You are on page 1of 31

CHRONICLE

1L NANAN0
18
09
v0L.
N0.
12.03.12
l33N N0. 0218-7310
CATCH ME
IF YOU CAN
NEWS | 4
Prof. Kerry 3ieh
appointed trst Chair in
Natural azards in Asia.
Uespite the fun and games, 3urf N 3weat
2012 enoountered a few problems.
SPORTS | 32
DOWN TO
EARTH
Uisoover the
restaurant that doubles
as an art studio.
CULINARY
ARTS
LIFESTYLE | 7
News Bites
NEWS 02
18
09
v0L.
N0.
CHRONICLE
1L NANAN0
NTU
Upcoming Events
WORLD
SINGAPORE
If you have any
exciting events to
publicise, please contact us at
chronicle@ntu.edu.sg
NEW PROGRAMME TO PRODUCE
CHINA-SAVVY LEADERS
The Future China Advanced Lead-
ers Programme, a new collabora-
tion between Nanyang Business
School and Business China, aims to
nurture China-savvy senior execu-
tives. Business China is a platform
launched in 2007 to encourage bi-
linguism and bi-culturalism. The
new programme is targeted at lead-
ers and managers of organizations
based in Singapore but will have
operations in China. Apart from
covering know-how on business
in China, the three week-long pro-
gramme will provide participants
with rst-hand experiences in Chi-
nese tea drinking, calligraphy and
cuisine. There will also be a week-
long eld visit to China.
NEW CAFFE EXPRESS OPENS
MAIDS TO GET MANDATORY
REST DAYS EACH WEEK
NEW TERMINAL 4 TO REPLACE
BUDGET TERMINAL IN 2013
NIGHT SAFARIS GIRAFFE CALF
MAKES ONLINE DEBUT
NKF FOUNDER DIES AGED 91
JUICY APPLE DEALS REMOVED
FROM IT SHOWS
KONY 2012 MEDIA CAMPAIGN
GOES VIRAL
HUNT FOR ESCAPED PENGUIN
CONTINUES IN TOKYO
SYRIAN ARMY DENIES AID
THOUSANDS EVACUATED AS
FLOODS HIT SOUTHEASTERN
AUSTRALIA
PRINCE HARRY DEFEATS
USAIN BOLT IN FOOT RACE
Renovations have been completed
at Caffe Express, a caf located
beside the Nanyang Auditorium.
Students can now enjoy their meal
in an air-conditioned dining area
with black and white furniture that
gives a modern and simplistic feel.
Refurbishment of the caf was part
of the efforts by the school to up-
grade facilities and infrastructure
in NTU.
NTU OPEN HOUSE
This years open house, L.I.F.E @
NTU, which took place on March
10th featured a new contest LIFE
Collection @ NTU. The competi-
tion is a platform to showcase NTU
students dressed in stylish yet cas-
ual clothing suitable for campus. A
catwalk took place at the Quad in
the afternoon, where contestants
strut their style while students got
to vote their most stylish student.
Other competitions included U-
Photography and NTU Dance Beat.

EUROPEAN COMMISSIONER
GIVES SPEECH AT NTU
The European Commissioner for
Research, Innovation and Science
encouraged greater European Un-
ion (EU)-Singapore collaboration in
her speech on March 3rd. Here on
her rst ofcial visit, Mdm Mire
Geoghegan-Quinn, stated that NTU
is one of the most active Singapo-
rean participants in our European
research programmes. Examples of
joint research centres include the
Centre for ElectroMobility with the
Technical University of Munich and
the Lee Kong Chian School of Med-
icine with Imperial College London.
HEALTH-TEE CAMPAIGN IN NTU
A health campaign, Health-Tee
Me!, by Youth Advolution for
Health (YAH) came to NTU on
March 5th. YAH is a youth-led
health advocacy programme un-
der the Health Promotion Board.
NTU students had their photos
taken with youths advocates, who
were wearing shirts featuring large
cartoon carrots, as part of a photo
competition. NTU is the fourth edu-
cation institute to be visited since
the campaign started a month ago.
From January 1st next year, a new
regulation will require employ-
ers to give their foreign domestic
workers a day off weekly, or com-
pensation in lieu. The new law will
not apply to existing maids un-
til their permits are renewed after
that date. Employers who break
the rules can be ned $5,000, or
slapped with a six-month jail term.
Currently, only about 10 per cent
of maids here have a day off each
week, and the Ministry of Man-
power said it hopes the regulation
will promote Singapores image as
a quality destination for maids.
A new and improved Terminal
4 will replace Changi Airports
Budget Terminal, which will be de-
molished on September 25th. The
Changi Airport Group said the new
terminal can accommodate up to
nine million more passengers per
year. Airlines currently operating
in the Budget Terminal, such as Ti-
ger Airways, will shift their opera-
tions to Terminal 2 from September
25th. Terminal 4 is expected to be
ready by 2013.
The Night Safari, which welcomed
giraffe calf Nalo three months ago,
has set up a blog to enable Sin-
gaporeans to follow the baby gi-
raffes growing-up moments. Nalo
means lovable in Swahili. It is
the rst giraffe to be born at the
Night Safari in three years, and is
also the tallest baby, standing at
1.88m and weighing 75kg at birth.
The blog is the rst for an animal
in the Night Safaris care and pro-
vides glimpses into the calfs life,
such as its attempts at walking.
National Kidney Foundation found-
er Dr Khoo Oon Teik died on March
5th in hospital after a long illness.
He was 91. Dr Khoos abiding inter-
est was chronic renal failure, after
his brother, the late Reverend Khoo
Oon Eng, succumbed to the disease
in the 1950s. Described as the fa-
ther of dialysis treatment in Sin-
gapore by former Health Minister
Vendors have been advised to sell
Apple products only at approved
stores, not major consumer elec-
tronics events such as the PC show
in June or Comex in September.
Distributors say a reason for the
change is that Apple believes in-
volvement with such shows dilutes
its image. The only vendors not
affected are the telcos, which can
continue to sell Apple iPhones and
iPads with subscription plans.
Syrian military forces carried out
artillery bombings on the western
suburb of Homs in early March.
This was the latest offensive in the
governments crusade against the
year-long civilian uprisings aimed
at toppling President Bashir al-As-
saads regime. At least 1,700 people
have been killed in the town known
as the Capital of the Revolution.
Repeated attempts to send humani-
tarian aid to the stricken town have
been blocked by the military, ac-
cording to the Red Cross.
A Humboldt penguin escaped its
Tokyo Sea Life Park aquarium, leav-
ing behind 134 of its companions.
Park keepers suspect the penguin
scaled a rock about twice its own
height and went under the park
fencing into the city. Staff from the
Park have been combing riverbanks
in search of it since March 4th.
The worlds fastest man took on
Queen Elizabeths 27-year-old
grandson, only to be stricken by
laughter after the prince made a
false start. Both sprinter and prince
struck a pose for cameras after the
mock race in Jamaica, one of the
lighthearted highlights of Prince
Harrys visit to the country. As part
of Queen Elizabeths Diamond Jubi-
lee celebrating 60 years of her reign,
British royalty and dignitaries will
be on such visits over the year.
A half-hour lm made by US-
based charity Invisible Children
went wildly viral in the rst week
of March, garnering several million
views in the span of a few days.
The video calls for the internation-
al community to help raise aware-
ness about Ugandan war criminal
Heavy, continuous rains have
caused river swelling and ooding
in certain parts of New South Wales
and Victoria. The unprecendented
amount of rain was anticipated
and evacuation orders were given
in timely fashion to thousands of
residents. The rains are expected
to continue, but herald a bumper
year for crops, according to an
Australian commodity forecaster.
Joseph Kony. The purpose of the
lm was to help keep Konys ar-
rest a priority in US foreign policy.
Kony has been indicted as the top
war criminal in the International
Criminal Court for crimes such as
child abduction and rape, but has
never been brought to justice.
Khaw Boon Wan, Dr Khoo brought
the rst dialysis machines to Sin-
gapore in the 1960s. He chaired the
NKF until 1995, when illness forced
him to retire.
RED CROSS FUND RAISING
CONCERT ENAMOUR
A fund-raising oonoert organised by the N1u
Chaper of the Red Cross outh and supported
by the N1u Rotaraot Club, Fnamour features
performanoes by both N1u students and
external performers. 1his year, Professor Lr
Meng wa (vioe President of lnternational Af-
fairs) will be putting on a guest performanoe
as well. All prooeeds from the oonoert will go
to the Red Cross ome for the Uisabled and
N1u Rotaraot Club's welfare aotivities.
venue: Lee Kong Chian Leoture 1heatre
15 MARCH
MERCK MILLIPORE YOUNG
SCIENTIST AWARD
Pharmaoeutioals oompany Merok is oalling
for postgraduate students to submit soien-
tito papers in the telds of systems biology
or neurosoienoes. Candidates will be short-
listed based on the originality and quality of
their papers. winners stand to reoeive up to
$3,000 in oash, along with an award trophy.
lor more information, visit:
hrrp.mm,oungso|enr|sr.woropress.oom
TILL 30 APRIL
News
A delicious day out Page 4
6(5(1(&$,
Student entrepreneurs' efforts
recognised at Nanyang Awards
ALL SMILES: Proud winners of the Nanyang Awards ash their pearly whites for the
camera. PHOTO | TAN ZHIJIAN
HOME-COOKED biryani that does
more than just warm peoples
stomachs. This was the secret in-
gredient behind the NTU-Students
in Free Enterprise (SIFE)s achieve-
ment at the Nanyang Awards.
The team initiated Gourmet
Guru, a project to enable low-in-
come housewives to earn a sustain-
able income by recruiting them as
cooking instructors.
The initiative provided an op-
portunity for the homemakers to
prevent traditional recipes, such
as assam pedas and biryani rice,
from dying out.
Participants in SIFE projects
are exposed to business concepts
through meetings with mentors
and industry partners. They give
business students guidance while
they exercise real skills like build-
ing business models, such as help-
ing the low-income homemakers
commercialize their cooking ven-
ture. This also gives non-business
students a hands-on approach in
acquiring basic business skills.
A head for business, a heart for
the world is a motto that members
of the NTU-SIFE, the NTU chapter
of worldwide non-prot organisa-
tion, have lived by since the clubs
founding in NTU three years ago.
We are just doing
something that
has potential...
and is feasible,
as well as
helping other
communities.
Stanley Chia
President of NTU-SIFE
STANDING HIS GROUND: Unable to get on the shuttle bus, a man dashed onto the road and blocked it from leaving. Neither party
relented for a few tense minutes. PHOTO | COURTESY OF JONATHAN CHIANG
Stop, bus, stop
/81$+3+$0
TRAFFIC came to a standstill on the
morning of February 21st as a man
stood in the path of NTUs shuttle
bus C for about ve minutes.
The scene took place on the
stretch of road outside canteen 2,
in the lane that leads out to the
expressway. It was captured on
camera by Jonathan Chiang, 22,
at about 9.15am. The photo went
viral on Facebook.
The identity of the man is still
unknown.
Joshua Sim, 23, a passenger on
the bus, said the driver overshot
the bus stop opposite canteen 2 by
a few metres.
This resulted in people gather-
ing around the back door waiting
to get up the bus. However, the
driver opened only the front door
for boarding, said Sim.
Everyone was waiting around
the back door, waiting for it to
be opened, but it didnt, said the
rst- year student from Nanyang
Business School (NBS).
After a while, the driver closed
the door without taking on passen-
gers, and started to drive off.
At this point, people ran to-
wards the front door, said Sim.
That was when the man dashed in
front of the bus to prevent its de-
parture.
Passenger Tay Bo Yi, 22, also
from NBS, said the man shouted
and gestured to the bus driver to
open the door. However, the driver
did not.
During the ve-minute stand-
off, a long line of trafc formed
behind the bus.
The driver then accelerated for-
ward briey, causing the man to
move out of the way.
Before driving off, the bus
driver wound down his window to
shout some vulgarities at the man,
said Tay.
Mr Philip Peh, General Man-
ager of the bus company, Tong Tar
Transport Service Pte Ltd, could
not be reached for comment.
NTUs shuttle bus services fall
under the purview of the Student
Services department.
Deputy director of the depart-
ment, Mr Lim Boon Kiat, said it
was not clear whether the man in
the picture was a student, a staff
member or an outsider on campus.
communities, said Stanley Chia,
25, a third-year student from Nan-
yang Business School and presi-
dent of NTU-SIFE.
Launched in 2005, the annual
Nanyang Awards are given to
recognise the outstanding achieve-
ments of faculty, staff and students.
In his opening speech, NTU
President Professor Bertil Anders-
son thanked all 22 individuals and
two teams who received the Award
for their steadfast dedication and
exceptional contribution to NTU,
adding that they had truly done
the university proud.
He also believed that some
of the achievements would have
worldwide impact.
An example is Professor
Venkatramans research on fully
biodegradable stent technology
that also has the capacity to deliver
drugs. A stent is an articial tube
that can be surgically inserted in
blocked vessels.
Other notable winners of the
Nanyang Awards included Asso-
ciate Professor Zhang Hu, Assist-
ant Professor Tan Nguan Soon and
Abiding faithfully to this line was
what led the NTU-SIFE to a Nanyang
Award for Teamwork at this years
Nanyang Awards Ceremony.
We are just doing something
that has potential and that we feel
is feasible, as well as helping other
Professor Subbu Venkatraman.
For their research in bio-science
and material technology, they were
presented with the Nanyang Awards
for Research Excellence, Innovation
and Entrepreneurship.
The loudest applause of the
day, however, was reserved for the
18 professors and lecturers who
received the Nanyang Award for
Excellence in Teaching.
As each award winner strode
onto the stage, there were cheers,
whoops, wolf-whistles and standing
ovations as the students in the Nan-
yang Auditorium sought to show
their appreciation for those who had
inspired them.
Signing up for food and HI-ves
NEWS 04
18
09
v0L.
N0.
CHRONICLE
1L NANAN0
IMAGINE a world where sto-
ries are told not in words, but
through hand gestures. Dur-
ing their recess week, 24 NTU
students experienced just that
when they partnered hearing-
impaired (HI) people for a food-
themed amazing race, HI Gour-
met 2012.
This is the rst year the
event has taken on such a for-
mat, as opposed to previous
years which had only featured
awareness drives.
Held on February 26th, the
event saw NTU students and 18
members of the HI community
race from the Esplanade to Yi-
shun, taking part in games and
food checkpoints along the
way. Food such as soy bean curd
tarts, Turkish ice cream and In-
dian sh head curry served in
traditional banana leaf were
among the rewards for complet-
ing game stations.
Beyond gastronomic de-
lights, however, participants
said they learned to appreci-
ate the beauty of sign language
when interacting with their HI
partners. This was especially
since the experience was new to
many of them.
My biggest takeaway from
this event is having learnt some
basic sign language, said Lim
Jun Xiang, 21, a rst-year stu-
dent from the School of Civil
and Environmental Engineering.
I particularly like signs that
are special to Singapore such
as places of interests and MRT
names. It was one of the reasons
why I signed up for this event.
HI Singapore is an annual
event organised by the NTU
Welfare Services Club, which
aims to raise awareness and
promote interaction with the
deaf community in Singapore.
This years HI Singapore was
named HI Gourmet to t the
food theme.
Food is a common theme
for everyone, said Quek Sheng
Quan, 20, the overall organiser
of the event.
Thats why we have pro-
moted it as our highlight this
year to attract NTU students to
connect with the HI communi-
ty, added the rst-year student
from the Nanyang Business
School.
In preparation, the NTU
competitors watched a video of
basic signing of individual al-
phabets that would help them
communicate with their HI part-
ners. On the race day itself, they
used cue cards. Organisers who
went through a sign language
course the previous semester
were also on hand to help.
Lim said he was able to com-
municate with fellow HI partici-
pants with relative ease, despite
being a beginner in signing.
They are able to understand
very basic sign language, he
said.
He added that he was in-
spired by the bubbly personali-
ties of his HI friends.
One of them is 35 years old,
but he still plays with me like a
kid, he said.
Meanwhile, the HI partners
also said they found the experi-
ence interesting, as they could
interact with students outside of
their community.
I like the amazing race idea
because it is a fresh experience,
said HI participant Lily Goh. The
32-year-old likened the race to
popular South Korean variety
show Running Man.
EOS director to shake up research aims
NTUs Earth Observatory of Sin-
gapore (EOS) has been awarded
$5 million by AXA insurance
groups research fund on Febru-
ary 28th.
Its director, Professor Kerry
Sieh, was also made the rst
permanent Chair in Natural
Hazards in Asia.
At the signing ceremony,
Professor Sieh revealed that the
endowment will be used to fos-
ter earth sciences research, with
the focus on understanding and
forecasting earthquake, volcano
and rising sea levels in South-
east Asia.
Additionally, the funding
will help link natural hazards
research more directly to society,
in the elds of policy, economics
and education, risk assessment
and management, he added.
Professor Sieh cited Professor
Andreas Schaffer as an example.
The EOS Sustainability Di-
rector, who lectured in Sustain-
ability Management at the Nan-
yang Business School, also does
research in economic strategies
that help address climate change.
EOS plans to implement
cross-faculty appointments of a
similar nature with other insti-
tutes in NTU.
These include the S. Raja-
ratnam School of International
Studies, the Nanyang Business
School and the National Institute
of Education (NIE).
In addition, EOS also aims to
collaborate more closely with NIE
to enhance the educational as-
pects of earth sciences research.
I am going to work with NIE
to invent what I call Singapore
Earth Sciences, using past exam-
ples from Southeast Asia rather
than from Europe, Professor
Sieh said.
The endowment will not
be used for scholarships or ex-
change programmes for students.
Instead, it will help connect
EOS electives such as Natural
Hazards and Society more close-
ly to the social science aspects
of disasters, said Ms Susan C.
Eriksson, Education and Out-
reach Director of EOS.
This is especially for stu-
dents who major in social science
and humanities programmes but
appreciate what science brings
to society, she added.
NTU President Professor Ber-
til Andersson said: Annual re-
turns on the AXA Chair endow-
ment will enable Professor Sieh
to create and strengthen research
programmes with other entities
at NTU in natural hazards and
climate change.
EOS was triumphant amidst
stringent selection criteria and
considerable competition, said
the head of AXAs Research
Fund, Mr Godefroy Beauvallet.
He said EOS was selected
due to its good track record and
its potential for future growth.
TEACH A MAN TO FISH: A young participant weighs his catch at NTUs annual shing
competition on the 25th and 26th of February. Fish were released into the Nanyang
Lake, and anglers could rent rods and then reel in what they could for cash prizes or
simple leisure. PHOTO | LAU KIA YONG
/,=+82'$
GROUNDBREAKING DIRECTION: Professor Sieh (extreme left) intends to create more
Asia-centric natural hazards research.
PHOTO | COURTESY OF CORPORATE COMMUNICATIONS OFFICE
IN HIGH SPIRITS: An NTU participant (in yellow) joins her HI counterparts (in red) in decorating a kite, which is to be own during the
amazing race nale in Yishun. PHOTO | NG ZHONG JIN
/,=+82'$
NEWS 05
18
09
v0L.
N0.
CHRONICLE
1L NANAN0
SI T T I NG P RE T T Y :
L i m' s c a b b a g e -
inspired seating area
(above) and Li's bench
sculpture (left) may be
installed in public if
they clinch the top two
spots in the nals.
GRAPHICS | COURTESY
OF AARON LIM AND LI
WENJIN
THE simple folds of a cabbage
could well be the key to a prize-
winning outdoor furniture design
concept, as NTU student Aaron
Lim found out recently.
The 24-year-old was one of
two NTU nalists in the top eight
entries for an outdoor furniture
design competition, Mapletree
Business Citys Design in the City.
A third-year product design
major at the School of Art, De-
sign and Media (ADM), Lim said
his design of the seating area,
entitled VENA, was based on the
patterns formed by the cross-sec-
tion of a cabbage.
He added that he was inu-
enced by the idea of biomimicry,
a scientic eld which examines
and emulates nature to solve hu-
man problems.
The nalists of the competi-
tion were announced by real es-
tate company, Mapletree Invest-
ments on February 21st.
Lim and fellow NTU nalist Li
Wenjin, 22, will now have to build
prototypes of their designs before
the nal judging on March 28th.
Li, a nal-year product de-
sign major at ADM, said she was
hugely inspired by minimalist
sculptors like Carl Andre and Ri-
chard Serra.
Her design is a metal sculp-
ture shaped like a short ight
of steps. People can sit on the
sculpture as they do on public
benches.
She said although her design
concept was inuenced by artis-
tic considerations, she also had
to consider functional aspects
as it was meant to be a piece of
public furniture. For example, the
metal used had to undergo anti-
rust treatment.
Mapletree CEO Mr Hiew Yoon
Khong said the Design in the
City competition was held to
bring across appreciation for
innovation and creativity by
nurturing young design talents
in Singapore.
Lim and Li emerged as -
nalists from more than 60 other
entries from other local tertiary
institutions, including polytech-
nics, National University of Sin-
gapore and LaSalle College of the
Arts. They will now vie with six
other designers for two grand
prizes of $12,000 each. The win-
ners will also have the opportu-
nity to have their work displayed
permanently at Mapletree Busi-
ness City, an integrated business
hub at the fringe of the Central
Business District.
NTU's creative talents win big
6(5(1(&$,
A Cabbage That's Not For Cooking
Safer Police Posts For The Future
PEOPLE under threat of physical
harm, such as a teenager eeing
from a gang attack, may soon have
a secure place to retreat to, thanks to
the efforts of NTU students.
Chia Yan An, 23, Darrell Mak,
25, Robin Tan, 18, and Xu Mingjie,
22, came up with an L-shaped door
which prevents possible assailants
from following people into a safe
room, where they can hide from
For instance, the team was as-
signed to redesign Marsiling NPP,
but were unable to obtain the basic
blueprint of the oorplan. As such,
they had to make full use of their
imagination and creativity with re-
spect to the design.
The NTU students winning con-
cept also included a mobile exhibi-
tion area for SPF recruitment drives
or community outreach events.
assailants and make virtual police
reports via teleconferencing.
Their concept came up tops at a
design competition organised by the
Singapore Police Force (SPF).
NTU emerged joint champions
along with an SMU team, fending
off competition from 13 other en-
tries.
The inaugural Neighbourhood
Police Post (NPP) for the Future
competition, held this year, aims
to re-examine how NPPs can stay
relevant to the community by in-
corporating new technologies.
Chia, a second-year student
from the School of Computer Engi-
neering, said that one of the teams
biggest considerations was how to
balance imagination, creativity
and feasibility while factoring in
cost effectiveness.
Their ideas will be implement-
ed in future NPPs, and prototypes
of their design concepts will be
displayed at the May 2012 Annual
Police Workplan.
The biggest reward is hav-
ing our ideas being implemented
in the future NPPs to improve the
public safety of the community,
and leaving our impact all over
Singapore, said Chia.
INTRUDERS, KEEP OUT: The winning team from NTU (left) with the guest-of-honour, Second
Minister for Home Affairs Mr S Iswaran. Their design for an L-shaped door (above) prevents
assailants from entering a 'safe' room. PHOTO AND GRAPHIC | COURTESY OF CHIA YAN AN
NEWS 06
18
09
v0L.
N0.
CHRONICLE
1L NANAN0
*$1:(,/,1*
6+((1$7$1
NTU research poised
to get more complex
Audience gets
interactive
during lm on
safe sex
WHAT is the difference between
growing babies in the womb and
growing tumours in the body? Why
do we need to sleep about eight
hours each night?
The answers to these questions,
and more, are linked to a promising
area of research, complexity science,
said Mr Jan Wouter Vasbinder,
Director of the Complexity Program
in NTU.
Mr Vasbinder was speaking
at a three-day conference, More
is Different, held in NTU from
February 27th to 29th.
I t ma r k e d t h e f o r ma l
inauguration of the Complexity
Science programme in NTU, which
commenced in August 2011.
Complexity science, which is
the study of complex systems, looks
at things as a whole.
It st udies how i ndi vidual
components interact, giving rise
to new behaviour.
This differs from the scientic
method, which reduces a system to
its basic components and studies
each individually.
Complex
science... looks
at things as a
system, puts it
together.
Professor Geoffrey B. West
Former President
Santa Fe Institute
NOT ROCKET SCIENCE: Professor Geoffrey West illustrates complexity science using
real-life examples. PHOTO | LAU KIA YONG
FRANKLY SPEAKING: Six panellists addressed the audience's questions and concerns
about sex after the lm screening. PHOTO | ANGELINE YEO
A group of friends clubbing on New
Year's Eve were unable to decide if
they should drink and go wild at the
party. That decision was left to the
audience during the NTU screening
of the Not So Secret Lives of Us
(NSSL) lm.
T he pr ot agoni s t s f at e s
cont i nued to be l iter al l y i n
the audiences' hands, as SMS
responses from the hundred-strong
crowd determined the movies
story progression.
The film premiered in LT 1
on Febr uar y 7t h. Dur i ng t he
screening, the f ilm paused at
several dening moments, during
which the audience SMS-ed their
preferred choice of action. It then
proceeded to unfold the outcome
of the majoritys decision.
NSSL, whi ch i s bi l l ed as
interactive, is directed by Boo Jun
Feng, best known for his award-
winning lm Sandcastle.
It will also be screened in other
tertiar y institutes, such as the
Singapore Management University,
Management Development Institute
of Singapore, and ITE College East
this month.
The lm aims to educate youths
about sexuality and to address their
concerns about sexually transmitted
diseases. It was produced by the
Health Promotion Board (HPB)
under a sex-education initiative.
HPB par t ner ed 21 Young
Hearts, a NTU Hall of Residence
This lm shows
the audience
'what it could have
been'.
Mohamed Syahid
Second-year student
Nanyang Business School
5 community organisation, in the
making of the lm.
The organisers took pains to
conceal the sex-education theme in
its publicity efforts, as they took into
account youths natural aversion to
the topic. The message was revealed
only during the lms NTU premiere .
But the lms producers said
t he i nteractive medium apt ly
relays the message of sex health,
as it empowered viewers to make
choices on the characters behalf.
What better way than to give
them absolute power in deciding
the characters fates? said Ms Ng
Hui Min, the events programme
planner from advertising agency
Oglivy & Mather.
The chairperson of 21 Young
Hear ts, Mohamed Syahid, 26,
agreed. He said the lm enabled
viewer s to look back at t he
consequences of what the characters
did or did not do.
As youths, there are many times
when we nd ourselves in places
where you want to do something,
but you dont know what itll be
like, so this lm shows the audience
what it could have been', said the
second-year student from Nanyang
Business School.
The f i l m r ecei ved mi xed
responses from the audience in NTU.
I was disappointed that they
didnt show all the alternative
outcomes that we didnt choose,
said Tomasz Jan Ferenc, 25, an
exchange student from Poland.
But ot her s f el t t he f i l m
successfully put across the subject
of sexual health.
Instead of a stagnant one-
sided view showing all the cons,
we get to see different scenarios
through the interactive lm, said
a second-year student from the
School of Civil and Environmental
Engineering, 23, who only wanted
be known as Andy.
I think it increased awareness
of the dangers of unsafe sex and
is a wake-up call for some people.
Research in complexity science
could benef it countries, from
predicting earthquakes down to
easing trafc jams.
Traditional science breaks
things down but complex science
is opposite, it looks at things as
a system, puts it together, said
Professor Geoffrey B. West. The
former President of the Santa
Fe Institute (SFI) was an invited
speaker at the conference.
Examples of complex systems
include cities, brains and economies.
As they exhibit behaviour that
cannot be explained by being
broken down into parts, they are
studied as an entire system.
As such, complexity science
could be the next big thing in
solving global challenges such as
hunger and climate change, said
Mr Vasbinder.
All the major problems in
the world we deal with have
their bases in complex systems,"
he added.
I ndeed, researchers have
already identied themes such
as cities and governance to look
into, although the programme is
still in its early stages.
It was not until the 1980s
that the introduction of home
computers enabled complex
systems to be st udied and
simulated visually.
Complexity science is a very
fresh eld of research which is
still evolving and changing,
said visiting Professor W. Brian
Arthur from SFI.
Professor Arthur will also be
conducting research under the
Complexity Programme.
Currently, the programme is
only open to faculty members,
post-doctorate students, as well
as PhD students.
But due to its interdisciplinary
nature, there are no restrictions
to the schools which applicants
come from, or the elds of study
they intend to pursue.
Mor e ove r , t he u s e of
compl exi t y sci ence i s not
limited to graduate students
or professors. St udents who
attended the conference said they
found it useful for their research
topics.
The topics here are related
to my research, which is about
climate models, a type of complex
system, said Ms Queen Suraajini
Rajendran, 21.
This helps me understand
the subject area better, added
the rst-year student from the
School of Civil and Environmental
Engineering.
Collaborations both local and
overseas are also in the pipeline.
The programme plans for
workshops and research projects
with institutions such as the SFI
and the Institute Para Limes (IPL)
from the United States and the
Netherlands respectively.
Wi t h NTUs Complexi t y
Science programme underway,
Singapore is poised to kickstart
the research eld in Asia, said
Mr Vasbinder.
He added that Singapore is
uniquely able to understand and
make use of scientic knowledge
earlier than other countries.
Si ngapor e can become
the rst movers in the eld of
complexity in helping develop
theories and applications used in
solving these problems, he said.
Beyond marking the formal
inauguration of the programme,
the conference also aims to create
a community of complex science
researchers.
WEEKEND
ESCAPADES
Lifestyle
Riding the Dutch Way Page 11
0noe the simple pleasures of life that uplift our spirits from the daily grind, eateries have now evolved to beoome sites of
oasual studying or projeot meetings than plaoes of esoape. 0an wei Ling explores eateries where you are foroed to oast the
books aside to engage in an adventure through art and tlm.
foodsnoop
333A 0rohard Road, #04-
14/15 Mandarin 0allery
0pening hours:
Monday to 1hursday, 12pm
-10pm, lriday, 12pm-11pm,
3aturday & 3unday, 11am-
11pm
website: www.arteastiq.oom
ARTEASTIQ
a common type of art. Stepping
into the art jamming room was a
refreshing sight of many artists
diligently at work. Situated at
Mandarin Galler y, this social
painting and tea lounge is not
merely for the artistic.
According to Ren, the sales
manager, the concept of the place
was to welcome beginners to try
out painting in a non-intimidating
environment. Understanding that
it can be quite scary for rst-timers
to approach art, he says, The idea
is more to have fun than to come
up with something perfect.
Though there are art teachers,
Ren made it clear that their role is
not to teach but to be a guide as
they are more interested to assist
customers in coming up with
something of their own.
Like many others, my feelings
were a mix of excitement and a fair
bit of skepticism. At the end of the
3-hour session, I was convinced
t hat Ar teast iq's approach to
beginner painters worked. The
participants, too, stood in utter
amazement of what they had
accomplished.
Im still overwhelmed. Ive
never been good in art and I never
thought I could paint at this age,
said Sarah Lim, 32. Her friend,
Ying Ru, 29, who described herself
as an absolute beginner said,
Its okay to come unprepared, just
come with an open mind.
The 3-hour session costs $48
and comes along with a free
beverage, set of brushes, free
ow of paint and standard 20cm
cotton canvas. Subsequent visits
to complete painting costs $5
per hour. There is also a student
price of $28. Above that, there
are different promotions everyday
from Mondays to Thursdays.
While guests are welcomed to
have their meals or snacks while
art jamming, Arteastiq also has
a stylish tea lounge area. Unlike
most cafes, they do not sell any
readymade tea bags, much to
the disappointment of the tea
connoisseurs who may wish to buy
some home. Instead, they boil the
fruit with the tea base pot by pot
upon orders. Tea is usually served
with biscuits and a wide selection
of mochi. They also offer exquisite
avors like liquor-infused tea with
gelato ice cream after 5pm.
Just like the concept of music
jamming, art jamming is a bunch
of people coming together to create
12 Ann 3iang Road
0pening hours:
1hursday, 8pm,
lriday & 3aturday, 9.15pm.
Closed on 3undays
website: www.soreeningroom.
oom.sg
THE SCREENING ROOM
Marrying the culinary passions
of Chef Samia Ahad and her
husbands interest in film, the
Screening Room was born. They
screen lms of all genres, as long
as Chef Samia nds its crusine
executable.
Located at Ann Siang Hill,
the ve-storey building consists
of Mamounia lounge, Mamounia
restaurant, the studio, the film
theatre and La Terraza rooftop
bar. While every level is decorated
differently, the place exudes a posh,
middle-eastern charm, featuring
an Arabian tent and plush carpets
at the alfresco dining area.
Fi l m screeni ngs are onl y
available on Thursday to Saturday
evenings. Usually, the guests
have their meal at Mamounia
restaurant and proceed to the lm
theatre at 9:15pm when the movie
commences.
I caught the lm Paris je taime
and was served French cuisine.
The menu of the day was Cream
of Portobello Mushroom soup, a
choice of Duck Leg Cont or Butter
Poached Threadn and Pineapple
Tarte Tartin for dessert.
The meal began wit h t he
chefs selection of complimentary
appetizers, better known as amuse-
bouche French-Turkish White
Cheese with Pomegranate Seeds
and Molasses with Mint Leaves
and Mexican Guacamole with
Nachos. The Turkish White Cheese
is salty and creamy, while the
hint of pomegranate exudes a rich
tantalizing taste.
The Cr eam of Por tobel lo
Mushroom with white trufe oil
emulsion has got to be one of the
best mushroom soups I have tasted.
It is neither as creamy nor chunky
as most mushroom soups, yet it
leaves a lingering avor at the
back of your tongue.
The Butter Poached Threadn
is served with boiled carrot, ginger,
capsicum and cherry tomato. The
dish gives a light and fresh feel, a
safe dish that is satisfying but less
extraordinary.
It pales in comparison to the
Duck Leg Confit. Paired with
roasted Idaho potatoes and shallot
marmalade, the saltiness of the
crispy roasted duck skin adds to
the sweet, grilled f lavor of the
duck meat. Both fish and duck
went well with the Pieropan Soave
Classico white wine, which has an
invigorating razor-sharp crisp.
Aside from the lm-inspired
di shes, Mamounia restaurant
serves what they term the Other
Mediterranean cuisine, savouring
the culinary delights of intriguing
lands spanning from Marrakesh
to Mecca.
Coriander Leaf, an afliated
cooking school, is another of Chef
Samia Ahad's initiatives, where
they teach the dishes served in
these food and lm package.
The Screening Room charges
$20 for the lm ticket alone, more
than twice the price of the usual
movie ticket. But if it is a movie
date with that special someone, it
may be worth it after all.
While we may have snacked
a popcorn while catching a lm,
not many of us have heard of
a film and food package ($68)
where a 3-course meal is crafted
to complement the lm. You can
be sure to get different theatrical
experiences every time you visit
The Screening Room.
PHOTOS | COURTESY OF GAN WEI LING
HUNTING FOR A GOOD BUY: If you're selling second-hand stuff, price it at around $5-$10 and expect customers
coming for a good bargain.
LIFESTYLE 08
18
09
v0L.
N0.
CHRONICLE
1L NANAN0
ONCE USED, TWICE CHEAP
DEALS & STEALS: Zouk, a popular nightclub, is transformed for the Zouk Flea & Easy market with bargain-hunters on the prowl for great buys and items going as low as $1.
ou're broke and you want oash. our monthly allowanoe oan't oome fast enough and you're spending more than you really should. 3ounds
familiar? Lvelyn Lee and Amanda Phoon speak to two students and a graduate who have found a way to beat the tnanoial doldrums.
W
ith a wardrobe bursting with
more clothes than it can hold,
sel f-confessed shopahol ic
Brenda Lim has come to terms
with letting some of them go.
With Topshop and Miss Selfridge
among her favourite brands, the 21-year-
old rst-year student at the Wee Kim Wee
School of Communication and Information
spends over $100 every month on a typical
shopping trip.
After keeping her buys for a year or
two, Brenda would set up a stall at a ea
market to get rid of unwanted clothes and
make space for new ones, and also to top
up her empty piggy bank.
The convenience of selling her wares
at a ea market is the biggest draw.
It is the easiest way to clear my
wardrobe. Setting up a blog shop takes time.
I'll have to take pictures, hire someone to
model my clothes, set up a website, and do
my own advertising. A ea market is less
of a hassle, being a one-off thing, she says.
With the extra cash, Brenda has an excuse
to buy more clothes to ll up her closet.
Besides selling second-hand clothes,
there are also other ways to earn extra cash
the ea market way.
Kr i s t y Te o, 21, a f i r s t -ye a r
accountancy student sets up a stall to
increase online trafc to her blog shop
(www.loveyourphone.wordpress.com), which
sells imported iPhone cases.
She usually hands out online discount
codes to her ea market customers. Since
then, online sales have increased by about
one and a half times.
And what started out as a hobby also
turned out to be a full-time job for Kevin Yin,
a recent Computer Engineering graduate in
2011 from NTU, and his girlfriend Jeanrin
Loh, both 26.
The couple, who had had enough of
nding things to do in Singapore with little
money, were inspired to start a business when
they came across NaRaYa, a Thai brand of
fabric bags in Bangkok. They then obtained
the rights to import the bags to Singapore.
This started RinVin.Closet, a small
business selling an assorted array of knick-
knacks, from quirky spectacle frames to lego
sets, and they plan on expanding.
But such a money-making method
has its fair share of risks. Bad weather is
a common impediment resulting in lower
human trafc. At Kevin's rst ea market
at Marina Bay Sands, heavy rain and strong
winds nearly destroyed the tent.
All the male vendors were pinning our
weight down on the tent, and some of us even
got carried up with the tent about a foot off
the ground, he says.
But despite unpredictable weather
conditions, Kevin remains fond of f lea
markets.
Being under the sun and rain selling
your products gives you an experience you
wouldnt nd elsewhere, he says.
Also at ea markets, our prices are
somewhat bargain-able if you buy more."
Kristy has also learnt that pricing is
important to attract customers. Allowing
people to bargain usually leads to a more
successful deal, as people feel they have
clinched a worthy purchase, she says.
Brenda, who usually prices her
items around $5-10, says: A piece of
clothing from Topshop can cost up to $80,
but when you bring it to a ea, nobody
cares if its branded. If it isnt $5, they
arent buying.
But towards closing time, going
all-out to slash prices works like a charm.
I will drop prices drastically to clear as
many clothes as I can. I even sold a few
pieces at $1 each, she says.
Additionally, Miss Soe Chandra,
28, Marketing and Business Development
Manager of Zouk Flea & Easy, advises
vendors to set their pricing strategy based
on the type of products they sell. If your
products are unique, a one-off item or
vintage, there are denitely people who
are willing to pay more, she says.
But mos t of t he t i me, t he
Singaporean mentalit y plays a part.
Because it is a ea market, the bargain
factor is important, some are looking for
items that go as low as $2 to $5.
For sellers looking to get more out
of an online business via ea markets, Mr
Kent Teo, the organizer of ea markets at
venues such as *SCAPE and Singapore
Flyer has some advice.
Flea markets are a good avenue to
test market response to your products and
services, and gain market exposure for
your brand name. You can complement
your onl i ne market i ng ef for t s by
expanding your database and inviting
customers to sign up for your mailing
list after they make a purchase, says the
27-year-old who is also For Flea Sake's
spokesperson.
Of course, there is also the added
advantage of real-time customer contact,
so it is a good chance to interact with
customers and strengthen relationships,
he adds. PHOTOS | INTERNET & COURTESY OF ZOUK & LEE SU FERN
LIFESTYLE
18
09
v0L.
N0.
CHRONICLE
1L NANAN0
09
FLEA
MARKET
101
1

DO RESEARCH
Different organisers aim to capture
different crowds. So try attending
ea markets by various organisers
to observe the type and level of hu-
man trafc, as well as how vendors
operate. It would be even better to
speak to a few vendors to nd out
more about their experience.
2

READ THE FINE PRINT
It is important to take note of what
is included in the rental package.
For example, only some organisers
provide tables and chairs.
3 VISUAL APPEAL
The aesthetics of your stall is ex-
tremely important to make sure that
it stands out. Make use of bright col-
ours, posters or signs to attract atten-
tion. Also ensure that it is reasonably
neat to make it easier for customers
to check out your products.
4 ADVERTISE
Leverage on the popularity of social
media platforms to increase the pro-
le of the ea markets and also that
of your shop.
5
ENSURE THAT YOU ARE
CONTACTABLE
One way to do so would be to pro-
vide name cards or mini posters.
Alternatively, bring a notebook for
people to pen down their email in
case they lose your name cards.
6 BUILD RELATIONSHIPS
Always remember to smile, greet
and make small talk with custom-
ers. Never underestimate the power
of building good customer relation-
ships, and always be proactive. No
one likes unfriendly stallholders.
Friendliness goes a long way and
leaves a deeper positive impression
on customers.
Also, make friends, not only
with customers but also with other
vendors. Whether youre attending
a ea market or holding a stall, it is
important to network as youll never
know when these relationships would
come in handy.
Reoent Ngee Ann Polyteohnio
graduate Lee 3u lern, a seasoned
tea market shopper and vendor,
dishes out the following tips to help
you aooomplish more than simply
soreaming 'le|ongl'.
Let's Get Down To
BU$INESS
FOR FLEA SAKE
It organises both regular and ad-hoc ea
markets. Regulars include Flashbang at
the Singapore Flyer, for a more upscale
clientele, and Space at *SCAPE, which
attracts mainly youths and working adults.
WHERE: Various places such as *SCAPE
Sky Terrace (Level 4), the Singapore Flyer
and Chinatown Pagoda Street
WHEN: Check www.foreasake.com/ea-
markets for dates
STALL RENTAL FEE: Between S$40 S$55
ITEMS PROVIDED: 1 table, 2 chairs, 1 rack
space. Extra tables and chairs available at
extra cost.
MAIN CLIENTELE: Females aged 16-24
years old and young families
HOW TO REGISTER: Email sales@
foreasake.com
FOR MORE INFORMATION: Check out
www.foreasake.com
WHAT THE FLEA!
Have a tarot card reading done, or try out a
hair and beauty makeover. What The FLEA!
also collaborates with charity groups and
organisations to raise funds for a village
in Prey Kla, Cambodia, and welcome new
charity outreach projects.
WHERE: Various locations island-wide
WHEN: Check What The FLEA!s Facebook
or Twitter page for the latest schedule (the
next one is on April 17th at the F1 Pit
Building)
STALL RENTAL FEE: Dependent on location
ITEMS PROVIDED: One 0.9m x 0.9m (3ft x
3ft) table and two chairs
MAIN CLIENTELE: Aged 17-35
HOW TO REGISTER: Visit www.
whattheea.wordpress.com/registration
FOR MORE INFORMATION: Visit www.
whattheea.wordpress.com
BEHIND THE SCENES: Vendors think of creative ways
to get their items noticed.
WE'RE ALL MAAD HERE: Enjoy live performances, sit still while your caricature is being drawn by a group of 20
artists and get a daring hairdo by a hair artistall at MAAD Pyjamas.
ZOUK FLEA & EASY
Forget the traditional tables and chairs. At
Zouk Flea and Easy, items are hawked from
every available surface to maximise the
use of space. The event is held is at Zouk
and Winebar in the afternoon till evening,
a rare chance to enter the club before
nightfall. Also, savvy shoppers need not be
deterred by the seemingly upscale location,
as there are bargains from as low as $2.
WHERE: Zouk Singapore
WHEN: Every quarter of a year
STALL RENTAL FEE: $50
ITEMS PROVIDED: Stall location is
dependent on items sold
MAIN CLIENTELE: Aged 16-35
HOW TO REGISTER: Apply personally at
the Zouk ofce reception or download the
application form from the website, to be
faxed or emailed with a recent photo
UPCOMING FLEA: Sometime in May
alongside the Asian Fashion Exchange
(14-20 May), celebrities, stylists and
fashion magazine editors will be invited
to take up stores at Flea & Easys special
Fashion Elite Edition.
FOR MORE INFORMATION: Check out
www.zoukclub.com or call 6738 2988
*SCAPE BAZAAR
Next to Cat hay Ci nelei sure Orchard,
*SCAPE Bazaar i s usual ly t hrongi ng
with teens and people in their 20s. It is
held on Fridays, Saturdays and Sundays,
and stallholders can choose pitches with
or without air-conditioning. The stalls
operate, come rain or shine. Soak up the
energy and go bargain hunting with the
huge assortment of stalls. Pre-owned items
are no longer allowed so there is no need to
worry about the state of the items.
WHERE: *SCAPE Mall
WHEN: Every Friday (2pm - 10.30pm),
Saturday (12pm - 9pm), and Sunday
(12pm- 9pm)
STALL RENTAL FEE: Ranges from $38-60,
depending on location
ITEMS PROVIDED: 0.6m x 1.2m (2ft x 4ft)
table and a plastic chair
MAIN CLIENTELE: Teens and young adults
HOW TO REGISTER: Online registration
form at www.scapebazaar.com
FOR MORE INFORMATION: Email
scapebazaar@gmail.com
MAAD PYJAMAS
The Market of Ar ti sts and Designers
(MAAD) is the place to go for original and
creative products. Not an ordinary ea
market, it is better known as a monthly
art and design festival. Forget run-of-
the-mill products, only original works by
the vendors are for sale. Featuring only
artists and designers, vendors can range
from hair artists to dessert makers. They
are encouraged to unleash their creativity
and decorate their stalls any way they like.
While shopping, enjoy performances by
local musicians, sip beer and simply relax
on a Friday night.
WHERE: Red Dot Design Museum, a
three-minute walk from Tanjong Pagar
MRT station
WHEN: One Friday night of each month
(the next one is on April 13th, 5pm to 12
midnight)
STALL RENTAL FEE: $50-$70
ITEMS PROVIDED: A display case, a case
stand, a lamp and a stool/chair
MAIN CLIENTELE: Young adults and the
working crowd in the area
HOW TO REGISTER: Online registration
form at www.maad.sg
FOR MORE INFORMATION: Call 6534 7194
or email ask@maad.sg
Kids of the 80s and 90s, still remember those sandy playgrounds which provided the
perfect arena for a game of marbles? Relive those times with Marble Mixer, an electronic
spin on the classic game of marbles
Designed exclusively for the iPad,
the game allows for up to four players.
The objective of the game is to score
as many points as you can by icking
marbles across the point mat or by
knocking your opponents marbles off.
There are three game modes featuring
various challenges on different mats.
The controls for this game are so
nely tuned, that it feels completely
natural to be f licking imaginary
marbles across a screen. If you want
to ick hard to smack an opponents
marble off the mat, the game picks it
up precisely, and the collision of mar-
bles sound exactly like the real thing.
APP
of the
PARTY
Nothing dampens the mood of a party more than a
room full of people wholly intent on oheoking their
1witter feed or playing a round of Angry Birds. with
the inoreasing number of games that enoourage multi-
player partioipation available as apps, whipping out your
phone no longer has to reek of anti-sooial behaviour.
Ng 1ze Min shows you some of these apps.
An all-time favourite party game that almost everyone has played before, the app version
is not much different, save for a few tweaks for greater convenience.
Before the game begins, choose from two to 20 players and key their names in. In order to
draw a name, this app replaces the spinning the bottle part with shaking the phone.
The questions and dares you get may be harmless and reminiscent of secondary school
days with guileless questions such as Who is your bestww friend? or cheeky such as Hold
hands with the person opposite you until its your turn again.
While the app certainly saves time and brainpower by providing ready-made questions
and dares, it can get slightly infuriating when you have to shake your phone vigorously for it
to register the next turn.
If you are familiar with games such as Taboo and Charades, this game
will not be completely foreign to you. Simply put, Snapwords is a word-guessing game. Two
teams compete against each other by trying to guess the word that appears without mention-
ing the word itself.
The interface of the app is clean and fuss-free, with no customisation (you are either
in Team 1 or Team 2). The sound effects of the game amp up the excitement, an ominous
sounding ticking starts whenever time is almost up, while a ping indicates to the opponent
how many points your team is racking up. But with words such as carburetor, sordid and
desiccant, this game is certainly not for the vocabulary-challenged.
SNAPWORDS
FREE
Available on iPhone and iPad
FREE
Available on iPhone and Android
TRUTH OR DARE
What used to be a handheld toy has now been condensed into an app for the tech-savvy
generation. This is basically an audio-reaction game requiring you to bop, twist, or spin,
amongst several other features, according to the music.
Bop It! is available in both single player and multiplayer versions, in which you can either
play along with several players or go head-to-head with just one opponent. It gets surprisingly
addictive despite its repetitive nature, and a voiceover chirps funny and usually disparaging
comments whenever you lose.
BOP IT!
US$0.99/ SG$1.25
Available on iPhone and iPad
To win the game, your tenor needs
to act like a bumper car, bumping your
opponents off the centre and taking hold
of that spotlight for the longest time
possible by avoiding other tenors.
So take on up to t hree ot her
opponents, and be engaged in the most
comical party knockdown ever. Upon
winning, you may literally take on the
spotlight for the rest of the party this
is if no one else tries to take it over with
a friendly bump on the shoulder.
US$0.99/ SG$1.25
Available on iPhone and iPad
KING OF OPERA
US$0.99/ SG$1.25
Available on iPhone and iPad
MARBLE MIXER
LIFESTYLE 10
18
09
v0L.
N0.
CHRONICLE
1L NANAN0
ALL EYES ON THIS: Games that cater to more than one player help people interact with each other.
PHOTO ILLUSTRATION | VINNIE QUEK
It is a giddy chase. It is a disoriented takeover. It is a ditzy ight.
Upon tapping a corner, wildly spinning opera singers, or tenors, each carrying a unique
voice, will start walking in a straight line and take on a chance at stealing the limelight.
PHOTOS | INTERNET
LIFESTYLE
18
09
v0L.
N0.
CHRONICLE
1L NANAN0
11
ROTTERDAM ON
TWO WHEELS
lf there is one thing you don't have to worry about in the Netherlands, it's transport. Never mind that publio transport is
effioient and oheap, you won't truly live like the Uutoh until you own a bike yourself, as Uanson Cheong
finds out in a nation where the population of bikes outnumbers the people.
travelogue
I
t is minus 15 degrees and the wind is
howling. I am wearing four layers, a
scarf and thick woollen glovesbut
I am still cold.
The snow, which has been falling
since the previous night, has left the
cobbled roads caked with icy powder. But
despite the bitter cold, people are still riding
their bikes and going about their daily
business.
Welcome to Rotterdam, the heart of a
biking nation, in the grip of its longest cold
snap in 15 years.
Earl y last mont h, temperat ures
in Rotterdam and many other cities in
the Netherlands plummeted below zero.
Unfortunately, the drastic drop coincided
with my arrival in late January.
Undaunted by the cold, I spent the
larger part of a month exploring the ins-
and-outs of the nancial heart of the Oranje
nation (the moniker of the Dutch football
team). And like the Dutch, I did it mostly
with pedal power.
Indeed, one of the f irst things I
noticed is that come hell or high water,
the Dutch never stop riding their bikes.
Ever. This is in spite of the fact that public
transport is cheap and efcientyour choice
of tram, metro, train or bus.
Now, after a month riding around
Rotterdam and the surrounding country, I
nally understand why: to ride a bike is to
be Dutch.
They love their bikes so much, the
running joke is that every bike in the
Netherlands have been stolen at least twice
and sold on the streets.
It makes sense then that any Dutch
adventure should begin and end on two
wheels. There are many shops in the city
that rent bikes out to travellers for about
ve to 10 euros ($8-$16) a day.
One of these places is the StayOkay
hostel in the heart of Rotterdam located in
the kooky-crazy Cube Houses (literally a
collection of cubed-shaped buildings) that
rents bikes out to travellers. This was where
I stayed during my rst week and also
where I rented my bike for seven euros a
THE CUBE HOUSES: A collection of 39 cube-shaped buildings, one of the many hyper modern sights in
a city centre that was razed during World War II.
PHOTOS | COURTESY OF DANSON CHEONG
day. Room rates were reasonable (about 20
euros a night) and like all hostel stays, I had
the opportunity to meet people from diverse
backgrounds. Interesting charactersa
Swiss lawyer on a sabbatical, a German
lm critic, a Welsh carpenter hiding from
his girlfriend to name a fewcame and went
almost daily in my six-bed dorm room.
Out side, t he cit y of Rot terdam
unravelled. Just two minutes from the
hostel was the Binnenrotte Marketthe
biggest in the city. Here you can get Dutch
specialities for as low as 2 euros. A common
gripe many tourists have is that the Dutch
have no food culture. A typical Dutch meal
consists of bread and cold cuts for breakfast
and lunch, and only one hot meal a day for
dinnerconsisting mostly of potatoes.
While the complaint might be true
for the most part, there are culinary gems
to be found, if you know where to look.
At the market, you have all the
greatest hits of Dutch food in one place.
Everything from lekkerbek (a fried sh
eaten with a garlic sauce and literally
Dutch for tasty face), to broodje haring
(raw herring gutted, tossed with onions and
served atop pillowy buns) to my personal
favouritesteamed mussels.
The mussels (four euros for a serving)
are served up by a sherman couplewho
shovels them screaming hot out of a giant
steamer. Even in a market of 450 stalls, this
one is easy to nd. The ever-growing heap
of mussel shells on the table, the burgeoning
crowd jostling for a space at the counter,
the steam from the giant vatsall signs
pointing to a quality establishment.
Stomach-f i l led, I bi ked onward.
Al t hough Rot ter dam has numer ous
museums, such as The Maritime Museum
and World Art Museum, I gave them a
miss. A decision I do not regret because
otherwise, I would not have chanced upon
the dark back-alleys of Delfshaven, or biked
down the sleepy boulevards of Kralingen
where I could observe actual everyday life
whilst enveloped in the wintry air.
But for me, the city centre was the star
attraction. Because most of Rotterdam was
bombedliterally, to its foundationsby
the German air force during World War
II, practically the whole city centre had to
be rebuilt. In a bold statement of rebirth,
architects rebuilt the city with eccentric
designs. Their works can be seen around
the city, from the famous Cube houses to
the swan-like Erasmus Bridge.
Perhaps the most enjoyable experience
I had was biking through the quirky city
centre and finding myself suddenly in
an older part of town, surrounded by old
European-colonial buildings, cobble-stoned
streets and an ancient harbour reminiscent
of a bygone era.
This juxtaposition should feel out-
of-place, and in any other city, I could not
imagine it to work.
But as I listened to the waves lapping
against the old boats in the harbourwith
one leg over my bike, it was then that I
realisedthis is Rotterdam.
MUSSELS, ANYONE?: A great, piping-hot snack at the Binnenrotte Market to keep you warm in the
crazy cold weather.
Perhaps the most
enjoyable experience I
had was biking through
the quirky city centre
and nding myself
suddenly in an older
part of town.
Tracks from the album such as
Dont Wanna Lose You Again, have
a distinct melancholic quality that
departs from their previous sound.
Mark attributes this to the 10 years
of maturity that the bands music
has undergone.
On the evolution of their music:
> Were a little bit wiser
from relationships and breakups,
and we translate these personal
experiences to our lyrics. When we
rst started out it was all about the
fun and positivity, and our songs
were like calling cards for our fans,
Hey, come and join our gang!
Now were just writing about things
that really matter. Anyone who gets
the chance to catch us live will
really see how weve developed as
a band.
> Our fanbase comprises most-
ly young female adults who grew
up listening to our songs. I think
listeners, whether young or old,
will be able to identify with songs
such as Like a Rose and Heaven by
Your Side.
On the appeal of their songs:
> Were very lucky to have
an amazing bond with our fans.
About our songs appeal, I guess
thats something only the fans can
answer, but weve heard that its
our positivity and relatability of
the lyrics. Were all quite down-to-
earth guys, very approachable and
normal. We love to spend as much
time as we can with our fans and
our favourite thing to do besides
performing is chatting with them.
After an eight-year
hiatus, British-Norwegian
boy band A1 made an
appearanoe in town
on lebruary 28th for
their 0reatest its 1our.
Renee Poh speaks to the
band's keyboardist and
vooalist Mark Read on
their fans who grew up
with their musio, as well
as the band's feelings
about maturing from a
boy band.
PHOTO | UNIVERSAL MUSIC
FORMED i n 1998, A1 or i gi-
nally comprised main vocalist
Ben Adams, keyboardist Mark
Read, and guitarists Christian
Ingebrigtsen and Paul Marazzi.
They achieved worldwide success
with over three million records
sold, eight international Top 10 hits
and a Brit Award for Best British
Breakthrough Act in 2001.
Following their split in 2002,
Mark, Ben and Chri stian an-
nounced in August 2009 that they
would regroup for a series of con-
certs in Oslo. Subsequently, their
fourth and latest studio album,
Waiting for Daylight, was released
in October 2010.
Its a song about
looking for light
at the end of the
tunnel. No matter
how hopeless a
situation is, theres
no point in giving
up.
Mark Read of A1 on the title track
of their album Waiting For Daylight.
On the biggest highlight of their
comeback:
> We had no expectations
whatsoever. Singapore has changed
so much and we didnt know
whether there would be anyone
here to see us as its been so long.
But when we got to the airport
and saw quite a lot of people, we
thought Hey, this could be good.
The proudest moment for us is com-
ing back here and seeing that the
fans have stayed. They used to be
like 10, 12 years old, now theyre
22. There isnt a bigger compliment
than seeing fans stay loyal to you
for 10 years, its amazing.
On growing up:
> Its been difcult trying to
get audiences to accept the evolu-
tion from boy-band to man-band.
Its going to take time, but were not
going to shy away or alienate our-
selves from the audience because
of it. Ultimately, well let our new
music speak for itself.
In our shows we usually do at least
one dance routine for old times
sake and its pretty bad but also
hilarious. We make an absolute joke
out of it, These are some really
advanced moves, try to keep up if
you can but the most advanced
dance move we do is like a slide
on the oor and a click. We like to
have fun with the audience and I
think that shows in our concerts.

> Compared to ten years
ago t he music i ndust r y has
changed dramatically, and unfor-
tunately record sales have dropped
to an all-time low because of illegal
downloads online. One challenge
any musician faces is thinking
outside the box to make a name for
himself. But the good thing is its
also easier to reach out to audiences
now as artistes can get launched
off the back of Youtube and other
social networking sites. In essence,
its a challenging but also very
exciting time for bands now.
On being passionate about music:
> Each of us is passionate about
different genres, Christian enjoys
country, Ben likes soul and R&B
music, while I really like classic
mainstream pop. It can really be a
nightmare writing together. So if
we get something we all like, we
know its going to connect with our
fans because we put the best of all
worlds into one.
Its challenging, but the day you
stop being challenged and getting
that thrill from doing what you do
is probably the time to quit. Were
certainly not anywhere near that,
in fact we feel like this is a new
beginning for us and were going
to be making music for a very
long time. Weve all done our own
solo projects, but nothing can be
compared to being in a band, that
camaraderie you have among all
the members. Its so much more fun
to do things together.
spotlight
18 LIFESTYLE 12
18
09
v0L.
N0.
CHRONICLE
1L NANAN0
Same Old
Brand New
Band
English and Scottish folk
music, as well as classical
music and jazz, were some of
Andrew Birds early inuences.
REPLETE with the warm tenor
and the distinctive whistling
that have come to dene the
American singer-songwriter
and multi-instrumentalists
music, Break It Yourself
bears all the hallmarks of an
Andrew Bird album.
The 38-year-old American
returns after 2009s critically
acclaimed Noble Beast, which
hit 12th on the Billboard 200,
and his seventh solo album is
yet another masterpiece.
Abandoning the studio,
Bird attempts a less rigid
approach to recording on
the self-produced album,
completing the whole of Break
It Yourself in a barn outside of
Chicago with his three-piece
touring band.
It st ar ted out as a
glorified rehearsal, Bird
said in the press release for his
album, and the spontaneous
nat ure of t he recordi ng
process shows as he forgoes
traditional song structure
on tracks like the opener
Desperation Breeds.
BREAK IT YOURSELF
Andrew Bird
(Indie Rock)
MUSIC
Gently plucked strings
and ghostly vocals make way
for an almost groovy melody
that builds in urgency, nally
erupting with high-pitched
strings and feedback that end
as abruptly as they began.
The folksy Orpheo Looks
Back is dominated by periods
of violin-led instrumentation
and feels almost like a jam
session. Improvisation is key
here and indeed the ever-
changing, ever-uid Break It
Yourself never bores despite
its 14 tracks spanning a
daunting one hour.
Break It Yourself is also
Birds most straightforward
and most accessible album
yet. With the exception of the
eight-minute standout Hole
In The Ocean Floor, he keeps
away from the long winding
interludes of his previous
albums, opting for simpler
arrangements instead.
Lead single Eyeoneye is
Birds most radio-friendly
track to date with its infectious
melody and driving guitars,
while the austere Sifters is
arguably the most affecting
track on the album.
Lyrically Bird has also, by
his own admission, become
more di rect . Metaphor s
and wordplay, which are a
mainstay of his previous
NOT THE END OF THEM: Plants and Animalss third album is a step in the right direction. PHOTO | INTERNET
works, are less obtuse and
signicant in the new album.
The line I cant see the sense
in us breaking up at all
on the song Lazy Projectors
is the musician stripped
of his layers of words and
this vulnerability resonates
throughout the album.
Blunt as he may be, the
album is still littered with
THE END OF THAT
Plants and Animals
(Indie Rock)
Plants and Animalss rst
full-length album Parc Avenue
was shortlisted for the 2008
Polaris Music Prize.
CANDADI AN trio Plants
and Animals have been in a
state of constant ux. From
the stirring indie folk rock
of their 2008 debut album
Parc Avenue to the aggressive
electric sounds of 2010s La
La Land, their music has
taken diverse routes to reach
moderate success.
On their third full-length
album, Plants and Animals
attempts to establish some sort
of middle ground, returning
to the acoustic-driven sound
of Parc Avenue, sans the
elaborate instrumentation.
The End of That finds the
band embraci ng a more
stripped-down, live sound,
reminiscent of the 70s guitar
rock that seems to be the
inspiration for most of the
tracks on the album.
The opener, Before, is a
gorgeous slow-burner with
lead singer Warren Spicers
voice f loating over gentle
strumming that never rushes.
Indeed, the album is rarely
ever urgent, the twanging
guitars and Spicers laidback
delivery strolling through the
albums eleven tracks.
The general weariness
of the album is perhaps a
reection of the themes that
The End of That grapples
with. As the band matures,
Plants and Animals faces an
existential crisis brought on
by the advent of adulthood,
with growing responsibilities
and stagnating relationships.
Were hopi ng to be
friends, do cool stuff and be
equal, Spicer announces on
the genial, country-tinged
title track. It is evident that he
and the rest of the band have
accepted these crumbling
relationships with sensibility
and tired resignation.
The centerpiece of it all is
the six-minute long Crisis!, a
bluesy, guitar-drenched track
that has Spicer talk-singing.
The stroller situation on the
sidewalk is out of control, he
quips, as the guitar riffs build
into an epic crescendo, which
unfortunately does not attain
the cathartic effect it aims for.
This is perhaps where
the albums biggest aw lies.
Despite a few standout tracks
like the forceful Control Me
and the blistering Lightshow,
the album never seems to
be convincing enough. In
choosing a languid approach,
Plants and Animals does not
deliver the emotional impact
that their material promises.
Striving for self-aware wit,
Spicer cannot help but sound
apat het ic, i mpedi ng hi s
ability to connect with the
listener better.
F u r t h e r mo r e , t h e
contrived 2010, clocking
almost seven minutes, and
t he meander i ng closi ng
track Runaways, make the
album feel draggy, like it has
overstayed its welcome.
That is not to say that
Plants and Animals has come
off worse than before. In
actual fact the band has taken
another step forward in the
right direction with The End
of That.
In spite of its slip-ups,
the band shows that they
still can write good songs. It
is a refreshing change from
the loud, in-your-face rock
sound of La La Land, with the
band sounding much more
comfortable with themselves
this time round. The End of
That, while not the best that
Plants and Animals can offer,
is still worth a listen.
-KOK YUFENG

AN UNDERRATED TALENT: Andrew Bird is a multi-instrumentalist who holds a Bachelors degree in violin performance. PHOTO | INTERNET

lyrical gems such as Youre


laying mines across the shore/
So my heart is ripped and
torn on Lusitania, a duet with
Annie Clark (better known by
her stage name St. Vincent).
Singing And well dance
like cancer survivors/Like the
prognosis was that you should
have died on the track Near
Death Experience, only Bird
can pull off that line with
such ease and grace. It is the
magical songwriting that
makes the album every bit
as cerebral as it is emotional.
Break It Yourself is Birds
most unied work to date.
His newfound frankness has
allowed emotions to f low
much more freely and connect
with the listener.
reviews
LIFESTYLE 13
18
09
v0L.
N0.
CHRONICLE
1L NANAN0
Consistent and relatable,
Break It Yourself dispenses
with the distractions and
goes straight for the heart.
This is not the rst time Bird
has achieved success with his
creations, and it is not hard to
see why this is the talented
musician at his nest yet in
his 16-year career.
-KOK YUFENG
war takes place in stark, wintry landscapes
littered with the debris from bombed build-
ings and corpses. The lovers clandestine
meetings are lengthy, with heavy over-
tones, and are punctuated with swift acts of
violence, both physical and psychological.
The initial effect is jarring, but this pattern
becomes a tad repetitive later on.
Jolie has skillfully dramatized the atroci-
ties and suffering of the Bosnian war. No one
is spared from the monstrous acts, which are
presented in uninching detail. Women are
presented as powerless and voiceless, and
the movie includes shocking images of rape
WARTIME drama In the Land of Blood and
Honey is a brave and and unexpected choice
for Hollywood actress Angelina Jolies di-
rectorial debut. Set during the Bosnian War
in the 1990s, the lm tells of a love story
that blossoms between Bosnian Serb forces
captain Danijel (Goran Kostic) and Bosnian
Muslim artist Ajla (Zana Marjanovic). The
two meet in secret because she is a prisoner
at a camp that he runs. However as the ethnic
conict drags on, the two nd themselves
torn apart by the war.
To ensure authenticity, Jolie chose a cast
of relatively unknown, local actors who
had lived through the war. This move has
rewarded Jolie handsomelywith so much
emotional depth brought to their roles, it is
difcult to nd fault with their acting.
Danijel is portrayed as a man torn
between conicting desires. His father, a
prominent Serbian general Nebojsa (Rade
Serbedzija), had taught him to view Muslim
Bosniaks with contempt. However a pacist
at heart, Danijel is sickened by the senseless
killing of civilians. Teetering between cyni-
cism and idealism, loyalty and suspicion, he
is a richly complex character of much pathos.
Like Danijel, Ajla is an equally com-
plicated character, as she struggles with
the guilt of having consorted with the
enemy. Although constrained by the script,
Marjanovic still delivers a captivating
performance with the few lines she has. In
one powerful scene, she asks with a slight
tremor in her voice, Are we so terrible that
we should be exterminated?
The somewhat perverse and masochistic
love story between captor and prisoner is
IN THE LAND OF BLOOD
AND HONEY
ROMANTIC / WAR DRAMA (BOSNIAN)
Goran Kostic, Zana Marjanovic
127min
deeply compelling. In comparison, the rest
of the lm sags as the secondary characters
like Ajlas sister, Lejla (Vanesa Glodjo), are
severely under-drawn. Though Serbedzija
gives a chilling performance as a self-
righteous general obsessed with ethnic
cleansing, he is given too little screen time. A
more nuanced portrayal of these characters
would have have added depth to the lm. To
Jolies credit, she strives to avoid the villain
stereotype and instead attempts to explore
the Serbs motives for prolonging the war.
There is no easy way to convey such a
grim subject matter. Spanning ve years, the
A SEPARATION
DRAMA (PERSIAN)
Leila Hatami, Peyman Moaadi
123min
WINNER of this years Academy Award for
Best Foreign Film, A Separation is an Iranian
lm that takes audiences on an experiential
journey, exploring complicated emotional
conicts in an upper middle-class family.
Beginning in the courtroom, the movie
shows married couple, Nader (Peyman
Moaadi) and Simin (Leila Hatami) ling
for separation. Simin yearns to start a new
life in another country, but her husband is
unwilling to leave, instead choosing to stay
behind to look after his elderly father who
suffers from Alzheimers disease.
Back home, Nader copes with his wifes
departure by hiring a pregnant Razieh (Sareh
Bayat) to take care of his father.
The next day, Nader and Termeh return
home to nd the elderly man unconscious
on the oor with his hands tied to the bed.
Nader ies into a rage and accuses Razieh
of stealing when she returns. A heated ar-
gument results in the womans miscarriage,
and the two parties make ensuing lawsuits
against each other thereafter.
Amidst the conicts and frustration,
there are still moments of kindness and
love where we see both the humane and the
brutal sides of the characters. The beauty of
FILMS
A Separation lies not in the dramatic events
but in the alluring little moments where the
characters deliver emotions through the
simplest actions, like Naders elderly father
holding on to his departing daughter-in-law
with trembling hands.
The tensions in the movie are excel-
lently handled by the moving performances
of the actors, whose realistic acting adds
immense depth to characterisation. Moaadi
and Hatamis portrayal of a couple in love
but unable to stay together was particularly
notable. Sarina Farhadi also delivers an im-
pressive performance as the young daughter
Termeh. Equally attached to both parents,
she is caught between the honor she wishes
to show her mother and the moral struggle
she faces when defending her father in court.
Although she does not feature prominently,
Sarinas tearful and nervous performance is
pivotal in heightening the emotional pitch
of the lm.
Although the plot may seem simple and
the many issues potentially small and re-
mediable, they form an intricate web when
culminated together. Unlike clichd drama,
A Separations magnicence lies less in its
narrative but more in its depth. It sheds light
on contemporary Iranian society by tackling
issues such as gender and class.
All in all, the lm poses questions and
offers no obvious conclusion, leaving audi-
ences thinking. A Separation is an intimate
and complicated lm which, rather than giv-
ing a straightforward social commentary of
society and human rights, touches the very
core of our hearts by displaying the multi-
faceted complexities of human emotions.
This is undoubtedly one of the best lms
released this year.
-GAN WEILING
PROMISING RAW TALENT: Zana Marjanovic (left) shows audiences the fearful conditions in which women had to live in during the Bosnian war. PHOTO | INTERNET
5-STAR PERFORMANCE: Peyman Moaadi (left) and Leila Hatami deliver in their roles. PHOTO | INTERNET

reviews
18 LIFESTYLE 14
18
09
v0L.
N0.
CHRONICLE
1L NANAN0

in the form of the prisoners bloodied thighs


and lifeless eyes.
Jolies ability to transmit her political
message about the evils of war must be
lauded. However this is also where she falls
short as by putting politics ahead of story and
character, she fails to weave together a truly
powerful and convincing story. Nonetheless
she has demonstrated great care in crafting
each scene, and bringing out the best in each
actor. With a more sensitive touch to the plot
and consistent characterization, she could
have told a more poignant story.
-TOH EE MING
THE most interesting fact about Act of Valor
is that its stars are not trained actors, but
members of the US Special Forces unit, the
Navy SEALs. Without disclosing their real
identities, these soldiers play lead roles in
a ctional story about a counter-terrorist
operation against a multinational terrorist
network intending to strike home.
Criticisms about its explicit Navy-
promotional slant have proliferated among
criticsin fact the movie was initially cre-
ated as a recruitment tool. However from an
entertainment standpoint, Act of Valor is a
solid bet with impressive cinematography
and compelling action sequences.
The story centers on Chief Dave and Lt.
Rorke, two long-time friends and leaders of
a SEAL team. An undercover agent, Morales
(Roselyn Sanchez), has been captured and
tortured by men working for an inuential
jihadist backer, Christo (Alex Veadov).
Upon rescuing Morales, Daves team
discovers that a well-known terrorist named
Shabal (Jason Cottle) is planning to use
Christos support to smuggle suicide bomb-
ers into the US. Throughout the lm, Dave
and Rorke track Christo and Shabal down in
order to safeguard their country against the
deadly attacks.
Dave also narrates parts of the show,
sharing his feelings of deployment, as well
as recounting his friendship with Rorke.
Interspersed between the main plot sequenc-
es are snippets of the soldiers camaraderie
and scenes with their own families.
An immediate downside to casting real
soldiers to act shows itself in intimate fam-
ily scenes. With their sub-par acting, the
SEALS are unable to produce the depth of
emotional expression needed to move audi-
ences. However, their performances shape
up considerably on the battleeld. Friendly
banter and jokes between teammates have
enough warmth to create a passable con-
nection with viewers. Furthermore, the crisp
execution of combat maneuvers makes the
ghting feel realistic and raw.
While no single character receives any
substantial character development, the show
deserves credit for adding some deeper layers
of characterization to its villains. The backer,
Christo, contemplates stopping his insur-
gency support for the safety of his family.
Shabal is heartless enough to kill children
in collateral damage. Yet, for a moment, we
see that he seems to genuinely suffer on
FOR those unacquainted with the In Death
series, Celebrity in Death is essentially a
marriage of murder mystery and Hollywood
glitterati. But for familiar readers, this is an
enjoyable breather from its previous darker
and much more intense episode, From New
York to Dallas.
In the 43rd entry of the crime-thriller
series, Lieutenant Eve Dallas investigates the
murder of a female celebrity at a celebrity-
saturated party. With a victim that was
highly unpopular among her peers and
a star-studded list of suspects, the plot
unfurls into a classic whodunit manner.
Writing under her grittier and darker
pseudonym of J.D Robb, popular romance
author Nora Roberts vies away from her
trademark amorous writing style for a
steelier tone set in the streets of futuristic
New York.
For those who have been faithfully
following Lt. Dallass career, this book
greets like an old friend. Dallas does not
disappoint with her signature caustic
demeanor and dry-as-dust humor, which
is frequently shown in exchanges with
her partner Peabody, as well as with her
husband Roarke. It is also gratifying to
ride along Dallass train of thought, as she
progressively gets closer to nailing the
murderer.
However, it is not advisable for new-
comers to the In Death series to start with
this book, as most characters and the vari-
ous relationships they hold with each other
have already been considerably eshed out
since her rst book Naked in Death. Robb
makes no exception for newcomers as she
hits the ground running from the get go,
which may prove to be confusing for those
who are unfamiliar with the series.
While Celebrity in Death promises a
murder mystery like its predecessors, it
is dissimilar to an Agatha Christie novel
where the culprit is almost always drasti-
cally unexpected. Instead, Robbs eventual
perpetrator is easily predictable and does
not provide for any gasping moment of
truth at the end.
Celebrity in Death paints a more re-
alistic crime story where instead of solv-
ing the mystery by tying together a few
ACT OF VALOR
ACTION
Alex Veadov, Jason Cottle
123min
some level, counting the cost of the soldiers
he sacrices.
By showing a more human side to its
antagonists, the movie avoids the mistake
of creating what could easily have been
cheesy, one-dimensional villains. As such,
both heroes and villains feel like real, be-
lievable people.
The main draw to Act of Valor is the
action, which directors Mike McCoy and
Scott Waugh present in a clear and focused
manner. Each battle, ranging from a jungle
mission to the storming of a yacht, is riveting
and intense, and there is a sense of urgency
to each engagement because both sides are
equally capable of decimating the other
under the right circumstances. There is no
discomfort in following the action sequences
too because the explosions, sounds, and pace
of the movie have all been nely calibrated
to make sure that the audience can keep up.
FILMS
The SEALs only engage enemies when
they have the preemptive and can dictate
the terms of the battle. When they are
outnumbered, they retreat decisively from
the hails of gunre raining down on them.
The professional and unexaggerated actions
of the SEALs create an appealing realism
that distinguishes itself from the typically
steroid-infused, hyper-masculine heroics in
most Hollywood action movies.
While the disappointing acting of the
SEALs beyond the battleeld may detract
from the movies value, there is something
real and engaging about their heroism that
refreshingly contrasts the over-the-top,
CG-saturated action icks of today. Act of
Valor may not shake you to your core, but it
will denitely remind you of the sacrices
the men and women in the service make to
keep our world safe.
-BENJAMIN MOEY
EXPLOSIVELY FUN: Disregard the sub-par acting of the Navy SEALs and you will be treated to an action-packed visual treat. PHOTO | INTERNET

incongruous details, the detective relies


on forensic science, nancial-tracing and
record-checking to sift out the culprit. This
may prove mundane for those expecting
sudden plot twists and an explosive ending.
Nevertheless, Celebrity in Death is a
solidly crafted story that pays attention to
the details. Its strength lies in the highly
developed nuances of each character as well
as of the relationships they share. Robb is
gifted in molding each of the main character
into distinction, so much so that they may
all too likely be real people instead of names
in a book. This makes reading particularly
BOOK
CELEBRITY IN DEATH (Fiction)
J. D. Robb
$27.99 at Kinokuniya
Published by Little, Brown Book Group
rewarding when it comes to emotional scenes
between Dallas and Roarke.
In comparison to New York to Dallas,
there is a marked languidness in Robbs
storytelling this time round. The relatively
light-hearted plot allows followers to ease
back into the routine of Lieutenant Dallass
life. While the In Death series rarely strays
from its tried and tested formula of multiple
suspects, red herrings and a dramatic police
interview scene at the end, Robbs latest of-
fering is nevertheless, no less satisfying than
its predecessors.
-NG TZE MIN

J. D. Robbs In Death series tracks NYPD
Homicide Departments Lieutenant Eve
Dallas in both her career and personal
life. We look at the books which contain
major plot developments in the series:
#1 Naked: The rst book of the series fol-
lows Eve as she tracks down a serial killer.
It also features her rst encounter with
her would-be husband Roarke.
#2 Reunion: A female convict whom
Eve has put away several years ago is
released. Bent on taking revenge on Eve,
she goes on a killing spree with Roarke as
her end goal.
#3 Vision: Eve pursues a psychotic serial
killer who exhibits his victims bodies
around New York with their eyes re-
moved. Her aide Peabody suffers a vicious
attack during the course of investigation.
#4 Creation: Eve tackles the reappearance
of a serial killer nicknamed The Groom,
who slips a silver ring on the ring nger
of his victims.
#5: New York to Dallas: A hardened crimi-
nal previously arrested by Eve escapes
from prison and continues abducting
young victims. Eve confronts her child-
hood as a character from her past makes
an unexpected appearance.
THE TOP 5 IN-DEATH BOOKS
reviews
LIFESTYLE 15
18
09
v0L.
N0.
CHRONICLE
1L NANAN0
18
09
v0L.
N0.
CHRONICLE
1L NANAN0
dapper: your essential style guide
SHOW 16
3R 7EVEL: (prev page) Pleateo black blouse
wltb telt collar, metalllc A-llne sklrt. (lett to
rlgbt) Grey knlt prlnt sweater, plnk pencll
sklrt. Plalo tartan oress. Salmon plnk Noral
oress. Crepe sblrt wltb leatber collar ano
cutts, reo leatber pants. All prlces on request,
Tbe Loltor's Market / Avenue.
3R .SREXLER: (prev page) Wblte sblrt wltb
wlngeo sleeves, prlce on request, Tbe Loltor's
Market /Avenue. Pyjama pants, Mooel's own.
(lett to rlgbt) Orange strlpeo polo T-sblrt,
$39.90, H&M. Dark oenlm, Mooel's own.
8lue plalo tartan sblrt, prlce on request,
Tbe Loltor's Market / Avenue. Dark oenlm,
Mooel's own. Plelateo prlnt sblrt, prlce on
request, ASOS.com. Dark oenlm, Mooel's
own. Summer tlme T-sblrt, $17.90, H&M.
Denlm overalls, Mooel's own.
7KH5R\DOW\
Meticulously selected by the people of ntu, these charmingly well- groomed
individuals are the best of the best in their respective lands. Presenting
the Kings & Queens of ntu. Photographer: Bryan Ho
Styling: Farhana Jaafar
Make-up & Hair: Zanncreations
Models: (Clockwise from Left) Nim Jin
Xiang from SCEMSE, Crystal Lim from
SCEMSE, Richard Lesmana from Hall 13,
Nicholas Chia from Hall 2, Loh Min Zhen
from Hall 1, Fiona Lim from Hall 13,
Karmen Tong from CAC Cynosure Ball.
(Clockwise from Left) On Jin Xiang:
Beige patchwork eld crew, $69.90, dark
blue denim jeans, $49.90, black shoes,
$63.90. On Crystal: Chain print dress,
$49.90, Colour block strappy heels,
$46.90, panelled bag, $33.90.
On Richard: Dark blue cardigan, $69.90,
brown centre seam shoes, $69.90, light
brown chino, $59.90. On Nicholas:
Light brown cardigan, $69.90, pink
zipped pocket skinny jeans, $46.90.
On Min Zhen: Green oral tuck cap
sleeve, $69.90, multi-colour block bag,
$33.90, patent scallop platform T-bar
heels, $59.90. On Fiona: Bird-printed
waist dress, $59.90, vintage ower stud,
$9.90, ower pendant, $16.90.
On Karmen: Black oral tuck cap sleeve,
$69.90, enamel hinged cuff, $13.90,
woven bead earrings, $9.90, red and
black heels, $59.90, all from New Look.

\
\d

--
\,

20
100

\
,

,
\


22

,`

,`

,
,

,`

,
2012

\,

,
33City
Square Mall

,`

,`

,
,

36
\
\,

\\,

,`

,`
`
,

\321

\
\,d
21
18
09
v0L.
N0.
CHRONICLE
1L NANAN0
\

|Red Cross
Youth NTU Chapter)214
217,

,28'

`,
NIE
,

26,
,

219
NUS University Cul-
tural Centre Hall
----\,
\

,
d
\ d
,

,
\
,

,
\
,

,
\
,
\ \;
,
\ \,`

,`
,
8
,`

,,`

,
,
\

,,`
,

,:

,`


Red Cross Humanitarian Network
|Iacebook)
,
72'
21'

,`

,
27'

,
22
18
09
v0L.
N0.
CHRONICLE
1L NANAN0

NBA

`
,

NBA
MBA,
`

<Z]VO
,

NCAA,
NBA
,

`,

,
,

NBA

NBA,

NBA

`,

,
,

,,,
,

,,

,2010
82
\
,

,
,,

,,

`,
LASIK
,

,,

,
,

,

`

Davinder Sinh

,
,

,
,
`

,`

,
,

,

,`

23
18
09
v0L.
N0.
CHRONICLE
1L NANAN0

1.
2.
2.
d

Mararet River,

Voyaer Estate Win-


ery

,
Chardon-
nay,

`Rocky Road
`
,

,
nou-
ats and fudes

,
,

11honey-
crunch
,

Mammoth Cave ,

Frevelly
,

,
,

24
18
09
v0L.
N0.
CHRONICLE
1L NANAN0

`,
6

\
,

,`
\

\MV

19

,
Min Brides,

We Are
R.E.M.`,
19

Who Knows?`

\,

,
`

Sweet Misfortune\

\,

,
13

,
,

,`

,

Iunkie Monkeys

`
,

,9,3
19
,

,
d

]ukebox
Wake up\

Wake up\
\

Wake
up\,

,
Wake up\
,

,
\
,

,,

\

\
\

\
224
\,
11

\,\
\,
\
,

,
\


\,

\
,

,
,

OPINIONS EDITORS
Aloysius Lai
3neha 0ururaj
SPORTS EDITORS
uang 3huqun
Xavier Koo
LAYOUT EDITOR
Uebbie Lee
PHOTO EDITORS
Alex 1ai
Mark Leong
GRAPHICS EDITOR
Nioholas 0ng
ONLINE EDITORS
1uong Minh
1ran 1rung Kien
BUSINESS MANAGERS
Lim Pei i vivian
Ng wei ing

PRODUCTION SUPPORT
Ng eng 0hee
0ng Li Chia
TEACHER ADVISORS
Andrew Uuffy
Uebbie 0oh
Xu Xiaoge
A students' newspaper pub|shed by the
Wee KmWee 5choo| of Uommuncaton
and Informaton (WKW5UI)
unsigned editorials represent the majority
view of the editorial board of 1he Chroniole
and do not neoessarily reteot the polioies or
views of Nanyang 1eohnologioal university,
its employees, the students or the Counoil of
the university.
3igned opinion oolumns, letters and editorial
oartoons represent the opinion of the writer
or artist and are not neoessarily those of
1he Chroniole.
Prnted by KPL Prntng Uo. Pte Ltd,
57 Loyang 0rve, 5ngapore 508968
WL WAN1 10 PLAP IP0M Y0U
Facebook: The Nanyang
Chronicle
Website: www3.ntu.edu.
sg/chronicle
General Enquiries:
chronicle@ntu.edu.sg
Nanyang 1echno|ogca| Unversty
31 Nanyang Lnk, 5ngapore 637718
1e|: 6790 6446
CHRONICLE
1L NANAN0
DEBBIE LEE
LAYOUT EDI TOR
frankly, my dear
A oolumn by Chroniole Lditors on issues olose to their hearts
EDITORIAL
An ex-bookworm confesses
GRAPHIC | QIXUAN LIM
B
r o o d i n g E d wa r d
Cullen immortalised
in Stephenie Meyers
Twilight series is the
subject of many a teen-
age girls fantasies.
Not mine.
I gave up on the vampire ro-
mance series after getting to New
Moon. It became overwhelmingly
sappy to me, like those bubble
teas which go too heavy on sugar.
Now, a layer of dust coats all four
Twilight novels on my bookshelf.
It is not just hot vampires
who have been getting the cold
shoulder from me.
A whole collection of books
ranging from Dan Brown paper-
backs to Lee Kuan Yews Hard
Truths silently beckon to me to
pick them up where I left off.
I am becoming a lapsed book-
worm, a once-voracious reader
who can no longer nd the time
or the will to read nowadays.
Thoughts of assignments and
presentations nag away at me
whenever I consider nishing off
a half-read book. To make mat-
ters worse, I lose track of the plot
line once a book has been in cold
storage for too long.
This has not always been the
case. I was an avid bookworm
during my teenage years, with
dog-eared copies of Harry Potter
or Mr Midnight being my school-
bag staples.
Opinions
The conservative American
radio talk show host Rush
Limbaugh was embroiled in a
controversy recently.
Ms Sandra Fluke, a 23-
year old law student from
Georgetown University, tes-
t i f ied before a session of
Congress on contraception
policy. She spoke of the need
for birth control for both re-
productive and medical rea-
sons, mentioning a friend
who needed contraception to
prevent the growth of cysts.
However, Limbaugh be-
lieved Fluke was promoting
casual sex. In response, he
called her a slut and a pros-
titute on live radio. The back-
lash was immediate. Limbaugh
was denounced in both main-
stream and new media, while
Fluke received a personal call
of support from the President.
This is the first time he
has lost advertisers in droves.
Fearing negative publicity led
by social media users on Twitter
and Reddit, companies like AOL
Inc. and Sears have distanced
themselves from him.
Another case in point is
the video Kony 2012. In brief,
it was made by non-profit
group Invisible Children to
raise awareness of Ugandan
warlord and mass-murderer
Joseph Kony, urging people to
pressure governments to bring
him to justice.
These examples are just
two of the new spin on an old
tradition. Sometimes grass-
roots movements fizzle out.
Sometimes they create a lasting
impact, like the abolition of
slavery in Britain. However,
technology has become cru-
cial in passing on information
and alerting the world of such
wrongs. Such speed has led to
better organization, increased
awareness, and giving a voice
to the people who previously
had none.
The old refrain of What
can I do? Im just one person
is losing credibility by the day.
TIME magazine honoured The
Protestor as its Person of the
Year for 2011, celebrating the
brave young men and women
of the Arab Spring and the
Occupy Movement. While the
gradual opening of public dis-
course withholds pitfalls such
as hate speech, it is a move for
the better.
While in the past people
like Limbaugh and Kony might
have gotten away for their mis-
takes, technology is making it
easier for the world to organize
a response today. In this new
century, your voice matters.
CHIEF EDITOR
3ulaiman Uaud
MANAGING EDITOR
3ia Lingxin
SUB-EDITORS
Cassi ang
Chua uxuan
ariz Baharudin
Lysandra Lu
Miohelle Ann Kwara
3tefanus lan
NEWS EDITORS
Lileen 1ay
Liao Xiangjun
LIFESTYLE EDITORS
Celine Chen
wong Pei 1ing
REVIEWS EDITOR
Benjamin Lim
DAPPER EDITORS
Bryan o
larhana 1a'afar
CHINESE EDITORS
0oh 1iayi
Lhao Bing
THE ONLINE CAUSE
I r emember s omewhat
proudly that I nished all seven
Potter novels before each cor-
responding movie was screened.
But now, I have lost count of
the books that I have carted home
from Kinokuniya, but not read.
Their fancy covers and famous
authors compel me to take a look.
I try to. I ip through the pages
for a while, and then put the book
back in its place.
Even when I nally have time
to read, I would rather surf the
web instead. Reading gets tedious
after a while, and the monotony
of squinting into paragraph after
paragraph is no match for the ex-
citement and instant gratication
that the online world promises.
A while ago, I read a book
which explored the rather curi-
ous nature of the Internet.
In a st yle remi niscent of
Mar shal l Macl uhan s , The
Shallows by Nicholas Carr pro-
poses that the web is funda-
mentally changing the way we
think and read. Carr invites
us to picture a book reader as
a scuba diver plunging into the
depths of information, and a
web surfer as a water-skier who
merely skims the surface.
Alarming as it may sound, his
proposal resonates with me. I do
not have the patience to read the
lengthy novels I used to relish
tackling. If I do nd the time to
read at all, I go for zippy paper-
backs that do not impose on my
time or bag space.
Already, most of my reading
is squeezed into a short period at
the end of the day. It seems that
people around me see it the same
way too. On my daily commutes,
I hardly see anyone take out a
book to read anymore. The only
people who do so are the elderly or
foreigners. Reading is now viewed
as a quaint hobby, something done
only by people with too much free
time on their hands.
Yet, I have also noticed that
most commuters are fully en-
grossed in their smart phones
watchi ng videos, gami ng, or
texting away. It seems that people
are too busy for books.
But I still feel that the read-
ing habit can and should be
maintained. I believe the payoff
that comes from reading makes up
for the time we fork out for it. A
good book res up my brain and
brightens up my day.
Making time for books calls
for more effort now as compared
to the past, but it is not impossible.
For instance, we could pur-
posefully set aside some time
each day on daily commutes
perhaps to nourish our spirits
with a dose of good literature.
In an age of online distrac-
tions and shuttered bookstores,
the very future of books has been
thrown into question.
What I am certain of, how-
ever, is that reading will always
be worth the effort we put into it.
Well, except for sappy vampire
romance novels.
a matter of perspective
ALOYSIUS LAI
GRAPHIC | NUR FAIZAH
The age-old question
If the failure of
the Baby Bonus
scheme has proved
anything, it is that
policies can only
encourage certain
courses of action,
but do little to
change a persons
mindset.
B
e grateful to your par-
ents and look after them
in their old age this is
what Singaporeans have
been told since young.
Filial piety, a basic reciprocation of
the love our parents shower on us,
is a value inculcated in most of us.
Yet, the latest Singapore Budget
suggests the government is detract-
ing from this long established ide-
ology. With policies like increased
CPF contributions for older workers,
Silver Housing Bonus to encourage
seniors to move to smaller HDB
ats, and more subsidies for elderly
healthcare, the responsibility of
caring for aged parents appears to
have been lifted off the shoulders
of their children.
T
he Governments new
initiatives toward the
elderly in the recent
Budget raise questions
about whet her t hese
measures wi ll reduce the re-
sponsibility that children have
towards their aged parents.
The senior citizens of our com-
munity should be well taken care
of and I believe this is best done
when children take responsibil-
ity for their parents. The value of
lial piety risks getting lost with
the new budget plan that is geared
towards senior citizens providing
for themselves.
I rmly believe that promot-
ing self-sufciency amongst the
elderly is the wrong move when
it comes to how we treat the very
people who have contributed to
the building of our economy and
society.
A report by the Committee of
Ageing Issues in 2006 showed that
72.9% of senior citizens aged 65
and above lived with their fami-
lies, while just 7.3% lived alone.
To this end, lial piety and
being responsible for the elderly
is a value that most Singaporeans
have internalised. Yet, this is a
value that has come under ques-
tion.
Admittedly, some of the mea-
sures proposed in the budget, such
as increased nancial assistance
for the home care of elderly or
increased tax reliefs for the self-
employed are a good thing.
The tax reliefs are especially
benecial for the 7.3% who have
to be self-sufcient. Even then, it
is unknown how many of them
actually have sufcient income
to qualify for such tax reliefs. Even
worse, some of the other measures
such as the building of elderly care
within housing communities can
potentially provide an excuse for
children to not have to take respon-
sibility of their parents.
Humans are creatures of con-
venience and as long as we provide
people with an excuse to not have to
work that hard, they might take it.
This is especially so for those
who will give up their person-
al responsibility to the welfare
mechanisms that the government
is providing.
For many struggling families,
giving up their parents and the ex-
penditure linked to them is the rst
step to saving household income.
just to be respected, but should also
feel loved and cared for by their
own family. They need consistent
care and affection, and old people
who live alone, especially in the
bracket mentioned above, will lose
out on this.
Any grandparent who only
meets their children or grandchil-
dren only once a month is bound
to feel less than satised with their
life and begin feeling depressed or
upset. This is not how we should be
treating our senior citizens.
Key indicators in 2010 showed
that only 17.6% of all senior citi-
zens actually are still employed
and have self-sustaining daily
income. With the creation of budget
plans like an increase in CPF and
Medisave contributions, it may
incentivise senior citizens to go
back to work.
However, with 85.8% of senior
citizens aged 65 and above only
having education qualifications
below secondary school level, it is
no surprise that many seniors are
turning to hard labour such as be-
coming cleaners, garbage collectors
or road sweepers.
We should be discouraging, in-
stead of encouraging, such a trend
amongst our elderly.
Instead of pushing for indepen-
dence, we should facilitate dignity
in old age.
This move towards self suf-
ciency is a kind of implicit encour-
agement for less than responsible
children. It is the basic responsi-
bility of children [to take care of
their parents], especially given
the challenges the elderly grapple
with, said second-year Electrical
and Electronic Engineering student,
Anisha Raina.
With every family being a mi-
crocosm of society, it is important
to principally promote unity, care,
concern, lial piety, respect for our
seniors and the protection of the
welfare of our elderly.
These are principles that the
government is compromising on
with the new budget proposal and
this is detrimental to the future of
the country.
I welcome the Governments
move towards making life easier
for the elderly through nancial
incentives and policies.
However, perhaps it needs to
have a rmer stance on children
and their responsibility towards
their elderly parents.
It is easy to build elderly neigh-
bourhood ats and promote one-
room home living, lled with con-
veniences and welfare mechanisms.
But if we soon have to deal with
elderly couples and singles living
alone in the nal years of life with
little emotional support, then that
is hardly a dignied society.
has also progressed from single-
income families to dual-income
families.
With both spouses bringing
home the bacon, juggling career,
children, social life, as well as el-
derly parental care is fast becoming
impractical.
With an ageing population that
shows no signs of slowing, coupled
with the increasing difculty of
coping with elderly care, the need
for government inter vention is
undisputable. The only reasonable
path to take is to facilitate indepen-
dent elderly care.
Besides, Singapore is becoming
increasingly cosmopolitan. More
adults are opting for alternative
lifestyles being openly homo-
sexual or staying single.
On February 4th, TODAYonline
published that 44.2 percent of men
and 31 percent of women between
the ages of 30 and 34 have chosen
singlehood. This is an increase from
42 and 30 percent respectively only
two years ago.
To accommodate individuals
who avoid marriage, it is necessary
to equip them with the skills and
means to care for themselves when
they age. Without children, they
have no choice but to be self-reliant
in their golden years.
Certainly, one cannot ignore
the possible moral implications
of emphasising independent care
amongst the elderly.
At rst glance, it advocates an
every man for himself mentality,
which will hurt the social fabric of
the nation. But will it?
Concluding that the new gov-
ernment stance on elderly care
distorts traditional cultural values
is going too far. Government poli-
cies are incapable of degrading our
lial piety.
If the failure of the Baby Bonus
scheme has proved anything, it is
that policies can only encourage
certain courses of action, but do
little to change a persons mindset.
The choice to provide for our aged
parents all boils down to the fun-
damental moral values ingrained
in us as children.
Without a doubt, education is
vital in the moral upbringing of
our young.
Ensuring that our education
system promotes the right values
will go a long way in strengthening
the moral bre of our society.
Only then can we maintain a
strong family unit where the young
continue to care for the old.
It will be a sad day indeed when
the younger generation no longer
feel beholden to their parents.
After all, if we shirk responsi-
bility to our elders, who is to say
our children will not do the same?
VIHASINI GOPAKUMAR
This, however, is denitely not
the case. If anything, this is an
indication that the government ac-
knowledges the increasing difcul-
ty in caring for the elderly, and is
adapting strategies to complement
the changing local demographics.
It is no secret that Singapore has
an ageing population. Singapores
old age support ratio dropped from
9.9 in 2000 to 7.9 in 2011.
This means there are currently
7.9 residents aged 15 to 64 years
old for every senior citizen aged
65 years and above. Consequently,
every working adult has to bear a
heavier responsibility of elderly
care.
Despite past government ef-
forts, we are fighting a losing
battle in alleviating our ageing
population.
Policies like the Baby Bonus
scheme and r omanci ng pr o-
grammes have met little success.
In a decade, the average number of
children borne by a woman dropped
from 1.60 in 2000 to 1.20 in 2011.
This is far below the minimum of
2.1 needed to exactly replace the
population with the passing of each
generation.
The predominant family unit
27
18
09
v0L.
N0.
CHRONICLE
1L NANAN0
OPINIONS
The senior citizens
of our community
should be well
taken care of and
this is best done
when children take
responsibility for
their parents.
Even though they may not be
concerned with the nancial as-
pects, knowing that your parents
are being cared for, albeit by some-
one else, will make a person feel as
though it is unnecessary to have to
meet and interact with them.
I feel that this is detrimental
for the unity and cohesiveness
of a family, and the government
should not be encouraging this.
Every senior citizen deserves not
OPINIONS 28
18
09
v0L.
N0.
CHRONICLE
1L NANAN0
I
t is common to hear adults
today begin their conver-
sations with Youth nowa-
days... They lament the
younger generations love for
expensive toys, frequent travels
and high spending power.
These privileges are enviable,
but are often deemed extravagant.
With the extensive comforts
that these extravagances offer, it is
easy to claim that the younger gen-
eration today is somehow unmo-
tivated, inefcient and frivolous.
This call seems to be echoed by
the media. Youths spend more to
show off, AsiaOne News reported
in November 2011.
GRAPHIC | ALFONSUS WONG
Cash rich, sense poor?
Globalization has enabled com-
panies to lower production costs by
relocating to countries with cheaper
resources and manpower.
As a result, products are becom-
ing more affordable. When every-
one around them has a smartphone,
how can a teenager not own one?
When being constantly bom-
barded by advertisements and when
popular shows like Gossip Girl extol
the merits of looking good, is it
normal for a teenager to turn away
from such products?
We are living in a culture where
having new and fancy things is not
only desirable, but is also the norm.
Development in many Asian
countries tends to be associated
with afuence.
I n Si ngapore, for example,
success is frequently measured by
how much money one makes. The
mainstream media perpetuates this
by glorifying successful business-
men and women. Universities aunt
their highest-paid fresh graduates
every year as part of marketing
strategies.
At the same time, they convey
the idea that success is highly re-
lated to ones wealth.
With all these ideas in place,
parents inevitably feel the need to
give the best to help their children
establish their positions in a society
xated with afuence.
What constitutes as the best
can range from attending a presti-
gious school to going on overseas
learning programmes to having
the latest gadgets that will enhance
learning and networking.
To t hese parents and t hei r
children, such expenses are not
extravagant but necessary. Take
the tablet PC for example.
Students without them may
nd it hard to keep up with lessons.
This is especially more prob-
lematic in an education system
that puts an increasingly greater
emphasis on a networked system.
Secondary schools in Singapore
BRIAN LEONAL
have started to introduce the use
of iPads in lessons. It will not be
long before all schools adopt this
technology.
Without such gadgets, young
people may nd it harder to func-
tion productively in society.
The i ncreased expenses of
young people is not unique to
Singapore. In October 2011, the UK
Daily Mail reported that parents in
the United States of America spent
S$5000 on their rst-borns before
the end of their childs rst year.
Almost half of the gure is spent
before the child is even born.
A middle-income two-parent
American family spends more than
S$50,000 more to raise their chil-
dren today than they did in 1960,
according to a 2011 report by the US
Department of Agriculture.
Excluding college tuition, par-
ents can spend up to S$275,300 to
support a child to the age of 17.
More has to be done to change
the misconception that youths
today are necessarily extravagant.
For example, students should
explain why these expensive learn-
ing tools are needed for a more
complete learning experience.
It is also high time for parents,
youths and society to have equal
say in this matter.
While it is good to have a rich
learning experience, it is also
important to control spending,
because education is after all an
investment.
If a costly investment does not
give a comparable return, it prob-
ably cannot be called a worthwhile
one.
All parties should hence en-
courage a rational evaluation about
spending patterns so that they can
understand each other better.
louder than words
NI CHOLAS ONG
GRAPHI CS EDI TOR
Parents inevitably
feel the need to
give the best to
help their children
establish positions
in a society xated
with afuence.
However, education expenses
should be affordable for everyone,
including lower-income families.
If aid is given to the most dis-
advantaged population, it should
not make them feel belittled in the
society.
If a student needs to borrow an
iPad from the school for learning,
it should be made clear that the
notion of having to borrow does
not diminish the students place
in society.
This will help individuals who
cannot afford certain expensive
goods and services by making them
feel that they are not in any way
less important or valuable as their
richer friends.
In the end, it is the spirit and the
values that you choose to embody
that counts.
If extravagance is indeed need-
ed to instill and foster critical
thinking and creativity among
youths, probably it is the most
worthwhile investment that parents
can make.
More has to be
done to change the
misconception that
youths today are
necessarily more
extravagant.
According to the article, 84
percent of the 1104 consumers in
a survey think there is widespread
consumption of products and ser-
vices to improve their looks and
image among young people.
But is it fair to simply blame
young people?
29
18
09
v0L.
N0.
CHRONICLE
1L NANAN0

canteen talk
when the video 'Kony 2012' went viral, thousands
of people beoame more aware of the issues aftiot-
ing Afrioa. Uoes 'liking' and 'sharing' suoh stories
online really ohange anything eventually?
TEXT | SNEHA GURURAJ ; PHOTOS | VINNIE QUEK
R
ecall the awkwardness
you felt when you wit-
nessed a nearby couple
kissing passionately on
the train, oblivious to
the presence of others.
You are not alone.
A bemused parent recently
posted a photograph online of
a couple kissing on the bus, be-
seeching netizens to suggest how
he should explain the act to his
child.
Another post on online com-
munity portal STOMP showed a
girl sleeping soundly on the lap
of her partner on the train.
Such public displays of affec-
tion (PDA) have kicked off an-
other round of debates on the ap-
propriateness of such behaviour.
Couples caught in the heat of
action might feel that it is up to
an individuals discretion to be-
have anyway he or she desires.
However, the very fact that
PDA is public denotes that others
are affected by it as well.
It can tarnish a schools repu-
tation, corrupt young minds or
cause discomfort to members of
the public. PDA should be right-
fully regulated.
So why do young couples
persist in these public acts of in-
timacy?
GRAPHIC | JEROME SIEW
A touchy matter

We are constantly
overwhelmed by
such campaigns
that after a point,
they dont hit you
as hard.
Nashita Kamir, WKWSCI, Yr 4, 23
She predicted that simulations
and reality will one day merge or
become indistinguishable due to
progress of science and technol-
ogy.
In contrast, more conservative
members of public have a clear
concept of privacy. They grew up
in an environment with a clear
distinction between the private
and public sphere.
These different conceptions
of privacy often lead to different
standards of acceptable intimacy
in public.
However, just because dif-
ferent concepts of privacy exist
does not mean that PDA should
be condoned. Nor will this expla-
nation satisfy those annoyed by
these acts or those who feel that
such behaviour is against their
values.
Presently, Singapore has no
laws specically regulating PDA.
However, there are other laws
that the public can invoke should
they feel uncomfortable in wit-
nessing these acts.
For example, under Section
17 of the Rapid Transit Systems
Act, intimate couples in the pub-
lic can be charged with causing
nuisance and ned up to $500.
Our neighbours however, are
not as tolerant due to religious
concerns.
In Malaysia, Muslims have to
adhere to the Sharia Law which
prohibits unmarried Muslim cou-
ples to be alone together even in
private quarters.
However, should we impose
such restrictions in Singapore, es-
pecially since we live in a society
which promotes multi-racial val-
ues? My answer is a denite no.
Hard law enforcement not
only damages Singapores claims
of democracy, it can even back-
re.
In South Africa, many teenag-
ers protested by organising mass
kissing sessions when a law was
passed that forbade PDA among
those below 16 years of age.
Softer approaches like educa-
tion might work better.
Given the high number of
public intimacy cases observed
in teenagers, schools should have
clear codes of conduct and edu-
cation programs specifying ac-
ceptable levels of PDA.
LI ZHUO DA

I watched the
video but it doesnt
change me because
I dont really know
where my effort is
going.
Daniyar, SCE, Yr 4, 24

If such videos reach


the right people, it
can create change.
Thats important.
Neethi Thomas, EEE, Yr 1, 21

Most people just


like the video or
share it, and think
they have done
enough for the
cause.
Florian Zeisbrich, NBS (MBA), 22
You can create
awareness. Thats
good because at
least people now
know what the
problem is.
Aq Samat, CEE Yr 2, 23

OPINIONS
It has to do with
the changing
conceptions of
privacy. For a
generation of
youths that grew
up in the data-
driven networked
world, the concept
of privacy seems
to be eroding.
Perhaps it has to do with the
changing conceptions of privacy.
For a generation of youths
that grew up in the data-driven
networked world, the concept of
privacy seems to be eroding.
Private lives are becoming in-
creasingly public as couples now
post intimate photographs of
each other.
This is especially prevalent on
social networking sites such as
Facebook and Myspace.
The streams of likes, com-
ments and shares only serve to
reafrm their affection, encour-
aging them to display it further.
It is not surprising to see
youths extend their online habit
of exhibitionism into the real
world.
Massachusetts Institute of
Technology Professor Sherry
Turkle mentioned that popular
culture compounds the situation
as it deconstructs or deactu-
alizes reality in the vision they
offer.
In contrast, more
conservative
members of public
have a clear
concept of privacy.
They grew up in an
environment with
a clear distinction
between the
private and public
sphere.
This should come along with
lessons on privacy, in order to
improve understanding from the
other members of the public.
Though not all PDA cases can
be regulated, the government can
start in places with high human
trafc such as MRT and buses.
The public could be accorded
the right to separate the couple in
action, and empowered to inform
staff of the occurrence of these
acts.
Ultimately, public education is
just a form of external regulation.
It is still up to the individuals to
constrain their level of intimacy
in public.
As a sensitive society, we have
to be able to balance our need to
express affection with basic con-
sideration for others in a shared
public space.
Merry-go-round at the Bridge
they said
that?
Without Messi,
Barca are the
best team and
with him, they
are in another
galaxy.
Bayer Leverkusens coach
Robin Dutt after his side
lost 7-1 to Barcelona in the
European Champions League,
with Lionel Messi scoring ve
goals against his team.
But Im 21, so
Im still young. I
think from last
year, already Im
bigger [older] in
my head
Manchester City player Mario
Balotelli (above) on his ne by
manager Roberto Mancini for
breaking the club curfew.
FORMER Chelsea manager Andre
Villas-Boas might be laughing his
way to the bank after the club sacked
him a mere nine months into the sea-
son with a pay-off of several millions.
Once a part of Jose Mourinhos
backroom staff, he was touted as one
of the most talented young managers
in Europe after an undefeated season
with Porto, picking up a quadruple of
trophy wins.
After Chelsea paid Porto 15 mil-
lion euros to bring Villas-Boas to the
club, many expected him to bring
success to the West London club.
Things looked rosy when Chelsea won
the 2011 Barclays Asia Trophy in the
pre-season, winning all six games
while conceding a goal just once.
The Premier League, howev-
er, certainly looked anything but.
Implementing a high defensive line
similar to that he used with Porto,
the club made several defensive er-
rors that even resulted in a 3-1 home
defeat against Aston Villa.
Subsequent woeful performances
led to the return of the 4-3-3 forma-
tion that Mourinho used, yet there
was no improvement, with owner
Roman Abramovich deciding that
the recent loss against West Brom
was the last straw.
But he was not entirely to blame.
At the rst sign of trouble, veteran
players like John Terry and Frank
Lampard complained to Abramovich
about the poor results and lack of
playing time.
The core players of Mourinhos
team are still at the club, labeled as
the old guard. Under-performing
massively this season, they have
placed the blame squarely on the
manager, undermining his author-
ity openly by publicly questioning
his tactics.
Such is the nature of the Premier
League, with the immense pressure
to succeed immediately. Large player
fees also means that the manager is
usually the one that has to make way
in times of trouble.
Managerial stability is one thing
that Chelsea has lacked since the
departure of Mourinho, with seven
sds | LEsds
I do know the
rst lines, I
know the whole
of God Save
the Queen.
Im not known
for my singing
ability. I dont
think thats
necessary.
US-born British hurdler
Tiffany Porter being asked to
sing British National Anthem
after being named as the
British team captain for the
World Indoor Championships.
managers leaving the club in eight
years under Abramovichs ownership.
Roberto di Matteo is taking over
till the end of the season, with Pep
Guardiola, Rafa Benitez and Jose
Mourinho lined up as possible re-
placements for the role.
Hot favourite Mourinho may have
a point to prove after abruptly leaving
the club in 2007.
In the meantime, fans can only
hope that Chelsea would still be play-
ing in the Champions League this
time next year.
sports talk
Is education worth the gamble?
NICHOLAS QUEK
MOST would have heard of his
exploits on the basketball court
for the New York Knicks in the
National Basketball Association
(NBA) league, but few would have
paid any attention to Jeremy Lins
Harvard University background.
That is the nature of the sport-
ing arena, where athletes are judged
based on their achievements on the
eld, and the players academic
background is given only a eeting
mention.
It explains why many aspiring
athletes would train hard everyday
to become a successful athlete, of-
ten at the expense of their studies.
The last Ivy League player to ply
his trade in the NBA was University
of Pennsylvania player Jerome
Allen in 1995, while one would
have to go back to 1954 for the last
Harvard graduate, Ed Smith.
One might suggest that educa-
tion is virtually irrelevant in a pro-
fession where players earn millions
annually from their basic wages as
well as bonuses and endorsements.
In 2011, Forbes SportsMoney
50-50 found that the top 50 athletes
in the world earned an average
annual income of US$28 million
(S$35 million).
Such statistics give rise to the
misconception that education is not
critical to determine the success of
an athlete. As with any other pro-
fession, these statistics are skewed
by the top earners of the game.
The average athlete would earn
far less and many would not even
be able to play full-time as they
would have to supplement their
income with a daily job.
Even after a player has broken
through the ranks and made a
name for himself in the sporting
arena, he cannot play indenitely
as age will catch up with him.
Depending on the physicality
of the sport, most athletes would
usually retire by the age of 40.
Some of them may go on to
become sports coaches, analysts
or even commentators but many do
not stay in the sport after spending
so many years in the game and seek
other ways of livelihood.
Famous names such as Mike
Tyson have ended up with bank-
ruptcy problems due to their lavish
and expensive habits.
It is, of course, no guarantee
that a good education can ensure
that an athlete would be able to
avoid all these problems upon
retirement.
But it gives the athlete a chance
to start over in a different career.
After all, they cannot survive
only on their past reputation and
they do not have a choice.
The wisest sportsmen plan their
career options after their time on
the eld, and education plays a
crucial part as they decide to em-
bark on their new journey.
Former basketball player and
NBA legend Michael Jordan has
a degree in cultural geography
f r om the Universit y of Nor th
Carolina.
Frank Lampard of Chelsea
Football Club has 11 GCSEs, with
an A* in Latin, and he has publicly
stated that he would like to work in
the property market after retiring
from football.
When even the most successful
of athletes take the effort to plan
their future, more must be done for
the less-sucessful.
It just goes to show that edu-
cation still remains the key to
long-term sustenance and career
earnings would not always last
their lifetime.
18
09
v0L.
N0.
CHRONICLE
1L NANAN0
bpl talk
SPORTS 30
HUANG SHUQUN
S PORT S E DI T OR
REPLACED: Roberto di Matteo (right) takes over from the sacked Andre Villas-Boas.
HARVARD GRADUATE: Jeremy Lins meteoric rise to prominence incidentally brings in
another dimension of professional athletes. PHOTOS | INTERNET
He has to face
this pressure in
a way for having
the Djokovic
surname.
World no. 1 tennis star Novak
Djokovic on his younger
brother Marko after Markos
loss to Andrey Golubev in the
Dubai Championships.
GRAPHIC | INTERNET
SPORTS 31
09
CHRONICLE
18
v0L.
N0.
1L NANAN0
Reaching for the stars
A DAZZLI NG di splay by t he
Hall of Residence 1 dance team,
Unic, saw them clinch gold for the
fth year in a row in the annual
Hall Olympiad Closing Ceremony
(HOCC) dance competition held
on February 24th.
The t heme for t hi s years
competition was Danza Libre,
which meant liberation through
dance. The dance teams had
to choreograph their dances to
express this theme.
Unic awed the crowd with
their tremendous performance,
as they went on to defend their
title. Their dance was about a
romantic bittersweet memor y,
expressing the feelings of loss
and pain in such a relationship
as t he male and female lead
struggle to free themselves from
their past and their memories.
Unic captain Geraldine Sim,
23, said that the dance teams
key purpose was to entertain the
viewers instead of winning, as
they wanted to express dancing
i n t hei r own way i nstead of
adhering to the rigid guidelines.
We di d not f ol l ow t he
judging criteria as it does not
hold priority over putting up a
good show as we feel that (the
criteria) restrict dance.
We wanted to show NTU a
different kind of HOCC (dance).
There were many unique parts
to our dance, such as si lent
choreography and movement,
said the third-year student from
the School of Humanities and
Social Sciences.
As t he team had not paid
much attention to the judging
cr i ter i a, Ger al di ne bel i eved
t hat t he wi n had come as a
pleasant surprise despite their
track record.
We were very shocked, but
happy, to receive such appreciation
and acknowledgement for our
ef for t s and har d wor k. The
applause from the audience was
the best gift for us, she added.
Childhood memories proved
to be a popular choice for halls to
express the theme of liberation.
Hal l 16 and Hal l 10, t he
f i r st and second r unner s-up
respectively, drew inspiration
from Disney and children stories
such as Oliver Twist.
Captai n of Hal l 10 dance
team Soulmix Crew, Mohamed
Shukri, 23, was sur pr i sed by
their third placing as they felt
that their objective was just to
entertain the audience with an
interesting story.
We are aware that we do not
have a vast dance experience or
high technique level. During the
rehearsal, we have seen the high
standards by other halls, so the
results really came as a surprise
to us, said the third-year student
from the School of Mechanical
and Aerospace Engineering.
Wh i l e ot he r ha l l s us e d
cheerful and positive themes and
story lines for their dances, Hall
4 stood out for their performance
as the dance reected a darker
theme of a haunted house and
the eventual death of a dancer.
Hall 4 dancer Toh Mei Siew,
21, had no regrets about her halls
performance even though they
were not placed in the top three.
Shocked
The endi ng of our dance
might have been controversial
but we chose this as we hope to
leave an impression on both the
audience and judges, said the
third-year student from Nanyang
Business School.
Hal l 16 dance captai n, Li
Jian, 24, felt that he had gained
a lot from the dance competition,
forging strong bonds within the
PUTTING UP A GOOD SHOW: Hall 1 dance team Unic showing off their winning dance moves. PHOTO | COURTESY OF DARYL KOH
HUANG SHUQUN
S PORT S E DI T OR
Overall Champion:
Recreational Games
Dance Placings
Title Winner
Hall 9
Hall 3
1st: Hall 1
2nd: Hall 16
3rd: Hall 10
Hall 3
Overall Champion:
Sports
Overall Champion:
Recreational Games
and Sports
team, bot h dancers and non-
dancers alike.
The second-year student from
t he School of Elect r ical and
Elect ronic Engi neer i ng said,
More than half of our dancers
had no dance background prior
to joining, but they have all put
in a tremendous amount of effort.
We believe that with hard work,
we can overcome everything.
Sports
Hall 1 stirs up a storm Page 31
PROBLEMS plagued the annual
Surf N Sweat 2012 event as par-
ticipants disputed the nal results
of some events.
A technical error in the time-
recording equipment caused it to
stop working mid-race in the main
event, Surf N Run.
This resulted in inaccuracies
in the final race timings and
positions, causing a delay in the
announcement of the results.
Participants were unhappy
with the event, which was mod-
elled after a biathlon.
Not only were the timings
inaccurate, they could not even
provide the nal results on the
same day, said Eugene Tan, 21,
who took part in the Surf N Run
Mens Doubles event.
Honestly, when compared to
previous years, I would say this
year was the worst that I have
taken part in," added the rst-year
student from the School of Sport
Science and Management.
Held at Siloso Beach, Sentosa,
Surf N Sweat is an annual event
organised by the NTU Sports Club.
The event also comprised of
Surf N Hunt II which required
participants to locate items to score
points around the island and other
side games.
This year's event attracted
more than 1300 participants from
the public.
It was also the first to use
Radio-frequency Identification
(RFID) tags that were tied to the
ankle of each race participant.
Timings were then taken manually
at the start of the race and would
NICHOLAS QUEK
automatically be recorded when
the participant crossed the gantry
at the nish line.
However, an error with the
RFID system resulted in a disrup-
tion due to the lack of a backup
plan, such as the use of manual
time-taking that was practised in
previous years.
There was a technical error
with the equipment, which was
provided by an external vendor.
We were told by the vendor
that they had a back-up system in
place in case of any unexpected
equipment failure, said Pearlie
Sum, the vice-chairperson for Surf
N Sweat.
These technical errors were
coupled with human errors made
at the start line that resulted in
the start timings being not in
sync with the computerised clock.
Eventually, the organisers had
to rely on the backup system by
the vendors.
Although Sum acknowledged
the inaccuracies regarding the
race results, she maintained that
the organising committee had
More problems
made efforts to gather the most
reliable result.
After comparing the results
we had with that of the external
vendors, we were able to attain a
result that was much more accu-
rate than what we originally had,
added the rst year student from
Nanyang Business School.
I do not think that any rac-
ing event is able to produce a 100
percent accurate result, especially
on such a large scale.
Surf N SINK
Besides inaccuracies with the
nal results, there were also other
issues that frustrated participants.
Some lamented the inadequate
knowledge of the marshals and an
unclear nishing point.
Most marshal ls were not
clear of the route, as they were
volunteers from the various Junior
Colleges. They were only briefed
with simple instructions, said
Russell Chua, a rst-year student
from the School of Mechanical
and Aerospace Engineering who
is also the chairman for Surf N
Sweat 2012.
As for the ending point, we
changed it from last year. Maybe
some people were unsure.
However, we did make the
nishing line as prominent as we
could, added the 22-year-old.
Others felt that the stage, which
hosted entertaining events, was
too far away from the main races.
Alex Tang, the stage control-
ler, acknowledged t hat space
constraints from side games such
as frisbee pushed the stage too far
away from the races.
Although the stage was quite
some distance from the main races,
we had speakers placed all over the
beach, said the rst-year student
from the School of Electrical and
Electronic Engineering.
Despite the negativity, others
recognised the efforts made in
organising the event and compli-
mented the improvements made
over previous years.
Beach volleyball was one of
the more popular side games that
received positive feedback.
TECHNICAL DIFFICULTIES: Participants of the main event sporting the RFID ankle tags which did not work and caused frustration. PHOTOS | COURTESY OF ZHANG WEILIANG
SIDE-GAME: Food challenge was popular.
Overall, it was quite organ-
ised. The xtures began punctu-
ally and there were little delays,
said Pek Hong Kiat, a rst year
student from the School of Sports
Science and Management, on the
volleyball event.
Other side events such as the
Tug-of-War and eating competi-
tions provided alternative en-
tertainment that was generally
well-received.
On the whole, many partici-
pants agreed that despite the
problems with the results, the
event still succeeded in providing
participants with a day of fun-
lled entertainment.
It was still quite fun, and my
friends and I still enjoyed our-
selves, despite the hiccups, said
Ong Kaiyan, 22, who has also
participated in previous years.
It is difcult to fault the or-
ganisers especially for an event
of this size. I would still come
back next year after I graduate,
added the fourth-year student
from the School of Humanities and
Social Sciences.