre-Planning

Planning

Launch

Management

Event

Target setting

At the planning stage, the Province needs to give careful thought to whether targets will be set. It is strongly recommended however, that each Province does set a target for its Festival. There are various types of target, the most common are:• • • A Provincial target – an aggregate total which all members work to achieve. A Lodge target – all contributions whether from the Lodge or members are aggregated. A per capita target across the Province – each member is asked to contribute a fixed amount i.e. £300 or £500.

Feedback received at Festival Forums indicates that those Provinces that set targets have been more satisfied with their final total than Provinces that chose not to set a target. The advantages of having a target are:• • • • • • The Province knows what it is aiming for. The Charity knows the scale of the Province’s ambition (which can assist with its financial planning). It can be a strong motivator. If a stretching target is adopted, then the Province will work hard and go the extra mile. The challenge can be broken down into manageable chunks which can be easily understood. Each member of the Province is aware of the scale of the challenge.

However, it is necessary to consider the possibility that there may be some disadvantages of having a target; these include:• • If the target is set too low, and is not stretching, then motivation may be poor. Lodges may resent having to meet pre-determined targets.

It is often feared that failing to achieve a target might be seen as failure by the Province, but the Charity will always prefer that the Province falls short of a stretching target rather than meeting a modest target because the former will normally yield the highest total.

51

Pre-Planning

Planning

Launch

Management

Event

The target for the Festival Appeal

Target setting should be the subject of very careful consideration. The target should be achievable but challenging. Individual Lodge demographics and membership levels must be recognised as well as Provincial factors such as the spread of members or the affluence of certain Lodges or geographic areas. Honorific levels should be linked to targets. Some Provinces have based Lodge targets on previous Festival results. This practice, however, can have pitfalls as the profile of the Lodge or Province may have changed since the previous Appeal. Do not set the minimum threshold level for Jewels and bars too low; there is a tendency for some members to donate the minimum amount required to receive a Jewel and subsequently donate nothing else. The Province should therefore set the Stewards’ level at a challenging but achievable level for members of moderate means. Attaining the Steward’s Jewel should be achievable over the period of the Appeal by all members, whatever their circumstances; many of the more affluent members will still aspire to achieve higher honorifics. The target might include individual and Lodge giving as well as Gift Aid. It is important to maximise Gift Aid because it is a vital source of revenue for all Charities. At the current rate, it augments donations by 25%. Appendix P shows the fundraising achievements of Provinces in Festival from 1999 to 2010. Published targets and Festival results from other Provinces may provide a useful indicator when setting a target. Sharing this information with members may also demonstrate that the target is achievable and realistic. The target (or targets) must be well publicised so that everyone understands what is expected of them. “We didn’t want to set a target at first, and then we set our Steward levels too low which also set the wrong behaviour – Not setting a target put us back years and eventually resulted in a disappointing final total.” The former Chairman of a recently concluded Festival Appeal

52

Pre-Planning

Planning

Launch

Management

Event

Example target for the Province

It may be helpful to consider a simple example of how a target for a Province might be calculated. Taking the example of the Province of Barsetshire which has 150 Lodges and a membership of 5000. 10% of members belong to more than one Lodge, so the actual number of Freemasons is 4500. There are also 50 Royal Arch Chapters. The Appeal is scheduled to run for five years. How is the target to be determined? • • • • • The PGM feels that each member should consider a contribution of £3 per week i.e. £150 per annum or £750 over the five year Appeal. The aggregate contribution from Craft Lodges would therefore be 4500 x 750 which equates to £3.375m. Members of the Royal Arch might be asked to contribute an additional £100,000 which would equate to £2,000 per Chapter*. Other Orders might be expected to contribute £25,000*. Central fundraising events and sales of merchandise might be expected to contribute £25,000*.

* Based on approximate amounts received during recent Festival Appeals. Therefore the total target for the Province’s Appeal might be set at say £3.6 million. What would be the approximate target for individual Lodges? • • • A large Lodge with 60 members would have a target of £40,000. An average Lodge with say 40 members would have a target of £27,000. A small Lodge of say 25 members would have a target of £17,000.

53

Pre-Planning

Planning

Launch

Management

Event

The target for the Lodge

Lodge targets can also be calculated on a per capita basis (in the previous example this would generate an individual target of £750 per member of the Lodge over the course of a five year Appeal). Past Master’s Lodges might need to be considered separately. Members of such Lodges usually belong to another Lodge where they would be expected to contribute (and often do so). However, the members should be seasoned Freemasons and may be willing to contribute more. The Committee needs to consider the effect of multiple memberships and the per capita method should be factored so that those with multiple memberships are not double counted. Some would argue, however, that if a member can afford to join two or three Lodges then he may be willing to make the recommended Charity contributions to each. In many Provinces Lodge membership is falling. This may need to be factored into the target depending on the number of members who may leave or die. It is not unusual for a Lodge membership to decline by as much as 10% over the course of a Festival Appeal. There are also macroeconomic factors which affect charitable giving; the recent recession has had a detrimental effect on levels of disposable income for many households, so the potential for maximising donations has been reduced. It is best not to overcomplicate the calculations but the Festival Appeal Committee should be aware of a potential drop in numbers over the period of an Appeal. If each member knows what is expected of him as a minimum then he can clearly see what he needs to do over the period of a Festival. Lodge Charity Stewards can then plan accordingly and target individual members that appear to be failing to meet expectations. Not all members will give the amount necessary to reach a given target (in the Barsetshire example, is £750), so other members will need to give more to compensate. This can be achieved by setting the honorific levels for Patron and Grand Patron sufficiently high to make up for any shortfall. A stretching individual target for a five year Appeal (including Gift Aid) might be £750 per head based on the simple calculation of £3 for each week of the Appeal. A challenging target would be £1,000 per head as this would recognise that there may be some occasions, for example at fundraising events, where the member is prepared to donate an extra amount.

The target for the individual member

54

Pre-Planning

Planning

Launch

Management

Event

Target setting – size of Province

The size of a Province is important when setting targets. In some smaller Provinces the PGM knows each member personally and the members of the Provincial Executive are also well known to all members. In these cases a higher per capita figure is often achieved as senior members of the Executive, in regular contact with their members, are able to speak directly to them and maintain the momentum of the Appeal. Larger Provinces can have more difficulty and the PGM may only be able to visit each Lodge once throughout the duration of the Appeal. The demographics of a Province are also important when setting targets. Provinces with a higher than average age profile may have more members with fixed incomes that are less able to give. All Provinces include a spread of affluent and less well-off areas. The targets set by the Festival Appeal Committee need to reflect the demographic analysis. Please remember that Lodges in the least affluent areas can also be the most generous. Any target will have supporters and detractors but it is recommended that the target should be maintained throughout the Festival Appeal. It is also important to take account of other factors which can affect the total amount raised during an Appeal such as an economic recession, increased unemployment or local issues such as major flooding, foot and mouth disease or depressed industry such as car manufacturing or farming. Refer to the section on assessing the Province on pages 26-29 for more information. Many members look to be guided on how much to give and it is important to explain the target clearly. One approach is to fix the target in terms that members can relate to, For example, for a member to reach the £750 target for the Appeal, he would need to donate £150 per year for a 5 year Appeal. This equates to around £3 per week or £12 per month; the same as many everyday items such as the cost of a daily newspaper or the cost of one pint of beer or a gin and tonic a week. It also helps to link different contribution levels to tangible benefits that the Charity provides for its beneficiaries. For example, donating £20 per month for the length of the Appeal will allow the RMTGB to provide a laptop computer with specialist software for a child with learning difficulties. The Charities will be able to provide up-to-date examples of support given.

Target setting – demographics

Target setting – common comparisons

55

Pre-Planning

Planning

Launch

Management

Event

Involving the Royal Arch

There is a special relationship between the Craft and the Royal Arch which can make a significant contribution to the Festival Appeal. It is important to ensure that the Grand Superintendent of the Royal Arch is involved in the Festival Appeal. If the Province has a Grand Superintendent who is not the PGM, then it would be courteous to ensure that there is a senior Provincial Royal Arch officer on the Festival Committee and that he is committed to the Festival Appeal. Any target set for the Royal Arch (either by Province, Chapter or Companion) must be discussed and agreed with the Grand Superintendent. Wearing Festival Jewels in Chapters might further encourage members of the Royal Arch to support the Festival Appeal. Cheques from the Royal Arch are often presented at Provincial Grand Lodge and Provincial Grand Chapter meetings and in either case the Grand Superintendent and the members should be publicly thanked for their donations. The Festival Appeal Committee and PGM must recognise and thank other Orders for their contributions. Many Orders meeting in the same or neighbouring Provinces will comprise members from the Province who are normally happy to contribute as long as they are not in a Festival Appeal of their own. The Mark Degree has its own Festival system but it is rare for other Orders to have Festival Appeals. It would be courteous to approach the PGM of the Mark Degree and the Heads of the other Provincial Orders to make them aware of the Festival Appeal. Make them welcome at Festival fundraising events and recognise their contributions appropriately. It is not appropriate to wear Craft Festival Jewels in Mark Lodges or in other Orders.

Other Orders

“If only we had set aside some planning time in advance, we could have avoided making some basic mistakes that are affecting our total.” A Treasurer of a current Festival Appeal

56

Pre-Planning

Planning

Launch

Management

Event

Jewels and incentives

Jewels can be an important incentive for members and Lodges. Bars can be added to recognise higher levels of giving such as the qualification as a Patron, Grand Patron etc. The level of donations required to qualify as a Festival Steward must therefore be set at an appropriately high level, otherwise the Jewel becomes uneconomical. It is not compulsory to have a Jewel; some Provinces have used lapel badges and others have elected to have no physical symbol of recognition at all. Jewels should only be worn by those members that have qualified as a Festival Steward. The design of the Jewel must be approved by the Grand Master through the host Charity. This can take time so it needs to be given early priority. Keep the design of the Jewel simple, but make it attractive because wives and partners may wear a similar design, usually in the form of a brooch. Unless the use of the Provincial Crest or Arms of the PGM has been approved by the College of Heralds, they should not be used. Check with the Charity about their individual policy on the provision of Jewels. In some cases the Charity can provide the Jewel free of charge to the Province. If the Province decides to produce the Jewel itself, a reputable manufacturer should be used. The Charity may be able to suggest some suppliers. Order a sensible number initially – don’t get left with too many Jewels, but make sure the Province has sufficient stock to meet expected demand. The quantity needed in the first order is best discussed with the Charity. In some circumstances the Province will sell the Jewels to qualified Festival Stewards with any profits being used to defray the cost of running the Festival Appeal. The fee for purchasing a Festival Jewel in these circumstances is not a voluntary donation and is therefore not eligible for Gift Aid. Advice should also be obtained on the potential VAT implications of sales of this nature. An application must be made to the Grand Master through the host Charity if the Province wishes the Jewel to be made permanent. This is requested at the completion of the Festival Appeal. The Jewel can be presented in open Lodge. Alternatively the Jewel can be sent to the individual with a letter of thanks for the contributions. It is normal etiquette for the Festival Jewel not to be worn outside of the Province.

57

Pre-Planning

Planning

Launch

Management

Event

Merchandise

Merchandise, if properly priced and sold in sufficient quantities, can be an additional source of revenue for a Festival Appeal. Popular items are diaries, own labelled wine or beer, cufflinks, Christmas cards and greetings cards. A special tie for the Festival could also be produced. It may be helpful to discuss ideas with the Charity beforehand. Merchandise must be readily available for purchase, either through the website or from a dedicated stall. A stall can be a visible presence throughout the Appeal, especially at the launch and at other Provincial occasions such as Provincial Grand Lodge meetings or the Provincial meetings of the other Orders. The Appeal Committee and area managers should actively promote the sale of merchandise. It will be necessary to have a good distribution system so sales opportunities are not lost. Merchandise can be expensive to purchase and distribute so it is essential to road test any ideas beforehand – try not to get stuck with unwanted stock. Please remember that VAT may be payable on commercial activities such as the sale of ties and cards so obtain advice at an early opportunity. The planning stage of the Appeal can also be used to identify and organise more complex fundraising methods which may also incur significant upfront costs. Examples of this type of method include lotteries and raffles with large prizes, for example, a car, holiday or kitchen. Appendix H contains further fundraising ideas. A considerable amount of time and organisation can be expended in marketing, selling and distributing merchandise, but sometimes, the equivalent energy might be better directed towards persuading individual members to contribute monthly using Gift Aid.

“The early promotion of the Festival tie and cufflinks gave good impetus to the drive of the Appeal, it engendered pride and “ownership” within the membership and of course brought in useful revenue.” Peter Taylor DPGM for Shropshire and Chairman of the 2008 Festival

58

Pre-Planning

Planning

Launch

Management

Event

Literature and stationery

A brochure needs to be available to launch the Appeal. It must be available on the day of the launch. As a follow-up, it might be posted to each member in the Province. It will be designed in conjunction with the host Charity who will arrange for its production. Look at the brochures for recent Festival launches from other Provinces. Distribution to members will be the responsibility of the Appeal Committee. Page 40 provides further suggestions about designing and producing the Festival brochure. For maximum impact, each brochure should be posted individually to the member’s home address not sent via a Lodge Secretary or the Provincial Office. Other literature may be required such as accompanying notes, factsheets, Q&As. It is strongly recommended that a Gift Aid form and regular donation form be separately available. The latter must be approved by the Charity beforehand. Avoid giving items of stationery a shelf life by including dates or using individual names that are likely to change. Consider having an electronic letterhead – in this way there is little need for printed headed paper and initial printing costs can be reduced. Also ensure that all Festival documents are available to download from the website.

Literature and Stationery
(Continued)

59

Pre-Planning

Planning

Launch

Management

Event

Launch
Description Year Conclusion of previous Festival Appeal Pre-Planning Planning Launch of Festival Appeal Management Festival Event Post Festival Appeal de-briefing 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Objective

The objective of this section is to plan and execute a successful launch.

Each Province must make its own decisions – this document offers guidelines only.

What’s in this section

This section explains how to organise and deliver a Festival Appeal launch at one or a series of events. It includes the following:Planning the launch............................................................... 61 Announcing the date and venue for the launch ..................... 62 Members attending the launch .............................................. 63 Contents of the launch presentation...................................... 64 Delivery of the message ........................................................ 65 Rehearsing the presentation ................................................. 66 Funding the launch................................................................ 67 Questionnaire review............................................................. 67 Information to give to the members ....................................... 68 Unveiling the targets.............................................................. 68 Post-launch – cascading the message to Lodge members ... 69 After completing this section you should be able to:• • • • Deliver a successful launch event or series of events. Ensure members understand what is required from them to support the Festival Appeal. Be ready to communicate the details of the Festival to a wider audience. Start raising money.

60

Pre-Planning

Planning

Launch

Management

Event

Planning the launch

You should consider the various ways a launch can be delivered and then decide which best suits the Province. Engage with the Charity during the decision making process; they will be able to provide guidance based on experience and examples from other Provinces. There are a number alternative options for a Festival launch, for example:• • • • A specific launch event (or series of events). A family day. A public or open event. At a meeting of Provincial Grand Lodge.

The Province should select the event best suited to its objectives. It is helpful to discuss the choice of event with the Charity, which will have experience of other Appeal launches. Feedback from the Festival Forum has indicated that Provinces that choose to launch their Festival at Provincial Grand Lodge sometimes regretted their decision as the launch of the Appeal gets lost in the wider business of the Province. These meetings can often be very lengthy, which can result in a loss of interest from the audience. Provincial Grand Lodge meetings are also usually only attended by a limited number of members resulting in only a small proportion of potential donors actually being present. Suggestions for a successful Appeal launch include:• Plan it well and give early and detailed notice to ensure that there is a greater likelihood of the launch being well received by the delegates. Make it a professional presentation. Make it fun and enjoyable for the delegates – they should remember the event and feel enthusiastic about the Appeal. First impressions are important – remember, “there will never be a second chance to make a first impression!” The delegates and members need to be impressed not deflated; eager to begin, not cowed by the challenge. Set high expectations but make them achievable. Explain the needs of the Charity, its purpose and its key messages; this will help members relate to the Charity and make them empathise with its objectives.

• • • • • •

The launch marks the official start of the Festival Appeal and early commitment from all Lodges is crucial.

61

Pre-Planning

Planning

Launch

Management

Event

Announcing the date and venue for the launch

Each Province must decide when and how it will announce its launch to the Province and who will be eligible to attend. The choices for announcing the launch are:• • • • At a Provincial Meeting. Part of a regular newsletter or magazine. A separate communication to each Lodge via its Secretary or Charity Steward. A separate communication to each member, possibly including some literature and an early invitation to contribute to the Festival Appeal. A web or text communication.

Several methods for announcing the launch of a Festival Appeal might be employed, involving all or some of the above suggestions. Some members and Lodges may wish to donate in advance of the formal launch. It is essential that these early givers have the means to do so. Ensure the procedures are established and regular donation and Gift Aid forms available well before the launch is announced. Make sure the date of the launch doesn’t clash with anything major – such as a big sporting event, a Lodge Installation or a Bank Holiday. If it clashes with a Lodge Installation, ask if the PGM would consider granting a dispensation so that the Lodge date can be moved? The launch will inevitably clash with something so consider having several launch events. This gives members a choice and leaves no excuse for non-attendance. In larger Provinces with significant distances to travel, separate launches at different geographical locations may be preferable. The choice of venue should be easy to find and have the appropriate facilities – parking, refreshments, catering, bars, and lecture theatres...etc. The launch needs to look and feel professional. “Because of the large area we needed to cover to reach the largest possible audience, Devonshire took the decision to launch the 2012 Festival on three consecutive nights at three main locations in the Province.” Conrad Donaldson Provincial Charity Steward - Devonshire

62

Pre-Planning

Planning

Launch

Management

Event

Members attending the launch

Involve the widest possible audience – every person who attends the launch is a potential champion and ambassador for the Appeal. It must be decided whether the launch will be attended by members only or members with wives or partners. Wives or partners can be influential in persuading their husbands/partners to contribute and past experience suggests that wives and partners should be involved at the earliest opportunity. There should be at least one representative from each Lodge. The choices are:• • • • • The Master and Wardens (but they are in office for only a short time). Lodge Charity Steward or Almoner. Lodge Mentor. Key, influential Lodge members. Possibly a combination of all of the above, if space permits.

The PGM and his Executive should attend along with other senior members of the Province (such as Provincial Treasurer, Almoner, Charity Steward, Mentor, Orator, DC etc). Remember to involve senior members of the Royal Arch, other Orders and also Visiting Grand Officers or Visiting Officers. A prestigious and important event such as the official launch of a Festival Appeal should be attended by a senior representative from the Charity and possibly current or past beneficiaries. Remember to invite them in good time; they have very busy schedules. The Appeal Chairman, members of the Organising Committee and Area Managers should always attend. It is also worth considering inviting Civic dignitaries and members of the press and public. Ensure everyone is aware of the start and finish times of the event and, if necessary, the dress code. It is preferable for as many people as possible to attend the launch in order to help spread the message. Depending on the size and geography of the Province, more than one event may be required. Keep a note of those who attend and those who do not. This information can be useful when targeting Lodges in the future. Those Lodges that are not represented at the launch can be targeted to receive visits and/or presentations during the Appeal.

63

Pre-Planning

Planning

Launch

Management

Event

Contents of the launch presentation

Carefully plan the key messages and structure the launch so that it is understood and captures the imagination of all the delegates. As a minimum, the messages contained in the launch presentation should include: • • • • An explanation of the kind of work the Charity undertakes. An explanation of the nature of the Festival Appeal and, if known, the format of the Festival Event. An explanation as to why the delegates have been invited. A presentation from the Charity, illustrated by case studies, which includes the message that all delegates are potential beneficiaries. The data on the support the Charity provides, and has provided, to the members of the Province. An explanation about the importance of Festival income in enabling the Charity to continue its core work. Examples of what the members, and their wives and partners, can do; for example: brief their Lodges, start to generate support, make arrangements for a presentation from their Area Manager to be delivered at their Lodge. Announce the target or targets (if appropriate). Explain very carefully the significance of Jewels and the various honorific levels. A keynote motivational speech from the PGM and/or Appeal Chairman. Examples of literature available from the Charity and/or merchandise available to purchase. The announcement of a programme of visits to Lodges or Lodge Centres.

• • •

• • • • •

64

Pre-Planning

Planning

Launch

Management

Event

Delivery of the message

Having decided what needs to be said, the next important step is to determine who conveys the message and how it is to be delivered correctly. An effective presentation should be delivered by following a number of key principles, which include:• • • • • Plan precisely what needs to be said and by whom. Script everything; this is too important an occasion to forget things. Avoid careless repetition. Use visual images; they can be powerful especially those which involve case histories. If making a PowerPoint presentation, use bullet points but don’t make the screen too crowded (use the 6 x 6 rule; 6 lines per slide, 6 words per line) and don’t simply read off the screen, the audience can do that for themselves. Emphasise and elaborate, but don’t repeat. Use good and respected speakers – passion and commitment are important when appealing to members for donations. The PGM must show he fully endorses the message – consider involving his predecessor to demonstrate continuity of that support. When wives and partners are present, consider including the PGM’s wife in any formal presentation – she can be persuasive and complement the message given by the PGM.

• •

65

Pre-Planning

Planning

Launch

Management

Event

Rehearsing the presentation

The best presentations look natural and relaxed but are usually tightly scripted and thoroughly rehearsed. To ensure that the launch presentation is effective, it is prudent to rehearse as there will only be one opportunity to deliver the initial launch presentation and make a good first impression. A successful plan and rehearsal will cover the following:• Assemble all the speakers beforehand to have a run through and a dress rehearsal. All must be present – operate a “Three Line Whip”. Check on timings – the Chairman of the event must ensure everyone keeps to their allotted timeslot. Site visit the venues beforehand to check on logistics and any peculiar features. Have back-up technology available – batteries/light bulbs often run out at the most inconvenient times. Make sure the appropriate cables and extension leads are available and working. Check microphones, pedestals, platforms, lecterns. If there is a dinner, make sure it doesn’t clash with the presentations. Make sure the caterers do not interrupt proceedings by clearing away at inappropriate times. Ensure the bar is fully staffed and that the venue does not run out of beer, wine etc. Speakers and helpers must turn up early and in a relaxed mood – stress is not a pre-requisite for public speaking. Be prepared to change the schedule – for example a speaker may be delayed due to travel difficulties. Plan appropriate comfort breaks. Allow plenty of time for questions. Review the presentation after the initial event and make changes if the presentation is part of a road show.

• • • • • •

• • • • •

66

Pre-Planning

Planning

Launch

Management

Event

Funding the launch

The launch cannot be funded from donations given for charitable purposes. Any costs can be met by a variety of other options including:• • • Provincial funds. Fundraising events specifically designated for the launch, including the sale of merchandise. Ticket sales for the launch.

It is useful to set a budget for the launch and ensure that working capital is available for any up-front expenditure required. Delegate the responsibility for organising the venue and seating plans, if appropriate. Make sure the venue isn’t double booked. After any event such as a launch, ask the delegates for their feedback. Design a simple one page questionnaire to solicit feedback, gather suggestions for improvement and ideas for further fundraising events. Make sure that pens are available – it is surprising how many Freemasons don’t carry them! Act on the feedback and change the presentation if it will be used again elsewhere.

Questionnaire review

67

Pre-Planning

Planning

Launch

Management

Event

Information to give to the members

Each delegate attending the launch and every Lodge Charity Steward in the Province should be sent a full information pack which includes Gift Aid forms and other supporting material, such as:• • • • • • • • • • • Launch brochure. Any other information about the Charity such as its latest Annual Review or information leaflets. An appeal from the PGM and/or Appeal Chairman for support. An explanation of what is expected, broken down to Lodge and individual level. An example of a competed Gift Aid declaration and regular donation form. The address of where to send donations. The payee name for the Charity. An explanation of Gift Aid envelopes (include specimens). Factsheets and Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) with answers. Details of the website and where to get further information such as contact numbers and emails. An appeal for volunteers to run fundraising events.

The delegates should have the information packs available to take away with them (ensure that they are not left behind in the launch venue). A further copy of the pack should be sent to each Lodge via its Secretary with details of where to obtain more copies. The Area Managers should plan a programme of follow up calls to delegates to ensure the message is understood and to explain the next steps that the members should take. As part of the launch, an announcement may be made regarding the targets. If the target for the Province will be announced it should include an explanation of how it has been determined. Area and Lodge targets might also be published at this time. The launch booklet will contain details of individual Festival Jewel qualification levels and higher honorifics. Encourage as many members as possible to qualify for the higher honorific levels but stress that the wearing of Jewels and bars is optional.

Unveiling the targets

68

Pre-Planning

Planning

Launch

Management

Event

Post-launch – cascading the message to Lodge members

Once the launch has been completed, the next step is to cascade the information to the members of all Lodges in the Province. Communicating the message needs to be done promptly after the launch; time lost equates to money lost in terms of interest and Gift Aid. A strategy should be put in place which seeks to meet the following aims:• • • Donations: All members should know how to make a donation to the Appeal in a way that is eligible for Gift Aid. Sources of information: All members should know where to get information and literature about the Festival. Presentations: A member of the Appeal Committee should visit and speak at every Masonic Centre (and ideally to every Lodge). Publicity: Any news items about fundraising events or developments at the Charity should be uploaded to the website on a regular basis.

To reach a wider audience, which may include members of the public, the Province may wish to issue a press release after the launch. Please see Appendix U for guidance on drafting press releases. At a later date, consideration may be given to a special event for those Lodges which achieve Grand Patron status or higher. The beneficial impact of praise to the Lodge and to the individual is most important and can act as a further boost to members. Please remember, however, that some donors will wish to remain anonymous. Pages 34-41 contain further information on effective communications.

69

Pre-Planning

Planning

Launch

Management

Event

Management of a Festival
Description Year Conclusion of previous Festival Appeal Pre-Planning Planning Launch of Festival Appeal Management Festival Event Post Festival Appeal debriefing 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Objective

To enable the Province to manage the Appeal from launch up to, but excluding, the Festival Event. The Province will aim to maximise the take-up of regular giving and avoid mid term fatigue.

Each Province must make its own decisions – this document offers guidance only.

70

Pre-Planning

Planning

Launch

Management

Event

This section contains the following information:-

What’s in this section

Administration – collecting the money ................................... 72 Administration – robust systems............................................ 72 Administration – legal issues ................................................. 73 Administration – Gift Aid ........................................................ 73 Organisation – Appeal Committee......................................... 74 Organisation – central enquiry point for all issues ................. 75 Organisation – Jewels, Bars and certificates......................... 75 Management information....................................................... 76 Management information – targets and progress .................. 77 Operation – visiting Lodges ................................................... 77 Operation – Lodge procedures.............................................. 78 Operation – handling objections ............................................ 78 Operation – wives and partners............................................. 78 Operation – use of the Charities............................................ 79 Operation – driving the message down ................................. 80 Operation – targeting non-attendees..................................... 81 Operation – top-ups............................................................... 81 Operation – donations to other Provincial appeals ................ 82 Mid-term Boost – combating ‘Festival fatigue’ ....................... 83 Mid-term boost – re-launching the Appeal............................. 85 Mid-term boost – the psychology of giving ............................ 86 Mid-term boost – releasing the “rainy day fund” .................... 87 Mid-term boost – relationships with Provincial Almoners ...... 87 After completing this section you should be able to:• Manage the Festival Appeal efficiently on a day-to-day basis. • Use all sources of information to maximise the total money raised for the Charity. • Be aware if and when the Appeal needs a mid-term boost and what steps need to be taken to refocus the members on the Appeal.

71

Pre-Planning

Planning

Launch

Management

Event

If the Province is going to collect donations itself, it needs a sound

Administration – accounting system which must include the ability to administer Gift Aid tax relief. Pages 50-51 provide further information on collecting the administering donations. money
HMRC is entitled to inspect any charity’s procedures and records. Using the host Charity or the Relief Chest Scheme avoids any unnecessary complications for the Province. There is no detriment to the Province or Lodge in transferring money directly to the Charity or to a Relief Chest as soon as it is collected, perhaps on a monthly or quarterly basis. The Charities will, however, benefit from this regular cash flow. Whatever method is used to collect donations, each donor must be acknowledged and thanked – either by the Province or by the host Charity – at an early opportunity. For those Provinces administering the Festival Appeal ‘in-house’, it is Administration – essential that a sound accounting system is used by the Festival robust systems Appeal Treasurer. He should ensure that progress reports are issued regularly and in a simple and easily understood format. The following information will need to be stored:• • • • • • • • • Name and address of donor. Lodge or Lodges of the donor. Amount and date of contribution (if one-off payment). A signed copy of the Gift Aid declaration. Date of commencement (and cessation) of regular contributions. Amount and frequency of regular contributions. Amount of Gift Aid reclaimed. Bank Details including name of bank, address, sort code and account number. Management information.

Please note that all Gift Aid declarations and envelopes must be retained (or scanned) for possible inspection at a later date. Provinces need not take on this considerable workload. It may be preferable to use the systems of the host Charity or the Grand Charity Relief Chest scheme to maximise the funds available for charitable purposes.

72

Pre-Planning

Planning

Launch

Management

Event

There are many administrative matters to consider and for which the

Administration – Province may need to seek legal advice or discuss with the Charity, for example:legal issues
• General Charity and Trust Law (and Charity Commission requirements) if the Province wishes to administer the collection of the charitable donations. VAT if selling goods and services. Data Protection Act if storing personal records. Lottery rules if operating a draw of any sort Health and safety of any staff involved in running the Festival Appeal (if not covered elsewhere). Advertising and copyright law. Professional indemnity cover.

• • • • • •

If money is held by a local Masonic Charitable Association account, permission will be needed from the donor to pass the money on to the Charity. If this intention is not covered on the original regular donation form, serious administrative complications can arise. If in any doubt, speak to the Charity and seek legal advice. The Province must be familiar with the rules and regulations relating

Administration – to Gift Aid. Gift Aid
The Province may wish to appoint a Gift Aid Co-ordinator to its Festival Appeal Committee – this is imperative if the Province is intending to collect members’ donations and claim Gift Aid tax relief itself. Gift Aid is often seen as a complex subject, but its importance needs to be understood by all members from the start of the Festival Appeal to ensure that they are aware of what is and what isn’t eligible. Appendix E contains more information about Gift Aid, but the Charity can provide more detailed advice. “I always considered that the Gift Aid covenants were the bedrock of our Festival Appeal. They gave certainty of income, at times when there was uncertainty over interest rates or where Festival fatigue was perceived.” Peter Taylor DPGM for Shropshire and Chairman of the 2008 Festival

73

Pre-Planning

Planning

Launch

Management

Event

Organisation – Appeal Committee

The Festival Appeal Committee will be chaired by the Festival Appeal Chairman and will meet regularly (at least monthly or quarterly). See earlier section: Creating the Committee (pages 31-34) in the Planning section. In summary, the Committee is likely to comprise:• • • • • • • • • • A Secretary. A Treasurer. Area Managers (exact number will depend on the size and complexity of the Province). An individual with fundraising experience. An individual with experience at organising large events e.g. Banqueting Manager. A Marketing Manager. A Media Manager. A Website Editor. A Gift Aid Co-ordinator. The Provincial Grand Charity Steward.

The Team must be highly motivated – the standard will be set by the Appeal Chairman. There may be a need to reshuffle or refresh the team during the period of the Festival Appeal. For example, in the final years of the Festival the committee should appoint a person, or sub-committee, to plan the Festival Event. Those who are leaving the team must be thanked for their work and contributions. Knowledge of the Province is essential and the composition of the Committee should be representative of all geographical areas of the Province. Representatives of other Orders should also be considered, particularly the Royal Arch. Members of the Committee are likely to be responsible for presenting certificates to recognise the achievements of Lodges. Accurate records will be required for all Lodge Charity Stewards and their contact details, including email addresses, will need to be kept up-to-date.

74

Pre-Planning

Planning

Launch

Management

Event

Organisation – central enquiry point for all issues

A central contact point might be necessary, possibly an individual at a ‘virtual’ help desk who may not know all answers but who will take ownership, find the answer and report back. Email is particularly useful for this kind of assistance. The majority of enquiries can usually be anticipated and covered in either a Fact Sheet or FAQs. These documents need to be regularly reviewed and updated if required. It is worth including them on the website. A process needs to be established so that eligible members and Lodges are promptly issued with Jewels (and bars) and achievement certificates or awards. The same processes should be used to issue Ladies Jewels or brooches. This process needs to link into the administration systems and the Area Manager must be notified of any new Festival Stewards. There may be a charge for the Jewel – this will need to be collected and recorded. The Area Manager will need to ask the Lodge if a particular Jewel is to be presented in open Lodge. The PGM or a member of his Executive may wish to visit the Lodge to undertake this task but some donors may wish to remain anonymous. In larger Provinces, presentations could be undertaken by the PGM’s representative such as a VGO or VO or a member of the Festival Committee. If Festival honorifics are set for Lodges (such as Vice Patron, Patron, and Grand Patron) they should be recognised by a Certificate or other visible expression of thanks. Each Lodge can recognise its collective achievement on the Lodge Summons. A system needs to be in place for the presentation of certificates to Lodges by the PGM or his representative.

Organisation – Jewels, Bars and certificates

75

Pre-Planning

Planning

Launch

Management

Event

Management information

It is essential that at regular intervals, the Treasurer should report to the Committee on progress towards the Appeal total. This report should break down the figures to show: cash received, Gift Aid tax relief received, future contributions anticipated and Gift Aid to be collected. The information should be produced and summarised by Lodge and grouped by Area with a grand total. Contributions from other Orders should be also be shown, but listed separately. In each case, the achievement (cash amount) against target (in percentage terms) should be reported. The Treasurer will identify trends and issues to be discussed and resolved. He will also conduct regular reconciliations with bank statements and Gift Aid reclamations from HMRC. Ensure that the Treasurer has accurate records and data available when compiling progress reports. His report will only be as accurate as this information - remember: “rubbish in, rubbish out” – Please don’t forget data protection. Individual records must be kept private, secure and safe. Individual records should only be accessed by the donor, Lodge Charity Steward and Festival Appeal Chairman. Where contributions are collected by the host Charity, all of this information can be provided at no cost or effort to the Province. The Charities can provide a range of bespoke reports which can show, for example:• • • • • • • Number of Lodges / Chapter that have donated. Tax relief reclaimed. Donations from each Lodge. Individual donations. Honorifics attained. Jewels and brooches sold. New commitments received each month.

The information contained within these reports can be extremely important when supporting Lodges and the Festival Appeal Chairman and the Committee will need to regularly discuss the information contained in the reports to determine whether changes in the Appeal strategy or tactics are necessary.

76

Pre-Planning

Planning

Launch

Management

Event

Management information – targets and progress

Regular communication with the wider membership is essential. They must be kept informed of their own Lodge’s progress and of the success of other Lodges in achieving targets or in holding specific fundraising events. Successful Lodges might be able to lend assistance to Lodges which are struggling, especially towards the end of the Festival Appeal. ‘Friendly rivalry’ may help boost donations and to that end the Province might decide to publish a league table showing how each Lodge is performing. A league table may also highlight how far each Lodge is from reaching Patron, Vice-Patron or Grand Patron status. If the Province wishes to publish a league table showing how each Lodge is performing, there will be a need to determine what information to include, for example, trends by quarter or area; friendly competition can increase donations by highlighting generosity. On the other hand, enforced competition can prove counter-productive and alienate some Lodges or individuals who may end up donating nothing at all. It is therefore important to find the balance which is appropriate for the Province. For clarity, progress reports should list donations from other Orders separately and show the Gift Aid separately from the donations, pledges and income from general fundraising events. Publish notable achievements, such as Lodges attaining Patron or Grand Patron status, or specific fundraising events. Photographs in the Provincial Newsletter or Festival Appeal Newsletter can be inspirational. The Appeal Committee should determine a schedule for visiting Lodges and Masonic Centres. Such visits will communicate Festival objectives, raise awareness and provide updates on the progress of the Festival Appeal. Successful and struggling Lodges will need entirely different strategies. A standard presentation could be used but adapted to suit the requirements of the Lodge. Where possible, presentations should be made when there is no competing business, such as a ceremony, which could detract from the key Festival messages. Immediate feedback is helpful but a follow up with the Lodge Charity Steward a month or two later is essential. Progress can be monitored by revisiting the statistics several months later.

Operation – visiting Lodges

77

Pre-Planning

Planning

Launch

Management

Event

Operation – Lodge procedures

Lodge procedures can be used to ensure that the Festival Appeal is always in the mind of the members of the Province. Encourage all Lodges in the Province to include the Festival Appeal as a standing item on their agendas. This will also remind nonattendees about the Festival. It is also common for Lodges to highlight their Festival status on the Lodge Summons. Lodges should also be encouraged to have a good supply of Gift Aid forms and Charity or Festival literature available for their members. Generally there are three categories of potential donors when it comes to charitable giving – those who will give freely and voluntarily, those who need a little persuasion and those who reject the concept. It is prudent to prepare for objections. Compose a list of possible objections and think up ‘knock-out’ responses to overcome them. Examples of typical objections and responses can be found at Appendix G Wives and partners have a crucial role to play and, whenever possible, they should be invited to events when members of the Charity visit the Province. If they feel included they will be supportive and may increase the value of their donations – indeed they might qualify for their own Steward’s Jewel. Wives and partners sometimes organise their own events to help support the Festival. It is therefore vital they are fully aware of all aspects of the Festival Appeal and they should understand their potential to make a significant difference to the final total.

Operation – handling objections

Operation – wives and partners

78

Pre-Planning

Planning

Launch

Management

Event

Operation – use of the Charities

Each of the Charities has representatives available to speak to gatherings of Freemasons and their wives and partners, to Past Masters’ Lodges or indeed to any audience that the Committee assembles for the purpose of promoting the Appeal. Representatives of the charity are knowledgeable, entertaining and can be persuasive. They are an important resource for every Festival Appeal Committee. Decide on how many visits the Province might require, book venues, advertise the events well in advance and continually remind the members not to miss the opportunity to hear the representative speak. Coordinate these visits through the Festival team. Let the Charity know exactly what will be required from their representative; how long should they speak and what aspects of the Charity should be promoted in particular. Make sure that any equipment the representative requires is available and in good working order. If local presenters are being used and will be working with material sent from the Charity make sure that the material is up-to-date and if using case studies ensure that they differ from previous occasions – it is much better to get an update on the progress of beneficiaries.

79

Pre-Planning

Planning

Launch

Management

Event

Operation – driving the message down

Cascading the right message to members is crucial to the success of the Festival Appeal. It is vital that there is a full communication plan demonstrating how this cascade of information will operate. The Appeal Committee has to plan and execute effective communications. A good Lodge Charity Steward will discretely approach members on a one-to-one basis; he will write to those who don’t attend and follow up those who have asked for a Gift Aid declaration or regular donation form. He will help the members complete any forms. He will encourage regular giving either through regular donations forms or in envelopes and he will promote the use of Gift Aid. Identify the working practices of the best Lodge Charity Stewards and use them as role models for others to follow. The Worshipful Master and other senior members such as VGOs or VOs should lead by example. The Lodge Almoner can be important, especially if he is aware of relevant cases that are, or have been, supported by the Charity. Initiates should be encouraged to sign up to the Appeal on Initiation night, not afterwards. There are many calls on individual Freemasons which will remain throughout the Festival. For example, some Masonic Centres have severe problems with their buildings and have to raise significant sums of money from members to spend on maintenance and restoration. It is important that the ultimate beneficiary of each fundraising event is clearly communicated to avoid any confusion or embarrassment for the donor. Some Lodges will have donated money to the Provincial Charitable Association or Benevolent Fund whilst the Province was out of Festival. These funds may remain unallocated and, following the launch, these Lodges might now be persuaded to direct unallocated money to the Festival Appeal.

80

Pre-Planning

Planning

Launch

Management

Event

Operation – targeting nonattendees

For reasons of infirmity, age or even apathy, a significant number of Freemasons do not regularly attend Lodge meetings (in some Lodges it can be 30-40%). Irregular and non-attendees must be included in the Festival Appeal. Charity Stewards can write to or visit them. Lodges where the minutes are read out but not posted to nonattendees risk leaving absent members without important information about the Festival Appeal and other matters. Regular donation and Gift Aid forms should be sent to every irregular or non-attendee and if there is no response there should be follow-up contact. Some members will appreciate simply receiving a call. The reason why they are not attending may also become clear. Maybe they are in need of a visit by the Almoner? The Secretary can also send a Gift Aid envelope regularly with each Summons to encourage non-attendees to give. A Province may consider a general Appeal letter from the PGM to all those who have yet to make a major contribution – an example is shown at Appendix S. It can be highly effective if every member is sent a letter at strategic points of progress throughout the Appeal. This letter could, for example, explain that with a little top up a member could achieve a higher honorific. Care should be taken so as not to alienate members who are already donating generous amounts – the idea should be offered as a suggestion. If a member is currently giving £5 per month he might be prepared to top up – say by a minimum of £1 per month or possibly double his commitment to £10 per month. The additional payment could be taken on another day in the month. Don’t forget to encourage renewal when an existing period of giving expires. Sometimes the initial donation is made for a fixed period which may end before the conclusion of the Festival Appeal. Initiates should be signed up early in their Masonic career preferably on the night of their Initiation when charity should be at the forefront of their mind.

Operation – topups

81

Pre-Planning

Planning

Launch

Management

Event

Operation – donations to other Provincial appeals

When a Province is hosting a Festival Appeal, its members should be encouraged to concentrate their Masonic charitable giving towards the Festival Appeal. The Charities are aware that many members are keen to donate to local or Provincial Masonic charities. However, the Charities are also keen to ensure that donations made to the Appeal are maximised. With careful planning, Provinces should ensure that the time between Festival Appeals is spent focussed on other appeals or upon building up Provincial Funds to be used for supporting local causes once the Appeal for the central Masonic Charity commences.

82

Pre-Planning

Planning

Launch

Management

Event

At some point during the progress of the Appeal, ‘Festival fatigue’

Mid-term Boost may occur. Festival fatigue is a real threat to an Appeal as it may undermine the ability of a Province to reach its target. The symptoms – combating ‘Festival fatigue’ of Festival fatigue include:• • • • • • • • A decline in the number of regular donation commitments being set up. Fewer Jewels being issued by the Province or Charity The total donations figure does not increase as rapidly as before. Negative feedback about the Festival from Lodges and members in the Province becomes more common. Hits on the Festival website reduce. Little or no merchandise is purchased. Fundraising events are not held as frequently, or are not as well attended as they have been previously. Presentations about the Appeal are held less regularly at Lodge meetings.

It is important, however, not to assume that the only problems the Appeal is facing are those that can be easily identified from the centre by the organising Committee (such as those listed above). Undertaking research and gathering views from around the Province can assist in identifying any hitherto unseen problems. For example: is the training that has been given to Lodge Charity Stewards suited to the Festival? Is the Gift Aid form or donations process too complex? Does this prevent some members from setting up a regular donation? Re-examine the section on assessing the Province on pages 26-29 for further ideas regarding this research. Typically, Festival fatigue is caused by the over-repetition of the same messages which reduces their impact and makes the reader or listener less likely to act. For example:• Many of those who have been fully supportive of the Appeal from the outset will already be a Festival Steward and feel that they have now done their bit. Those who were opposed to giving at the launch may still be opposed as nothing has occurred to change their mind. Those who may be willing to make some form of donation have not yet been persuaded or have not yet had the chance to make a donation or commit to regular giving.

• •

83

Pre-Planning

Planning

Launch

Management

Event

A carefully considered plan which springs into action at the first sign of mid-term fatigue will minimise a waning of donations and reinvigorate the enthusiasm of the members. This plan could include actions such as:• • • • Increasing efforts to encourage new givers without alienating those who have given or who are already giving. Using Lodge influencers, VGOs/VOs to reinforce the message at Lodge meetings. Considering the introduction of new merchandise. Rearranging the Festival Committee by bringing in enthusiastic new members and retiring those who have given their best. Redesigning or overhauling the Festival Appeal website. Issue a new or updated Festival Appeal newsletter. Asking the Charity to provide new case studies or updated promotional material.

• • •

Ask what the Charities can do to help with a mid-term boost.

84

Pre-Planning

Planning

Launch

Management

Event

Mid-term boost – re-launching the Appeal

A formal re-launch may be required to help overcome deep-rooted Festival fatigue and give a fresh feel to the messages used in the Appeal. Alternatively a re-launch may be applied to a successful ongoing Festival simply to boost the Appeal total. Re-launching the Appeal provides the members of the Province with a focal point which can offer them new or additional reasons why they should, for example, increase their regular donations, set up regular donations for the first time or make a one-off donation. A dedicated event can provide a focal point at which the Appeal can be re-launched as it provides an opportunity for the Appeal Committee, members of the Provincial Executive and the Charity to re-connect with the members of the Province to discuss the Appeal. A re-launch event should ideally be tailored to solve the problems that the Appeal is facing and provide fresh impetus to fundraising efforts. Refer to the Launch section of this document for ideas about possible re-launch events. It may be advisable not to replicate or closely follow the type of event that was used for the Appeal’s initial launch as this may be one of the reasons why a re-launch is now needed. Think of an event that will address the current problems caused by Festival fatigue, for example:• If there is negative feeling towards the charity or the Appeal which is preventing many from donating, hold an event which includes a presentation by the Charity so that the work can be fully explained and a Q&A session so that concerns can be addressed and misconceptions corrected. If there are too few regular donation forms being returned, use a re-launch event to provide new training to Lodge Charity Stewards and explain how they can assist in promoting regular giving to their members.

As an alternative, a re-launch brochure sent to all members of the Province can also be effective as it provides direct communication about the re-launch to the entire Province. Ask if the Charity could assist with the production – don’t forget to include regular donation and Gift Aid forms.

85

Pre-Planning

Planning

Launch

Management

Event

Mid-term boost – the psychology of giving

An understanding of the psychology of giving and what motivates people to give to Charity is useful to every Festival Appeal Team. Professional fundraisers have considerable experience when it comes to persuading people to pull out their wallets or reach for their cheque books. Members of the Institute of Fundraising might be available to talk to the Festival Appeal Committee. If not, they have an excellent website (www.institute-of-fundraising.org.uk) which contains a wide range of information useful to any charitable organisation. Once again, representatives of the host Charity have a great deal of understanding on the subject of giving and they are very keen to share that knowledge. In understanding the factors that make people give, consider the following:• A small donation can have a great effect for good. Demonstrate how money is spent and make donors feel that their relatively small gift is very important indeed. Giving to charity has a ‘feel good’ aspect to it. Donors must be able to identify with the beneficiaries – “it could happen to me or my family”. Cases studies should represent a common situation which might happen to any of us at some time of our life. “What are others doing? Should I do the same?” The herd instinct is strong. If one person is seen to be giving, his action can encourage others. Awarding Jewels to qualified Stewards can have this effect. Controlled use of statistics usefully illustrates the benefits of charity. To begin by saying that one in three of the population at some point in their life will develop cancer is shocking. To follow that up with a positive message – that three out of five cancer sufferers now achieve lasting remission - restores the listeners’ confidence. To finish up by saying that advances in medicine and surgery are continually helping to improve the chances of survival, and that their money will assist that process, is persuasive.

• •

86

Pre-Planning

Planning

Launch

Management

Event

Mid-term boost – the psychology of giving (Continued)

• •

Remember that although the desire to give tails off after a period of time, it can be revived. It is sometimes counter productive to use dramatic or shocking case studies; use those that potential donors can connect with. People will often give if they can see that there is something additional to be gained, for example a chance to win a prize. In some cases an individual might only give a pound to the Alms collection but happily buy five pounds worth of raffle tickets. Where appropriate, structure fundraising events to include the possibility of a reward. Do not always choose the cheapest option when planning an event. People are often prepared to pay more money to attend unique or interesting events. A high-cost event, for example a cabaret night, can often provide better value for money than a low-cost event such as a quiz night. Above all, remember that charitable giving is a voluntary act. Each member will make his own decision about whether and how much to give. An effective Lodge Charity Steward will ensure that his members have the relevant information needed to help them make that decision.

For further theory about the reasons why people make charitable donations see Appendix G. Ask Lodges if they are holding unallocated balances in Charity Relief

Mid-term boost Chests or Benevolent Accounts. The money was not given only to be hoarded and not used – explain that the money will also be added to – releasing the “rainy day fund” their Lodge total which will be announced at the conclusion of the
Festival. Work closely with the Provincial Almoner and ensure that members are regularly updated on the work of the Charity they are supporting in their Province – see Appendix C. Members should also be made aware of the total support received throughout the full 11 year Festival cycle and also the assistance provided by the other three Charities. If possible, ask the Provincial Almoner to deliver presentations at Lodge meetings on real cases. Unless the beneficiaries have given their permission, always de-personalise real and/or local case studies.

Mid-term boost – relationships with Provincial Almoners

87

Pre-Planning

Planning

Launch

Management

Event

Festival Event
Description Year Conclusion of previous Festival Appeal Pre-Planning Planning Launch of Festival Appeal Management Festival Event Post Festival Appeal Debriefing 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Objective

The objective of this section is to plan and deliver a successful finale to the Festival Appeal – the “Festival Event”

Each Province must make its own decisions – this document offers guidance only.

88

Pre-Planning

Planning

Launch

Management

Event

This section contains information about:-

What’s in this section?

An overview of the Festival Event.............................................. 90 What form will the Event take? .................................................. 90 Preparation – Festival Event Committee ................................... 91 Preparing for the Festival Event – first steps ............................. 92 Procedure and protocol ............................................................. 94 The main guest list .................................................................... 94 Guest list considerations ........................................................... 95 Festival Stewards ...................................................................... 95 Dress code ................................................................................ 95 The procession .......................................................................... 96 Seat allocations and table plan.................................................. 96 Agreeing the seating plan.......................................................... 96 Toast list .................................................................................... 97 Materials required...................................................................... 97 The Festival List and booklet..................................................... 98 Banner....................................................................................... 99 The menu booklet...................................................................... 99 Public address system............................................................... 100 Briefing ...................................................................................... 100 Brief for guest of honour ............................................................ 100 Flowers ...................................................................................... 101 Photographer............................................................................. 101 Media......................................................................................... 101 First aid and health and safety .................................................. 101 After completing this section you should be able to:• • • • Understand the features of a successful Festival Event. Identify a suitable venue. Prepare all the necessary materials for the Event. Determine an appropriate guest list and format for the Event.

89

Pre-Planning

Planning

Launch

Management

Event

An overview of the Festival Event

The Festival Event celebrates the culmination of the Festival Appeal. It usually takes the form of a dinner, which is presided over by the PGM as President of the Festival. The Guest of Honour will be one of the High Rulers. The President and the Trustees of the Charity being supported will also be in attendance. The Festival Event is usually held within the Province, although there have been occasions where venues outside the Province have been used in order to cater for a greater number of people. In recent years some Festival Events have differed in format and this is covered later in this section. At the Festival Event the total raised during the Festival Appeal (hitherto a closely guarded secret) is announced. Above all the Festival Event is the Province’s celebration of their fundraising achievements and whilst the Charities are happy to advise and assist where required, they will not interfere with or attempt to dictate the arrangements. The Festival Event can take a variety of forms, for example:-

What form will the Event take?

A traditional Event which takes the form of a Festival Dinner attended by members of the Province who have qualified as Festival Stewards and their wives and partners. The Dinner is concluded by a series of Toasts and the announcement of the Festival result. Alternatively, the Festival result can be announced at a meeting of the Provincial Grand Lodge of the sponsoring Province. In some cases a family day or a Provincial Party without the formality of a Festival Dinner will be held at a later date to celebrate the achievement.

The format of the Festival Event is entirely up to the Province and the decision should be taken by the PGM and his Executive. This section of the document outlines the aspects most closely related to a traditional Festival Event.

90

Pre-Planning

Planning

Launch

Management

Event

Preparation – Festival Event Committee

Once the PGM has determined the form of the Festival Event, he should appoint a separate Committee to undertake the more detailed planning and manage the logistics of the Event:• Past experience shows that a specific “Festival Event Committee”, separate from the “Festival Appeal Committee”, is best placed to manage the Event (although there is likely to be some overlap in the membership). We would recommend that the Festival Appeal Treasurer should be appointed to the Committee. The Committee should be in place early and in a position to meet regularly for at least two years prior to the end of the Festival Appeal.

"We wanted to have the Festival Dinner at a location within the Province, but our choice was limited by there being only one venue which appeared able to accommodate the number of people that we hoped would attend. Some months after making the provisional booking, it became clear that the venue would not prove suitable for a number of reasons, and we reluctantly decided to book somewhere outside of the Province which could better satisfy our needs. Fortunately, we had made the original booking three years in advance of the Festival Event and we were therefore able to successfully change our plans" Howard Wilson Provincial Grand Charity Steward, Worcestershire

91

Pre-Planning

Planning

Launch

Management

Event

Preparing for the Festival Event – first steps

Once the Festival Event Committee has been established, it should agree on the exact format of the Festival Event before more detailed planning commences. It is recommended that early decisions are taken on the following aspects of the Festival Event:• Seed fund: The Festival Event will require a seed fund which will be needed to pay any necessary deposits for the venue, catering, hotels or entertainment which may be required. The venue and any necessary caterers, entertainment or equipment should be booked as early as possible to prevent having to change plans at a later date. Managing ongoing expenses: It is recommended that the Province establishes a non-charitable fund to deal with the ongoing administrative expenses of running the Festival Event. It is vital that VAT is taken into account in the budgeting process. Raising funds for the Festival Event: It is up to the Province to determine how best to fund the Festival Event. Previous methods of raising money for this purpose have included:o Special fundraising events focussing on raising money solely for the Festival Event, such as a dinner-dance, sponsored walk…etc – see Appendix H for other suggestions. o Profits from the sales of Festival Jewels. o Dining fees or ticket charges for the Event which would be paid by eligible members wishing to attend the Festival Event. Past experience shows that setting dining fees or ticket prices too high can be counterproductive – remember that most guests will have already made a sizeable donation to qualify as a Festival Steward. It should be made explicitly clear that any money raised for the purposes of financing the Festival Event is not classed as charitable donations and as such are not eligible for Gift Aid. • Number of guests: The likely number of attendees at the Event will determine the size of the venue required, so the Committee should decide which members will be eligible to purchase tickets at an early stage and take into account the likely attendance of VIPs. Traditionally, only qualified Festival Stewards (this includes wives and partners) have been entitled to attend the Festival Event; however this requirement differs from Province to Province.

92

Pre-Planning

Planning

Launch

Management

Event

Preparing for the Festival Event – first steps (continued)

The venue: An early decision on the venue is crucial to ensure the preferred facility is available for the date selected for the Festival Event. The location should be suitable for the type of Event selected by the PGM and take into account the travel (including car parking) and accommodation needs of the guests. If possible, try to attend similar events at any chosen venue(s) to assess how well large events are managed and identify any problems with the venue before a confirming the booking. Suppliers: It is important to try and meet with representatives of the venue and any necessary suppliers as soon as possible to discuss the detailed aspects of the Event and to feel confident about the services they can deliver. There have been instances where even large, well established venues have made significant mistakes, for example understaffing bars, running out of wine and providing inadequate toilet facilities – leave nothing to chance.

The Committee should not begin detailed planning until these steps have been taken and a venue has been secured with a deposit.

“When we received the invoice for the Festival Event suddenly it dawned on us that we were 17 ½ % light on all our budget calculations. Always check what is and isn’t inclusive of Value Added Tax” Gerry Hann Provincial Grand Charity Steward, Berkshire

93

Pre-Planning

Planning

Launch

Management

Event

Procedure and protocol

Due to the scale of the Event and the presence of VIPs, various procedures and the correct protocol should be followed. This is covered in the following sections. The guests listed below, and their wives or partners, are normally invited to the Festival Event. Responsibility for issuing invitations is usually shared between the Charity and Province. The Chief Executive of the Charity will usually issue invitations to:• The Grand Master, his ADC and detective, or the Pro Grand Master, or the Deputy Grand Master, or the Assistant Grand Master. The PGM, the Provincial Grand Secretary or Chairman of the Appeal from the Province whose Festival will conclude in the following year. The Grand Secretary. The Grand Director of Ceremonies. A Deputy Grand Director of Ceremonies. The President and Deputy President of the Charity. Members of the Charity’s Council or Board of Trustees.

The main guest list

• • • • •

Only one High Ruler will attend and Provinces will often not be informed of which High Ruler will be attending until close to the Festival Event – don’t waste time worrying about who it will be! The Province may also issue invitations to:• • • PGMs of neighbouring Provinces and any others with which the host Province has a special relationship. Non-Masonic dignitaries. Any other guests of the PGM.

In recent years many Festival Events have been attended by civic dignitaries such as the Mayor or a religious leader. Their presence is a matter for the Province to determine.

94

Pre-Planning

Planning

Launch

Management

Event

Guest list considerations

The Province does not need to pay the dining charge for those on the main guest list. The Charity, UGLE or the individual will meet these costs:• • • Plan early to identify those who will receive a complimentary dinner. Often PGMs attending from other Provinces will make a donation to the Appeal on behalf of their Province. The Charities and UGLE will determine between them which VIPs and their costs they will meet.

The Charity should be notified in advance of any other guests’ dinner, travel and/or accommodation costs which they will be asked to meet. Usually, at a traditional Festival Event, only members who have qualified as Festival Stewards, together with their wives and partners, are eligible to attend; however, this is a decision for the Province. In addition, the Province might choose to nominate Special Stewards (or Working Stewards) for the day. The number required will depend on the numberof guests attending the event, the venue, car-parking arrangements, etc. A number of Provinces use the services of their Provincial Stewards Lodges and Chapters on the day. A dress code should be agreed by the Festival Event Committee in consultation with the PGM. The potential options are:• • • • • • Full Dress Regalia (no gloves or Gauntlets). Collars only. No Regalia. Morning Dress (usually with Regalia), long or short coats, or evening dress. Lounge suit or dinner suit. A variation of the above (this needs to be discussed with the Charity and approved by UGLE).

Festival Stewards

Dress code

Festival Jewels are usually worn irrespective of the dress code selected. Discuss the dress code with the Charity well in advance of the Event, particularly if an alternative option to those listed above has been selected. If Masonic Regalia is being worn, a list of any ‘acting’ Grand Officers from the Province who will be attending the Festival Event should be supplied in advance to the Chief Executive of the Charity who will inform the Grand Tyler and ensure that their regalia is available on the day.

95

Pre-Planning

Planning

Launch

Management

Event

The procession

The Grand Director of Ceremonies (GDC) will direct the order and format of the procession. Traditionally, the GDC, or his Deputy, will lead in the procession which will normally be limited to the following:• • • PGM / Festival President. Guest of Honour (The High Ruler). President and/or Chief Executive of the Charity.

Their wives or partners will also be part of this procession. The Province can choose to have a traditional banquet layout, or use round tables. The seating of guests is also largely at the discretion of the Province, but it is important to discuss the plans with the Charity well in advance. Traditionally, the Festival Dinner has a top table which is kept fairly small, although this is again at the discretion of the Province. Whatever the size of the top table, it must comprise the following guests and their wives or partners:• • • The PGM / Festival President. The Guest of Honour (The High Ruler). The President of the Charity.

Seat allocations and table plan

Depending on the space available, others sitting on the top table could include:• • • • • • The Chief Executive of the Charity. The Grand Secretary. The Grand Director of Ceremonies. Attending PGMs. Members of the Provincial Executive. Deputy GDC’s and Provincial Grand Chaplain. (At the commencement and conclusion of the Dinner, the Provincial Grand Chaplain will say Grace. He must be seated appropriately to do this and may require a microphone).

It is recommended that any Trustees of the Charity who will attend are dispersed among the Provincial tables. The Province should agree the top table plan and the seating arrangements for all other VIPs with the Charity. A full preliminary seating plan of the entire Dinner should also be sent to the Chief Executive prior to the Festival Event.

Agreeing the seating plan

96

Pre-Planning

Planning

Launch

Management

Event

The approved running order for speeches is:-

Toast list
• • • HM The Queen – Proposed by the PGM (Festival President). The Grand Master – Proposed by the Festival President. The Charity – Proposed by the Festival President or Chairman of the Festival Committee (the Festival Results are announced as part of this section of the Event). Response to the Toast – Delivered by the President of the Charity. The Festival President – Proposed by the visiting High Ruler. Response by the Festival President.

• • •

Please note the section on page 100 which refers to public address systems. Depending on the type of Festival Event selected, it may be necessary to prepare or request materials and/or additional facilities to be available on the day. A full Festival Event Checklist has been provided at Appendix J. The following sections cover the major practical aspects of the Festival Event.

Materials required

97

Pre-Planning

Planning

Launch

Management

Event

The Charity will prepare a Festival Announcement Booklet (The Festival

The Festival List) or ‘result’ which shows the total amount of money raised during the List and booklet Festival Appeal, including payments promised and still to be paid and Gift
Aid tax relief still to be added. This information is used to produce a souvenir booklet of the Festival Event. The process for the production of the list and booklet is as follows:• • Prior to the Event the Charity may write to each Lodge to confirm the amount given and the amount promised but still outstanding. The communication highlights how much will have been raised by the date of the Festival Event (this should be the amount announced at the Dinner) and how much is expected to be received over the next four (or more) years under regular donation promises and from Gift Aid tax relief. The list is produced with the strictest secrecy and the final amount will not be announced until the Festival Event when the banner is unfurled or cheque presented. The Charity is responsible for publishing the Festival List. The Province can assist in production of the booklet or can enhance the booklet, at their expense. Approximately four weeks before the Festival Event the Charity will sort, summarise and proof read the Festival List prior to publication. Last minute additions can be made at the final proof reading stage which might be about a week before the Festival Event. Printing will be arranged by the Charity as close as possible to the date of the Festival Event to minimise the need for any addenda. Once printed, any later additions can be announced at the Dinner. The Festival List is only distributed at the point during the Festival Event when the result is revealed. The use of ‘Table Stewards’ (or Special Stewards) to distribute the leaflets is recommended. On some occasions the booklet has been sealed in envelopes and left on the individual tables with the instruction that the seal is only to be broken once the announcement has been made. Copies of the Festival List are issued to all Provinces, Districts and Lodges overseas and to the UGLE secretariat following the Festival Event.

• • •

As there is some variation in the approach to the production of the Festival List, it is recommended that the Charity should be consulted for further guidance.

98

Pre-Planning

Planning

Launch

Management

Event

The Festival list and booklet
(Continued)

The President’s List The Festival List also contains a “President’s List” to highlight any donations made to the Festival Appeal which are not attributed to a Lodge or Chapter within the Province. The list may also include:• • • • • • Donations made on behalf of other Provinces. Donations from other Orders. Donations from individuals to which the PGM would like to make special reference. Individual or unusual fundraising efforts. Donations made by local businesses. Donations from civic dignitaries.

This list is devised by the Charity, in consultation with the Festival President. Often the result of the Festival is revealed by unfurling a bespoke banner which has been printed with the final amount raised by the Festival Appeal. If the Province requires decides to use a banner, the Charity will produce it in consultation with the Province and take responsibility for it to be delivered to the venue. It is recommended that the Province produces a Menu Booklet for the information of guests and to act as a further souvenir of the Festival Event. It may contain any of the following:• • • The Menu. The Toast List. Photographs of:o The PGM / Festival President. o The President of the Charity. o The activities of the Charity. A foreword by the PGM / Festival President. An article by the President of the Charity. An article on the history of the Province. A list of members of the Festival Committee. An alphabetical table plan.

Banner

The menu booklet

• • • • •

The form and content of the Menu Booklet is at the discretion of the Province, but a draft copy should be sent to the Charity to agree the layout and content.

99

Pre-Planning

Planning

Launch

Management

Event

Public address system

Most venues will require a public address system for use during the speeches, announcements and any other relevant element of the Festival Event. Arrangements for the venue to provide a public address system should be made. Ensure that those using it understand how it works. Briefing the PGM / Festival President about his role during the Event is essential to ensure the smooth running of the Event. He should be aware of the following duties he will need to perform, such as:• • • • When he is due to speak and for how long. How the result of the Festival Appeal is to be announced. Who to thank for their role in the Festival. Which wives or partners to be presented with flowers.

Briefing

Other VIPs who may be required to perform certain roles should also be suitably briefed – the Charities can provide guidance with this task. Approximately one month before the Festival Event, the Province should provide all the information necessary for the Guest of Honour (High Ruler) to prepare his speech. This information should include:• • Biographical details (both Masonic and non-Masonic) of the PGM, the Provincial Executive and the Appeal Chairman. Notes on the Province including its history, the number of Lodges, number of members and anything else of interest, both Masonic and non-Masonic. Information about the Charity being supported. Details of the Festival Appeal, in particular the date and function (if any) at which it was launched and any special or unusual fundraising initiatives undertaken. A detailed timetable of the arrangements for the Festival Event. A list of the guests attending any pre- and post-Event drinks receptions, including first names and those of their wives or partners.

Brief for guest of honour

• •

• •

This information should be sent to the Chief Executive of the Charity who will liaise with the Guest of Honour to ensure he receives all the necessary information.

100

Pre-Planning

Planning

Launch

Management

Event

Flowers

At the discretion of the Province flowers may be presented to the wives or partners of the Festival President, the High Ruler and the President of the Charity. They may be presented by the PGM / Festival President at either the pre-dinner drinks or during the Dinner itself. The Province may care to check with the wives or partners concerned shortly beforehand their preferences e.g. for type and colour of flowers. Most Provinces engage a photographer to take pictures throughout the Festival Event and in particular of any pre-dinner receptions, groups from Lodges and individual members. The photographer should be briefed about what sort of images are required and provided with a list of important photos to take, such as the unfurling of the banner, the presentation of flowers and any speeches which are to take place. The Charity will be keen to have good quality images to use in publicity with the necessary permissions already agreed. The Festival Event provides an excellent opportunity to highlight the charitable nature of Freemasonry to a wider audience via the local media. It is for the Province to decide whether it should invite the local press to cover the Festival Event or issue a press release documenting the Event – see Appendix U for guidance on drafting a press release. Points to consider if choosing either of these options are:• • Ensure all the VIPs are aware of the presence of the media. Any attributed quotes should be cleared by the individual and the Charity.

Photographer

Media

Liaise with the Charity in the first instance – they all have experience of media and PR activities. The Province should arrange for medical and/or first aid qualified personnel to be available at the Festival Event. There should be at least one such individual in each room being used. Alternatively, Provinces may consider arranging for members of the local branch of St John Ambulance to attend. Larger venues may use their own staff to provide this cover. Ensure that the venue conforms to all current health and safety regulations and a fire risk assessment has been undertaken for the rooms being used.

First aid and health and safety

101

Appendix A – Working Group Terms of Reference
Membership
Chairman: Conrad Donaldson, Provincial Grand Charity Steward for Devonshire (Devonshire 2012) Secretary: David Ferdinando, RMTGB Members: • Gerry Hann (Berkshire – RMBI 2011) • John Francis (Staffordshire – Grand Charity 2013) • Howard Wilson (Worcestershire – RMTGB 2011) • Roger Pemberton (Shropshire – MSF 2008) • John Davis (South Wales – Grand Charity 2010) • Roger Needham (Sussex – Grand Charity 2017) • Richard Camm-Jones, Secretary of the Grand Charity • Peter Williams, Head of External Affairs – RMBI • Alison Lott, Festivals and Donations Manager – MSF • Harry Smith, Communications and Administration Officer – RMTGB The Working Group was given the following terms of reference:-

Terms of Reference

• •

The Working Group is tasked with producing a Manual, in paper and electronic form, being a Guide for Provinces raising funds through the Festival system for the four Central Masonic Charities (the Charities). The Guide will cover all aspects of organising an Appeal including planning, preparation, launch, organisation, selecting a team, targets and the final Event. The Guide is to be written in an attractive format using diagrams/flow charts/pictures; fully referenced and indexed; to be downloadable in whole or part from the websites of the Charities. As far as possible, the Guide will be consistent with, and cross refer to the corresponding Guide being produced for Provincial Charity Stewards. The Working Group will consult external organisations such as the Institute of Fundraising and other successful Charities. The Working Group will meet regularly at Freemasons’ Hall, London; the organisation of rooms, refreshments and other materials is to be supplied by the Grand Charity and/or the RMTGB. The aim is to produce a final draft by the end of July 2010 so that a published document is available in printed and electronic form by September 2010; followed by the formal launch at the 2010 Festival Forum in October 2010.

102

The Guide will be a ‘living’ document and will be updated regularly.

103

Appendix B – Appeal Matrix
Introduction
The PGM’s Forum has agreed to the following matrix of Festivals and the Provinces that will support them. The Mark Benevolent Fund Festivals are also shown to help indentify Provinces where Festivals may overlap or where fundraising may become more difficult.
Royal Masonic Benevolent Institution Durham Berkshire Leicestershire and Rutland Northamptonshire and Huntingdonshire Dorset East Lancashire Cumberland and Westmorland Yorkshire, West Riding Suffolk Surrey Northumberland South Wales Worcestershire Cambridgeshire Royal Masonic Trust for Girls and Boys Buckinghamshire Worcestershire Devonshire Monmouthshire Lincolnshire Bedfordshire Hampshire and Isle of Wight North Wales Nottinghamshire Hertfordshire Middlesex Durham Oxfordshire Berkshire Masonic Samaritan Fund Mark Benevolent Fund Northamptonshire and Huntingdonshire North Wales Middlesex East Anglia Buckinghamshire Worcestershire Devon Berkshire Lincolnshire Sussex Kent East Lancashire Oxon Surrey Year

Year

The Freemasons’ Grand Charity South Wales Essex Cambridgeshire Staffordshire East Kent West Wales Norfolk Sussex Gloucestershire Shropshire Somerset West Lancashire Leicestershire and Rutland Warwickshire

2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022 2023

West Lancashire Oxford Warwickshire Cornwall Derbyshire West Kent Cheshire Wiltshire Yorkshire, North and East Ridings Bristol Herefordshire Buckinghamshire Essex Devonshire

2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022 2023

104

Appendix C – Quarterly Provincial Statistics (Example – Dec 2010)

105

Appendix D – Typical Festival Appeal Committee Structures
Example 1

Example 2

Provincial Grand Master

Appeal Chairman

Chief Executive Central Masonic Charity

Communication (PR) and Media

Appeal Area Coordinator

Appeal Secretary

Appeal Treasurer

Events Coordinator

Web and Technical Officer

Area Y Chairman

Marketing Manager

Area X Chairman

106

Appendix E – Gift Aid
Gift Aid – an overview
Gift Aid is tax relief on money donated to UK charities. Donations are treated as if the donor had already deducted basic rate tax from them. The Charity can then reclaim this tax to increase the value of a donation. To ensure a donation is eligible for Gift Aid, donors must:-

Gift Aid rules
• Pay sufficient UK income tax and/or capital gains tax to cover the amount of tax the Charity will reclaim • Provide the Charity with a Gift Aid declaration, which should include: o Their name o Their home address o The Charity’s name o Details of the donation – saying that it is a Gift Aid donation o Confirmation that they have paid sufficient UK tax – to cover the tax the Charity will reclaim A declaration can be made to cover individual donations or a series of donations. It can cover donations made during a specified period or to cover all future donations. It can also be backdated to cover donations made over the last four years.

How Gift Aid works

Charities receive a donation (which, if the donor is a UK taxpayer, is money that has already had income tax deducted), and reclaim tax on its ‘gross’ equivalent (its value before tax was deducted) at the basic rate of 22 per cent – Please note that this rate will decrease to 20 per cent from 6 April 2011. In practice, this means that if £10 is donated to Charity using Gift Aid, that the donation will generate a further £2.82 for the Charity. (£2.50 from April 2011) The Gift Aid scheme is for monetary gifts only.

Higher rate taxpayers

If you pay higher rate tax, the difference between the higher rates of tax (40 and/or 50 per cent), and the basic rate of tax (20 per cent), on the total 'gross' value of your donation to the charity can be reclaimed. This claim can be made on a Self Assessment tax return. Non-taxpayers should not use Gift Aid.

Non-taxpayers

It is strongly recommended that you visit the HMRC website for further information on Gift Aid – www.hmrc.gov.uk/individuals/giving/gift-aid.htm

107

GIFT AID – FLOW CHART An example from the RMTGB

108

Appendix F – The Relief Chest and other donation systems
Introduction Different systems in the charities
The Charities have donation systems and other ways to assist in accepting donations. These systems fall into two categories: 1) Each of the Charities operates their own donations management system to collect acknowledge and record donations given to their own Charity. 2) There are also two central schemes which can be used to donate money to any, or all, of the Charities. These are: • • The Freemasons’ Grand Charity Relief Chest Scheme The RMTGB Blanket Gift Aid Scheme

Available for appeals

The Grand Charity Relief Chest, RMTGB and MSF Donation Systems have been established to support Provinces with their Festival Appeals. In particular the RMTGB and MSF Donation systems have bespoke reports available to assist in running the detailed elements of a Festival including numbers of Stewards and members enrolled for regular donations, Gift Aid reclaimed and interest earned. You should discuss the systems available with the Charity in order to fully understand all the options for administering donations during the Festival Appeal.

The Grand Charity Relief Chest

The Grand Charity Relief Chest Scheme was set up to help Freemasons give to Charity easily and tax-efficiently. It was launched in 1986 and offers individual "Relief Chests" which can be used to accumulate funds collected by a Lodge, Chapter, Province or other Masonic organisation for charitable purposes. In addition to the Lodge and Chapter Relief Chests, The Grand Charity also manages Relief Chests for Provincial Grand Lodges holding Festivals for the other three central Masonic Charities. The Grand Charity holds the money on behalf of the Lodge or other Masonic organisation, although that organisation retains control over the dispersal of the money. The Chest Holder uses the funds in their individual Relief Chest to make donations to any Masonic or nonMasonic Charity or to an individual (e.g. a Lodge member or the widow or a dependant of a member) who is in need.

109

In 2009:

The Relief Chest fund in 2009

• • • •

£7.50m was deposited into the Fund Tax relief gained under Gift Aid added more than £0.75m Over £0.61m was generated in interest More than £8.08m of charitable donations were made

In the year ended 30 November 2009, activity for the Relief Chest Scheme included: 2009 Number of Relief Chests Average number of monthly donations into the scheme Average number of monthly payments qualifying for Gift Aid tax relief Average number of monthly payments from the scheme Number of new Relief Chests opened during the year 4,160 21,178 18,251 325 161 2008 4,040 19,725 17,750 325 274

Limitations

The Grand Charity Relief Chest Scheme has some limitations to a Province in an Appeal because each Charity Relief Chest is set up as a private arrangement between the Lodge and the Relief Chest. The Provincial Grand Charity Steward (or Festival Chairman) has no visibility of the monies available in Relief Chests within his own Province. Establishing a Relief Chest in the name of the Appeal will however allow the Province to view and monitor donations collected in the name of the Appeal. For further information, please contact the Relief Chest Department on 020 7395 9246. Details of the 2009 Budget update on Gift Aid can be found on the HMRC website.

Further information

110

The RMTGB Blanket Gift Aid Scheme

The Blanket Donation Scheme (BDS) is administered by the Royal Masonic Trust for Girls and Boys (RMTGB) on behalf of the Charities and the Mark Benevolent Fund. It enables the donor to make regular donations, and to allocate these funds on an annual basis to one or more of the Charities of his choice. Donations can be made in the name of any of the donor’s Lodges or Chapters and can be used to support a Festival Appeal for one of the Charities where applicable. Donations made through the BDS are eligible for Gift Aid. The RMTGB reclaims tax from HMRC. For Further information, please contact the RMTGB Gift Aid Department on 020 7405 2644.

111

Appendix G – Effective Fundraising
Introduction
This section outlines a number of basic principles for effective fundraising which may assist with planning and managing a Festival Appeal. If people see that others are giving generously or regularly they may be inspired to give more themselves. There is no better example than that set from the top. If the leaders of the Province (and other Orders) give generously others will follow the example they have set. So try to ensure they set the example and that it is widely known. Try not to view all potential donors in the same way: Segment the market Usually, Freemasons, like other donor groups, can be divided into thirds: • • • 1/3 will give readily, almost without asking. 1/3 will give if prompted (and possibly reminded again). 1/3 will only give if they are really persuaded (and sometimes not even then).

Lead by example

Different strategies – one for each of the ‘groups’ listed above – are likely to be more successful than a single strategy which assumes all potential donors have the same approach to charity. Separate strategies may also be employed to encourage other groups to donate to the Appeal. These groups include: • • • • Differentiate the mission Members of the Royal Arch and other Orders Younger or older members Working, non–working or retired members Wives and partners

Charity fundraising professionals talk about “differentiating the mission” or defining the unique selling point of a particular Charity. The aim is not to denigrate other charities but to help potential givers to ‘identify’ with your Charity. In the private sector, competitive advantage is the phrase used to describe what makes people buy a particular product or service over another. In Charity fundraising professionals talk about comparative advantage – the unique points which can be used to persuade people that a particular Charity is worthy of their support. Try to explain the vital nature of the work to build the comparative advantage of giving to that Charity. People need to feel that giving to a particular Charity is meeting their view of what the world needs.

Tell a credible story

Never be inaccurate or untruthful about what the Charity does or what it is doing – nothing destroys trust and support more.

112

Give recognition for donations

Most donors like to have their contributions recognised and this promotes further giving. There are different views about honorifics – some say they are divisive, but many believe they are productive, and they do give the recognition that is vital. There are many ways of recognising a donation, including: a letter of thanks, a personal thank you, presenting Festival Jewels in open Lodge…etc. People give more, and give more regularly if they receive some form of recognition.

Link donations to benefits

People like to know what is happening to their money. Too often donors feel that their donation simply disappears into a black hole. To gain commitment it is therefore vital that people know what the charity does and how their donation will be spent. If they understand the good work that the charity does they will be more likely to give. Try to link amounts given to benefits provided. The Charities can help by making presentations and providing information.

Choose the right fundraisers – and be prepared to change them if necessary

Not everyone is a good fundraiser. When selecting Lodge Charity Stewards or Festival Stewards make sure they are capable of doing the job. This implies both the required skills and a willingness to “make the ask”. It is often necessary to "eyeball” people and actively persuade them to give. The ideal Lodge Charity Steward or Festival Steward should be able and prepared to “eyeball” the members of the Lodge. Remember the 1/3 1/3 1/3 approach. It is those in the last 1/3 which represent the most significant challenge because they are unlikely to respond to a general approach. Donating to charity is voluntary, but experience shows that, to reach those who are reluctant to give at the first time of asking, a more direct approach can be effective at persuading them to give willingly. For example:• Try and approach members and ask them to make a donation, preferably through regular giving, when it is possible to speak to them in person (returning if necessary). If a face-to-face approach is not possible an individually addressed letter (preferably from PGM) may achieve the desired response – see Appendix S for an example.

Use direct and personal approaches

If the latter approach is used do not be apprehensive about spending a high amount on postage as it will be repaid many times over, but remember that the cost cannot be met using donations.

113

Start early and aim for regular donations

If the Province is holding a five year Appeal, start marketing on day one and plan well in advance (at least two years prior to the launch). Although raffles and social events can play a part in raising funds for the Appeal, the overwhelming contribution has to come from individual donations. Therefore secure as many regular donations that are eligible for Gift Aid tax relief as early in the Appeal as possible – this is the easiest and most effective way to raise a higher final total. Be clear about expectations but do not be afraid to set a stretching target. Experience demonstrates that stretching targets lead to higher Festival totals. It is often feared that failing to achieve a target might be seen as failure by the Province, but the Charity will always prefer that the Province falls short of a stretching target rather than meeting a modest target because the former will normally yield the highest total.

Make it fun

One of the great benefits of Festival Appeals is that fundraising events can substantially improve the social life of the Province. Fundraising events can be organised at Provincial level or by individual Lodges or groups of Lodges. As stated above, these events will not raise the majority of the funds and will represent a relatively small contribution to the final total. However, these events can add a sense of fun to the Appeal and provide an opportunity for members, and their wives and partners, to enjoy themselves.

114

Handling objections to giving

The following table provides a list of objections which are often given as reasons for not donating to the Festival. Next to each objection is a potential response. Objection Possible response Consider paying monthly to “I can’t afford £x as a lump sum” ‘spread the pain’. Encourage the individual to become a Festival Steward and put the Jewel in the drawer. “I won’t wear a Jewel” Alternatively, remind them that the wearing of a Jewel shows support for the PGM and the Appeal. Break down the amount to £s per month and relate it to a cost of “I can’t afford what I am being everyday living such as a pint of asked to donate” beer or a gin and tonic a week. It is a question of choice and priority. Post a cheque or bankers order “I don’t want the members of my form with a Gift Aid declaration Lodge to know about my directly to the Lodge Charity donation” Steward or to the Charity. The money spent by the Charities is used to benefit Freemasons and their dependants across the “These are ‘London’ Charities and country – see Appendix C; a don’t affect us” fellow Lodge member may benefit in future. There are likely to be individuals in the Province who currently benefit. Spread donations monthly and “I belong to more than Lodge and budget for the cost of multiple can’t afford it” memberships. This may be a potential case for “I genuinely can’t afford it!” the Lodge Almoner but handle with tact and confidentiality.

115

Appendix H – Fundraising Ideas
Introduction This section captures numerous ideas to assist with Festival fundraising, many of which have been tried and tested by members of the Festival Working Party. Raffles are likely to be the most common fundraising method used by Lodges and at private functions. There are variations on this theme such as a “Champagne and Chocolate Draw” aimed at wives and partners by offering the opportunity to take something home from the Lodge meeting to soften the blow of a member’s late return. Often a “booby” prize or prize that is always returned to the Lodge for next time (tin of beans, pair of socks etc) adds a touch of humour. Sponsoring an individual, or group (which could include wives and partners) to participate in an event can be an excellent way to raise funds and also promote the Appeal to the members of the Province. As well as the more traditional walks, cycle rides and marathons, other achievements, such as parachute jumps or mountain climbs, are also high profile ways of generating sponsorship. Remember to ask all those sponsoring to complete a Gift Aid declaration. Online sites, such as JustGiving.com, allow sponsors to make donations directly to the Charity and can relieve the administrative burden of collecting the money following the event. A year round event, usually managed by the Lodge Charity Steward. For a fixed annual fee members buy one or more numbers which are then drawn at an appropriate time during the Festive Board. Members can purchase a number on behalf of their wives and/or partners and family, but the general public are not invited to participate. Proceeds are usually split 50:50 with 50% of the profits given as a cash prize and 50% given to the designated Charity. Pass a bowl, or designated box/bottle, around the Festive Board and invite members to rid themselves of all their small change. It is quite surprising that amount of money that can be raised during a Masonic season. Another task for the Charity Steward. Open a book for those present to predict the time the WM gavels to summon the Tyler for the final toast. This is to be recorded by the hour and minute. No two wagers to be the same, nor is the WM permitted to bet. Agree the wager (usually 20p, 50p or £1) and return 50% of the takings to the member who correctly predicts the time and donate the remaining 50% to the Charity. Somebody who knows his wines is essential to lead this event. If possible, bring in the local brewery, or a wine producer, to use the occasion as an educational event and take advantage of the captive audience. As well as a variety of wines, consider having cheese and bread available.

Raffles

Sponsored events

100 club

Copper pot / tiddler box

The Tyler’s toast

Wine tasting evening

116

Lottery

A centre may consider running a lottery solely for the Festival Appeal and invite all Lodges to participate. Larger cash prizes may provide an added incentive and lead to a greater number of members and their families participating. Once the prizes have been allocated, the balance of the proceeds may then be donated to the Appeal. It is recommended that the proceeds should be attributed equally between the Festival donations totals of the Lodges participating. The general public should not be invited to participate. It is strongly recommended that legal advice is sought from the Local Authority and the Gambling Commission before commencing any lottery as there are many regulations to adhere to and often a licence may be required.

Quiz nights

Quiz nights can be organised by members forming their own group to compete against others in the Lodge and are ideal for the intelligent members of the family to flex their “knowledge bumps”. Alternatively, Lodges can compete against each other within a centre. If each centre organises a quiz event the winners of each could battle it out in a grand Provincial quiz evening. This event will need somebody willing to organise events and to arrange for quizmasters…etc. Many social occasions can be held in the garden of one of the Lodge members (usually the one with the largest acreage). This type of event also provides an opportunity to invite non-Masons. Many of the other fundraising ideas listed in this section could also be used during the event. So called because they have moved away from the paper tablecloth to white linen because wives and partners are invited! On these occasions it is usual not to have a ceremony, but to undertake the routine business of the Lodge only – opening, minutes, ballots, correspondence, risings and closing. The Ladies are then invited to join their respective partners in the Lodge room for an address or discussion on an appropriate subject. On completion of this everybody retires to the bar and eventually the dining room for the Festive Board. Speeches are reduced to the minimum, i.e. visitors, with no response.

Garden parties, barbecues, and hog roasts

White tables

Burns supper

Celebration of one of Scotland’s favourite sons (and a Freemason as well!). Burns’ night (25th January) celebrates the birth of Robert Burns and many Lodges now hold a supper at their January meeting. This yuletide event is practised each year in a number of ways. One way is to hold a special evening at a centre when the family and other non-Masons are invited to a supper interspersed with Christmas Carols.

Carol singing evening

117

Bavarian evening

Slapping the lederhosen can be fun! A good “Oompah” band together with Deutsche Fayre and beer makes for a highly entertaining evening. A large room with plenty of long, but stout tables is a requirement and the atmosphere will be much improved if everybody dresses for the occasion. This event also provides the opportunity for a raffle (possibly themed to fit with the event). Provide each Lodge member with a Gift Aid envelope to complete. Money is then placed in the envelopes which are then collected by the Charity Steward. The Charity Steward collects and opens each envelope noting the name of each subscriber and amount given. The Lodge Secretary should be informed of the total amount collected. Ensure that members complete their Gift Aid declarations – guidelines are available from the Charities and further information can be found at Appendix E. This event is most popular if there is a thriving Lodge of Instruction within the Province. An LOI supper is managed in a similar fashion to the Festive Board and provides a forthcoming WM with a taste of the Top Table. The supper provides a good opportunity for a raffle or other form of entertainment to take place to raise funds. A well tried and enjoyed annual event in honour of wives and partners. A good opportunity to raise funds via a raffle. Make use of the local ten pin bowling or skittle alley – speak to the local ten pin bowling centre or the landlord at a pub with a skittle alley to check whether kids can participate. Arrange a concert and charge for tickets or ask for donations. Taste in music permitting, all varieties can be considered including Jazz, Choral, and Classic…etc. Secure a well known sportsman / personality with sufficient notoriety to appeal to the audience. Money may be needed “up front” to pay for deposits…etc, so it is important to work out the expected profit prior to going ahead with this. Sell unwanted items at a car boot sale and donate the proceeds to the Charity. Get a group together to share costs of the pitch. A car boot sale can also be a good day out for the family. Sell unwanted items on eBay and donate the proceeds to the Charity. Online services such as MissionFish.org make this process easy and also allow existing eBay sellers to donate all or part of their eBay sales revenue to the Charity.

Gift Aid envelopes

LOI supper

Ladies’ festivals Bowling / skittles evening Jazz or other musical evening Sportsman’s dinner

Car boot sales

eBay

118

Social outings

Organised outings for Lodge members and their families can provide opportunities to raise money. An example of a coach trip could be to sell tickets for a Saturday morning tour of Grand Lodge which offers an insight into Freemasonry that is not seen by many. A look around the Masonic museum is a must. This trip can include lunch somewhere in London followed by a few hours of sightseeing before heading home. The return journey can also provide a further opportunity to rid passengers of the last of their money with a raffle with proceeds going to the Festival Appeal. Hire sealed videos of professional races and run the event as it would be held at the racecourse.

Race nights

119

Appendix I – Promotional Items – Incentives
Introduction
Although some Freemasons do not regard the wearing of a Jewel to be in keeping with charitable giving, they are a major part of the Festival system. Detailed below are some alternative ideas to the standard Jewel and Brooch. Provincial Awards can be set for individual Lodges. These include a level of achievement (Platinum, Gold, and Silver etc) and a Jewel or other form of recognition. Once a Lodge has achieved an award it can then use appropriate wording on their Lodge Summons…etc. Some Provinces, however, have introduced interesting variants to awards. For example:• • The qualifying Lodge receives alms bags with their award noted on the outside of the alms bag. A self standing plaque showing the award is produced against each level of achievement.

Provincial awards

The Province needs to take the lead by determining which awards are to be used and how they are to be administered.

Traditional merchandise: ties, pins, cufflinks…etc Other promotional items

Supporting the Charity can be demonstrated by purchasing traditional Masonic merchandise such as ties, pins and cufflinks. Permission should always be sought from the relevant body if crests or coats of arms are used. Such promotional items are available through numerous Masonic Regalia suppliers. Less traditional promotional items can also be produced, for example: mugs and cups, USB sticks, coasters, mouse mats…etc. There are a number of companies that produce these items and they can easily add a livery to any design. Other items, such as key rings, bookmarks, mouse mats, pens and notepads all provide an ever-present reminder about the Festival. Some Provinces have produced or purchased bottles of “Provincial wine” as a promotional item – many merchandise suppliers can place text and imagery on the front label of bottles of wine. Charity Stewards have been able to acquire these bottles of wine for use as a prize in raffles.

120

Appendix J – Event Check List
Introduction Event check list
The following list of practical tips for the Festival Event has been compiled from various sources and is based on actual experience. The Venue 1. Does the venue have wheelchair access and disabled toilet facilities? 2. Has the venue got adequate fire exits and staff for the number of guests expected? 3. Are first aid facilities available? 4. Is there space for a Robing Room for VVIPs and VIPs? 5. Is there space for a Robing Room for other members? 6. Is there a cloakroom with rails for coats, does it need to be staffed? 7. Is there a separate room to host a private VIP Cocktail Party and processional route to main dinner venue? 8. Does the venue have a licence for music…etc? 9. Are there adequate car parking facilities? 10. How far is the venue from the nearest railway station? Is there a good taxi service or does transport need to be laid on? 11. Are reserved car parking stickers needed? Will there be stewards at the car park? 12. Does the venue have a hearing loop system installed? If so, ensure those who need to use it know what to do. 13. Is there an appropriate room where the VVIP wives and partners can change? Equipment, materials and suppliers 14. Has a professional photographer been booked – the Charity will be keen for high quality photos to use in their publicity. 15. Is there a planned list of photographs to be taken? Print the list and give to the photographer and the intended subjects of the photos. Ensure that these are taken in as expedient a manner as possible. 16. Has entertainment been booked? What equipment or space will they require? 17. Flowers – table decorations and presentation bouquets to principal wives and partners: High Ruler’s Lady, PGM’s Lady, President of the Charity’s Lady. 18. Have the caterers been informed of special diets…etc? 19. Does there need to be a large cheque? It works better in photographs. 20. Are gifts to wives and partners being purchased? How will they be distributed? 21. Ensure that a lectern is available for speakers to use. 22. How are tickets, place cards, menus…etc, to be printed? 23. If the event is to take place in a large venue, will relay screens and/or projectors be needed? Does there need to be a rolling presentation of the Charity’s work before the televising of the main speeches…etc? Will the venue provide the cameramen and all the necessary equipment…etc?
121

24. Check the public address system(s) thoroughly. Ensure that microphones can be turned on and off and ensure that all microphone stands are placed in the correct locations. 25. Ensure that those who will use the microphones know how to turn them on and off. If radio microphones are to be used, ensure that new batteries (also have spares) are inserted. Check that lapel microphones are not likely to rustle against clothing. Ensure that speakers and microphones are not co-located to prevent feedback. 26. Are spare Jewels available in case anyone has mislaid their own? 27. Ensure that sufficient wine is available at the venue. Always question the levels of stock that the venue intends to put in place for the event and be satisfied that there are contingency plans in place. 28. The Charity will arrange the printing of Festival List to be distributed on the night immediately after the total has been announced. Guests 29. Who needs to be placed on the VIP List? 30. Which High Ruler will attend? The Province will only be informed of this a few weeks in advance. 31. What are the duties of Stewards on the day? 32. Appoint and issue Table Stewards with instructions as to their duties. 33. Does hotel accommodation need to be provided for VIPs? Is this hotel within walking distance of Festival venue? Does transport need to be arranged? 34. Can the Province supply a map of the area for the Charity to send out to VIP guests travelling by car? Procedure and protocol 35. Prepare and agree the running order. 36. Does the local hospital need to be informed? 37. Do the local police need to be informed? 38. Does the Province need to think about public liability insurance? 39. Is there going to be a special mention of Lodges achieving gold, silver or bronze awards? 40. Shortly before the Festival Event, The Charity may write to confirm figures for the Festival Announcement. A label run of Lodge Secretaries/Charity Stewards needed from Province. 41. Has the PGM provided dispensation for the wearing of regalia? 42. Will there be a presentation (ship’s decanter?) to the PGM? 43. Prepare a wine taking list if this is required. 44. Prepare and agree a toast list (normally in the brochure). 45. Determine the policy for the wearing of Jewels at the Festival (for example, will they be Mandatory). 46. Specify the dress code (including that for wives and partners) 47. Will the Provincial Banner be displayed? Arrange a suitable location and area for the stand. Many banners are highly valuable – do they need to be insured especially for the Event?

122

Appendix K – Example Festival Biographical Details
Example of Provincial Team Member’s Biographical Details
RW Bro. Sir Gabriel Oak Bt. MBE PGM for Barsetshire Born – 4 July 1938 Educated – Canford and King's College Cambridge (MA) Married 1962 – One son, one daughter Succeeded father as 4th Baronet in 1975 Lives in Casterbridge Career 1962 1972 1987 1992 Qualified as a solicitor Partner, Ash, Elm and Oak Appointed Registrar District Judge

Masonic Career 1962 1967 1970 1982 1988 1988 1993 1995 1996 Initiated in Casterbridge Lodge No 5514 (Barsetshire); Master 1960 Exalted in Casterbridge Chapter No 5514; Z 1966 Joined Barsetshire Masters Lodge No 6365; Master 1971 Provincial Junior Grand Warden Assistant Grand Registrar Assistant PGM Deputy PGM PGM, Barsetshire Grand Sojourner

Charities etc. • Church of England. Long-standing member and Treasurer of St Mungo's, Casterbridge PCC; has been Church Warden. • Round Table member Casterbridge, past Chairman. Other Interests • Singing – Founder member Casterbridge Barbershop quartet. • Beekeeping.

123

Appendix L – Example of Timetable for the Festival Event
The following provides an example of the running order of the Festival Event. It is intended to provide suggested timings and to highlight some of the logistical and procedural issues which need to be addressed at the planning stage. The timetable below largely follows the format of a traditional Festival Event. FESTIVAL [Day] and [Date] - [Place] Programme TIME EVENT Arrival at the...[…]…Hotel, [address/location], of most official guests, including (separately) Chief Executive of the Charity, the GDC and his Deputy, by car/train Guest of Honour and Lady [Name] arrive at... [...]... Station GDC and Dep GDC driven to [Dinner venue] to “walk the course” and check arrangements REMARKS Parking at the Hotel

VIP’s Tea - ... Hotel - ...Room PGM will receive guests informally DPGM and APGMs will circulate among guests PGM and lady [Name], leave Hotel for [Dinner venue] Pre-dinner drinks for members of the Province attending [Dinner venue] - [Room] PGM and lady [Name] in [Room] to welcome Provincial guests informally Prov GDC requests special guests to board coaches [Guest of Honour] and Lady [Name], GDC and Mrs [Name] leave Hotel for [Dinner venue] Pres GC and Lady/Mrs [Name], Dep GDC and Mrs [Name] leave hotel for [Dinner venue] Coaches depart...Hotel for [Dinner venue] Coaches arrive [Dinner venue]. Guests shown to...[...]...Room. Members don regalia in adjoining robing rooms when convenient. Special guests Pre-dinner drinks - [Dinner venue] Separate “walkabouts” among members of the Province at pre-dinner drinks by: PGM and lady [Name] Guest of Honour and lady [Name] Pres Charity and lady [Name] “Walkers about” to return to..... Room(s) Prov GDC requests Provincial guests to take their places in the [Dining Hall]
124

Collected by PGM and Mrs [Name] Festival Organiser or Provincial GDC and Chief Executive of the Charity Prov GDC in attendance Car No. 1 Pay bar open W Bro [Name] in attendance Car No. 1 met by W Bro and Mrs [Name] Car No. 2 met by W Bro and Mrs [Name] Prov GDC and W Bro [Name] Met by W Bros [Name and Name] and ladies No receiving line Unplanned meetings that are accompanied by: Prov GDC GDC Dep GDC [Name]

GDC, DepGDC and others request special guests to take their places in the [Dining Hall] Procession enters [Dining Hall] GDC, President of the Festival (PGM) and lady [Name], Guest of Honour and lady [Name] Pres GC and lady [Name] Grace Said by Provincial Grand Chaplain [Band] plays During the banquet the band will stop playing on a signal from the GDC who will announce that: • The Festival President and his lady (name) will be very pleased if the Guest of Honour (name) and his lady (name) will take wine with them. The Festival President and his lady (name) will be very pleased if the President of the Charity (name) and his lady (name) will take wine with them. The Festival President and his lady (name) will be very pleased if the civic guests (names) will take wine with them. The Festival President and his lady (name) will be very pleased if the Brethren of the Province of (--------) and their ladies will take wine with them. The Festival President and his lady (name) will be very pleased if all the Ladies, Gentlemen and Brethren will take wine with them. The Guest of Honour (name) and his lady (name) and the President of the RMTGB (name) and his lady (name) will be very pleased if all the Ladies, Gentlemen and Brethren will take wine with them.

Announced by GDC from microphone on stage GDC calls for silence Until completion of meal

On completion of the meal the remaining items follow on in sequence with only short breaks between each. It is only necessary to specify times if large numbers of those attending will have to return home by public transport. Grace GDC calls for Said by Provincial Grand Chaplain silence Loyal Toast GDC announces National Anthem Accompanied by band. Toast proposed by Festival President: “Ladies, Propose toast – Gentlemen and Brethren, The Queen” (omit “and the sing 1st verse – Craft”) drink toast

125

Toast to Grand Master Festival President: “Ladies, Gentlemen and Brethren, the Grand President of the Charity, the Most Worshipful the Grand Master, His Royal Highness The Duke of Kent” Coffee and Liqueurs served. [Band] departs Toast to Charity Announced by GDC Proposed by the Chairman of the Festival Appeal Announcement of the Results Announced by the Chief Executive of the Charity (and/or the PGM) Response to the Results By the President of the Charity

Announced by the GDC

Comfort break 20 minute

The President of the Charity is usually unaware of the Grand Total until the formal announcement

Toast to President of the Festival Announced by GDC Speech by High Ruler Response by President of the Festival and Toast to Announced by the the Charity GDC Response by Festival President who will continue with speech during which he announces the results of the Festival. He will then hand a cheque to the President and propose the toast “Success to the Charity”. Reply by President of the Charity Announced by GDC Reply by [Name] Stewards distribute Festival Lists After President’s speech Presentation of Flowers to [the Guest of Honour’s lady, By members as The President of the Charity’s lady and the Festival arranged President’s lady.], Retiring Procession GDC announces and leads procession out of [Dining Hall] Remaining guests leave the [Dining Hall] Guest of Honour and President of GC transport as Car No. 1 required Coaches take other special guests back to the hotel After-dinner drinks Charity will issue Reception hosted by the Charity own invitations It is for Festival Provinces to decide whether to follow this illustrative example. However, it is essential that the timetable and agenda are discussed and agreed with the Charity Chief Executive, and the GDC well in advance of the event. This will allow the Guest of Honour to be properly briefed, and for the guests invited by the Charity, to be able to make appropriate return travel arrangements.
126

Appendix M – Financial Data
Table 1 The average annual income of the Charities over the previous 5 years and the proportion of income derived from Festivals

Charity

Investment income £m

GC Contribution £m £3.0m n/a n/a n/a £3.0m

Income from Festivals and voluntary donations £m £3.4m £4.1m £4.7m £3.5m £15.7m

Total Annual Income £m £7.2m £5.3m £7.1m £8.0m £27.6

Proportion of income derived from Festivals % 47 77 66 43 Average: 57

Grand Charity MSF RMBI RMTGB Annual Total

£0.8m £1.2m £2.4m £4.6m £9.0m

Table 2 The income of the Charities in 2009
Donations £m Investment Income £m £0.7m £1.3m £2.5m £4.2m £8.7m Total Income £m

Charity

Grand Charity MSF RMBI RMTGB Total

£4.0m £4.1m £4.5m £4.5 £17.1m

£8.4m

£5.4m £7.0m £8.7m £29.5

This figure includes the annual contribution.

127

Appendix N – Specimen job description – Festival Appeal Chairman
Main role • • • To be responsible for the planning, launch and management of a Festival Appeal (excluding the Festival Event) in support of one of the central Masonic Charities To manage a team that maximises the Appeal outcome To be answerable to the PGM and the host Charity for the management of the Appeal

Qualities required • • • • Tasks • • Appoint the Festival Committee and be willing to change the team as and when necessary Consult as necessary with the PGM and his Executive on all aspects of the Festival Appeal (but responsibility for the final Festival Event usually rests with another individual) viz. launch targets, systems, literature, publication of results, Jewels, budget, collection of monies, Gift Aid…etc Be responsible for the approval of all publications, merchandise and fundraising events Be responsible for initiating strategic and tactical reviews which are to be discussed and agreed with the PGM and his Executive Liaise with the host Charity on a quarterly basis Meet the PGM and his Executive on a quarterly basis to brief, determine and agree any changes in tactics and strategy regarding the Appeal Deliver presentations, make speeches, manage and deliver training sessions and undertake other tasks as required, including promoting regular donations through Gift Aid Develop links with other Provincial Charity Stewards and Almoners and attend the Charity Stewards Conference and Festival Forum Be responsible for producing a comprehensive de-brief document to be discussed and agreed with the PGM and the Charity Must be an enthusiastic and motivational leader with charisma, strong persuasive skills and the ability to speak clearly in public Able to manage a diverse team and be prepared to make difficult changes in personnel if required Needs to enjoy the full confidence of the PGM and his Executive Needs to have a detailed and thorough knowledge of the Charity

• • • • •

• • Other • •

It is expected that the Festival Appeal Chairman will be in situ for the entire duration of the Appeal, from pre-planning to the final Event The Festival Appeal Chairman is normally, but does not have to be, a senior Mason or a member of the Provincial Executive. An exceptional junior Mason, with a proven track record, might also be an appropriate candidate
128

Appendix O – SWOT Analysis
Province of Barsetshire Festival Appeal in aid of the ‘xyz’ Masonic Charity ‘SWOT’ analysis of the Appeal two years since the launch
Strengths 1. Charity is a fundamental part of Freemasonry so we should be “knocking at an open door”. 2. Every Lodge has a collection at each meeting for alms. Many Lodges already use the Gift Aid envelopes for Charity Chests. 3. The Province has always enjoyed a long tradition of Charitable Giving. 4. The local Barsetshire Masonic Fund is an established channel for giving locally to non-Masonic charities and supporting “Freemasonry in the Community” 5. We have an enthusiastic and passionate Provincial Executive and a strong Festival Organising Committee. 6. The Appeal has the full support of the Charity. Weaknesses 1. A large proportion of Lodge Charity Stewards (about a third) are not as effective as they could be – either they don’t understand the full duties and are only interested in draws or they are not committed to the Appeal. 2. There is a strong correlation between less effective Charity Stewards and those Lodges which are lagging behind. 3. Many Lodges have lost touch with the importance of charitable giving. 4. Alms average only £1 per member at each meeting – unchanged for 20 years. 5. Approximately 50% of the membership has yet to make a significant contribution to the Appeal. 6. Many members still profess ignorance of the Appeal, the Charity and the local Masonic Fund. 7. Installed Masters Lodges do not show a greater lead. Threats 1. Increased apathy from members. 2. Pushing the Appeal too hard and too often may increase the members’ resistance to give. 3. The recession and its impact on family finances. 4. Gift Aid will be reduced to 25% in 2011 (from 28%) and could reduce further. 5. Lodges may decide to divert funds elsewhere, for example to repair Lodge buildings. 6. Some Lodges are choosing to make other Charities a priority 7. The Province’s Mark Festival launch is imminent. 8. A neighbouring Province’s Festival is to be launched within the next 18 months.

Opportunities 1. £5 per month is affordable to most members. 2. The Province has a membership of several thousand members (50% of the members have yet to make a significant contribution). 3. Encourage greater use of Gift Aid envelopes for Alms. 4. Encourage top-ups of extra monthly amounts and renewals of expired/expiring Gift Aid declarations. 5. The Province has not fully seized on the potential for donations to be made by wives and partners or widows. 6. Approach the members who don’t attend Lodge meetings by writing letters – include a regular giving and Gift Aid form. 7. Hold more events to promote the Appeal, or use existing events as a platform for doing so. 8. Invite the management, staff and beneficiaries of the Charity to explain its work to the members at meetings and events. 9. Greater use of Newsletters, websites, open Lodge evenings and White Table evenings.

129

Appendix P – Previous Festival Results
The following table may be of use when determining a target for individuals or the Province.
Amount raised by Province alone (£) Average number of Masons Average amount raised per Mason (£)

Year

Province

Grand Charity 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 Middlesex Buckinghamshire Worcestershire Leicestershire and Rutland Northamptonshire and Huntingdonshire Dorset East Lancashire Wiltshire North Wales Yorkshire, West Riding Herefordshire Hertfordshire South Wales 4,197,567 2,226,223 2,222,452 1,776,787 1,912,563 1,139,874 3,932,949 842,030 2,215,682 4,915,154 477,676 3,041,964 3,920,931 8,763 4,360 3,856 3,121 3,622 2,985 7,765 2,377 4,250 7,578 587 6,315 6,642 479 511 576 569 528 382 506 354 521 649 814 482 590

Masonic Samaritan Fund 1999 2002 2003 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 South Wales ED Staffordshire Lincolnshire Monmouthshire Bedfordshire Hampshire & Isle of Wight Gloucestershire Nottinghamshire Shropshire Suffolk West Lancashire 3,207,494 1,849,188 1,933,434 731,053 1,625,372 6,620,879 2,185,834 3,475,865 1,173,323 2,086,800 5,043,188 8,555 3,365 3,903 1,455 2,103 12,102 3,307 3,248 1,371 2,933 11,501 375 550 495 502 773 547 661 1,070 856 711 438

130

Royal Masonic Benevolent Institution 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 Hertfordshire Durham Essex Oxfordshire Cornwall West Kent Sussex South Wales WD Norfolk Somerset Bristol Middlesex Durham 5,767,480 3,606,419 6,757,816 1,048,454 2,523,720 4,758,783 3,825,318 623,690 2,171,919 2,666,866 785,297 3,780,000 3,002,840 7,652 10,610 12,323 2,753 3,843 6,763 5,965 1,729 3,677 4,207 1,430 6,047 6,999 754 340 548 381 657 704 641 361 591 634 549 625 429

Royal Masonic Trust for Girls and Boys 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 Herefordshire Northumberland Berkshire Warwickshire Cambridgeshire Derbyshire East Kent Cheshire Yorkshire, NE Cumberland & Westmorland Surrey Northumberland Buckinghamshire 650,218 2,578,004 1,831,093 2,979,093 784,063 1,581,967 5,185,152 5,463,092 2,160,711 1,895,341 3,405,924 2,803,213 2,411,710 772 9,387 3,800 5,772 1,576 3,213 8,207 7,551 4,431 3,815 8,077 5,613 3,536 842 275 482 516 498 492 632 723 488 497 422 499 682

131

Appendix R – Example Budget
The Appeal
EXPENDITURE* Launch event Venue hire Food, wine and soft drinks Entertainment Communications Website hosting and development Postage Headed paper Posters Honorifics and merchandise Jewels Certificates Festival Ties Fundraising events Venue hire Food Beer, wine and soft drinks Entertainment Licenses TOTAL INCOME Beer, wine and soft drinks at events Jewels (purchase cost) Tickets to fundraising events TOTAL Surplus / Deficit £... £... £... £... £…

£... £... £... £... £... £... £... £... £... £... £... £... £... £... £... £...

The Festival Event
EXPENDITURE* Venue Hire Catering Equipment – PA system, lighting Printing – Tickets, Posters, Menu booklet Photographer Flowers and decoration TOTAL INCOME Ticket sales Merchandise Sponsorship TOTAL Surplus / Deficit £... £... £... £... £... £... £…

£... £... £... £... £…

* Expenditure cannot be financed by donations to the Festival Appeal or any other charity. These costs must be met from additional sources of income such as sales of tickets or merchandise. The income from special fundraising events can be used to finance Appeal expenditure, but it must be made explicitly clear to attendees that the money is to be used in this way and will not be donated the Charity.

132

Appendix S – Example Letters from PGM to members
Letter 1 – Launch of the Appeal
Province of Barsetshire 2013 Festival - Royal Masonic Trust for Girls & Boys R W Bro Sir Gabriel Oak Provincial Grand Master The Old Manse Barchester BZ22 OAP ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Tel 01777 - 999666

December, 2007 W Bro/Bro XYZ 123 Headland Road East View Barsetshire Dear Bro XYZ At the annual Provincial Meeting I launched our Festival Appeal for the Royal Masonic Trust for Girls and Boys. Details of the Charity and the Appeal are included in a small booklet which has been produced by the Trust and I am pleased to enclose your personal copy. I have arranged for the booklet to be posted to you as I am keen that it be shared in your home with your family. The RMTGB is a family charity and the good work that it does is illustrated in the booklet. Our Festival Appeal will run for the next six years and the amount required from each Brother in the Province to make the Appeal a success is relatively modest when spread over that period. I hope that your family will read the booklet and support you in whatever contribution you can make to ensure the success of the Appeal – a regular donations form is enclosed. Thank you for reading the booklet and for the support which I am sure you will give to this very worthy cause. Yours sincerely and fraternally, Gabriel Oak Provincial Grand Master

133

Letter 2 – Mid-Appeal letter

Province of Barsetshire 2013 Festival - Royal Masonic Trust for Girls & Boys R W Bro Sir Gabriel Oak Provincial Grand Master The Old Manse Barchester BZ22 OAP ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Tel 01777 - 999666

December, 2010 W Bro/Bro XYZ 123 Headland Road East View Barsetshire Dear Bro XYZ Please excuse this personal letter, but as you know our Province is engaged in an Appeal for the Royal Masonic Trust for Girls and Boys which concludes in September 2013. I am writing this letter to you at Christmas, the season when we enjoy special times with our families. Sadly there are some families who are not in a position as fortunate as many of us. As a consequence of death or sudden illness or other tragedy that has befallen them, children can find themselves in very difficult and distressing situations through no fault of their own. Fortunately for families with a Masonic connection the Royal Masonic Trust for Girls and Boys will put their arms around these families and support them for as long as necessary which, in the case of younger children, can be for many years. The 2013 RMTGB Festival affects and hopefully touches each and every Brother who is a Member of a Lodge within our lovely Province. I feel it is appropriate at this time to remind ourselves that over the last 10 years the Brethren and their families and dependents within the Province of Barsetshire have received benefits from the four central Masonic charities in excess of £5 million. Most of this money will have been raised by Festivals held in other Provinces. So Brethren, we now have the privilege and opportunity to say thank you for this support by, in turn, supporting the RMTGB and their wonderful work which holds families together and gives children the opportunity to have a normal life. We have had a most generous response to the Festival so far and have raised almost £3 million. Our target however is £4 million which, although achievable, will only be possible if more Brethren become Stewards of the Festival. A relatively small (minimum) contribution of £5.00 a month for 5 years will qualify you as a Steward of the Festival and, more importantly, really make a positive contribution to the life of a child. This is a personal appeal from me to each and every Brother within the Province because I know that even now, when speaking to some of the Brethren in the Province, there is little understanding about the Festival and the wonderful work done by the Royal Masonic Trust for Girls and Boys.
134

Many ladies are choosing to become a Festival Steward at a cost of £150 – again this can be paid monthly (@ £2.50 per month for five years) if convenient. What a super Christmas present for your wife or partner: and a present which will go on working for years to come! If you, or your lady, feel able to support the Festival by becoming a Steward, there is a form attached to this letter which I would encourage you to complete and return to me at the address shown below. I do really hope that you feel able to be an important part of this Festival and I extend my grateful thanks to you for everything you have done so far. Finally may I wish you and your family a very happy and peaceful Christmas. Yours sincerely and fraternally, Gabriel Oak Provincial Grand Master

PLEASE RETURN THE COMPLETED FORM TO: Sir Gabriel Oak Esq, The 2013 Appeal, Provincial Office, Lodge Road, Barchester BZ21 9QT

135

ROYAL MASONIC TRUST FOR GIRLS AND BOYS Registered Charity No 285836
FULL NAME HOME ADDRESS ……………………………………………………………………….. ……………………………………………………………………….. ……………………………………………………………………….. ……………………………………………………………………….. POSTCODE ………………………………………………………………………..

LODGE NAME & No

………………………………………………………………………………….

I am a taxpayer and would like the Royal Masonic Trust for Girls and Boys to reclaim the tax on my donations. (Please delete if not applicable). I pay an amount of Income Tax and/or Capital Gains Tax equal to the tax that the Trust will reclaim on my donations in the tax year.

MY DONATION I wish to donate a lump sum £……………………………… (Please make your cheque payable to RMTGB)

I wish to make a monthly contribution

YES/NO

If you wish to make a regular contribution, then please complete the Banker’s Order underneath.

BANKER’S ORDER To: The Manager Account Number Bank Address PLEASE PAY £5 /£10/ …….. On the 1 day of To:
st

……………………………………………………….. Bank PLC ………………………….. Sort Code ……………

…………………………………………………………………… Other mount

……………… 2011 and thereafter at monthly intervals for 5 years.

The Festival Account, RMTGB (A/c No 36123560) at NatWest Bank PLC (Sort Code 60-30-06), Bloomsbury Parr’s Branch, 214 High Holborn, London WC1V 7BX ……………………………………. DATE ………………..

SIGNED NAME IN CAPITALS ADDRESS

……………………………………………………………….. ………………………………………………………………..

136

137

Appendix T – Website Design Considerations
The following information will assist in the planning and design of a website for the Festival Appeal:• • Advertising: If using advertising, ensure it is relevant to the general enquirer. Audience: Remember that the intended audience could be very wide - Freemasons in the Province, Lodge Charity Stewards, members of the Festival Appeal Committee, wives and partners of Freemasons and members of the public. Consistency: Have web pages that are consistent in design throughout the site. Design: Make good use of colour and have attractive visuals. If the website is not pleasing on the eye, then no one will study it. Links: The website should include a link to and from the Provincial website, the Charity website and any other sites which are relevant to the Appeal, for example JustGiving.com. Navigation: Design a simple and easy navigation system – don’t overload menus with options. Publicity: The website address should be included in stationery, letters, Year Books, Newsletters about the Festival Appeal, Provincial magazines and communication by word of mouth. Search: The website must have an efficient search engine ranking. This means if an enquirer types in some key words (such as PGL Barsetshire, 2015 Festival Appeal) to a general search engine such as Google then the website should appear in the top 10 results. A competent designer should know how to do this! Updating: Maintenance is just as important as design and it is important to keep it up-to-date. Ensure that new content is added to encourage users to return – old and out of date information can deter future visits.

• • •

• •

138

Appendix U – Press Release
A typical press release will include the following information:• • Headline: A headline to seize the attention of the reader, written in bold and larger text size and containing key words Text: The main text of the copy which will have:o Date and place of origin of the Release e.g. Barsetshire 01/01/2010 o A leading sentence to grab the attention of the reader again e.g. “Barsetshire Freemasons seek to raise £5m for Children in Poverty” o The main text should be drafted with double line spacing and be no more than two pages in length. The first paragraph must summarise the entire content of the story with the remaining paragraphs providing more detailed information. Journalists will not read the entire press release if the opening paragraph doesn’t generate interest Background information: Information about the Charity, Freemasonry and the Province Contact details: contact information – include details, preferably a mobile telephone number and times of availability. Also provide email and website addresses

• •

Further suggestions for drafting and dispatching an effective press release include:• • • Facts: The press release must be factual – what is the news? Why is it news? Names: The name or the type of beneficiaries of the Charity should be included in the title. Embargo: If for immediate release, then write “IMMEDIATE RELEASE” at the left hand margin; and if the release is embargoed, add “EMBARGOED UNTIL ….” at the left hand margin. Reaction: Include a call to action – what should the public to do with the information? Recipients: Target the press release to a specific media outlet – don’t blast the document to all reporters. Simplicity: Avoid jargon and technical terms. Title: The title must be concise and factual, but don’t title the document or email simply “Press Release” – use a phrase to grab the attention, such as “Barsetshire Freemasons challenged to raise £5m for the elderly”. Writing the title last will assist with making it a concise summary of the text.

• • • •

Send the press release by email (in the main body of the email, not as an attachment) and follow up with a phone call to the recipients at any newspapers to discuss developing and placing the story.

139

The Freemasons’ Grand Charity
Registered Charity Number 281942

Masonic Samaritan Fund
Registered Charity Number 1130424

Supporting people in need Tel Fax Email Website 020 7395 9261 020 7395 9295 info@the-grand-charity.org www.grandcharity.org

Helping towards a healthy future Tel Fax Email Website 020 7404 1550 020 7404 1544 mail@msfund.org.uk www.msfund.org.uk

Royal Masonic Benevolent Institution
Registered Charity Number 207360

Royal Masonic Trust for Girls and Boys
Registered Charity Number 285836

Caring for older people Tel Fax Email Website 020 7596 2400 020 7404 0724 enquiries@rmbi.org.uk www.rmbi.org.uk

Relieving poverty, advancing education Tel Fax Email Website 020 7405 2644 020 7831 4094 info@rmtgb.org www.rmtgb.org

60 Great Queen Street London WC2B 5AZ

140

Sign up to vote on this title
UsefulNot useful