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Public sector Social Media Nordic

SOCIAL MEDIA NORDIC


on the use (and abuse) of social media in Northern Europe

Category Archives: Public sector

Crowdfunding enters Scandinavian cultural scene


SEP 24 Posted by Ingeborg Volan Crowdfunding, having the public chip in to finance great ideas and projects, is hardly a new phenomenon. Weve seen it done successfully in fundraising for years, for instance through Kiva.org (http://kiva.org) and Kickstarter (http://www.kickstarter.com/).

(http://www.flickr.com/photos/aslakr/1876612463/)
Photo: Aslakr ond Flickr/CC-BY-2.0

The arts and culture have embraced this financing model. Starting in 1992, Finnish sci-fi project Star Wreck (http://www.starwreck.com/) has been an online cult phenomenon, attracting production help, downloads, and purchases from all around the world. Though not strictly a crowdfunding project, its definately a forerunner of the trend. The first Scandinavian truly crowdfunded cultural project Im aware of, was Norwegian rock group Kaizers Orchestra (http://www.kaizers.no/index.php?Itemid=7)s collecting money
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from fans toward the recording of a new album in 2010. But since then, crowdfunding is rapidly becoming mainstream activity for lots of cultural innovators. Does crowdfunding work? The big question, of course: Does it work? Are projects getting funded? The answer is a definate maybe, so far. While there is no lack of fundraising efforts, the Scandinavian public are somewhat reluctant in opening their wallets yet. But its early days, stil, and a little too soon to prophesy doom to the Scandinavian crowdfunding projects. Instead, lets have a quick look at the status quo. (I do not in any way believe that this is a complete list of Scandinavian cultural crowdfunding projects. If you know of any I have missed, please leave a note in the comments section!) Sweden racing ahead Sweden is taking the lead. Since 2010 the public have paid up for culture through the website Funded By Me (http://www.fundedbyme.com/). Several projects have been realized due to collective efforts online. People in Swedens capital Stockholm also have the opportunity to contribute through Crowdculture.se (http://www.crowdculture.se/static/about), where they can vote for their favorite projects and help fund their development. Crowdculture.se is particularly interesting since it is in part initiated by local authorities in Stockholm. To my knowledge, this is the first example of crowdfunding efforts by the public sector in Scandinavia. Norwegians getting started This summer saw crowdfunding in general entering the Norwegian cultural scene as well, since Funded By Me launched a Norwegian sister-site (http://www.fundedbyme.com/) to their Swedish operation. A local theatre group in Oslo is among the first candidates for crowdfunding. The response to the Norwegian site seems to be so-so so far, but I look forward to following their progress. New Danish site The Danish cultural scene has recently been expanded by the launch of Boomerang (http://www.booomerang.dk/), a new crowdfunding site for arts and culture. Not many projects seem to have caught the eye of financers as of yet but again, its early days and too soon to deem any crowdfunding efforts a success or a failure. Less culture, more crowd: Iceland and Finland Though not a cultural project per se, the Finnish crowdfunding efforts of Hub Helsinki (http://www.helsinki.the-hub.net/public/index.html) pave the way for new crowdfunding projects in Finland (http://aaltosi.org/2011/03/paving-the-way-for-crowdfunding-infinland.html).The cooperative of people trying to change the world are attempting to raise 50,000 (http://www.lainaaja.fi/yritykset/Muu/Rakennamme+Hub+Helsinki%C3%A4/378.html) towards the refurbishing of their new premises in Helsinki. The Aalto Social Impact (http://aaltosi.org/) initiative has taken a serious interest in crowdfunding in Finland.
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I have not been able to find examples of crowdfunded cultural projects on Iceland. This is probably due to my abysmal comprehension of Icelandic the country which crowdsourced its new constitution (http://stjornlagarad.is/english/) must surely have some interesting projects to show for. If you know of any, please leave a note in the comments section! If you are interested in crowdsourcing as a phenomenon, check out this extensive list of crowdfunding sites (http://management-of-innovation.overblog.com/pages/List_of_Crowd_Funding_Web_Sites_and_Web_Sites_To_Find_Investors-4605700.html). Among the inspirations for this post are the blogs of Danish Mikael Mejlvang (http://mandenfrakommunen.dk/2011/05/03/crowdfunding-i-kommunal-kontekst/), a.k.a. Municipality Man (blogs in Danish), and Arts and Business Norway (http://kulturognaringsliv.blogspot.com/2011/05/kulturbransjens-nye-moteord.html) (in Norwegian). Thanks! Posted in Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway, Public sector, Sweden Tags: crowdfunding, crowdsourcing, culture, Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway, sweden Leave a Comment

Norway: Almost 40 percent of municipalities use Facebook


SEP 9 Posted by Ingeborg Volan Monday there is a general election to elect local governments in Norway. So just before the election, lets have a look at the state of social media use in Norwegian municipalities. The following data have been compiled by blogger and communications strategist Alf Tore Meling (http://twitter.com/alftore), who kindly has allowed me to translate the essence of it into English.

46% more likes since January

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(http://socialmedianordic.files.wordpress.com/2011/09/likes-municipal-facebookpages.jpg)
Increase in number of "likes" for municipal Facebook pages. Data and chart courtesy of Alf Tore Meling.

38 percent of Norwegian municipalities (http://ialloffentlighet.blogspot.com/2011/09/antallkommuner-med-offisiell.html) (162 of 430 municipalities) maintain Facebook pages (original article in Norwegian). Thats an increase of 6 pages since this spring. The total number of likes of the municipalities is increasing; in January there were 56,244 likes. That increased to 70,935 by May, and the likes total 82,331 in September, 2011. Thats an impressive 46% increase since the beginning of the year. But for a country with almost 2.5 million Facebook users, the potential is so much greater.

17% continue one-way communication The increase in user numbers is even more impressive given the fact that some of the municipalities Facebook pages are inactive, and that 17 percent of municipalities with a Facebook presence have closed their wall for comments from the public. This serves as a natural barrier for interaction with the public.

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(http://socialmedianordic.files.wordpress.com/2011/09/facebook-closed-open-wall.jpg)
83% open wall, 17% closed wall. Chart and data courtesy of Alf Tore Meling.

Increasing social media engagement A study this spring revealed that 58 percent of Norwegian municipalities (http://www.ks.no/tema/Innovasjon-og-forskning/fou/Bruk-av-sosiale-medier-vokser-ikommunesektoren/) had some sort of social media presence on Facebook, Twitter and/or YouTube (Norwegian article). The study was conducted by the advertising agency HK (http://www.h-k.no/) on behalf of the Norwegian Association of Local and Regional Authorities (http://www.ks.no/u/English/). The recent updated Facebook figures suggests that the increase in social media use in local government in Norway continues. I will bring more data when they are published, and will of course give an account of social media use in the ongoing Norwegian local election once election day has come and gone. Given time, I will provide data for social media use in government in the rest of the Nordics, too.

Posted in Norway, Public sector Tags: Alf Tore Meling, facebook, government, local government, municipality,
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Norway, social media

Swedish police receive tips through social media


SEP 7 Posted by Ingeborg Volan Local police authorities in the Swedish municipality of Gotland changed their Facebook presence from a profile page to a business/fan page, due to Facebook terms of service demands that public authorities operate such pages. This has given the police new insight into their Facebook interactions with the local community. In a news story on their home page (http://www.polisen.se/sv/Aktuellt/Nyheter/Gotland/juli-sept/Narpolisen-paFacebook/) (in Swedish), the police outline the statistics from their first ten days of running the new page. And they are thrilled by the response: Tips every day Local police representative Tryggve Karlsson receives 5-10 tips through his own Facebook page (http://www.facebook.com/tryggvek) each day. Any post made to the official Facebook page of the Gotland police is read by between 4.000 and 6.000 people. The page has more than 2,700 followers not bad for a 10-day-old page in a community with less than 60.000 people (http://www.gotland-tv.se/islandgames/svenska-ig/praktiskt/praktiskt_20fragor.htm)! (I cant seem to find the actual page; I welcome the help from any better-informed Swedish readers!) The Gotland police have been active in social media for just over a year, winning a lot of acclaim for their work and their interaction with the local community. The possibilities for Facebook are huge, and only creativity will limit us, the police representative states on their website. Other Scandinavian efforts Other Scandinavian police authorities are active in social media as well; I know the Norwegian police departments efforts quite well from a research report/recommendation I co-authored while working at Sermo Consulting. I will write more in-depth about this in a later post. Thanks to Swedish communicator and blogger Hans Kullin (http://twitter.com/kullin) for mentioning the story (http://www.socialamedier.com/2011/09/06/polisen-pa-gotlandsociala-medier/) on his blog and calling it to my attention! Posted in Facebook, Public sector, Sweden Tags: Gotland, Hans Kullin, Norway, police, scandinavia, social media, sweden
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