LEAD ING CREATIVE LY

MINNEAPOLIS, MN 2012 CONFERENCE

SEP 6–8
NATIONAL ALLIANCE
FOR

ME DIA ARTS

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C ULTURE

NATIONAL ALLIANCE

FOR

ME DIA ARTS

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CULTURE

LEAD ING CREATIVE LY
MINNEAPOLIS, MN 2012 CONFERENCE

SEP 6–8
We wish to inspire, illuminate, and activate you so that you can return to your communities reinvigorated. As a network, we flourish on the exchange of ideas and on collaboration.
NATIONAL ALLIANCE
FOR

MEDIA ARTS

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CULTURE

NATIONAL ALLIANCE

FOR

MEDIA ARTS

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CULTURE

TABL E O F CO N T E N T S

Welcome Credits Official Proclamation Letter General Information Awards Plenary Sessions Locally Sourced Events Expo Schedule at a Glance Documentary Screening Program Schedule in Detail and Map

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W ELCOME!

In 2010, NAMAC took on issues of developing leadership and building organizational capacity across the media arts field in our publication Leading Creatively. Now, with our National Conference, Leading Creatively, we’re bringing this work up to date and extending it for today’s challenges. More than a decade of leadership work has taught us that artists increasingly lead our member organizations. Recognizing that many of the original founders of media arts organizations were artists as well, we wanted to explore this reemergence. And where better to do it than at our national conference? More and more, artists have stepped into organizational leadership — in policymaking, programming, and administrative roles. This is true for many of our member organizations, as well as for NAMAC itself. We’ve seen throughout the creative sector how artists have become a driving force in fieldwide planning, organizational development, public policy input and the creation of political action agendas. Related to this, the entrepreneurial creativity, skills, and experience that professional artists apply to their own small businesses often translate well into creative sector leadership positions. While many artists are bringing their business expertise to organizational boards and staffs, as a whole we rarely take the time to consider the impact of artist-leaders on our sector. Leading Creatively allows us to pause and examine how artists are leading, innovating, and changing the way our organizations thrive in these challenging times. National arts policy has increasingly focused over the last decade on “creative placemaking.” Tracing its origins to Richard Florida’s controversial book The Rise of thew Creative Class, this subject has led to a tugof-war among various discourses. On one side is the voice of economic development, which seeks to use cultural organizations as anchors of economic revitalization for economically underperforming or depressed areas, both urban and rural. On the other side is bottom-up placemaking, in which communities work collaboratively to ensure the heterogeneity of neighborhoods — economical, cultural and residential — while working through the arts to achieve social justice ends like workforce development or telecommunications equity. Between these poles exist many variations and examples that integrate both modes.
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The Twin Cities have long been at the forefront of creative placemaking. Through municipal and regional planning, philanthropic initiatives, and public–private partnerships, Minneapolis and St. Paul serve as regional models for community building, integrating the arts into community life. We look to the way the Twin Cities’ cultural landscape continues to be shaped by policies that support artists’ live-work neighborhoods; private and corporate foundations funding both artists and innovative community projects; and waves of immigrants who bring vital energy and ideas to the cultural environment. The recent voter-approved Minnesota Arts and Cultural Heritage Fund legislates new tax revenues for clean water, parks and recreation facilities, as well as arts and cultural heritage, ensuring capital for statewide creative placemaking over the next 25 years. These initiatives hold great promise, inspiring all of us in our separate communities to foster creative, cultural change that stays rooted in our humanity. We last convened as a field in 2009, a year into a new administration in Washington. Hopes then were high that finally our input would be heard on telecommunications policy, federal funding, and the role of the arts in America, contributing to a more just Federal government. We reconvene noting how little has changed. Funding remains scarce, policies continue to be shaped by private industry interests, and the arts are frequently caught in the political crosshairs (witness, for example, the Smithsonian’s removal of David Wojnarowicz’s A Fire in My Belly after conservative Congressional pressure was brought to bear). But let’s remember that we have victories to celebrate. Perhaps most notable this year was the elimination of dually restrictive bills in Congress—the Stop Online Piracy Act (SOPA) in the House and the Protect Intellectual Property Act (PIPA) in the Senate. Recognizing the importance of policy work in our sector, Leading Creatively sprinkles policy speakers across various panels. Our hope is to remind you of the interdependency of government policy and the work we do in our ever-evolving digital environment — and how this may touch your organizations in ways you have not yet considered. This conference offers us the opportunity to explore these broad themes — as well as the time to drill down on the consequences rippling out from them. We wish to inspire, illuminate, and activate you so that you can return to your communities reinvigorated. As a network, we flourish on the exchange of ideas and on collaboration. Use this time to engage, envision and thrive! n

JACK WALSH / EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR

WELCO M E !

Leading Creatively, the NAMAC 2012 national conference, has emerged as a remarkable expression of the sector-wide leadership of a diverse, engaged, and accomplished community. That community is you — the NAMAC membership. You are makers, advocates, strategists, resource managers, academics, educators, philanthropists. You are from established institutions and DIY collaboratives. You are working on your own — independently — and in partnerships both proximal and virtual. Whoever and wherever you are — you are leading creatively, and defining the cutting edge of the media and visual-arts fields, by taking innovative risks, exploring new opportunities, and excelling in your practice at a time of historic change from the local to the global. You are building new networks based on peer relationships rather than hierarchies. You are exploring new methods for teaching and learning. You are reconfiguring your staff structure and business operations in the face of economic decline and technological advances. You are uprooting your organization and putting money down on new types of community-based, partnership-driven placemaking projects. Your entire production studio now fits on a smartphone. Your traditional audiences for Friday night screenings and performances are diminishing; instead, you’ve noticed a spike in people downloading YouTube videos and showing up for lunch-hour art events during the work week. You raised more money from an experimental crowdfunding project than from your spring individual-donor campaign. Your interns proposed an alternative social-media campaign that had higher impacts than your previous six weeks of Facebook status updates combined. You are surfing the wave, taking the risks, consulting with peers at every level of your work and life, and applying this experience and knowledge to your strategic and tactical responses to widespread change. You are leading creatively. In an era of decentralizing media technologies, “crowdsourcing” has become a persistent, compelling buzzword. Yet “the crowd” is too often seen as an agglomeration of latent resources ripe for exploitation — something to use for fundraising, or to propagate your message virally — rather than as a stakeholder community brimming with innovation and leadership. Perhaps part of “leading creatively” is cultivating one’s own alertness to innovation and opportunity wherever it’s happening — and then doing something to support it.

These issues are all the more resonant for the artists, producers, and makers among us who find themselves in leadership positions, with their creative vision put to the test by the mundane realities of organizational and project management. One’s high-flying hopes for innovative programming and transformative initiatives can all too quickly be brought to ground level by budget limits, organizational capacity, and whether one’s board, staff, and volunteers want to play along. Yet it is at that moment of landfall, so to speak, that creativity comes more fully into play — not because it’s fun or interesting, but because one has no choice. Faced with limited resources or intractable circumstances, what’s the workaround, the lateral strategy? How does one cut the Gordian Knot? The term “leading creatively” is neither a zen koan nor an oxymoron, but it can certainly lead to speculation: What do you mean by that? How does it work, and what do you get for it? You’re here to tell us exactly that — you and all your peers. Thank you for speaking and sharing, thank you for listening and learning — and welcome to Leading Creatively. n

JOSH WILSON / CONFERENCE PRODUCER

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W ELCOME TO MINNEAPO L I S
It is with great pleasure that I welcome you to my adopted hometowns, the Twin Cities of Minnesota. It has been over 10 years since NAMAC last came to the Midwest. In that time, the cultural communities of the Twin Cities have adapted to and taken advantage of new tools, practices, and technologies, while holding on to core traditions that form our quirky identity. Twin Cities artists have long felt agency in transforming their surroundings. There are swathes of the population who come together around seasonal art events: ArtCars and ArtBikes parading in the summers, Haunted Basements and BareBones Halloween shows, Art Shanty Projects on frigid Medicine Lake, bringing in the spring with the massive Mayday Parade, and the newly established all-night public arts festival Northern Spark bringing us back to summer. Our rich geographical features, from grand lakes to the banks of the Mississippi river, provide an enduring context to these ephemeral happenings. We are in the midst of major land-use changes surrounding the development of a light-rail system that will ultimately connect the downtowns of Minneapolis and Saint Paul. Arts and city administrators as well as individual artists and community-arts groups have imbued the project with cultural awareness through formal and grassroots commissions and programs. Increasing this momentum is a flood of “creative placemaking” grant funding that, in addition to more lightrail-focused projects, will result in an American Indian cultural market as well as street art along a diverse north-south corridor, Chicago Avenue. When I think of Leading Creatively, I think of the many organizational arts leaders whom I have seen working together in joyful collaboration rather than dragging each other down in competition. My hope for the conference is that our guests from around the nation will engage in collaboration with our local leaders. I’m excited for the additional partnerships that will spawn, the kind that only surface through a major convening of this kind. As your resident party planner, I am pleased to make you feel welcome. Cheers! n

HOST COMMITTEE
We would like to extend a special thanks to our Host Committee; these organizations have gone above and beyond welcoming NAMAC to the Twin Cities:

Ange Hwang / Asian Media Access Tim Domke / CTV North Suburbs Jack Becker / Forecast Public Art Tim Peterson / Franklin Art Works Jane Minton / IFP Minnesota Center for Media Arts Katherine Milton / Minneapolis Institute of Arts John Akre / Minneapolis Television Network Steve Dietz / Northern Lights.mn Jeremy Holien / Perpich Center for Arts Education Mike Wassenaar / St. Paul Neighborhood Network Ben Heywood / The Soap Factory Sheryl Mousely, Dean Otto, and Kathie Smith / Walker Art Center Theresa Sweetlund / Intermedia Arts

ANDREA STEUDEL / CONFERENCE EVENT COORDINATOR
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TH AN K S TO O U R H O ST CO M M I T T E E

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CR ED I T S

L EADI NG C R EATI V E LY C O N F E RE N C E S TA F F

Josh Wilson / Conference Producer Kathy Harr / Conference Coordinator Andrea Steudel / Event Coordinator Aimee Le Duc / Curator, NAMAC Membership Screening Room Defne Beyce / Program and Graphic Design Andrea Hyde / Graphic Design Tio Aiken / Conference Intern Jun xian "Leo" Liu / Conference Intern Dazhi "Cherry" Yao / Conference Intern
NAM AC STA FF

N AMAC B OAR D OF DIR ECTORS

Nettrice R. Gaskins President Georgia Institute of Technology Nathaniel James Vice President S ocial S ector Consultant Cece Hughley Noel Treasurer Por tland Community Media Roberto Bedoya Tucson Pima Ar ts Council Ariella Ben-Dov Independent Cur ator David Dombrosky InstantEncore.com Georgiana “George” Lee Nativ e American Public Telecommunications Amanda McDonald Crowley Independent Cur ator Casey Rae Future of Music Coalition Anula Shetty Termite TV Col lectiv e

Jack Walsh / Executive Director Belinda Rawlins / Policy Strategist Aggie Ebrahimi Bazaz / Program & Member Services Manager
CON TR ACTO R S

Christine Busiek / Director, Meetings & Events Informed Meetings Exchange (Inmex) John Gavan / Senior Meeting Planner Informed Meetings Exchange (Inmex) Sam Kaplan / Web and Graphic Design Ann Benrud / Development Consultant
TOUR H O STS A ND PA RT I E S

Forecast Public Art Franklin Art Works In Progress Intermedia Arts Juxtaposition Arts

Kulture Klub Collaborative The Soap Factory Minneapolis Television Network Walker Art Center

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SUPPORT ERS

Wyncote Foundation

CUMMINGS
FOUNDATION

THE

NATHAN

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I N FO R MAT I O N

REGISTRATION INFORMATION
Greenway Promenade Our registration desk will provide an opportunity for you to sign up for Friday tours as well as other vital up-to-the-minute information on guides and available transport to the receptions, use of open space by affinity groups, and last-minute additions to the dynamic program.

REGISTRATION DESK
Thursday, Sept. 6: 3 p.m. to 7 p.m. Friday, Sept. 7: 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 8: 8 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.

A B O UT N AMAC
NAMAC’s mission is to foster and fortify the culture and business of independent media arts. Through dialogue, collaboration, research, and advocacy, we develop, organize and connect organizations to each other. NAMAC was founded in 1980 out of a shared impulse within the burgeoning media arts field. An eclectic group of media arts organizations from different regions realized that together they represented a strong social and cultural force. Their idea was as bold as it was simple: to create a national organization that would provide services to support the endeavors of its individual institutional members, while advocating for the field as a whole. The organization envisioned 32 years ago today represents over 300 institutional members. NAMAC is central to a network that reflects America’s ethnic and geographic diversity throughout the public media environment. Our membership roster includes artist service organizations, community-based digital media and technology centers, public media broadcasters (television, radio, Web), K–12 youth media and digital literacy programs, film exhibitors, and university programs. Much of the noncommercial and independently produced media seen on public television, in schools and community centers, and online has been supported by NAMAC member organizations. NAMAC’s programs, developed with input from our members, focus on leadership development, organizational capacity building, information- and knowledgesharing, and advocacy. Among them are National and

Regional Leadership Institutes, Campaign and Policy Institutes, and Capacity Building Support Programs. NAMAC’s distance learning programs demonstrate our commitment to engaging organizations in dynamic conversations through our Open Dialogues, Blog Salons, and Telesalons, all archived on our website. Through our monthly E-News Bulletin, NAMAC reports on current news, job listings, funding opportunities, and case studies about the changing media arts landscape. Mapping the Field, NAMAC’s survey of the media arts sector, provides a composite snapshot of our sector’s economic impact, annual programming, and organizational composition. The NAMAC Directory of Organizations, an online database now in its second decade, is the country’s most up-to-date and detailed guide to media arts and community media-related organizations. Visit namac.org to learn more about our programs and services, including information about joining this dynamic network. NAMAC’s programs and services are made possible by the generous support of The Nathan Cummings Foundation, Media Democracy Fund, a hosted project of the Proteus Fund, Microsoft, The McKnight Foundation, National Endowment for the Arts, The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Wyncote Foundation, and our members.n
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P hoto: Meet Mi nneap oli s

AWA RD S

AWARDS PRESENTATION
SATURDAY AT 12:15 P.M.
Greenway Ballroom At each Conference, the NAMAC Board of Directors present awards to a media artist, a media arts organization, and a philanthropic organization that have made major contributions to the independent media arts field nationally. Past recipients include:

ARTISTS

1998-Woody and Steina Vasulka 2000-James Benning and Sadie Benning 2002-D eeD ee Halleck 2005-Loni D ing 2007-Lourdes Portillo 2009-Jonas Mekas
ORGANIZATIONS

1998-The Minority C onsortia 2000-Appalshop 2002-Wexner C enter 2005-Grand Rapids C ommunity Media C enter 2007-V ideo D ata Bank 2009-C reative Time
PHILANTHROPIC ORGANIZATIONS

1998-The MacArthur Foundation 2000-The Rockefeller Foundation 2002-The Andy Warhol Foundation for the V isual Arts 2005-Open Society Institute 2007-William Penn Foundation 2009-C reative C apital

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AWA RD S
NAMAC AWARD FOR OUTSTANDING ARTIST

CAU LEEN S MITH
Filmmaker and visual artist Cauleen Smith was born in Riverside, California, in 1967 and grew up in Sacramento. She earned a BA from the School of Creative Arts at San Francisco State University and an MFA in directing from the University of California, Los Angeles. Cauleen Smith’s recent series of experimental, psychogeographic films on Sun Ra, improvisation, and creative music, CONSTELLATION CHICAGO (The Way Out Is the Way TUO) (2012), premiered at the Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago from May through September 2012. This work and research has been pivotal in Smith’s life and work, as she now considers herself a perpetual student whose work reflects the process of questioning rather than the expression of mastery. REMOTE VIEWING And Other Ways of Seeing opened at the Kitchen in New York City from January 3 to March 7, 2011 and was funded by Creative Capital. A collection of her short structuralist films was presented in the 2011 Video Studio at the Studio Museum in Harlem as part of their winter exhibition series, The Changing Same. Smith’s full-length work —The Fullness of Life — was commissioned by Creative Time and Paul Chan to produce a video response to New Orleans’ two years post-Katrina; it won the jury award for best film at the New Orleans International Film Festival. Her screenplay adaptation for the Martha Southgate novel, Third Girl From The Left is being produced by Washington Square Films, with George C. Wolfe attached to direct and Kerry Washington as executive producer. In the fall of 2008, Smith founded the Carousel Microcinema, a roving cinema space which has enjoyed screenings in San Diego, Chicago, New York, and Lagos, Nigeria. n

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AWA RD S
NAMAC AWARD FOR OUTSTANDING PHILANTHROPIC ORGANIZATION NAMAC AWARD FOR OUTSTANDING MEDIA ARTS ORGANIZATION

The Sundance Institute Documentary Film Program and Fund (DFP) celebrates its 10th year at Sundance Institute in 2012, providing a resource for independent documentary filmmakers worldwide working on cinematic documentaries focused on human rights and contemporary-issue themes. DFP Director Cara Mertes and her team lead year-round activities, including film funding, creative support, exhibition opportunities, and field-building activities globally. Since 2002, the DFP has supported over 400 feature-length documentaries, granted around $11.2 million globally, supported more than 275 filmmakers through its artist support activities and helped to generate millions of dollars in new resources towards the documentary field globally through its creative partnerships. Ongoing activities include: • Sundance Documentary Funds and Awards, granting $1 — $2 million per year in development, production/post-production, audience engagement and discretionary categories. Special Fund partners include Cinereach, MacArthur Foundation, Wallace Global Fund, and awards programs with Hilton Hotels Worldwide and Candescent Films. Open Society Foundation’s and Ford Foundation’s Just Films are leadership donors to the DFP. Creative Documentary Labs, and the Fellows Tracks at Sundance Film Festival and Summit for independent documentary directors and producers. Creative Documentary Labs are held at the Sundance Resort and elsewhere throughout the year, working with 50+ DFP Fellows annually. International Documentary Partnerships with cross-sector convenings, funder education, and increased resources for the independent documentary field globally, including Stories of Change films and convenings with social entrepreneurs and filmmakers. | Skoll Foundation; Good Pitch | Britdoc Foundation; and targeted international support with Arab Fund for Arts and Culture | Middle East, Greenhouse Project | Mediterranean and CNEX | China.n

Founded in 1979, Frameline is the nation’s only nonprofit organization solely dedicated to the distribution, promotion, funding, and exhibition of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender media arts. Inherent in all of Frameline’s work is the belief that diverse representations of LGBT life can challenge preconceived ideas and stereotypes of the LGBT community and in the process educate audiences and build awareness of human rights. Celebrating its 36th anniversary, the San Francisco International LGBT Film Festival is the longest running, largest and most widely recognized LGBT film exhibition event in the world. Frameline Distribution serves an audience of hundreds of thousands throughout the United States and abroad, reaching teenagers, college students, and families in urban centers, small towns, and rural areas. Established in 1981, it is the only educational distributor solely dedicated to LGBT film and video. In 2011, the organization launched its newest program, Frameline Voices, an initiative that offers free access to 75 LGBT films online. To date, the program has had over 350,000 views worldwide, and the films have been watched in over 200 countries and territories around the globe. Over 100 films and videos have been completed with assistance from the Frameline Completion Fund, established in 1990. Frameline also supports filmmakers with juried and cash awards: the Frameline First Feature Award, the Frameline Best Documentary Award, and audience awards. In addition, Frameline supports filmmakers and the LGBT community through the Generations Filmmaker Workshop, which brings youth and elders together to write, shoot, and edit their own films, and tell their own stories. n

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E SS AY

REMEMBERING GEORGE STONEY
AND THE POWER OF STORYTELLING
By Betty Yu, Center for Media Justice I first met George Stoney in 1995. I was in high school, and volunteering with the Chinese Staff & Workers Association, a 30-year-old center in New York’s Chinatown led by immigrant low-income workers fighting the sweatshop system. George had come to conduct a community screening and discussion of Uprisings of 34, a film he made with Judith Helfand about textile workers organizing in the South. The event was co-hosted with the Paper Tiger TV collective, one of the oldest radical-media activist groups in the United States. Through Chinese to English translation, George led a discussion about the struggles of textile workers in the 1930s, and their fight for the right to unionize. Chinese garment workers were fully engaged in the discussion, identified with the workers’ plight, and talked about their new vision for a labor movement that went beyond unionization. The conversation was profoundly rich and stimulating, and shaped me on so many levels as an organizer, activist, and media maker. I studied photography and documentary film and video at New York University. George was my professor and eventually became my longtime mentor. For several decades he has been a generous mentor and visionary for hundreds of students, filmmakers, and organizers. Yet for me and many others, his legacy lies in his unique understanding of the intersection of media making and social justice. He believed in and understood the power of people telling their own stories. He advocated for media-making tools to be put into the hands of people who are directly affected by injustice and are fighting for change in their communities. In the 1970s, George helped found National Federation of Local Cable Programmers — now the Alliance for Community Media — which fought for and won the battle to create Public, Educational, and Governmental Access (PEG) television. PEG TV required cable companies who were using the “public right of way” to give back to communities, by giving them access to mediamaking tools, training, facilities, and channel space. In an interview, George said public access was never meant to “make anybody famous.” The goal was the opposite: “To celebrate the ordinary things people do to help one another.” It was George’s philosophy and methodology of collaboration with community members that inspired me

to pursue community media and media-justice organizing. I worked at Manhattan Neighborhood Network (MNN) for nearly a decade, and was the Director of Community Outreach and Media for several years. I had the pleasure of working with dozens of social-justice and community-based organizations, providing their members with the tools to document their struggles, use media channels to reach supporters, and expose economic, racial, and social injustices. It was during my tenure at MNN that I saw, in a visceral way, how George was light years ahead when he helped fight for — and win — a piece of cable-company profits for people’s media 35 years earlier. He is often referred to as the “happy collaborator.” He taught me what it truly means to be accountable, respectful, and honest with the communities I am documenting. He often said that those in front of the camera are the filmmaker’s first collaborators. What struck a chord with me was when he would often admit that the community members themselves should be telling their story, instead of an outside filmmaker doing it for them. George believed deeply in the ability of everyday people to tell their own stories, come together and change societal problems, and shape their own destinies. His legacy lives on in so many of us who live in multiple spaces — as social-justice organizers, media makers, and media-justice activists. But those fundamental principles of dignity, respect, and belief in the resilience of the human spirit are what I will carry with me — always, in every arena of my life. n Betty Yu, Membership Organizer for the Center for Media Justice, is a recipient of the Union Square Award for grassroots activism. She joins the “New Networks” panel on Friday, Sept. 7, at 11 a.m., and moderates the panel “Prodding the Sleeping Giants: Media, Arts & Citizen’s Movements,” on Saturday, Sept. 8, at 2:15 p.m.
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Ph oto: Liz a B ea r

SPONSOR S

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AWA RD S

INY ASIAN DANCE THEATER
Led and choreographed by acclaimed Hmong artist Iny Xiong, Iny Asian Dance Theater serves more than 120 students annually by bringing Asian traditional dances to life, with a special focus on Asian Indian, Chinese, Hmong, Laotian, and Thai dances. n For more information visit: http://inyasiandancetheater.wordpress.com/.

PERFORMING AT NAMAC AWARDS LUNCHEON

Silver Skies dancers waiting to get

Ribbon Dance Photo: Iny Asian Dance Theater

Qeej Dance, Photo: Ocean Dance Group

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PLENARY S ESS IONS

PLENARY ONE
G R E E N WAY B ALLROOM, FRI DAY , SEPT. 7, 9:00 A.M .

ARTISTS AS LEADERS
Artists and media / arts producers are increasingly at the helms of organizations, working across sectors, shaping public policy, and managing their own careers. “Leadership” itself is a tricky concept in a world where peer-to-peer Internet technologies are decentralizing traditional social hierarchies. New ideas about and practices of leadership are adaptive in a time of rapid social change.

PA ULA M A N LE Y
C o -D ire c to r , T h e L e a r n in g C o m m o n s Po r tla n d, O re g o n

Paula Manley is co-director of The Learning Commons, NAMAC’s partner in presenting the NAMAC Leadership Institute for more than a decade. With a history in media making, jour nalism, and arts administration, Paula draws inspiration from the well of creativity embod ied by artists and cultural workers. As the principal of Paula Manley Consulting (www. paulamanley.com), she supports diverse cul tural and community development groups in achieving their missions. She specializes in participatory planning, community engagement, staff and board leadership development, succession planning, and executive director transiti ons. Based in Portland, Oregon, Paula is co-founder of the Oregon Commons Project, a grassroots initiative that engages diverse publics in exploring and catalyzing greater stewardship of our commons—the gifts of na ture and civilization we share across genera tions. n

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HA N K S H O CK LE E
M u s ic P ro du ce r , S o u n d D e s i g n e r & P re si d ent of S h o c kle e En ter tai n m e n t , N ew Yo r k C i t y Hank Shocklee’s producer/creator credits include landmark Public Enemy recordings such as “It Takes A Nation of Millions to Hold Us Back,” and a lifelong career creating powerful musical vehicles for the life- and culture-changing messages of rap and hiphop. With a collection of platinum and multi-platinum albums, and work at the executive level with MCA and Def Jam records, Shocklee also has produced recordings with Mary J. Blige, Janet Jackson, Ice Cube, Madonna, Peter Gabriel, Anthony Hamilton and others. As a sound designer, film composer, media entrepreneur and champion of electronic music worldwide, Shocklee is always seeking new and innovative ways to transform the audio arts. His company Shocklee Entertainment focuses on a series of multimedia projects he calls the “Future Frequency,” while his popular website Shocklee.com highlights a curated mix of future music, tech, film, and multimedia culture. As an advocate for creators’ rights, Shocklee says copyright law and digital licensing systems are biased toward “elite,” established artists who can afford the fees required to sample widely from the pop-cultural lexicon. This limits the ability of emerging artists and marginalized communities to participate in the cultural discourse of democracy in the United States. n

JEAN COOK
Di rector of Prog ra m s , Fut ure of Mus i c Coalition , Wa s h i ng ton D.C . Jean Cook is a musician, producer and Director of Programs for Future of Music Coalition (FMC), a national nonprofit that works to improve the lives of musicians through research, education, and advocacy on policy issues that directly impact the ability of artists to make a living and reach audiences. She is a founder of Anti-Social Music, a New York-based new music collective, and currently records and tours with Ida/Elizabeth Mitchell, Jon Langford, and Beauty Pill. Her background includes producing and hosting radio programs for 89.9 WKCRFM, New York, and producing dozens of new music performance projects. She currently co-directs FMC's Artist Revenue Streams project, a groundbreaking initiative offering data-driven insight into U.S.-based musician income and how this income correlates with genre, career arc, roles played, tech savviness, radio airplay, and other critical factors. http://money.futureofmusic.org n

JENNIFER DORNER

MARCUS YOUNG
C ity A r tist in Re s i d e n ce , P u b l i c A r t S t . Pa ul Marcus Young creates behavioral art in the form of personal practice and collective experience. Since 2006, Marcus has been Saint Paul’s City Artist in Residence, a program of Public Art Saint Paul that integrates artists into the city-making process. He received his BA in Music at Carleton College and his MFA in Theater Directing at the University of Minnesota. He is a 2011 McKnight Fellow in the Visual Arts and the founding director of the studio, Grace Minnesota. Ongoing works include Don’t you feel it too?, a form of public dance and quasi-spiritual practice, and Everyday Poems for City Sidewalk, a re-imagination of Public Works’ sidewalk maintenance and a slow turning of the city into a large book of poems. n

Di rector, Ind ep end ent Med i a Art s Al l i a n ce, Mont rea l , C a na d a Jennifer Dorner is the National Director of the Independent Media Arts Alliance, a Canadian national arts-service organization that promotes and advances the interests of a vibrant media-arts sector. Jennifer was born in Victoria, British Columbia, Canada. She received her BFA from the University of Ottawa and MFA from the University of Western Ontario. She moved to Nova Scotia in 2003 to run the Eye Level Gallery, an artist-run center in downtown Halifax. During that time she was instrumental in the establishment of the Association of Artist-Run Centres from the Atlantic, a network of artistrun centers in the four Atlantic provinces. Now based in Montréal, Jennifer is pursuing her award-winning, multidisciplinary artistic career while serving on several national arts advocacy boards. She has taught at the University of Western Ontario, Dundas Valley School of Art, and has a strong passion for advocating for the arts with an emphasis on artist-run culture. n

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PLENARY S ESS IONS

PLENARY TWO
G R E E N WAY B ALLROOM, SATU RDAY, SEPT. 8, 9:00 A.M.

CREATIVE PLACEMAKING
Placemaking. It’s a buzzword, but it’s also a reality. Recognizing that art defines the places in which we live is the first step towards more intentional design, deeper collaboration and more positive outcomes. Policy is a major driver of this process — yet so are the needs of communities living in the path of municipal redevelopment activity.

M A LK IA CY RI L
E xe c u tive D ire cto r an d Fo u n de r , C e n te r fo r M e dia Ju stice , O ak l an d

Malkia Amala Cyril is the founder and Executive Director of the Center for Media Justice (CMJ), launched in 2008 to strengthen the media activism and communications capacity of grassroots social justice movements. For the past 15 years, Malkia’s award-winning work has empowered local social justice leaders and organizations with the skills and strategies they need to navigate the complex media environment of the 21st century. For fun, Malkia spends an inordinate amount of time writing short stories, poetry, and blogs when she should be sleeping. Mentored by world renowned writers Audre Lorde and Barbara Smith, Malkia’s creative work has been published in Afrekete: An Anthology of Black Lesbian Writing, In the Tradition: An Anthology of Young Black Writers, and Aloud: Voices from the Nuyorican Poet’s Café. n

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D E B O R A H CU LLI N AN

E xe c u tive D ire cto r , I n te rs e ct i o n fo r t h e A r ts , Sa n Fra n i sco Deborah M. Cullinan has excelled for 20 years in nonprofit management, fundraising, and organizing. In 1996, she was named Executive Director of Intersection for the Arts, one of San Francisco’s most vibrant communitybased cultural centers. During this time, Intersection established a national reputation for developing inclusive models of contemporary art and performance creation, for the cultivation of new artists and audiences, and for powerful cross-sector partnerships. Previous to Intersection, Deborah served as Interim Executive Director and Development Director for Dolores Street Community Services in San Francisco. Among her many areas of distinction, Deborah has also worked in development at Twin Cities Public Television Corporation in Saint Paul, and has served as a member of the boards of directors of a variety of arts and cultural organizations. She is a co-founder of Arts Forum SF — an inclusive forum committed to bringing people together to share ideas and resources, and create sustainable and forward-thinking arts programming, partnerships, and civic policies in the city of San Francisco. n

GÜLGÜN KAYIM
C ul t ure a nd C rea t i ve Econom y , C i t y of Mi nnea p ol i s In August 2011, Gülgün Kayim joined the City of Minneapolis in the newly created role of Director of Arts, Culture, and the Creative Economy. Previously, she was the Assistant Director of the Bush Foundation Artist Program. Before joining the Bush Foundation, she served as Public Art on Campus Coordinator at the Weisman Art Museum, University of Minnesota, and has also consulted extensively on site-specific performance, public art, and professional development with individual artists and various arts organizations in the Twin Cities. Gülgün is also an interdisciplinary artist and co-founder of Minneapolis based site-specific performance collective Skewed Visions, the Minneapolis City Pages Artists of the Year in 2004. She is a core member of the international artist network Mapping Spectral Traces and Theatre Without Borders. Her artistic work has been recognized through a number of local and national awards, grants and fellowships. n

ANN M ARKUSEN

N OËL R AYMON D

Di rector, Art s Econom y Ini t i a t i ve U ni vers i t y of Mi nnes ota

A r tistic D ire c to r , P i l l sb u r y H o u s e T h e a t re, Ch ica go Noël Raymond is the CoArtistic Director of the Pillsbury House/Pillsbury House Theatre Cultural Community Hub. She has served on the Leadership Council of Pillsbury United Communities (PUC) for twelve years, on the boards of directors for the Multicultural Development Center, the Burning House Group Theatre Company — which she co-founded in 1995 — and the South Minneapolis Arts Business Association, which she also helped found. Noël received the Phyllis Colwell Award for excellence in service in 1997. She has served on numerous panels, holds an MFA in Acting from the University of Minnesota, and has performed locally and nationally with Pillsbury House Theatre, the Guthrie Theater, Penumbra Theatre in Minneapolis, and the Hangar Theatre in New York. n

Ann Markusen is Director of the Arts Economy Initiative and the Project on Regional and Industrial Economics at the University of Minnesota’s Humphrey School of Public Affairs. She is a frequent public speaker and advisor to public agencies, policymakers and nonprofit arts organizations across the U.S., in Europe, Japan, Korea, Australia, and Brazil. Markusen’s arts studies include California’s Arts and Cultural Ecology (The James Irvine Foundation, 2011), Creative Placemaking (National Endowment for the Arts, 2010), Native Artists: Careers, Resources, Space, Gifts (McKnight Foundation, 2009), Crossover: How Artists Build Careers across Commercial, Non-profit and Community Work (Hewlett, Irvine, and Leveraging Investments in Creativity, 2006), Artists’ Centers (The McKnight Foundation, 2006), and The Artistic Dividend (Humphrey Institute of Public Affairs, 2003). n

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LOCALLY S OU RC ED EVEN TS TOU RS
NAMAC'S TWIN CITIES TOURS: PUBLIC ART, ALTERNATIVE SPACES, CREATIVE SERVICES & LOCAL GEMS
Space is limited: sign up for Conference Tours at the registration desk!

YOUTH MEDIA/ARTS TOUR: IN PROGRESS TO KULTURE KLUB COLLABORATIVE
The Twin Cities are full of thriving youth-services organizations. In this two-stop tour we highlight Kulture Klub Collaborative, an independent nonprofit arts organization that brings together artists and homeless teens at a crisis drop-in center; and In Progress, a nonprofit space for young people to develop their skills as storytellers, artists, and leaders using photography, video, music, and digital media. n

ALTERNATIVE SPACES TOUR: INTERMEDIA ARTS TO FRANKLIN ART WORKS
Get an in-depth look at two Twin Cities gems that have altered commercial spaces into creative playgrounds. Intermedia Art’s auto-garage-turned-ArtsHub is a coworking program designed to spark collaborations and support creative people. Their youth media programs allow at-risk youth to create films and TV shows about issues in their lives and communities. Occupying a former silent-film era movie palace, Franklin Art Works is a nationally leading alternative space for solo exhibitions by emerging and mid-career artists from around the world. n

PUBLIC ART HIGHLIGHTS: PRESENTED BY FORECAST PUBLIC ART
Minneapolis has an impressive, expanding collection of public art spread throughout the city, from downtown to its wonderful neighborhoods — from monumental commissioned works to provocative street art. Veteran tour guide and public art expert Jack Becker (Forecast Public Art and Public Art Review magazine) will lead this amazing journey and reveal the back stories of compelling art projects around town. n

EXPERIMENTAL ECOSYSTEMS TOUR: THE SOAP FACTORY AND JUXTAPOSITION ARTS
Do not miss this behind-the-scenes look at these Minneapolis organizations creating platforms for creative experimentation. Juxtaposition Arts engages with Twin Cities youth through hands-on visual art and design programs that prepare young people for success in a diverse innovation-based economy. The Soap Factory is a laboratory for artistic experimentation and innovation, dedicated to supporting artists and engaging audiences through the production and presentation of contemporary art in a unique and historic environment. n

CREATIVE SERVICE TOUR: JUXTAPOSITION ARTS TO MINNEAPOLIS TELEVISION NETWORK
This tour focuses on two organizations offering unique creative skills training. Juxtaposition Arts combines design education and youth empowerment with a social-enterprise business model. Students begin with visual-arts literacy training and then have opportunities to be employed while learning and teaching professional design. Minneapolis Television Network is a TV station of immigrants, artists, neighbors, and you, a station dedicated to community and free speech, a station without commercials that treats you like a citizen, not like a consumer. n
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N e d K a hn ’s T h e Wav e, a wi nd ve il on Ta rge t Pl az a. Pho to: J a ck Becker

LO CAL LY SO U R CED E VE N T S PA RT IES , S H INDIGS & S O I R É E S
THURSDAY, SEPT. 6 5:00-9:00 P.M.
Opening Reception @ the Walker Art Center 1750 Hennepin Avenue, Minneapolis; walkerart.org

FRIDAY, SEPT. 7 6:00-9:00 P.M.
Art Opening at Franklin Art Works “Sighthouse,” by Jonathan Bruce Williams and “The Two Stories” by Alejandro Cesarco 1021 East Franklin Avenue, Minneapolis; franklinfresh.tumblr.com Franklin Art Works will present two concurrent solo exhibitions. In the Main Gallery, the Minneapolis artist Jonathan Bruce Williams will premier a major sculptural installation of a giant wooden lighthouse incorporating two 16mm projections. The adjacent Screening Room will feature Alejandro Cesarco's black-and-white single channel projection, The Two Stories, based on a story by Felisberto Hernández.

5:00-6:30 P.M.
Opening Remarks + Screenings at the Walker Cinema.

WELCOME NAMAC MEMBERS!
Please join us in the newly renovated Walker Cinema for opening remarks and an eclectic selection of four works from the Walker Arts Center's Ruben/Bentson Film and Video Study Collection: My Name is Oona, directed by Gunvor Nelson (1969, 16mm,10 minutes) A MOVIE, directed by Bruce Conner (1958, 16mm, 12 minutes) A Girl Like Me, directed by Kiri Davis (2005, video, 7 minutes) Broadway by Light, directed by William Klein (1958, 35mm, 12 minutes)

SATURDAY, SEPT. 8 7:00-11:00 P.M.
Art Opening at the Soap Factory "Why We Do This," by Andy Ducett 514 Second Street Southeast, Minneapolis; www.thesoapfactory.org Saturday night caps off NAMAC conference season with an epic, site-specific installation at the Soap Factory by Minnesota artist Andy Ducett. "Why We Do This" stitches together fragments of pop culture, workaday symbols and collective memory to create a single, 12,000-square-foot installation of interlocking, interactive vignettes. Join a giant game of Battleship, peruse a thrift store, watch the clouds roll by from the seat of an airplane, or catch a glimpse of a sasquatch through the window of a log cabin — all within the Soap Factory's sprawling, post-industrial interiors along the banks of the Mississippi River.

6:30-7:30 P.M,
Walker Gallery 8: Food and beverages served John Keston performs computer-generated music by gathering information from organic, time-based visual media, and using it to produce dynamic musical phrases.

7:30-9:00 P.M.
Free access to the Walker Art Center galleries and sculpture garden.

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LOCALLY S OU RC ED EVEN TS CON FE RE NCE HACKER SPAC E
BY TWIN CITIES MAKER/HACK FACTORY WORKSHOPS & DEMOS MIRAGE ROOM, HYATT REGENCY SEPT. 7-8

The hacker-space movement is flourishing all over the world. Hacker spaces are open-source, intensely collaborative, tech-savvy and intellectually unbounded — places for people to share in the act of imagining and creating do-it-yourself technology and art. Join the members of Twin Cities Maker in this mobile version of their open-source workspace, The Hack Factory (tcmaker.org/blog/hack-factory/). Hacker Space schedule: All workshops will run concurrently with each other and during all of the 90 minute panel blocks. You may attend them at your leisure, a-la-carte, or commit to single workshops for the full 90 minutes. n

MAKING INTERACTIVE ART WITH ARDUINO

Instructor: Scott Hill Limited supply of Arduino kits available at the workshop for $50. The Arduino is an inexpensive electronic device designed for artists, hobbyists, and educators, that makes it easy to add interactive elements to almost anything you can dream of. You’ll learn what the Arduino is all about, how easy it is to work with, and see some of the great things people have made with it. n

LEARN TO SOLDER
Instructor: Michael Krumpus Limited supply of soldering kit available at the workshop for $10 Students will learn basic soldering skills to assemble a small battery-powered electronic device that they can take home after completion. Basic electronics principles will also be discussed, so this is a great way to get started with hobby electronics. No prior experience necessary, suitable for all ages. Soldering iron equipment provided.n

22

LO CAL LY SO U R CED EV E N T S

INTERACTIVE LED ARTWORK BASICS
Instructor: John Wilson It’s one thing to have an idea for a glowing, blinking, flickering piece of art, and another thing entirely to create an actual, finished piece of work. Absolutely no prior electronics knowledge is required for this discussion and demonstration of the basics of an LED (light-emitting diode), the different types of LED lighting, how to control your LEDs and LED modules, how to determine what kinds of visual effects are feasible and what are not, and fitting your visual effects within a budget. The goal is to give participants an introduction to what is possible, as well as an intuitive understanding of LED technology. Includes some hands-on work with actual LEDs and pre-made LED modules.n

WOODEN BOWS: THE ART OF THE BOWYER
Instructor: Riley Harrison A bowyer is a person who crafts bows used for archery. Traditional wooden bows are made using wood, glue, and natural fibers, without any of the synthetic materials such as fiberglass used in modern compound or recurve bows. Come see a traditional North American flat bow being made using only unpowered hand tools. There will be bows in various stages of completion on display, and the instructor will discuss the tools, techniques, materials, and benefits of making and using a traditional wooden bow. n

SIMPLE TWO-TRANSISTOR LIGHT THEREMIN
Instructor: Alex Dyba Limited supply of Theremin kits available at the workshop for $10 Don’t know what a transistor is? After this workshop you will, along with all the other components that go into this incredibly simple theremin kit from (from GetLoFi.com) aimed at novice tinkerers. We will guide you through the circuit board assembly process with easyto-follow directions. In the end you will have an addictive little noise maker to show your friends or use as a fridge magnet. The kit features a quality circuit board, built-in speaker, output jack, and a battery. Assembly instructions: vendakit.com/pdf/theremin.pdf n

INTRODUCTION TO LOCKSPORT
Instructor: Michael Freiert Locksport is the amateur study of how locks and locking systems work. It’s not about how to break into a soda machine, but about the study of the little mechanical puzzles that we rely on for so many things in daily life. You’ve probably seen lock picking in movies and on TV, and may have seen “bump keys” on the news. Now find out more about how it all works. n

Ph oto: Pau l So b cz ak

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LOCALLY S OU RC ED EVEN TS

LO CAL LY SOUR CED AR T I NS TAL L ED, PER FOR MED & E XPE RIENCED
WONDER / THINK PROJECT
Chris Houltberg and Max Harper Commissioned by Northern Lights.mn for Northern Spark 2012 Da ily a t th e G re e n way P ro m e n ad e The cognitive acts of thinking and wondering have become more public with the emergence of mainstream social media. The Wonder/Think Project explores how the shift towards an online, social culture has shaped what we wonder about, and changed how we think about the unknown. The Wonder/Think Project consists of multiple simultaneous projections that invite the audience to consider what people worldwide are thinking and wondering right now. It is an installation that displays real-time Twitter messages that start with “I wonder” or “I think,” and pairs those messages with related images found via Flickr.com. The resulting stream of information offers a spontaneous glimpse into the lives of others, while giving participants a chance to examine and reflect what they themselves wonder about. n

ROLLING REVELRY (SOOLINE SERENADE)
Mike Hoyt, commissioned by Constellation S a turda y, Se pte m b e r 8 , 9 : 0 0 p m – 1 2 : 0 0 am Meet at the Soap Factory main entrance, 514 Second Street Southeast, Minneapolis. A limited number of bicycles will be available to rent, payable via credit card, on first-come-first-served basis through Nice Ride MN; www.niceridemn.org A bike- and pedestrian-focused event that will bring mobile karaoke to the streets and bike paths of Minneapolis, the RR(SS) will operate from a self-contained mobile karaoke system pulled behind a bicycle. It is presented in conjunction with the 2nd annual Constellation event, a collection of public cultural projects taking place in South Minneapolis. Twitter location for live updates: @NoraeHoyt n

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E SS AY

THIS PLACE
THE TWIN CITIES
By Jack Becker, Forecast Public Art What I love about the Twin Cities is that we have two very different, unique and great cities in ONE. Minneapolis and St. Paul are so close together, yet so different, it’s like having Boston and Los Angeles meeting at the Mississippi. St. Paul — like Boston — oozes European old-world charm and values, preserving its historic buildings (my favorite is the Ramsey County Courthouse, an Art Deco gem with its jaw-dropping Carl Milles sculpture — a monumental onyx masterpiece). It has winding streets that are easy to get lost in, lots of family-oriented museums, and of course it’s the capital of Minnesota, with an amazing State Capitol building designed by Cass Gilbert. Minneapolis is the arts and entertainment capital of Minnesota, with nightlife that won’t quit and amazing theaters, museums, and galleries. The streets are a grid, so you really can’t get lost. The city — like LA — tends to dispense with the old in favor of the new. Progressive architecture is easy to find (the Guthrie Theater and the University of Minnesota’s Weisman Art Museum are good places to start). I like the computer-programmed light displays on the top of the Target headquarters building (a light show every night). The Twin Cities have more community-based arts organizations per capita than anywhere in the country, and it shows. Public art is everywhere, and many artists benefit from the grants and commission opportunities that abound. But it’s also a heavy D.I.Y. art scene, and that means on any given day or night, you might encounter homegrown creativity on the streets, in the parks, and in unexpected places. Be prepared to be surprised, and don’t just visit one of the Twins! n Jack Becker is the founder and Executive Director of Forecast Public Art, a 34-year-old Twin Cities-based nonprofit. Jack will moderate the “Public Art: Engaging Communities, Claiming Space” panel at 10:45 a.m. on Saturday, Sept. 8.

R an d y Wal ke r ’s R et urn Journey (ak a T he Brac kett R ocket ) re u s e s a p l ayg ro u nd struc ture fo r a m o num ental l andm ar k i n B rac ke tt Park . Pho to : R andy Wal ker

P hoto: And rea S teud el

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E X PO ME DIA/ AR TS EXPO
NAMAC's first Media/Arts Expo builds a bridge between local and national arts-service, presentation, production and intermediary agencies, by providing an accessible, open marketplace of ideas, products, services, and opportunities. Unlike traditional expositions, the NAMAC Media/Arts Expo eschews isolated booths roped off with stanchions, instead placing 6'x33" banquet tables in close proximity. This facilitates networking and exchange by creating an atmosphere of sharing, connection, and intrigue. The result is intense cross-pollination and up-close socialization, and maximum exposure of exhibitors to each other and attending crowds.

INNOVA RECORDINGS
Innova redefines the typical relationship between artist and label. Artist and label work together, taking advantage of each other’s strengths, to provide both the tools of an established record label and the freedom usually associated with self-publishing. innova@composersforum.org 651.251.2823

JAZZ88 KBEM
Twin Cities’ public radio voice for jazz and education, KBEM (Jazz88) is a program of the Minneapolis Public Schools (MPS). Approximately 150 students annually participate in KBEM’s hands-on educational program, which focuses on all aspects of broadcasting and production. studio@jazz88fm.com 612.668.1735

ASIAN MEDIA ACCESS
Asian Media Access (AMA) is a comprehensive, mediabased community advocacy organization. AMA is dedicated to using multimedia and technology as tools for social betterment. amamedia@amamedia.org 612.376.7715

KARTEMQUIN FILMS
For over 45 years, Kartemquin Films has been making documentaries that examine and critique society through the stories of real people. info@kartemquin.com 773.472.4366

THE FILM SOCIETY OF MINNEAPOLIS ST. PAUL
The mission of the Film Society of Minneapolis St. Paul is to foster a knowledgeable and vibrant appreciation of the art of film through a commitment to exhibiting the very best of contemporary and historical independent, local, national, and international cinema to Minnesota audiences. info@mspfilmsociety.org 612.331.7563

KFAI
KFAI is a volunteer-based community radio station that exists to broadcast information, arts, and entertainment programming for an audience of diverse racial, social, and economic backgrounds. janislaneewart@kfai.org 612.341.3144

INDEPENDENT ARTS & MEDIA
IAM provides fiscal sponsorship to support commercial-free media and arts projects that build community, civic participation, and cultural engagement. Media, journalism, the arts and culture are all arenas of social interaction and civic engagement. mailbox@artsandmedia.net 415.738.4975

LIGHT GREY ART LAB
Light Grey Art Lab is a gallery and art events center. We host a variety of collaborative art exhibitions, studio and professional development workshops, networking events, and lecture series. hello@lightgreyartlab.com 612.239.2047

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EXPO

NEWSFUNDERS.ORG
Newsfunders.org is a collaborative campaign to transform the financing of journalism, and liberate journalists from the challenges of legacy-media business models. newsfunders@artsandmedia.net 415.738.4975

MINNESOTA PUBLIC RADIO
Minnesota Public Radio® is one of the nation’s premier public radio stations producing programming for radio, online, and live audiences. mail@mpr.org 651.290.1500

THE NATIONAL ALLIANCE FOR MEDIA ARTS + CULTURE
NAMAC fosters and fortifies the culture and business of independent media arts. Through dialogue, collaboration, research, and advocacy, we connect, organize, and develop organizations. members@namac.org 415.431.1391

TWIN CITIES YOUTH MEDIA NETWORK
Twin Cities Youth Media Network is a collaboration of youth media organizations in Minneapolis and St. Paul. Our mission is to promote, advocate for, support, and share resources with the Twin Cities community of youth media makers and media arts educators. www.tcymn.org

NORTHERN LIGHTS.MN
Northern Lights.mn is an interactive media-oriented art organization from the Twin Cities for the world. It presents innovative art in the public sphere focusing on artists creatively using technology to engender new relations between audience and artwork and more broadly between citizenry and their built environment info@northern.lights.mn

VIDEO DATA BANK
Founded at the School of the Art Institue of Chicago (SAIC) in 1976 at the inception of the media arts movement, the Video Data Bank (VDB) is a leading resource in the United States for video by and about contemporary artists. The VDB collection includes the work of more than 500 artists and 5,000 video art titles, 2,500+ in active distribution to venues all over the world. info@vdb.org 312.345.3550

MIZNA
Mizna is devoted to promoting Arab American film, literature, and art. Mizna publishes the only journal of Arab American literature, Mizna: Prose, Poetry, and Art Exploring Arab America, and produces the Twin Cities Arab Film Festival, among other events. mizna@mizna.org 612.788.6920

WORKS PROGRESS
Works Progress is an artist-led public art and design studio based in Minneapolis. They create collaborative projects that inspire, inform, and connect, catalyzing relationships across creative and cultural boundaries, and providing new platforms for public engagement. hello@worksprogress.org 612.838.0810

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SCHED ULE AT A GL ANC E
FRIDAY, SEPT. 7
BALLROOM 8:00 A.M. Breakfast REGENCY GREENWAY E GREENWAY F GREENWAY D

9:00-10:30 Plenary: Artists as Leaders 10:30-11:00 Expo + Coffee Using Data for an Arts Agenda Expo + Lunch

10:30-11:30 Workshop: Comics Online The New Networks 11:30-12:30 Workshop: Smart Phone Tool Kit

11:00-12:30

Teaching (and Learning) Media & the Arts

Mobile Media: Defining Places, Engaging Communities

12:30-1:30

1:30-3:00

Creating Equity, Representing Community

Grantmaker Speed Dating

1:30-2:30 Workshop: Mozilla Popcorn 2:30-3:30 Workshop: Mobile Engagement

Journalism's New Directions

Pennies from Heaven: Crowdfunding and Community Support

3:15-3:45

Expo + Coffee

4:00-6:00 Tours: Sign up at registration; buses load at 3:45

SATURDAY, SEPT. 8
BALLROOM 8:00 A.M. 9:00-10:30 Breakfast Plenary: Creative Placemaking 10:45-11:30 Workshop: ITVS OVEE Collaborating With Museums Public Art: Engaging Communities, Claiming Space Youth Media Networks: How We're Connected Open Space Documentaries REGENCY GREENWAY E GREENWAY F GREENWAY D

10:45-12:15

12:15 - 2:15 Awards Luncheon: Nicollet Ballroom, Main Level 2:15-3:15 Workshop: Alternative Spaces Movement 2:15-4:30 Power Mapping & Social Network Analysis Distribution: Brave New Digital Worlds Prodding the Sleeping Giants: Media, Art, & Citizens’ Movements

2:15-3:45

5:15-7:00

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SCH ED U L E AT A GLA N C E
SCREENING: MINNEHAHA ROOM

GREENWAY G

GREENWAY A

MIRAGE ROOM

GREENWAY J

PROMENADE

Supporting Independent Production

Hack FactoryMaker Space Screening Room (10:00 - 7:00) Expo (All Day)

Being Strategic About Transmedia

Workshop: Creating "Leaderful" Organizations and Networks

Hack FactoryMaker Space

1:30-2:30 Workshop: Media & Communication for Social Movements

GREENWAY G

GREENWAY A

MIRAGE ROOM

GREENWAY J

SCREENING: MINNEHAHA ROOM

PROMENADE

Digital Frontiers: Copyright, Censorship, the Commons, and Privacy

Hack FactoryMaker Space Screening Room (10:00 - 7:00) Hack FactoryMaker Space Expo (All Day)

2:15-5:15 Arts on Air: How to Start a Community Radio Station

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DOCUMENTARY S C REENI N G P R O GR AM

EVIDENCE

A PROGRAM IN DOCUMENTARY
Welcome to the NAMAC Conference documentaryscreening program, Evidence. In consideration of the conference theme of leadership as creativity, this program showcases people using the resources at their disposal to change the world for themselves and their own communities. These shifts in perspective do not come without desperate measures, tremendous sacrifice, and at times grave conflict, but they do come with people stepping into leadership positions in unprecedented ways. Evidence brings together documentary films that focus on individual narrative, intimate stories, and dramatic experiences — each serving as a point of entry into larger issues affecting communities across the world. Afghani women creating schools in quiet corners of their towns; musicians fighting for the rights of young women; Australian sex workers standing up for the disabled — Evidence offers a broad spectrum of intimate stories amid the larger social and political issues of our time. The screening includes films from internationally known filmmakers such as Lynn Hershman, and trailblazing organizations such as Women Make Movies, as well as pieces from emerging artists, some showing for the first time. As a program, Evidence brings a stunning variety of ideas and stories together, and exposes the NAMAC community to different forms of work and working. Please join us during the NAMAC conference for Evidence. For some screenings we will be hosting the filmmakers to discuss why they made their movies, and their successes and experiences in putting them out into the world. Thank you,

P RO GRAM O NE
IN THE MINNEHAHA ROOM
Friday, September 7 10 a.m. Gravity Hill Newsreels Series Two By Jem Cohen, 2012, 39:16 minutes Video Data Bank Four short documentaries on Occupy Wall Street’s emergence in New York City, at Times Square and Zuccotti Park. 10:45 a.m. The Fruit of Our Labor: Afghan Perspectives in Film By Hasibullah Asmati, Reza Sahel, Zarah Sadat, Aqeela Rezai, Ahmad Wahid Zaman, Mona Haidari, Majeed Zarand, Baqir Tawakoli, Fakhria Ibrahimi, Sayed Qasem Hossaini, 114 minutes, 2011 Community Supported Film These films were made by Afghans during an intensive five-week training in documentary production provided by Community Supported Film. After three weeks each student developed and produced a character-driven short documentary. For many of the trainees, this is their directorial debut as a documentary filmmaker. 12:45 p.m. Bocas de Ceniza (Mouths of Ash) By Juan Manuel Echavarría, 2003–2004, 18 min. “Colombian artist Juan Manuel Echavarría uses video and photography to create a visual requiem to his country. Through narrative and powerful imagery, he addresses pain and suffering caused by loss and repression.” — Weatherspoon Art Museum 1:10 p.m. Sarabah By Maria Luisa Gambale, Gloria Bremer & Steven Lawrence, 2011, 60 min Women Make Movies In this stirring documentary, hip-hop artist Sister Fa fights to stop the practice of female genital cutting in her home country of Senegal. From her early days as an unpolished music phenom through a career-reinvention in Berlin, Sister Fa has continually smashed barriers in the male-dominated hip-hop world. But as this film reveals, her strength of character was forged in a journey of hardship and transformation.

AIMEE LE DUC / SCREENING ROOM CURATOR

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DO CU M EN TAR Y SCR EEN I N G P R O G RA M

2:15 p.m. Janie’s Janie By Newsreel, 1972, 25 min Twn: Third World Newsreel. “Janie’s Janie is unique in the Newsreel collection. It is a ‘personal documentary’ that follows a woman who comes to realize that she has to control her own life, after years of experiencing physical and mental abuse. Using both interviews and verité material, it is one of the more complex Newsreel films.” — NYWIFT.org 2:45 p.m. Kivalina People by Gina Abatemarco Native American Public Telecommunications An intimate and unique look into the public and private lives of one of America’s last Indigenous cultures trying to survive in the modern Arctic, where struggles of poverty, climate change, and culture are inextricably intertwined. 3:30 p.m. Native Daughters: The Road Home by Princella Ann Parker Part of a series from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln: “Native Daughters is a collection of stories, profiles and multimedia projects about a diverse group of Native American women. They are healers and warriors, story tellers and law makers, leaders, environmentalists and artists. It is our intention that these stories are just a starting point to learn about Native American women and we hope women across the country will join in and share their voices.”

4:00 p.m. C Red Blue J Chris Sollars, 2009, 78 min Independent production “[A]n experimental documentary feature that illustrates the complications of division during the 2004 presidential election as it is manifested in one family. Director Chris Sollars, an artist living and working in San Francisco, sets out to try and bridge the political gaps in his own family between a younger sister who works for the Bush Administration, a Born Again Christian father, and Lesbian mother ... C RED BLUE J is pieced together through an archive of family super-8 films, photos, interviews, and art videos. The story personalizes the political division of the 2004 Presidential campaign as gay marriage is tactically used to split the nation’s vote and the director’s family.” — Winkleman Gallery, New York. 5:30 p.m. I Am by Sonali Gulati, 71 minutes Independent production I Am chronicles the journey of an Indian lesbian filmmaker who returns to Delhi, eleven years later, to reopen what was once home, and finally confronts the loss of her mother to whom she never came out. As she meets and speaks to parents of other gay and lesbian Indians, she pieces together the fabric of what family truly means, in a landscape where being gay was until recently a criminal and punishable offense. 6:45 p.m. 575 Castro Street by Jenni Olson Focus Features Shot on the set of Focus Features’ MILK, director Jenni Olson effectively employs archival recordings of Harvey Milk describing the events he would like to take place in the event of his assassination.

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DOCUMENTARY S C REENI N G P R O GR AM
PR O G RA M T WO
IN THE MINNEHAHA ROOM
Saturday, September 8 10 a.m. Everybody Lives Downstream by Anna Scime with Buffalo Niagara RIVERKEEPER, 2011, 28 min. Squeaky Wheel “[A] frank and astonishingly intimate real-life drama of a mother and daughter desperate for love and forgiveness, but caught in a devastating cycle. During the 1980s, a crack cocaine epidemic ravaged and impoverished many inner city neighborhoods. As parents like Diane succumbed to addiction, a generation of children like Love entered the foster care system. Shot over ten years, the film centers on Love and Diane af10:30 a.m. You Are Where You Live ter the family is reunited and is struggling to reconby Vincenzo Mistretta and Clean Air Coalition of WNY, 2011, nect.” — PBS.org 23 min Squeaky Wheel 4:00 p.m.: The Power of Two Three stories of community efforts to hold local pollut- By Marc Smolowitz, 2007, 94 minutes ers accountable, and the nonprofit coalition supporting their efforts. An intimate portrayal of the bond between half-Jap“[E]xamines the history of this city’s complicated relationship with the Buffalo River — the way we continue to alter this body of water through industrial exploitation as well as remediation and restoration efforts.” — Squeaky.org 11 a.m.: !W.A.R. (Women Art Revolution) by Lynn Hershman Leeson, 2010, 83 minutes Women Make Movies “Forty-two years in the making, !W.A.R. charts the history of the Feminist Art Movement in America from the 1960s to the present and deftly illuminates how this under-explored movement radically transformed the art and culture of our times.” — Newmediafix.net 12:30 p.m.: Scarlet Road By Catherine Scott, 2011, 70 min Women Make Movies “Impassioned about freedom of sexual expression, Australian sex worker Rachel Wotton has become highly specialized in working with clients with disability. Rachel’s philosophy, that human touch and sexual intimacy can be the most therapeutic aspects to our existence, is making a dramatic impact on the lives of her clients. The depth, humor and passion in this documentary will transform the way you see sex workers and people with disabilities forever.” — SXSW.com 6:15 p.m.: Gravity Hill Newsreels Series One By Jem Cohen, 2012, 27:01 minutes Video Data Bank First of two series in of short documentaries on Occupy Wall Street’s emergence in New York City, at Times Square and Zuccotti Park. anese twin sisters Anabel Stenzel and Isabel Stenzel Byrnes, their lifelong battle with the fatal genetic disease cystic fibrosis, survival through miraculous double lung transplants, and improbable emergence as authors, athletes, and advocates for organ donation. The film has garnered ten awards and screened at 30 film festivals and numerous community screenings in five countries and three continents. 4:30 p.m.: Audience discussion with Marc Smolowitz about the documentary The Power of Two. 1:45 p.m.: Love and Diane By Jennifer Dworkin, 2002, 116 min Women Make Movies

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E SS AY

OPEN SPACE D O C U M E N TA R I E S :
WHY, WHO, AND HOW?
By Patricia Zimmermann, Ithaca College, Finger Lakes Environmental Film Festival

I’ve never been more unsettled, confused — and excited — about documentary. Everything I have ever theorized, historicized, analyzed, criticized, programmed, and written about documentary in its linear, argumentative, analog forms needs a serious gut job. A total renovation from the attic to the kitchen. Why? Over the past few years, when I’ve gone to film festivals or scholarly symposia, it’s the new media sidebars — where no one wants to be called a director anymore and everyone is a convener or a designer — that yank me away from the movie theaters. Who? Example: Helen De Michiel’s Lunch Love Community Project — a lush mosaic website of short collaborative videos chronicling the movement for healthy food in Berkeley, California, public schools, produced with the teachers, cooks, kids, and parents. Three-dimensional spheres of place-based issues and people, these transmedia projects dismantle all of my previous theories like intellectual wrecking balls. Beyond the trendy tropes of mash-ups, crowdsourcing, user-generated content, “produsers,” and marketing engagement through double-screening — open-space documentaries invite encounters with people, ideas, places, and technologies. Example: Saving the Sierra, produced by jesikah maria ross and Catherine Stifter — a collaborative project charting the stories and voices of Californians and environmental issues in the Sierra Nevada Mountains using radio, community meetings, and innovative story mapping.

Collaborative and shape-shifting, these projects open up dialogue, convenings, stories, and a new form of collaborative, grounded space. They migrate fluidly across the analog and the digital, using adaptable platforms and inviting in interactive communities. How? Example: The Cotton Road Project, by Laura Kissel with Li Zhen, tracing the supply chain of cotton from South Carolina to Shanghai manufacturing, with short video vignettes, multiple stories, and an innovative “sourcemap” that tracks supply chains of commodities through crowd research. Although I still love their gutsy vigor, long-form doc features loom a bit like skyscrapers from the 1960s — overbuilt and probably not sustainable. In comparison, these more modest, open-space transmedia projects seem more agile, more adaptable, more alive, more responsive, less predictable. If you want to dig further into open-space documentary, you can join De Michiel, ross and Kissel for conversation at the working session on “Open Space Documentaries” (I will moderate) at this year’s utterly alluring NAMAC conference, Leading Creatively, in Minneapolis, September 6-8. This conference promises one of the biggest open spaces in the new media ecology. n

Patricia Zimmermann is a professor of screen studies at Ithaca College and co-director of the Finger Lakes Environmental Film Festival. Professor Zimmermann will moderate the panel “Open Space Documentaries,” featuring the abovementioned transmedia artists, on Saturday, Sept. 8, at 10:45 a.m.

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E SSAY POPPING YOUR BUBBLE:
By Eric Martin, Native American Public Telecommunications It was at SXSW 2011 that someone tweeted about realizing that not all their clients had smartphones and tablets, followed by a telling hashtag: #beyondthebubble. This was followed by a tweet from our friends at Native Public Media, heralding the wonderful achievement of reservation homes surpassing the 75 percent mark for landline phone penetration. Seeing these two tweets back-to-back just showed how out of touch many of those in the SXSW bubble were with the rest of the country — especially rural and poor areas. It’s not enough for technology advocates and leaders to move “beyond the bubble.” The bubble needs to be popped. I was at the 2nd Annual Tribal Technology Visioning Conference in 2003, when a room full of tech people working in Indian Country gave a standing ovation to the news that their goal of 50 percent landline phone penetration in reservation households had been met. It was a defining moment in my life that I often cite when people say that the Digital Divide has been bridged. It’s actually kind of funny how many times people have “corrected” me on that fact: “Oh, you mean Internet access, don’t you? Or cell phone penetration?” Bubbles can be hard to pop. The idea that there are households that physically can’t get a dial tone just doesn’t match up with a lot of people’s realities. And it isn’t just mainstream society’s bubble that needs to be popped. Yet another obstacle is convincing people who are not online that the Internet has value for them. Part of this is reaching out to non-digital communities and demonstrating how the Internet is a tool they can use — to connect with members of their community that have moved away, or to share their culture and community with the world. In the process, they can pop other bubbles around ideas of race, art, knowledge, and life. I hope to continue popping bubbles at the NAMAC 2012 conference in Minneapolis. We’ll discuss the Digital Divide, and learn how Internet “newbies” are using this new medium to preserve and share culture with each other, and with the world at large. n Eric Martin, Interactive Media Specialist with Native American Public Telecommunications, has presented around North America about radio, the Digital Divide, new media, and the Web. He will moderate the panel “Creating Equity, Representing Community” on Friday, Sept. 7, at 1:30 p.m.
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TRUE TALES OF THE DIGITAL DIVIDE

AN E X PE RIM E NT IN PL ACE M A K ING
By Deborah Cullinan, Intersection for the Arts

INTERSECTING ART AND EQUITY:

When Intersection for the Arts started looking for a new building in San Francisco, we were operating within a pretty traditional and limited sense of cultural space: If we just owned our own building, had a bigger theater, and a street level gallery, everything would be golden. Yet we were fooling ourselves if we thought the typical nonprofit arts model was working. How many of us can say that artists are able to live sustainably? That our creative impact is maximized in our communities? We eventually discovered — as the economy was falling apart and whole neighborhoods were going dark — that maybe what the world needs is not another arts venue, but an integrated approach to cultural, community, and economic development that embraces creativity and inclusion. Early in the process we thought we found that perfect building. We had competitors, figured out who, and sat down to negotiate. It was the founders of Hub Bay Area — an affiliate of a growing global community of social entrepreneurs. Within minutes of meeting, we started imagining a place where artists and entrepreneurs could share ideas, models, and resources. We started searching for a building together, picking up crazy new partners along the way. These included the 5M Project, a major urban development project in downtown San Francisco. Joining these partners meant letting go of dedicated places for art and performance, and instead infusing whole systems — workplaces, hallways, alleys — with creativity. It also meant accepting extraordinary risk in partnering with a big development corporation. Is gentrification the problem? Or is the problem that not everyone is included? Our challenge is to make and test the case for a kind of creative placemaking that includes those who are most vulnerable, and that asserts the social and economic necessity for nurturing diversity in its deepest, broadest, and most genuine sense. This is what we mean by creative placemaking — a holy connected system of people, programs, partnerships that celebrates the dynamic complexity of place, and connects people to each other and to opportunity. A system that lifts not some of us, but as many as possible. A system that is, in and of itself, a work of art. n Deborah Cullinan, Executive Director of Intersection for the Arts, will speak on the “Creative Placemaking” plenary session on Saturday, Sept. 8, at 9:00 a.m.

SCH ED U L E + M A P

THURS DAY , SE P T. 6
Conference Registration + Hotel Check-in 3:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m. “Prison Dancer: The Interactive Web Musical” Screening & Master Class in the Mirage Room Co-presented by Northern.Lights.mn NAMAC and Northern.Lights.mn present the awardwinning transmedia musical “Prison Dancer” for the first time in the Twin Cities. Playing to sellout crowds at the New York Musical Theater Festival, “Prison Dancer” is also an interactive musical Web series inspired in turn by the viral video “The Dancing Inmates of Cebu.” Featuring exciting Filipino musical talent from across North America, “Prison Dancer” is filled with catchy pop tunes and star-crossed lovers, combining the best of Broadway with YouTube storytelling. Producer Ana Serrano will host this master class and screening, share the techniques and challenges of producing a transmedia storyworld, and comment on Asian-American pop culture and musical theater. Photo credit: Juan Camilo Palacio 5:00 p.m. – 9:00 p.m. Reception @ the Walker Art Center Leading Creatively kicks off on Thursday night at the Walker Art Center, one of the foremost contemporary art institutions in the United States. Conference attendees will have free access to the Walker’s multifloor galleries and the adjoining 11-acre sculpture garden. The reception will feature hosted bars, complementary gourmet hors d’oeuvres, and a special screening curated from the Walker’s Ruben / Bentson Film and Video Study Collection. • Includes complete museum and gallery access • Exclusive / hosted food and beverages • Walker-curated film and video screenings See Page 21 for reception details.
Photo: Juan Camilo Palacio

Afternoon at the Hyatt Regency

HYATT REGEN CY M I N N E A P O L I S

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SCHED ULE

Ongoing Daily Programs, Sept. 7 –8
NAMAC Media/Arts Expo (Greenway Promenade) The Expo will feature a variety of film, video, and multimedia organizations looking to build their networks, promote their services, and meet the larger community of both Twin Cities locals as well as visiting NAMAC members. The Media/Arts Expo will run for the duration of the conference, and with the Screening Room will be open to the general public for $15 daily or $25 for both days. See Page 26 for expo details. Evidence: NAMAC 2012 Documentary Screening Program (Minnehaha Room) Showcasing a wide variety of contemporary and archival film and video output from the NAMAC community, the conference screening room will present featurelength movies and documentaries, plus a diverse array of shorts made for cinema, television, and the Internet. Evidence is curated by Aimee Le Duc, Gallery Manager, San Francisco Arts Commission. The screening room and Media/Arts Expo will run for the duration of the conference and will be open to the general public for $15 daily or $25 for both days. See Page 30 for screening details.

F RI DAY , S E P T. 7
TECHNIQUE AND TECHNOLOGY WORKSHOPS
Learn how to use emerging, open-source technologies to advance your art, your practice, and your organization. NAMAC is hosting a wide variety of how-to/showand-tell workshops led by innovators from across the media, arts, and technology sectors. 10:30 a.m. – 11:30 a.m. Comics Journalism Online: How To Do It Bunmi Oloruntoba, 3bute.com 11:30 a.m.12:30 p.m. From Digital Media Making to Artistic Expression: Realizing Your Smart Phone’s Full Potential Have you ever thought of your smart phone as a mobile production studio or as a means to broadcast your message live? After this hands-on workshop you will have a new appreciation for the wealth of applications that allow you to record, edit, upload, and broadcast media from almost anywhere. Vanessa Graber, Prometheus Radio Project 1:30 p.m. – 2:30 p.m. Mozilla Popcorn: Networked Transmedia Made Easy Mozilla Popcorn is a free, open-source application for producing and posting your own transmedia and multisourced online video projects. Learn about how Popcorn helps developers and authors create interactive pages that supplement video and audio with rich web content, allowing your creations to live and grow online. Jacob Caggiano, Mozilla Foundation. 1:30 p.m. – 2:30 p.m. Media and Communications for Social Movements: Experiences and Tools from the Media Mobilizing Project Over the last six years Media Mobilizing Project has produced a number of video projects in collaborations with groups from a wide range of social struggles to tell the untold stories of poor and working people. This session will share MMP’s collaborative production process for creating engaging media on social struggles with those most impacted. MMP will also share SwitchBoard, an SMS text tool it has developed to assist with our organizing, outreach, and distribution. Bryan Mercer, Media Mobilizing Project (Philadelphia)

Conference Hacker Space Hacker spaces are open-source, intensely collaborative, tech-savvy, and intellectually unbounded — places for people to share in the act of imagining and creating do-it-yourself technology and art. Join the members of Twin Cities Maker in this mobile version of their opensource workspace, the Hack Factory. Hack Factory workshops and demos will include: Interactive LED Artwork Basics Making Interactive Art with Arduino (Arduino kit available for $50 at the workshop) Simple Two-Transistor Light Theremin (Theramin Kit available for $10 at the workshop) Learn to Solder (Soldering Kit available for $10 at the workshop) Crafting Wooden Bows: The Art of the Bowyer Introduction to Locksport See Page 22 for Hacker Space details.

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SCH E D U LE

FRIDAY , SEPT. 7
2:30 p.m. – 3:30 p.m. Audiences on the Go: Mobile Engagement By 2014, more people in the United States will be accessing Internet content through mobile devices than through laptops and desktops combined. U.S. adults currently spend an average of 94 minutes per day using mobile apps compared to an average of 72 minutes per day using web browsers. Many of us believe that we don’t have the money to engage with mobile audiences. Not true! You can engage mobile audiences even if you have NO budget. This session will explore a variety of options for connecting with audiences via mobile devices, including QR codes, mobile websites, mobile apps, and more. For each option, we will highlight engaging features, discuss costs, and determine the time involved for implementation and maintenance. David Dombrosky, Instant Encore 11:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m. The New Networks Peer-to-peer media technology is flattening societal hierarchies and giving power to previously marginalized sectors. Amidst this tide of change, new ideas and opportunities for networks and collaboration are emerging. How can like-minded media producers and arts organizations work together? How can cities link up diverse, complementary resources and organizations to create a more productive gestalt? This panel explores the limits and possibilities of the new networks. Moderator: Philip Nadasdy, External Relations Coordinator, Interactive Arts & Media, Columbia College (Chicago) Jan Schaffer, Executive Director, J - Lab.org (Washington, D.C.) Betty Yu, Membership Organizer, Center for Media Justice (New York City) Kevin Davis, CEO and Executive Director, Investigative News Network (Los Angeles) Jo Ellen Kaiser, Executive Director, The Media Consortium (San Francisco) Mobile Media: Defining Places, Engaging Communities Mobile media have taken computing and communication power off the office desktop, and into the diverse, public places where people live, work, and traverse every day. Increasingly, mobile media has come to define these places — revealing histories, updating context, sharing experiences, and even connecting users with the policymakers who influence places and lives, both public and private. Moderator: John Fenn, Assistant Professor in Arts and Arts Administration University of Oregon John Bergmayer, Senior Staff Attorney, Public Knowledge (Washington, D.C.) Mindy Faber, Open Youth Networks, Mi Parque-Little Village, Columbia College Chicago Michael Kuetemeyer, Temple University, Termite TV (Philadelphia) Anula Shetty, Termite TV (Philadelphia)

SCHEDULE
8:00 a.m. – 9:00 a.m. All NAMAC participants and attendees are invited to join us for a breakfast buffet before we convene for our opening breakfast plenary. 9:00 a.m. - 10:30 a.m. Breakfast Plenary: Artists As Leaders Artists and media / arts producers are increasingly at the helms of organizations, working across sectors, shaping public policy, and managing their own careers. “Leadership” itself is a tricky concept in a world where peer-to-peer Internet technologies are decentralizing traditional social hierarchies. New ideas about and practices of leadership are adaptive in a time of rapid social change. Paula Manley, Co-D i rec to r , Th e Le a rn i n g C o m m o n s ( Por t l a n d . O reg on ) Jennifer Dorner, Director, Independent Media Arts Alliance (Montreal) Hank Shocklee, Music Producer, Sound Designer & President of Shocklee Entertainment (New York City) Marcus Young, City Artist in Residence, Public Art Saint Paul

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SCHED ULE

F RIDAY, SE P T. 7
Supporting Independent Production What sort of institutional alliances can support independent media and visual-arts productivity within and outside the mainstream? What infrastructural innovations can activate unaffiliated producers? From artist services to fiscal sponsorship, independent production can flourish with intentional and responsible support. Moderator: Frances Phillips, Senior Arts Program Officer, Walter & Elise Haas Sr. Fund (San Francisco) Jax Deluca, Executive Director, Squeaky Wheel Buffalo Media Resources (Buffalo) Tim Horsburgh, Communications Manager, Kartemquin/PBS Needs Indies (Chicago) Nonso Christian Ugbode, Director of Digital Media, National Black Programming Consortium (New York City) Laura Zabel, Executive Director, Springboard for the Arts (Minneapolis) Using Data for an Arts Agenda Policymakers are hungry for data. Leaders in our field are collecting data and stories through expansive research to allow our field to visualize a proactive policy agenda. Learn about two major arts data projects, Future of Music Coalition’s Artist Revenue Streams and NAMAC’s Mapping the Field, and consider how this work can allow us to have our seat at the policy table. Jean Cook, Director of Programs, Future of Music Coalition (Washington, D.C.) Jack Walsh, Executive Director National Alliance for Media Arts and Culture (San Francisco) Teaching (and Learning) Media and the Arts What does it take to teach media and the arts? What does it take to learn? From individual mentorships to comprehensive curricula, this panel explores diverse methodologies in media and arts education. Moderator: Mike Wassenaar, Executive Director, Saint Paul Neighborhood Network (Minneapolis / St. Paul) Joseph Douillette, Digital Studio Manager and Fast Forward Program Director, Institute of Contemporary Art/Boston Lila Kitaeff, Technical Director, Reel Grrrls (Seattle) Glenna Voigt, Principal, Media Arts Collaborative Charter School (Albuquerque) 12:30 p.m. – 1:30 p.m. NAMAC Media/Arts Exposition + Open Lunch Open conference period focused on networking over lunch and at the NAMAC Media/Arts Expo. 1:30 p.m. – 3:00 p.m. Journalism’s New Directions As the economic model of news-for-profit undergoes unprecedented retreat, nonprofit alternatives are emerging. New market opportunities and funding models, open-source technologies, divergent viewing and reading habits for news seekers — plus a profound reevaluation of the role of news media in our lives — have all sparked a slow-burning renaissance for the daily news. Here are some new sprouts coming up through the scorched but fertile earth. Moderator: Joe Torres, Senior External Affairs Director, Free Press (Washington, D.C.) Bunmi Oloruntoba, Editor, 3bute.com Barry Johnson, Editor, Oregon Arts Watch (Portland) Erika Owens, Community Manager, Knight-Mozilla OpenNews (Philadelphia) Jan Schaffer, Executive Director, J-Lab.org (Washington, D.C.) Creating Equity, Representing Community Does “diversity” amount to mere tokenism? Is “inclusion” meaningful if it is passed down by wouldbe benefactors rather than claimed by the excluded? Communities around North America are creating equity, claiming power, and representing themselves by creating their own media and art, rather than waiting for someone else to do it for them. Moderator: Eric Martin, Interactive Media Specialist, Native American Public Telecommunications (Lincoln, Nebraska) Vanessa Graber, Community Radio Director, Prometheus Radio Project (Philadelphia) K.C. Price, Executive Director, Frameline.org / San Francisco International LGBT Film Festival (San Francisco) Lana Salah Barkawi, Executive and Artistic Director, Mizna (St. Paul) Missy Whiteman, Independent Indigenous Film & Video (Minneapolis)

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SCH E D U LE

FRIDAY , SE P T. 7
Pennies from Heaven: Crowdfunding and Community - Supported Media / Arts Crowdfunding and microgrants can give communities power and activate productive capacity for independent media and visual-arts organizations. Yet there are also considerable challenges to tapping into public support. From crowds to communities, this panel will explore how individual giving has evolved in the peer-to-peer Internet era. Moderator: Nathaniel James, Founder and Lead Adventurer, Adventures in New Giving (Seattle) Stephanie Pereira, Art Program Director, Kickstarter.com (New York City) Scott Stulen, Project Director, MNartists.org, The Walker Center (Minneapolis) Being Strategic About Transmedia: Making a Big Impact with Limited Resources Transmedia has become a buzzword — but how do you focus your limited funds and time? Will your flashy app remain in use once you move on to your next project? This workshop will discuss goals, audiences, partners, and creating transmedia tools that will extend your narrative and make a tangible impact. Moderator: Shaady Salehi, Executive Director, Active Voice (San Francisco) Ana Serrano, Producer, “Prison Dancer: The Musical”; Director, Canadian Film Centre Digital Media Lab Michèle Stephenson, Director/Producer, “American Promise” Dennis Palmieri, Managing Director of Communications, ITVS (San Francisco) Workshop: Creating “Leaderful” Organizations and Networks To fulfill our missions in an era of complexity and growing interdependence, we need to sustain our own leadership and develop the leadership capacity of others. What does it take to create leader-full organizations and networks? What stands in the way? In this highly participatory workshop, we will co-create a visual matrix of strategies for growing and sustaining arts leadership. We will also touch base with current practitioner-based research to glean lessons learned about shared or distributed leadership. Facilitator: Paula Manley, Co-D i rec to r , T he Le arni ng C o m mo n s (Po r t l a n d . O re g o n ) Jennifer Olivia, Director of Technology and Operations, Bay Area Video Coalition (San Francisco) Nonso Christian Ugbode, Director of Digital Media, National Black Programming Consortium (New York City)
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Grantmaker Speed Dating Meet-and-greet with grantmakers representing a variety of national and regional organizations and interests. Full list of participating grantmakers will be available at the conference. Speed-dating attendance is first-come, first-served, with the signups at the conference only. Participating grantmakers include: Alyce Myatt, National Endowment for the Arts John Lightfoot, California Council for the Humanities Sarah Lovan, McKnight Foundation (Minnesota) Frances Phillips, Walter & Elise Haas Sr. Fund (San Francisco) Sarah Masters, Hartley Film Foundation Additional participants TBA. 4:00 p.m. – 6:00 p.m. Media/Arts Tours of Minneapolis/St. Paul NAMAC takes the conference out of the hotel’s hermetically sealed interior to meet the diverse, thriving community of organizations that make up the Twin Cities independent media and visual-arts sector. At the Conference registration desk, attendees can register for any of the following tours: Alternative Spaces Tour, Experimental Ecosystems Tour, Creative Service Tour, Youth Media/Arts Tour, Public Art Highlights See Page 20 for tour details. 6:00 p.m. – 7:00 p.m.: DINNER ON YOUR OWN 7:00 p.m. and beyond... Art Opening @ Franklin Art Works: Sighthouse, by Jonathan Bruce Williams, and The Two Stories by Alejandro Cesarco Franklin Art Works will present two concurrent solo exhibitions. In the Main Gallery, the Minneapolis artist Jonathan Bruce Williams will premiere a major sculptural installation of a giant wooden lighthouse incorporating two 16mm projections. The adjacent Franklin Art Works Screening Room will feature Alejandro Cesarco’s black-and-white single channel projection, The Two Stories, based on a story by Felisberto Hernández.

SC H E DULE
SATURDAY , SE P T. 8
TECHNIQUE AND TECHNOLOGY WORKSHOPS
10:45 a.m. – 11:30 a.m. ITVS OVEE OVEE is a social-TV widget that streams PBS content online and allows simultaneous online chat. Steve Goldbloom and Dennis Palmieri, ITVS Digital Frontiers: Copyright, Censorship, the Commons, and Privacy Can freedom of the press and the right to know survive the rough-and-tumble politics of lobbyist-addled Washington? Is your mobile device secure from search and seizure over whatever content you load onto it? Will the documentary feature you’ve labored over be accessible to your target audience? The Digital Frontier is up for grabs — and your participation in the debate will make a difference. Moderator: Casey Rae, Deputy Director, Future of Music Coalition (Washington, D.C.) Hank Shocklee, Music Producer, Sound Designer & President of Shocklee Entertainment (New York City) Chris Peterson, MIT Comparative Media Studies Program, Board Member, the National Coalition Against Censorship (Boston) Christopher Mitchell, Director of the Telecommunications as Commons Initiative, Institute for Local SelfReliance (Minneapolis) Youth Media Networks: How We’re Connected Media and visual arts organizations play a crucial role in providing young people with the skills, savvy, and access required for them to participate fully in today’s profoundly networked democracy. This panel explores how youth media and arts organizations are collaborating to effectively serve young people at a time of economic hardship and social change. Moderator: Kasandra VerBrugghen, Executive Director, Spy Hop Productions (Salt Lake City) Laura Deutch, Coordinator, Philadelphia Youth Media Collaborative (Philadelphia) Andrea Ellis, Learning Labs Project Coordinator, Kansas City Public Library (Missouri) Danielle Martin, Knowledge Manager, Intel Computer Clubhouse Network (Boston) Nicola Pine, Twin Cities Youth Media Network (Minneaoplis)

SCHEDULE
8:00 a.m. – 9:00 a.m. All NAMAC participants and attendees are invited to join us for a breakfast buffet before we convene for Saturday’s breakfast plenary. 9:00 a.m. – 10:30 a.m. Breakfast Plenary: Creative Placemaking Placemaking. It’s a buzzword, but it’s also a reality. Recognizing that art defines the places in which we live is the first step towards more intentional design, deeper collaboration and more positive outcomes. Moderator: Malkia Cyril, Executive Director and Founder, Center for Media Justice (Oakland) Deborah Cullinan, Executive Director, Intersection for the Arts (San Francisco) Gülgün Kayim, Director of Arts, Culture, and Creative Economy, City of Minneapolis Ann Markusen, Director, Arts Economy Initiative, University of Minnesota Noël Raymond, Artistic Director, Pillsbury House Theatre (Minneapolis) 10:45 a.m. – 12:15 p.m. Public Art: Engaging Communities, Claiming Space Public art has moved far beyond the abstract sculpture in the front plaza of your local office tower. It’s become interactive, multimedia, and occasionally lacking in official permits. Some of the Twin Cities’ finest public-art presenters and provocateurs join us for this thoughtful and inspiring presentation

Moderator: Jack Becker, Forecast Public Art (Minneapolis) Steve Dietz, Northern Lights/Northern Spark (Minneapolis) Broken Crow: John Grider and Mike Fitzsimmons (Minneapolis)

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SCH E D U LE

SATUR DAY , SEPT. 8
Open Space Documentaries We love their gutsy vigor, but long-form documentaries loom a bit like skyscrapers from the 1960s — overbuilt and probably not sustainable. In comparison, more modest, “open space” transmedia projects seem more agile, more adaptable, more alive, more responsive, less predictable. This panel explores how legacy documentary practices transfer to the multi-sourced transmedia environment. Moderator: Patricia R. Zimmerman, Professor of Cinema, Photography and Media Arts, Ithaca College (Ithaca) Helen De Michiel, Thirty Leaves Productions (Berkeley, CA) jesikah maria ross, Founding Director, Art of Regional Change, U.C. Davis Center for Regional Change (Davis, CA) Laura Kissel, Director, Film and Media Studies, University of South Carolina 12:15 p.m. – 2:15 p.m. Plenary Luncheon: NAMAC Awards Presentation + George Stoney Celebration The NAMAC Awards Presentation will showcase the great works of leading members of the NAMAC community. Additional programming will include a retrospective on the life and work of the storied and inspirational documentarian, George Stoney. NAMAC is pleased to announce that the Awards Presentation will be opened with a dazzling performance by Iny Asian Dance Theater. 2:15 p.m. – 3:45 p.m. Distribution: Brave New Digital Worlds Networked digital media have changed the distribution game. How are traditional film and video organizations responding? What are new streaming and digital platforms bringing to the table? What are the policy issues that independent media advocates and producers need to keep in mind? Will independent producers ultimately benefit from this epochal shift in technology and social norms? Moderator: Marc Smolowitz, Producer/Director, “The Power of Two,” “Still Around: 30 Years of AIDS,” “The Weather Underground,” “Trembling Before G-d” Kristen Fitzpatrick, Public Exhibition and Acquisitions Manager, Women Make Movies (New York) John Bergmayer, Senior Staff Attorney, Public Knowledge (Washington, D.C.) Brigid Reagan Balcom, Assistant Director, Video Data Bank (Chicago) Abbi Tatton, Manager of Global Communications and Public Affairs, Google (New York) Prodding the Sleeping Giants: Media, Arts, & Citizen’s Movements The power of independent, community-based media and visual arts has rarely been in more evidence nationally than with the #Occupy phenomenon. Constituencies were mobilized and viral messages, such as the concept of the 99% and the 1%, went on to inform front-page coverage of The New York Times and other national news media. But beyond the glory of the national spotlight, how do the independent media and visual-arts fields inspire community engagement and civic participation every day? Moderator: Betty Yu, Membership Organizer, Center for Media Justice (New York City) Erick Boustead, Co-Founder/Co-Director, Line Break Media (Minneapolis) Inez González, Executive Vice President, National Hispanic Media Coalition (Pasadena/Washington, D.C.)

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SCHED ULE

S ATUR DAY , SE P T. 8
2:15 p.m. – 4:15 p.m. Power Mapping and Social Network Analysis Running an advocacy campaign requires thoughtful planning to ensure you’re using your limited resources wisely and not spinning your wheels on ineffective strategies. In this session, we’ll go through the basics of campaign planning, from setting realistic goals, developing a strategy, choosing tactics and targeting policy makers. Beth McConnell, Executive Director, Media and Democracy Coalition 2:15 p.m. – 3:45 p.m. Arts On Air I: How Community Radio is Amplifying the Arts This workshop will provide an introduction to community radio and its impact on communities, arts organizations and artists. We will share examples from amazing stations, including Minneapolis’ own KFAI, and we’ll talk about how arts organizations can partner with community radio stations to celebrate and support local creative scenes. With a one-time-only chance to apply for community radio licenses in 2013, we’ll share how organizations can get involved to start new stations or spread the word. Brandy Doyle, Policy Director, Prometheus Radio Project Vanessa Maria Graber, Community Radio Director, Prometheus Radio Project Miguel Vargas, Program Director, KFAI 4:00 p.m. – 5:15 p.m. Arts On Air II: How to Start a Community Radio Station 2013 brings an unprecedented opportunity to apply for community radio stations in urban and rural areas. This nuts-and-bolts overview of the application process will include the technical and legal requirements to win an FCC broadcast license, a discussion of community collaborations and strategic partnerships needed to build successful stations, and an overview of the support that organizations such as the Prometheus Radio Project will provide to applicants. Michael Brown, President, Brown Broadcast Services Brandy Doyle, Policy Director, Prometheus Radio Project Vanessa Maria Graber, Community Radio Director, Prometheus Radio Project Danielle Mkali, Media Justice Program Director, Main Street Project
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2:45 p.m. – 3:45 p.m. Workshop: A Brief History of the Alternative Spaces Movement, 1995 - Present This presentation will explore the recent and ongoing renaissance of alternative spaces in the United States, beginning with the rapid and simultaneous launch of multiple exhibition spaces in the late 1990s. Tim Peterson, Director, Franklin Art Works (Minneapolis) 6:00 p.m. – 7:00 p.m.: Dinner on your own 7:00 p.m. and Beyond... The Soap Factory: Art opening & reception, Andy DuCett’s immersive, site-wide installation, “Why We Do This” Saturday night caps off Leading Creatively with an epic, site-specific installation at the Soap Factory by Minnesota artist Andy DuCett. “Why We Do This” stitches together fragments of pop culture, workaday symbols and collective memory to create a single, 12,000-square-foot installation of interlocking, interactive vignettes. Join a giant game of Battleship, peruse a thrift store, watch the clouds roll by from the seat of an airplane, or catch a glimpse of a sasquatch through the window of a log cabin — all within the Soap Factory’s sprawling, post-industrial interiors along the banks of the Mississippi River

CONFERENCE VIDEO & SESSION ARCHIVES
To document the NAMAC 2012 Conference, youth producers from Minneapolis and St. Paul will work with mentors from the Twin Cities Youth Media Network to captures interviews of panelists and participants. In addition, the “Artist as Leader” and “Creative Placemaking” plenaries will be recorded, along with the NAMAC Awards ceremony, by our host partners from CTV Northern Suburbs. Bring the conference home with the NAMAC YouTube channel: www.youtube.com/user/NAMACvideo

TH AN K YO U

MY NOTES

GREAT MUSIC LIVES HERE.

Wherever life finds you, Classical Minnesota Public Radio is the perfect companion. Tune in or listen online at classicalmpr.org

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www.namac .org

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