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Unit One

Course contents

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Month One

Month Two

Week one Open Chords exercises round the mountain - traditional Hey Jude - the Beatles Week two Amazing Grace - traditional gospel G major scale Week three Live forever - Oasis G minor natural Week Four Candle in the wind - Elton John G minor pentatonic

Week one F Half barre chords exercises Free Bird - Lynard Skynard G Mixolydian scale Week two G minor Natural First position barre chords Exercises Week three Here comes the rain - Eurythmics Full blues scale Week four Revise scales Half barres to barres Maggie may - Rod Stewart

Month Three

Month Four

Week one Second position half barres Exercises Nights in white satin - Justin Hayward Week two A rooted chords sharps and flats Second position barres Week three Combine first and second positions exercises Rent - The Pet shop boys Week four Basic blues chords Exercises Yesterday - The Beatles

Week one Chord theory One Tablature Exercises Week two Exercises Basic blues Week three Paint it Back - The Rolling stones Revise blues scale and in A Week four Crocketts theme electric - Jam Hammer Crocketts theme acoustic - Jam Hammer

Month Five

Month Six

Week one Repeats Hey Jude (with rhythm) - The Beatles Week two Exercises Who is like thee o Lord - Jewish Folk Week three About a Girl - Nirvana Week four Chord theory two Space oddity - David bowie

Week one Rock exercises Rock and grunge techniques Week two Rock exercises Smoke on the water - Deep Purple Week three Livin on a prayer - Bon Jovi Grunge Punk exercises Week four Smells like teen spirit - Nirvana

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Month Seven

Month Eight

Week one Country exercises Week two I walk the line - Johnny Cash Week three Reggae exercises Week four I shot the sheriff - Bob Marley Review of techniques exercises

Week one Blues exercises Week two Steam roller - James Taylor Week three Blues scale exercise Week four Improvisation

Month Nine

Month Ten

Week one Finger picking basics Exercises PIMI Picking Duet Week two Rain - Sad Fantasy Week three Introduce the annular finger Exercises Nights in white satin - Justin Hayward Week four Alternating bass line Exercises Everybody hurts - REM

Week one Alternating bass line exercise Susans song - Sad Fantasy Week two Exercise House of the rising sun - The Animals Week three Blocking exercises Week four 4/4 time exercises Nowhere man - The Beatles

Month Eleven

Month Twelve

Week one Fifth chord theory exercises slurs Week two Hammering on Paranoid - Black Sabbath Week three Pulling off Manic depression - Jimi Hendrix Picking directions Week four Zombie - The Cranberries

Week one Reading rhythm exercises time signatures Week two Bends House of the Rising Sun (Lead) Summer time (lead) Staccato and mutes Week three Wonderful tonight - Eric Clapton Week four Wonderful land - The Shadows

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Introduction Tuning

month one
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and

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In order for any guitar course to be successful, practise practise practise practise practise practise

Introduction
you must practise.

Getting started
machineheads top nut frets neck and fingerboard position markers body pickups sound hole tailpiece or bridge

fingering map
top nut frets strings 1 x string should not be played finger placed between the frets Left hand finger number

left hand

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fret map

E B G D A E

F C G# D# A# F

F#
C# A

G D A#

G#

A E
C

D#
B

E
B

F
C

F# C#

G
D D#

F#

G#

A#

Tuning
Before you start, it is important to tune your guitar. Even if youre playing correctly the guitar will sound wrong if it is out of tune. As time goes by you will start to recognize when your guitar is out of tune yourself. If you have a friend who can tune your guitar for you, it may be a good idea to let them do it for you until you become accustomed to the sound of the guitar. But if not dont worry. There are many electronic tuners on the market that will tell you when your guitar is out of tune, or you can use tuning pipes or an electronic keyboard to get a reference note to tune from. We have provided a free tuner that will give you three different types of tones to tune your guitar from. When tuning your guitar remember to turn your machineheads by very small amounts and re-pluck the string to see if it is tune, if you turn your machineheads to fast, to far, you will break your strings.

middle C

The thinnest string is referred to as the top E string because it sounds higher than the other strings. The thickest string is referred to as the bottom E string.

Hint. To remember the names of the strings you can use one of these silly sayings.

Every Angry Dog Growls and Bites Eventually Elephants And Dogs God Blesses Everything
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tuning the guitar to itself


Sometimes only a one or two strings will be out of tune or you may not have access to a reference note from which to tune your guitar. In either of these instances you can tune the guitar to itself, using the other strings as a reference point to tune from. This is the most common method for tuning guitars. 1. Until you have more experience of tuning your guitar you will need to use your tuner to get a string in tune, preferably, the top E string. 2. Place your finger in the FIFTH fret of the next string down the B string. Play this note shortly followed by the top E string and repeat this several times. If the B string is in tune, the two notes will sound the same. If the notes are different, then you will need to adjust the B string and then repeat the process until the notes sound the same. The B string should now be in tune.

Tuning the E string

Tuning the B string

IMPORTANT.

You are listening for the pitch of the notes. The tone of the note will always be a little different. Don t press too hard on the strings, because you can bend the string slightly making the note inaccurate. 3. Place your finger in the FOURTH fret of the next string down the G string, and play this note shortly followed by the B string and repeat this. If the G string is in tune, the two notes will sound the same. If the notes are different, then you will need to adjust the G string and then repeat the process until the notes sound the same. The G string should now be in tune. 4. Place your finger in the FIFTH fret of the next string down the D string, and play this note shortly followed by the G string and repeat this. If the D string is in tune, the two notes will sound the same. If the notes are different, then you will need to adjust the D string and then repeat the process until the notes sound the same. 5. Repeat this pattern using the FIFTH fret for the last two strings. 6. Compare the top E string and the bottom E string. As they are both E, they are octaves and have a unique sound. Firstly listen to them on free tuner provided as we know the tuner is in tune. Eventually you can use this sound as a double check, because if you have made a mistake on any of the other stings the two notes will not sound correct.
Tuning the D string Tuning the A string Tuning the E string

The best way to learn to tune

Packaged with this course is a third party digital tuner, the Guitar Academy tuner and the tuner game. 1. Play the tuner game as many times as it takes for you to get 6 out of 6 several times. The tuner note and the guitar note have different tones to make the game more realistic. 2. Then tune your guitar with the Guitar Academy tuner, using the tuner notes as a reference point to tune your guitar to. 3. Finally check your guitar with the digital tuner. The digital tuner is the quickest and easiest way to tune, but if you only use the digital tuner it will be years before you hear tuning problems for yourself.

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using a pick (plectrum)


How to hold your plectrum
There is no right or wrong way to hold your plectrum. Everyone will prefer there own style and sound of guitar music. There is however a standard method to work from. Dont feel you need to copy this method exactly it is just a good starting point.

1. Bend your fingers into a fist and lift your thumb.

2. Place the plectrum on the first knuckle of your index finger so that it points towards the guitar.

3. Hold the plectrum firmly in place using your thumb.

When playing with a pick the motion should come from the wrist, the whole arm should not move up and down. When strumming the motion comes more from the elbow. For stability and to aid with locating the strings without needing to look down, some players either rest the hand or arm on the guitar. Another approach to to rest your fingers on the guitar, scratchplate or place your little finger on a pickup if you have an electric guitar.

Which plectrum to use.

Plectrums come in all sorts of shapes and sizes, but they are usually marked with the thickness, which is helpful. Remember though that the thickness is just a guide, plectrums will play differently depending on what material they are made of. At this stage of your learning it is probably a good idea to buy a several to find out which one is best for you. 1mm is a common thickness of plectrum. It is a good all round plectrum. Plectrums over 1mm will not bend very much, if at all. They produce a more bassy tone and they can be more difficult for strumming. Plectrums under 0.7mm can bend a lot. They produce a brighter tone and are ideal for strumming as they are more forgiving if your plectrum accuracy isnt perfect.

IMPORTANT

As you get use to your pick look at the position youre holding it in every time you practise. If the pick position changes every time you play it will take you a lot longer to get used to it.

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Lesson One
open chords
X Am7
1 2

X
1

A
2 3

X
2

Am
1 3

X
1

A7
2

X
1

A7

X
2

B7
1 3 4

X
2 3

C
1

X
2 3

C7
1

X X

D
1 2 3

X X

Dm
1 2 3

X X

D7
1 2 3

X X

Dm7
1 2 2 3

E
1 1 2

Em
2

E7
1

Em7
1

X X

F
1 2 3

X X

Fm
1 1

G
2 3 3

G7
1

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exercises
Play the following open chord exercises. Then repeat them until the chords sound clean and the changes sound smooth.

X
2 3

C
1

X
2

Am
1 3 3 2

G7
1

C - - - Am - - - C - - - Am - - - C - - - G7 - - - C - - - Am - - -

X X

D
1 3 2 2 1

X
1 3

A
2 3 1 2

Em

D - - - G - - - D - - - A - - - D - - - G - - - D - - - Em - - -

X X

Dm
1 2 3 3 2

G7
1

X
2 3

C
1

X
2

Am
1 3

Dm - - - G7 - - - C - - - Am - - - Dm - - - G7 - - - C - - - C - - -

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Introduction
Bellow is a BAR. A bar is a representation of time used in music, and all music is made up of bars. To start with, the bars we are using contain 4 beats (they are 4/4 time). It is important that the length of time for each bar remains the same and therefore I recommend downloading the metronome and practicing trying to play the chords as accurately as possible on the first beat of the bar. beats bar

tunes

Try the following;

Remember that their is no break between th bars, every beat should remain the same, and therefore the beat should sound constant. Sometimes you will find that their is more than one chord in a bar, in this instance play the second chord on the THIRD beat of the bar (for now). As you get better and start to play more advanced pieces, you will find any number of chords in a bar. For example

D7

A7

A7

The arrangement
Every tune has an arrangement. An arrangement is the order in which a tune is played. For example, verse, chorus, verse, chorus. By listing arrangements the tunes are kept smaller, neater and easier to follow. You will also gain a better understanding of music for when you eventually want to write your own. Music can be made up of any number of sections in any order, here are some of the section names. Intro (introduction), Verse, Chorus, Bridge, transition, Solo, Coda (end).

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Week One
Now, lets try and put together some of what you have learned to play our first pieces of music. The two tunes bellow are in 4/4 time, so their are FOUR beats per bar. 1. Play the chords a few times until you are happy with the changes. 2. Try playing with a metronome in 4/4 time, using a slow setting (between 40 & 80)

month one

Shell be coming round the mountain


G G G D

tune

HEY JUDE - the beatles verse


D G A D A A D D

chorus
D7 D7 D7 A7 G G A7 Em Em A7 A7 D D

coda
D C G D
repeat and fade

arrangement

verse - verse - chorus - verse - coda

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Week Two
This tune is in 3/4 time, which basically means that their are THREE beats per bar. Try it with the metronome set on 3/4. The way to count for this piece will be as follows. beats bar 1 2 3 1 2 3

month one

Amazing Grace
G G G G G G G7 D7 C D7 C G G D7 G G

exercise - G major scale


Scales are the DNA of music and everything you do when you play your guitar either directly involves the use of scales or has been derived from a scale. Scales are played as single notes in succession, however all the notes will be put together on a scale map to help make the pattern more clear. Play the following notes in order and then repeat, try to increase speed and flow.

1 2 2

3rd fret

scale map

G major

1 2 2

3
1

3rd fret
3 4 4

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Week Three
This first month needs to be spent mastering open chords. As you play different tunes with different combinations of chords, your changes and speed should improve. 1. Play the chords a few times until you are happy with the changes. 2. Play with a metronome in 4/4 time, using a slow setting (between 60 & 100)

month one

Live Forever - Oasis verse


G G D D Am7 Am7 C C D D

tune

chorus
Em Em Am7 D D Am7 Am7 C Am7 D

coda
Em Em D D Am7 Am7 C Am
repeat and fade this line

Am7

Am

Am7

Am

arrangement

solo verse - chorus - verse - chorus - verse - chorus - verse - coda

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exercise - G minor (harmonic) scale


This time playing the scale should take less explanation, play this scale the same way as you did the G major scale in the last lesson. Play the scale both ways this time, from the bottom to the top and then from the top to the bottom. Keep practising the G major scale as well. It is very important to use the correct fingers. If you need to hear the scales, they can be listened to with the multimedia program provided with the course.

1 2

3 4

3 4

Rite The thumb is in the center of the neck and the fingers are putting pressure on only the string required.

Wrong The thumb is around the neck and the fi nger s ar e l ay i ng agai nst str i ngs which are not intended to be played.

Note In both cases you can see how the fingers naturally sit in a position above the cor r ect fr ets. Thi s i s why y ou should use the correct fingers.

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Week Four
tune
C G C C G C

month one

Candle in the wind - Elton John


verse G G G G chorus D G C D instrumental G G coda Em D C c G D D C D7 G D G C C G D Em C C D Em C G C G C D7 C C C

Arrangement verse - chorus - verse - chorus - instrumental - verse - chorus - coda

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exercise - G minor pentatonic


Practice this scale the same way as you did the G major scale and the G minor natural scale in the last lesson. Play the scale both ways, from the bottom to the top and then from the top to the bottom. It is very important to use the correct fingers.
4 1 1 1 1 1 1

3 4 4

Revision
Play these scales until you can remember them. The open chords will naturally re-occur as you play more tunes, therefore it isnt as important to memorize them, however the scales will only be used in relation to theory, so you may forget them if you dont practise them regularly. A second advantage in practising your scales is that, when we start learning lead guitar techniques, your fingers will already be adept at paying single notes. G major G minor harmonic G minor pentatonic

1 2 2

1 1 3 1 2 3 4 3 4 3 4 3 3 3 4 4 1 1 1 1 1 1

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month two

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Week One
F shape half barre chords
X X F
1 2 3 3

month two

X X

Fm
1

X X1

F7
2

X X1

Fm7

You might have noticed that two of these chords appear in the open chord chart you were given in the first lesson. The F major half barre chords often appears in open chord charts though strictly speaking a chord should contain an open string to be a true open chord. The reason it appears in open chord charts is that there is no open chord alternative for an F chord.

exercises
Play these exercises using the open chord you have allready learned. The F chords should be played as the half barre chords listed above. exercise 1 C C exercise 2 G7 G7 exercise 3 C7 C7 F7 F7 C7 C7 F7 Dm Fm Fm C C Am C F F Am Am G Am

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tune
Free Bird - Lynard Skynard
This tune gets very complex towards the end, so for the time being we will learn the verse and chorus which make up the first half of the tune. This should be good practice of our open chords and the F major half barre chord.

Verse/chorus
G F G F D C D C Em D Em G Em D Em D

arrangement

verse - chorus - verse - chorus - verse

exercise - G mixolydian scale


Play this scale the same way as you have for all the previous scales in the last months lessons. Play the scale both ways, from the bottom to the top and then from the top to the bottom. Keep practising the your other scales as well. fret 3 It is very important to use the correct fingers. If you need to hear the scales, they can be listened to with the multimedia program provided with the course.
1 2 2 1 2

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Week Two
exercise - G minor natural scale
1 1 1

month two

fret 3

3 4

3 4

Note. their is only one notes differ ence between the G mi n o r h a r mo n i c a n d t h e G mi n o r natural.

fret 3

1 2

3 4

3 4

E string rooted barre chords


G
1 2 3 4 3 4 3 1

Gm
1

G7
1 2

Gm7

fret 3

fret 3
3

Try playing these chords a few times. If you cant get them perfect, dont worry as you play them they will get better (it may take weeks).

Hints

Do not push to hard with the thumb, the pressure should be applied by the fingers. Do not tense your first finger too much, otherwise it will curve away from the strings. E string rooted barre chords are so called because the root of the chord is on the E string. The root of a chord (or scale) is the note that gives the chord or scale its name. For example, Looking at the chords above you will see that the first finger is in the third fret of the bottom E string. If you then look at your fret map you will see that the name of this note is G. This is why the chords above are all G chords. If you play one of the chords above on a different fret it will take on the name of the E string note for that fret. For example, playing the G major shape in the fifth fret is A major, and playing the Gm7 shape in the fifth fret is Am7.

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WRONG

The position of the thumb should not be allowed to go around the guitar because the fingers will be restricted.

RIGHT

The position of the thumb should either in the center of the back of the neck or towards the floor. This will allow your fingers to stand off the fingerboard.

WRONG

The first finger should be as straight as possible across the fingerboard and the fingers should be as close to possible to the center, between the frets.

RIGHT

If you can keep your first finger parallel to the frets the tone will be easier to maintain. If the fingers are as central as possible between the frets then you will not need to press as hard on the strings.

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Note map of the E string

F
1

F#
2

G
3

G#
4

A
5

A#
6

B
7

C
8

exercises
Practise each of these exercises, repeating them until you are happy with them. If your hand, thumb or wrist starts to hurt take a rest, but dont be concerned because this is quite normal when learning barre chords. exercise 1 c
1 2 3 4 3 4

Am
fret 5
1

F
fret 1
1 2 3 4

G
fret 3
1 2 3 4

fret 8

Am

exercise 2

Am7
fret 5
1

Gm7
fret 3
1

F
fret 1
1 2 3 4

Am7

Gm7

Am7

exercise 3

Am
1

G
fret 3
1 2

F
fret 1
1 2 3 4

E
OPEN
2 3 1

fret 5

3 4

3 4

Am

Em

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major
1 2 3 4 1

minor
1

7th
1 2

minor 7th

root

root
3

3 4

F
1

F#
2

G
3

G#
4

A
5

A#
6

B
7

C
8

exercises
By remembering the four first position barre chord shapes and the names of the notes on the E string, you should be able to play 32 new chords. For example. G#m7 = g# is on the fourth fret and the minor 7th shape. Bm = B is on the seventh fret and the minor shape. Try playing the following; exercise 1 Bm G A Bm G#m7
fret 4
1

exercise 2 G Am F G

exercise 3 Am Bm7 C Bm7

exercise 4 Am G#m Gm7 C

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Week Three
Here come the rain - Eurytmics
Play this using first position barre chords. The piece contains only a few chords, and you might think that once you have played the intro and chorus you can move on. I encourage you however to use this tune to build the strength in your hand. Play the whole tune or as far as you can, several times with the backing before moving on.

month two tune

intro
Am G Am G F Am F Am repeat once Am G F Am F Am

verse
Am G

repeat once

chorus
F D F D C G C repeat three times G

arrangement

intro - verse- chorus - intro - verse - chorus

note: the C chord can be played as an open chord if your prefer.

Note map of the E string

F
1

F#
2

G
3

G#
4

A
5

A#
6

B
7

C
8

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exercise - G pentatonic blues scale


This scale is probably one of the most important scales you will come across if your music of choice is rock, blues, county or much of modern pop. We will be doing several lessons using this scale in this year, so it would be a good idea to practise this scale until you can play it from memory. Whilst the correct name is pentatonic blues scale, most people simply refer to it as the blues scale.
1 1 2 3 4 3 3 4 4 4 1 1 1 1

fret 3

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Week Four
Revision
G major
1 2 2 3 4 4 4 3 4 3 4 3 4 3 3 3 4 4 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

month two

G minor natural

G minor pentatonic

You now have every scale you will need for the first year of the course.

G mixolydian
1 2 2 1 2 1

G minor harmonic

G pentatonic blues

1 2

1 2 3

3 4

3 4

3 4

3 4 4 4

exercises - half barres


Half barre chords can be treated in the same way as first position barre chords in that they are rooted on the E string and therefore can be moved up and down the neck to produce a range of chords. In some instances they can be used as a replacement for barre chords. examples.
fret 3

X X

G
1 2 3

fret 5

X X

Am
1

fret 1

X X

F
1 2

F
1

F#
2

G
3

G#
4

A
5

A#
6

B
7

C
8

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Maggie May - Rod Stewart


This tune should be played all as OPEN CHORDS with the exception of F#m. F#m is the same as the Fm half barre however it is played in the second fret.
X X F#m
1 1

tune

Em7

intro
D D Em Em G G D D

verse
A A G Em G G D F#m D D G Em7 D D A F#m

chorus
Em Em Coda Em Em D D A A Em Em Em G7 G G A D D D A A Em D A D

arrangement intro - verse- chorus - verse - chorus - verse - chorus - verse - chorus - coda - intro

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month three

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copyright G C Hargreaves 2004

Week One
A shape half barres
x x Bb
1

month three

x x

Bbm
1 2

x x

Bb7
1

Bbm7 x x
2

x x

Bb
1

x x

Bb

3 4

2 3

The Bb major chord can be played with a number of fingering options. Try to find the one you are most comfortable with and stick with it. This chord shape isnt one of the most important you will come across and therefore this chord is a rare exception where I say . . . If you have a lot of trouble playing them, skip them.

exercises
Play these exercises using open OPEN CHORDS with the exception of the Bb chords. exercise 1 C Bb exercise 2 Dm Bb C C Bb Am Am C Am C

exercise 3 F Bbm Am Am

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Nights in white satin - Justin Hayward


This tune should be played using OPEN CHORDS with the exception of F and B. The F is a half barre chord and the B is the same shape as Bb, only played in the second fret. This piece is 6/8 time. SIX beats to the bar. Try it with the metronome in 6/8 time. X X B
1 3 2 3 4

tune

X X

F
1 2

verse
Em C A Em D G A D Em F C Em D Em C D repeat verse

instrumental
Em Em Em Am Em D Em Em D C B D Em C Em Am C D B C B Em Em repeat line

arrangement

verse - verse - instrumental - verse - instrumental

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Week Two
The A shaped half barre chords are rooted on the A string and therefore derive their name from the A string note names. For example the names of all the chords you have studies this week are all Bb (B flat), this is because they are rooted n the first fret , and the name of the note of the first fret of the B string is Bb.

month three

the A string root

Bb
1

B
2

C
3

Db
4

D
5

Eb
6

E
7

F
8

Sharps and Flats


We have briefly looked at these previously, however it is important you understand what a sharp is and what a flat is.

A sharp is UP a semitone or a fret b A flat is DOWN a semitone or a fret #


Certain notes can have two names, for example Bb can be A#. This is because when you move B down a fret (Bb) and A up a fret (A#) they end up on the same fret (fret 1). Some notes where this can happen are;

A# = Bb

C# = Db

D# = Eb

F# = Gb

G# = Ab

the explanation of when to use the sharp or the flat note name will come later in the course.

A string rooted barre chords


These are the last barre chords you will be learning in the first year. The SECOND POSITION or A string rooted barre chords can be treated in the same way as the first position barre chords, in that they can be moved up and down the guitar to produce different chords. This time however the root of the chord is on the A string and therefore the chords get their name from notes on this string.

Bb
1

B
2

C
3

Db
4

D
5

Eb
6

E
7

F
8

Using the first and second position barre chords between the 1st and the 8th fret you can now play ever major, minor, dominant 7th and minor 7th chord.

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root

x
2

x
2

root

C
1

fret 3

C
1

The second position major shaped chord is the hardest chord we have learned so far. Many people have difficulty with it. One of the alternative fingerings might make the it easier for you if you are having trouble playing it.

exercises
Practise each of these exercises, repeating them until you are happy with them. If your hand, thumb or wrist starts to hurt take a rest, but dont be concerned because this is quite normal when learning barre chords. exercise 1
fret 5

D
1

A
fret 5
1 2

fret 2
3 4

Bm
1 2 3 4

G
fret 3
1 2 3 4

Bm

exercise 2
fret 5
1

A
fret 5
2 3 4

D
1

fret 7

E
1

exercise 3
fret 5

Dm
1 2 3 4

Am
fret 5
1 2 3 4

fret 3

C
1

G
fret 3
1 2

3 4

Dm

Am

copyright G C Hargreaves 2004

Week Three
E rooted -1st position
major
1 2 3 4 3 4 3 1

month three

minor
1

7th
1 2

minor 7th

root

root
3

A rooted -2nd position


x
root
2 3 4

major
1

minor
1 2 3 4

7th
1

minor 7th
1

root
2 3

note map for the bottom two strings

A E

A# F
1

B F#
2

C G
3

C# G#
4

D
A
5

D#
A#
6

E B
7

F C
8

note. from now on all underlined chords should be played as second position. exercise 1 F exercise 2 Bm exercise 3 Dm7 Cm Gm F G D A Dm G C

exercises

copyright G C Hargreaves 2004

Rent - the pet shop boys


Play this using first position and second position barre chords, remembering that the underlined chords are second position. The E and Em chords should be played as OPEN chords.

tune

intro
C F Am F G F G Bm

open

repeat line four times Em


open

verse
Am Am C F F F F G G G Bm Am

Em E E Am

chorus
F Am coda C F F F G G Bm Am repeat coda repeat line three times G E Am G F G Em repeat line

Am

Am

arrangement

intro - verse - chorus - verse - chorus - verse - chorus - coda

copyright G C Hargreaves 2004

Week Four
exercises
The Basic Blues
This basic blues sequence we will be looking at over a number of weeks in various forms, however initially try these chord sequences using some or all of the possible chords you have learned so far. To remind you, the chords are bellow. Sequence 1 A E E Sequence 2 A7 E7 E7 A7 D7 D7 D7 A7 A7 A7 A7 A7 A D D D A A A A A

month three

tune

X
1

A
2 3

X
1

A7
2

X
1

A7

X X

D
1 2 3

X X

D7
1 2 3 2 3

E
1 2

E7
1

A
1 2 3 4 3

A7 fret 5
1 2

x
1

D fret 5

D7
1

x
1

E fret 7

E7
1

copyright G C Hargreaves 2004

Yesterday - The Beatles


Play this tune using only BARRE CHORDS. It is a difficult tune at this stage, however it is an excellent tune to learn because it contains virtually all the barre chord shapes. So even if you find it too hard to play with the backing, just go through it and locate all the chords. The experience will be invaluable.

tune

verse
F F A7 Dm G7 Dm Bb F Bb C

chorus/coda
A7 A7 F F Bb F Dm Dm A7 Dm G7 Gm Gm Dm Bb F C C F F Bb F C G7

arrangement

verse - verse - chorus/coda

note map for the bottom two strings

A E

A# F
1

B F#
2

C G
3

C# G#
4

D
A
5

D#
A#
6

E B
7

F C
8

copyright G C Hargreaves 2004

month four

All rights reserved, unauthorized copying, reproduction, hiring, lending, redistribution and broadcast of this e-book or any part of the contents is prohibited.

copyright G C Hargreaves 2004

Week One
Chord theory one
the major chord triad
All major chords are made up of TRIADS. The triad of a chord is the FIRST, THIRD and FIFTH note of the scale with the same name. For example, the notes of the C major scale are; 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 The note names are marked on this chord map. You can see that all the notes in the chord are from the triad. The C major chord X E C G C E

month four

1st

3rd

5th

The triad is the FIRST, THIRD and FIFTH note.

triad = C D G the minor chord triad

The principle is the same for minor chords however for a minor chord it is essential to use a minor scale. A major scale produces a major triad and chord, and a minor scale produces a minor triad and chord. For example, the notes of the A minor scale are; 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 A minor X A E A C E

1st

3rd

5th

The minor triad is still the FIRST, THIRD and FIFTH note.

triad = A C E
E B G D A E
F C G# D# A# F

fret map
F#
C# A G D A# G#

A E
C

D#
B

E
B

F
C

F# C#

G
D D#

F#

G#

A#

copyright G C Hargreaves 2004

Tablature
In this course you are learning tablature instead of regular music notation. Dont be concerned though because tablature is rapidly becoming the regular form of notation for the guitar and whatever music you enjoy you can easily find tablature for that gandre or group. The staff is six lines, each line represents a string on your guitar. Remember the bottom string of your guitar is the bottom E string (the thickest string) and therefore the bottom line of the tablature will be the bottom E string.

E (top, thinnest) A D G B E (bottom, thickest The numbers on the strings represent the frets where you should place your fingers.

3
Bar line separates the bars or phrases.

exercises
exercise 1 twinkle twinkle 3 5 5 3 5 5 3 6 6 5 5 3 3 5

exercise 2 G major scale

exercise 3 arpeggio 2 2 5 5 5 5 2 2

copyright G C Hargreaves 2004

Week Two
For the following exercises and tunes, the numbers in red represent the fingers you should use to play the notes. In some cases the tunes are famous old tunes in order to help you recognize your own mistakes.

month four exercises

exercise 1
1 3 1

frera Jaqua 1 1 3 1 1 1 2 4 1 2 4

4 1 4 2

4 1 4 2

6 4 3

6 4 3

exercise 2
1 1 3

pop goes the weasel 2 1 4 1 1 1 1 3 2 1 1

3 6 3

3 6 3

3 3 5

copyright G C Hargreaves 2004

exercise 3
1 2

finger exercise, to help strengthen your little finger. 3 4 3 2 1 2 3 4 3 2

The basic blues


Try playing the following basic blues sequence using the metronome in open timing at about 60 bpm. Try to play it so that the notes are played on the clicks of the metronome and then try to play it with the backing track. 2 A7 1 4 1 2 1 4 1 A7

tune

5
D7

5
A7

5
2 E7 1

4
4

7
1

7
4

4 5
1 A7

2 D7

7
4 E7

5
4 D7

4 5

4 A7

copyright G C Hargreaves 2004

Week Three
Paint it black - the Rolling Stones
This tune is how a typical piece of music might be made up. It has tab for single notes open chords and barre chords all in it. The barre chord is the second position B chord which can be played either full or half barre.

month four tune

intro 0

0 verse
Em Em Em Em coda B E D D Em Em G G D D B B Em A7 B B Em B

repeat once

arrangement

intro - verse - verse - intro - verse - verse - intro - verse - coda

a reminder of the B major chord


x
fret 2
2 3 4

B
1

x x
fret 2

B
1

copyright G C Hargreaves 2004

alternative intros alternative intro 1


1 2 In this intro, in the 3rd bar you slide the fourth finger up from the 5th fret to the 7th fret. 4 2 1 4 3 4 4 2 1

0 alternative intro 2
Em

repeat once

This intro is more difficult, you only need attempt it if you feel you are ready.

5 4 4

5 4 4

repeat once

Revise the blues scale and try to play it in the 5th fret
The G blues scale is called G because, like the barre chords the root of the scale gives the scale its name. The root of the G blues scale is the first note you play when playing from the bottom of the scale, the 3rd fret on the bottom E string (G). If you move the whole scale pattern up by two frets, so you start on the 5th fret the scale becomes the A blues scale. Practice the A blue scale until you can play it fluently.

exercises

G blues scale

A blues scale

fret 3

2 3
4

fret 5
3 3 4 4 4

2 3
4

3 4 4 4

copyright G C Hargreaves 2004

Week Four
Crockets theme -Jan Hammer
This tune is a good introduction to lead techniques. The reason their are two versions of this tune is that on most acoustic and classical guitars frets above the 12th fret are either impossible or virtually impossible to play, and this piece is based above the 12th fret. So if you have an acoustic guitar play the acoustic version, If you have an electric guitar play the electric version. Their is also a technique used in this piece called finger tremolo where you repeatedly bend the string very slightly to produce a vibrato effect. It is denoted as a wavy line, and can make you sound more experienced than you are, so practise it. finger tremolo or vibrato

month four
tune

Crockets theme -Jan Hammer electric version (original) CHORDS


You dont need to practise these unless you want to, but they will help you follow the tune and would make good practise. When playing along with the backing, the intro is very long and boring, so playing the chords can make it more fun to play. intro and verse Em Em Em bridge F G G F Bm C G G F F G G D D Em F F Dm Dm Am Am

copyright G C Hargreaves 2004

theme 1
1 4 1 1 3 1 3 3 1 3 1 3 1 3

12

15 12

12 14

12 14

14 12 14

12 14

12

14
3 1 3 1 3

12

15 12

12 14

12 14

14 12 14

12 14

14 12

12

14 12

14

theme 2
3 1 3 3 1 2 2 4

14 12 14

14

12 13

13 15

12

1 2

13 15

12

bridge 1 1 1 1 3 1 1 3 1 1 1 1 3 1 1 3 1 1 1 1 3 1 1 3

intro - verse - bridge - verse - bridge - verse - bridge - end

arrangement (verse = theme 1 - theme 1 - theme 2)

note on the bridge.


The bridge can be played using the first finger across both strings which you can then slide up. electric version
x x x x
1

acoustic version
x x x x
1

fret 1

x x x x

x x x x
fret 6
1

copyright G C Hargreaves 2004

Crockets theme -Jan Hammer acoustic version


intro and verse Am Am bridge A# A# C C Em F C A# A# C C G Am A# Gm repeat once Dm

theme 1
1 4 1 1 3 1 3 3 1 3 1 3 1 3

8 5

5 7

5 7

7 5 7

5 7

7
3 1 3 1 3

8 5

5 7

5 7

7 5 7

5 7

7 5

7 5

theme 2
3 1 3 3 1 2 2 4 1 2 4 1

7 bridge 6 6

6 8

6 6 8 6 6 8

6 6

6 6 8 6 6 8

6 6

6 6 8 6 6 8

intro - verse - bridge - verse - bridge - verse - bridge - end

arrangement (verse = theme 1 - theme 1 - theme 2)

copyright G C Hargreaves 2004

copyright G C Hargreaves 2004

month five

All rights reserved, unauthorized copying, reproduction, hiring, lending, redistribution and broadcast of this e-book or any part of the contents is prohibited.

copyright G C Hargreaves 2004

Week One
repeats and terminals
Up until this point we have been simply writing repeat above the place in the score at which you should go back and repeat. The correct way to denote repeats is probably easier to understand and it is a clearer where you repeat from. The repeat sign is the same in tab as it is in music and it is denoted by a double dot and double line.

month five

repeat from here

repeat to here

a terminal is the end of a line or phrase

To make this completely clear look at these examples. The bars have been marked with letters and then the order they should be played in is marked underneath.

example 1

A
A B C D A B C D example 2

A
A B C D C D example 3

A
A B C B C D example 4

A
A B C B C D A B

B
C B C D

copyright G C Hargreaves 2004

tablature and chords


As you get more experienced with the guitar and advance onto more difficult music, you will find that the chords are written into the tab (tablature). There are many reasons for this, but one of the most common reasons is that many tunes are written using partial chords or broken chords. The exercises bellow are all based on chords, however the chord names are written above the tab for you.

Hey Jude - The Beatles


To start off easily here is a tune youve already looked at. The red number are the count. verse 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4

tune

D 2 3 2 0 G 3 0 0 0 2 3
chorus 1 2

2 3 2 0

2 3 2 0

A 0 2 2 2 0 D 2 3 2 0

0 2 2 2 0 2 3 2 0

0 2 2 2 0 2 3 2 0

A 0 2 2 2 0 A 0 2 2 2 0

0 2 2 2 0 0 2 2 2 0

0 2 2 2 0 0 2 2 2 0

D 2 3 2 0 D 2 3 2 0

2 3 2 0

2 3 2 0

3 0 0 0 2 3
3

3 0 0 0 2 3
4

D7 2 1 2 0 D 2 3 2 0
ending

2 1 2 0

2 3 2 0

G 3 0 0 0 2 3 D7 2 1 2 0

3 0 0 0 2 3 A7 0 2 0 2 0

Em 0 0 0 2 2 0 A7 0 2 0 2 0

0 0 0 2 2 0

A7 0 2 0 2 0

0 2 0 2 0

D 2 3 2 0

2 3 2 0

2 3 2 0

C 0 1 0 2 3

0 1 0 2 3

0 1 0 2 3

G 3 0 0 0 2 3

3 0 0 0 2 3

3 0 0 0 2 3

D 2 3 2 0

repeat and fade

2 3 2 0

2 3 2 0

arrangement

verse - verse - chorus - verse - coda

Try playing this tune with the backing track. Because you are now playing more than one chord in a bar, you will have to get use to changing more quickly.

copyright G C Hargreaves 2004

Week Two
Try the following exercises combining all the different techniques we have learned to date.

month five exercises

exercise 1
D 2 3 2 0 2 3 C 0 1 0 2 3 0 1 Em 0 0 0 2 2 0 Dm 0 0 0 D 2 3 2 0

exercise 2
C 0 1 0 2 3 Am 0 1 2 2 0

1 3 2 0

G7

3 Am 0 1 2 2 0 G7 1 0 0 0 2 3 Am 0 1 2 2 0 Am 0 1 2 2 0

1 0 0 0 2 3

exercise 3
Dm 1 3 2 0 Dm 1 3 2 0 Am 0 1 2 2 0 Am 0 1 2 2 0 0 1 3 1 0 1 3 1 1

copyright G C Hargreaves 2004

exercise 4 Fill from live forever.

This exercise is all played on one chord, however the tune is produced by only playing selected notes from the chord. The numbers in red represent the beats of the bar and the dots between the numbers are the half beats. To count these beats so you can play along more accurately say the dots as and for example. Counting along to this I would be saying one and two and three and four and.

Am7
1 2 3 4

1 Am7 2

. 1

2 2

. 3

. 1

4 2

. 0

1 . Am7 1 2

2 2

. 3

. 1

4 2

. 0

Who is like thee Lord - Jewish folk (Christian chorus) intro


Em 0 0 0 2 2 0 0 0 2 Em 0 0 0 2 2 0 0 0 2 Em 0 0 0 2 2 0 0 0 2 Em 0 0 0 2 2 0 0 0 2

tune

0 Am

0 Em

0 Em

verse
Em 0 0 0 2 2 0 0 0 2 0 1 2 2 0 1 2 0 0 0 2 2 0 0 0 2 2 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 2 2 0 0 0 2 2 0 0 0 2

0 Am

0 Am

0 0 1 2 2 0 1 2 Em

0 0 0 0 2 Em

0 Am

0 1 2 2

0 1 2

0 Em

chorus
0 1 2 2 0 1 2 0 0 0 2 2 2 0 2 1 0 0 0 2

0 Am

0 Em

0 0 0 2

0 Am

0 0 1 2 2 0 1 2 B7

0 Em

0 1 2 2

0 1 2

0 0 0 0 2 2 0 0 0 2 Em

0 0 0 2 2 0 0 0 2 2

0 0 0 2

2 0 2

0 0 0 2

arrangement intro - verse - chorus - verse - chorus

copyright G C Hargreaves 2004

Week Three
About a Girl - Nirvana
main theme 1 Em 0 0 0 2 2 0 intro Em verse Em chorus G Em G Em G Em G Em G Em G Em .
This is the rhythm that repeats all the way through the tune wherever Em and G are alternating, for example the intro. and the verse both consist of this theme. The bracketed notes are optional.

month five tune

3 G 3 0 0 0 2 3

1 Em 0 0 0 2 2 0

3 G 3 0 0 0 2 3

0 0 0 2 2 0

0 0 0 0

3 0 0 0 2 3

3 0 0 0 2 3

0 0 0 0

0 0 0 2 2 0

0 0 0 0

3 0 0 0 2 3

3 0 0 0 2 3

0 0 0 0

repeat once

G
repeat once

See if you can work out from the tab how to play these chords, and note that in the bar with the F#7add4 chord in it, it is the same chord all the way through the bar.

1 C# 6 6 6 4 1 Em 0 0 0 2 2 0

3 C#/G#

F#7add4 6 6 6 4 4 . 4 . 3 4 4 2 1 A 0 2 2 2 0 . 3 4 4 2 2 C 0 1 0 2 3

6 6 6 4 . 2 .

6 6 6 4 4 3

0 0 3

repeat once

3 4 4 2 3 .

0 0 3

3 4 4 2 .

0 0 0 2 2 0

0 0 0 2 2 0

0 0 0 2 2 0

0 2 2 2 0

copyright G C Hargreaves 2004

solo

in the solo you may notice the H symbol and the slur between the 5th and the 7th fret, this is a hammer on. A hammer on is where you pick only the first note in the sequence and then the second note is created be hammering the second note down quickly against the fingerboard. So in this instance you pick the 5th fret, but then hammer down your finger into the 7th fret to produce the second note.

2
H

3
H

4 7 7 7

. 7 7 7

Sl.

1 9 9 9

. 9 9 9

. 9 9 9

Sl.

3 12 12 12

. 12 12 12

4 12 12 12

.
repeat x4

0 bridge C end Em arrangement C

intro - verse - chorus - intro - verse - chorus - solo - chorus - verse - chorus - bridge - intro - end Note. The reason the open string notes in the main theme are in brackets is that they are optional to play. They are open strings that are played between the chords to keep the rhythm going and at the same time give you time to move your fingers, ready for the next chord.

Em 0 0 0 2 2 0

0 0 0 2 2 0

0 0 0 0

G 3 0 0 0 2 3

3 0 0 0 2 3

3 0 0 0 2 3

0 0 0 0

Em 0 0 0 2 2 0

0 0 0 2 2 0

0 0 0 0

G 3 0 0 0 2 3

3 0 0 0 2 3

3 0 0 0 2 3

0 0 0 0

The new chords


The C# chord bellow is a standard second position barre chord as you have learned in previous lessons, however notice that you dont need to play the whole chord. The C#/G# is a C# chord with a G# bass. An emphasis is put on the bass in order to make it sound clearer and the top one or two strings are not played.

X
1

C#

X
1

C#/G#

X
1

F#7add4

2 3 3 3 4

copyright G C Hargreaves 2004

Week Four
Theory two 'sevenths'
Quick revision. So far you have looked at the 'triad' a triad being the notes that any major or minor chord are made up of. The triad is the first, third and fifth note of a scale. Because the major and the minor chords are the most common and fundamental of the scales, we will call them our primary chords.

month five

The Major Seventh chord


The major seventh chord like all major chords starts with the major triad, however this time we find the seventh note of the same major scale we got the triad from and add it to the chord. For example, to create a Cmaj7 we start with the scale of C major, then we find the first, third and fifth notes so we have the triad. Finally we find the seventh note so we have a Cmaj7. The notes in Cmaj7 are C E G B. The note names are marked on this chord map. You can see that all the notes in the chord are from the triad. The Cmaj7' chord X E C G B E

1st

3rd

5th

7th

The Minor Seventh Chord


The minor seventh chord follow exactly the same pattern of logic as the major seventh chord with the exception that you have to use a minor scale rather than a major scale. For Example, to create an Am7 we start with the scale of A minor, then we find the first, third and fifth notes so we have the triad. Finally we find the seventh note so we have an Am7. The notes in Am7 are A C E G X A Am7 X A G E E

Am7 C E A G

1st

3rd

5th

7th

This is why you can have several variations of one chord, but they will all contain the same notes.

copyright G C Hargreaves 2004

The dominant Seventh Chord


The dominant seventh chord is without doubt the seventh chord we use the most, however it has the most complex theory of all the seventh chords. So, for the sake of the first year of the course we will use a simplified theory. The dominant seventh can be created in the same way as the major and minor seventh, however we use the mixolydian scale as its source. For Example, to create a G7 we star t with the scale of G mixolydian, then we find the first, third and fifth notes so we have the triad. Finally we find the seventh note so we have a G7. The notes in G7 are G B D F G B G7 D G B F

1st

3rd
E B G D A E
F C G# D# A# F

5th
F#
C# A G D A#

7th fret map


G#

A E
C

D#
B

E
B

F
C

F# C#

G
D D#

F#

G#

A#

study some of the 7th chords you have played


X
2

B7
1 3 4

X
2 3

C7
1

Am7
1 2

X
1

A7
2

X
1

A7

X X

D7
1 2 3

X X

Dm7
1 2 2

E7
1 1

Em7
2 3

G7
1

copyright G C Hargreaves 2004

Space Oddity - David Bowie


rhythm 1 . C 0 1 0 2 3 intro C intro/verse C Am verse C F bridge Fmaj 7 Bbmaj 7 Am Em7 G F Fmaj 7 Em7 E7 Fm C F F Fm C Am7 Em D7 C
repeat once

tune
.

1 Em 0 0 0 2 2 0 C

0 1 0 2 3

0 1 0 2 3

0 1 0 2 3

0 1 0 2 3

0 1 0 2 3

0 1 0 2 3

0 0 0 2 2 0

0 0 0 2 2 0 Em

0 0 0 2 2 0

0 0 0 2 2 0

0 0 0 2 2 0

0 0 0 2 2 0

Em

Em

instrumental
1 C 0 1 0 2 3 C F . 2 F 1 1 2 3 . 3 G 3 0 0 0 2 3 E7 Fm C . 4 A 0 2 2 2 0 . 1 C 0 1 0 2 3 F C . 2 F 1 1 2 3 . 3 G 3 0 0 0 2 3 Fm . 4 A 0 2 2 2 0 C .

0 1 0 2 3

1 1 2 3

0 2 2 2 0

0 1 0 2 3

1 1 2 3

0 2 2 2 0

copyright G C Hargreaves 2004

bridge 2 C F G G Eb7 E7 Fm Am C Am7 F F D7 C Fm C

arrangement

intro - intro/verse - verse - verse - bridge - verse - instrumental - bridge 2 - bridge - instrumental

chords

Bbmaj7 X X
2 3 4

X X

Eb7
1 1 2 3 4

Em7

Fmaj7 X X 1
2 3

copyright G C Hargreaves 2004

month six

All rights reserved, unauthorized copying, reproduction, hiring, lending, redistribution and broadcast of this e-book or any part of the contents is prohibited.

copyright G C Hargreaves 2004

Week One
styles rock
Rhythms for every style of music are very diversified, and especially now there is more overlap than ever before in styles of playing. This overlap makes each music style more interesting in itself. Over the next few lessons we will scrape the surface of several styles of music to get a basic idea of the techniques are used to produce the sounds. Rock. Rock rhythms are concentrated mainly on producing power from the guitar, and strangely you get a more powerful sound from the guitar by using less notes per chord rather than more. Most rock chords consist of two or three notes, usually around the bass.

month six

try to make these chords sound powerful using barre chords only play the bottom two or three strings.

exercise 1

eye of the tiger

Am - - - Am G Am - - - Am G Am - - - Am G F - - -

exercise 2

This signifies a DOWN strum or pick This signifies an UP strum or pick

try playing just this bass note in groups of three, touching the strings slightly with the right hand to mute the note a little. This is called palm muting.

5 55 5 55 5 55 5 55 5 55 5 55 5 55 5 55 5 55 5 55 5 55 5 55 5 55 5 55 5 55 5 55

exercise 3
Am

Put the two previous exercise together to produce the famous riff.

Am G Am

G Am

7 7 5

7 7 5 55 5 5 5

5 5 3

7 7 5

7 7 5 55 5 5 5

5 7 5 7 3 5

7 7 5 55 5 5 5

5 5 3

3 3 1

1 11 1 11 1 11

Practice this until you can play this as it is written, with only partial chords, then try to play it with the full barre chords. It is surprising that by putting more notes into the chords you actually weaken the impact of the chord, where as just two or three notes gives the chord greater impact.

copyright G C Hargreaves 2004

rock, grunge and punk techniques


When playing rock and grunge styles of guitar it is quite normal to cheat when playing barre chords. If you look at the exercises we have done so far it is clear that you rarely play the top strings and therefore their is no need to finger them. Also because you can easily find yourself playing entire tunes in barre chords it may be important to make it as easy as possible to play them. E string rooted

styles

Power chord fingering for the first and second position barre chords.

x x x

A string rooted

x x

clicks

A click is a style of what is called percussive strumming. This is when you use the guitar to create a rhythm. A click isnt a true note, it is the sound generated when you strum the strings when they are muted. To produce a click simply rest your left hand on the strings over the frets, without pressing down and strum the strings. It should sound like a clicking sound.
x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x

x x x

x x x

x x x

x x x

x x x

x x x

x x x

x x x

Note. Their are no fret numbers denoted because it isnt important, because you cant hear the tone.

exercise
exercise 1
F
3 3 1
x x x

Try the following exercise to get used to applying and releasing pressure when going between clicks and chords. Remember you can keep the chord shape if you want during the clicks, just dont press.

3 3 1

x x x

3 3 1

x x x

3 3 1

x x x

3 3 1

x x x

3 3 1

x x x

3 3 1

x x x

3 3 1

x x x

exercise 2
F
33 33 11
x x x x x x

G
33 33 11
x x x x x x

A
x x x x x x

55 55 33

55 55 33

x x x x x x

7 7 7 7 5 5

x x x

7 7 7 7 5 5

x x x

7 7 5

copyright G C Hargreaves 2004

Week Two
exercises
Rock shuffle (based on the twelve barre blues in E)
Practise this sequence, playing it palm muted. The chord names above the tab are only the chords that are reflected in the backing, you dont have to try and play them.

month six

22 44 22 44 22 44 22 42 22 44 22 44 22 44 22 42 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 A E

22 44 22 44 22 44 22 42 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 22 44 22 44 22 44 22 42 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 B E

44 66 44 66 22 44 22 42 22 22 22 22 00 00 00 00 22 44 22 44 22 44 22 42 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00

The Spirit in the sky - Norman Greenbalm


G C Bb G Bb C

5 5

5 5

5 5

5 5

5 5

5 5

3 3 3

5 5

5 5

5 5

5 5

5 5

3 3

5 5

Typical Van Halen style riff


H H

0 3

2 2 0 0

2 0

2 2 0 0

2 0

0 3

2 2 0 0

2 0

2 2 0 0

2 0

copyright G C Hargreaves 2004

Smoke on the water - Deep purple intro


G C G C# C G C G

tune

5 5 3

3 3

5 5 3

5 5 3

3 3

6 6 4

5 5 3

5 5 3 F

3 3

5 5 3

3 3 3

5 5 3

verse
Gm 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 1 F 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 G# 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 2 3 G Gm 1 1 2 1 1 1 2 3 Gm 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

5 5

5 5

5 5

5 5

3 3

3 3

5 5

5 5

Gm

3 C

5 5

5 5

5 5

5 5

3 3

3 3

5 5

5 5 3 C# C

chorus

5 5 3 C 5 5 3 G C

6 6 4 G#

5 5 3 G

3 3

5 5 3 C

5 5 3 G

3 3

6 6 4

5 5 3

C# C 3 3 6 6 4 5 5 3

6 6 4 C G

5 5 3

3 3

5 5 3

5 5 3

arrangement
intro verse - chorus verse - chorus verse - chorus instrumental verse - chorus intro - intro

5 5 3

3 3

5 5 3

5 5 3

5 5 3

copyright G C Hargreaves 2004

Week Three
Livin on a prayer - Bon Jovi Main theme
Am 7 7 5 7 7 5 Where an Am appear in blue, play the main theme G 5 5 3 Am 7 7 5 7 7 5 G 5 5 3

month six tune

intro
Am Am

verse
Am F Am G Am Am Am
repeat once

Am

bridge
F F G G Am Am F F G Am G

chorus
repeat once

Am

instrumental
repeat once

arrangement

intro - verse - bridge - chorus - verse - bridge - chorus - instrumental - chorus (repeat and fade)

copyright G C Hargreaves 2004

styles grunge and punk


Grunge and punk started off sounding very similar, in that they were a counter culture where the messier the music style the better. However as time has gone by the grunge sound is becoming more rock inspired ( in general) with more accuracy and skill involved. The examples bellow are more punk and early grunge inspired.

exercise 1
D 3 2 0 D 3 2 0

a typical open chord movement.

A 3 3 3 3 3 3 2 2 2 2 2 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 2 2 0 A 3 3 3 3 3 3 2 2 2 2 2 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 2 2 0 2 2 2 0 2 2 2 0 2 2 2 0 2 2 2 0 2 2 2 0 2 2 2 0 2 2 2 0 2 2 2 0 2 2 2 0 2 2 2 0 2 2 2 0 2 2 2 0

E 2 2 0 E 2 2 0 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 0 0 0 0 0 0

A 2 2 2 0 A 2 2 2 0 2 2 2 0 2 2 2 0 2 2 2 0 2 2 2 0 2 2 2 0 2 2 2 0 2 2 2 0 2 2 2 0 2 2 2 0

exercise 2

The main riff of Anarchy in the UK - The Sex pistols

C 1 . 2 . 3 . 4 .

F E 1 . 2 . 3 . 4 . 9 9 7

C 1 . 2 . 3 . 4 .

F E 1 . 2 . 3 . 4 . 9 9 7

10 10 10 10 8 10 10 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8

10 10 10 10 8 10 10 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8

exercise 3
Intro/chorus

Song two - Blur.

F Eb Ab Bb C 1 . 2 . 3 . 4 . 1 . 2 . 3 . 4 .
10 10 10 10 10 10 13 8 8 8 13 11 verse 13 13 11 13 13 15 17 13 13 15 17 11 11 13 15 17 17 15

F Ab Bb C Eb 1 . 2 . 3 . 4 . 1 . 2 . 3 . 4 .
10 10 10 10 10 10 13 8 8 8 13 11 13 13 11 13 13 15 17 13 13 15 17 11 11 13 15 17 17 15

F Eb Ab Bb C 1 . 2 . 3 . 4 . 1 . 2 . 3 . 4 .
8 3 3 3 8 3 3 3 6 1 1 1 8 8 6 6 6 8 10 6 6 8 10 4 4 6 8 10 10 8

Eb F Ab Bb C 1 . 2 . 3 . 4 . 1 . 2 . 3 . 4 .
8 3 3 3 8 3 3 3 6 1 1 1 8 8 6 6 6 8 10 6 6 8 10 4 4 6 8 10 10 8

copyright G C Hargreaves 2004

Week Four
Smells like Teen Spirit - Nirvana intro
semi acoustic F Bb G# C# 1 . 2 . 3 . 4 . 1 . 2 . 3 . 4 .
3 3 1 3 3 1
xx xx xx xx xx xx

month six tune

F Bb G# C# 1 . 2 . 3 . 4 . 1 . 2 . 3 . 4 .
3 3 1 3 3 1
xx xx xx xx xx xx

3 3 3 3 1 1

6 6 4

6 6 4

xx xx xx xx xx xx

6 6 6 6 4 4

3 3 3 3 1 1

6 6 4

6 6 4

xx xx xx xx xx xx

6 6 6 6 4 4

electric F Bb G# C# 1 . 2 . 3 . 4 . 1 . 2 . 3 . 4 .
3 3 1 3 3 1
xx xx xx xx xx xx

repeat x 4 F Bb G# C# 1 . 2 . 3 . 4 . 1 . 2 . 3 . 4 .
3 3 1 3 3 1
xx xx xx xx xx xx

3 3 3 3 1 1

6 6 4

6 6 4

xx xx xx xx xx xx

6 6 6 6 4 4

3 3 3 3 1 1

6 6 4

6 6 4

xx xx xx xx xx xx

6 6 6 6 4 4

verse
1 . 2 . 3 . 4 .
1 1

1 . 2 . 3 . 4 . 1 . 2 . 3 . 4 .
1 1

repeat x 3 1 . 2 . 3 . 4 .

chorus
Fm 1 . 2 . 3 . 4 .
1 1 3 1 1 1 1 3 1 1

Fm 1 . 2 . 3 . 4 .
1 1 3 1 1 1 1 3 1 1

Fm 1 . 2 . 3 . 4 .
1 1 3 1 1 1 1 3 1 1

Fm 1 . 2 . 3 . 4 .
1 1 3 1 1 1 1 3 1 1

F Bb G# C# 1 . 2 . 3 . 4 . 1 . 2 . 3 . 4 .
3 3 1 3 3 1
xx xx xx xx xx xx

repeat x 6 F Bb G# C# 1 . 2 . 3 . 4 . 1 . 2 . 3 . 4 .
3 3 1 3 3 1
xx xx xx xx xx xx

3 3 3 3 1 1

6 6 4

6 6 4

xx xx xx xx xx xx

6 6 6 6 4 4

3 3 3 3 1 1

6 6 4

6 6 4

xx xx xx xx xx xx

6 6 6 6 4 4

copyright G C Hargreaves 2004

F F# 1 . 2 . 3 . 4 .
3 3 1 3 3 4 3 3 4 1 1 2 3

F Bb 1 . 2 . 3 . 4 .
3 3 1 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 1 1 1 1 1

F F# 1 . 2 . 3 . 4 .
3 3 1 3 3 4 3 3 4 1 1 2 3

F Bb 1 . 2 . 3 . 4 .
3 3 1 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 1 1 1 1 1

solo
1 4 1 1 4 1 4 2 1 2 1 3 1 3 1 3 1 0

1 0

1 0

1 0

1 0

1 0

1 0

1 0

1 0

coda
Fm
1 1 3 1 1 1 1 3 1 1

Fm
1 1 3 1 1 1 1 3 1 1

Fm
1 1 3 1 1 1 1 3 1 1

Fm
1 1 3 1 1 1 1 3 1 1

F
3 3 1 3 3 1
xx xx xx xx xx xx

Bb
3 3 3 3 1 1

G#
6 6 4 6 6 4

C#
xx xx xx xx xx xx

F
3 3 1 3 3 1
xx xx xx xx xx xx

Bb
3 3 3 3 1 1
feedback

G#
6 6 4 6 6 4

C#
xx xx xx xx xx xx

6 6 6 6 4 4

6 6 6 6 4 4

F
3 3 1

arrangement intro - verse - chorus - verse - chorus - solo - verse - coda

copyright G C Hargreaves 2004

month seven

All rights reserved, unauthorized copying, reproduction, hiring, lending, redistribution and broadcast of this e-book or any part of the contents is prohibited.

copyright G C Hargreaves 2004

Week One
styles country
Again, because of style overlap over the last few year it is impossible to generalize on any specific style of music however hopefully this section will give you an idea of what makes that country sound. But remember because of the overlap in styles, even if you hate country music, the techniques are important to learn. The country music influence can be heard strongly music from Bob Dylan to Guns n Roses. Country. The main thing we will concentrate on in order to get a country sound is the bass line. Many country tunes have a strong walking bass line and this gives a unique character to the music.

month seven

exercise
exercise 1
0 2 0 3 3 0 2 0 4 0 2 0 3 0 2 0 3 0 2 0 3 0 2 0 3 0 2 0 3 0 2 0 3 4 0 2 0 0 2 0 3 0 2 0 3 020 3 0 2 0

0 2 0 3

020

0 2 0

0 2 0 3 3

0 2 0 3

0 2 0 3

0 2 0 3

0 2 0 3

0 2 0 3

0 2 0 3

exercise 2
G 3 0 0 3 Em 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 2 3 0 0 3 0 0 3 3 0 0 3 0 0 2 3 0 0 3 0 0

copyright G C Hargreaves 2004

exercise 3
C 1 . 2 . 3 . 4 . 2 0 2 F 1 . 2 . 3 . 4 . 3 2 1 2 3 C 1 . 2 . 3 . 4 . 2 0 2 3 G 1 . 2 . 3 . 4 . 0

C 1 . 2 . 3 . 4 .
H

F 1 . 2 . 3 . 4 .
H

C 1 . 2 . 3 . 4 .
H

G 1 . 2 . 3 . 4 .
H

0 2 3

0 2 2 3

2 3

0 2

2 3

0 2

exercise 4
C 0 1 0 2 0 1 0 2 0 0 1 1 0 0 3 Am 0 1 2 2 0 1 2 2 0 0 1 1 2 2 0 F 1 1 1 1 2 2 3 1 G7 1 0 0 0 3 1 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 2 3 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 2 3 1 1 2 3 1 1 2 3 1 1 1 1 2 2 3 1 G7 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 2 3 0 1 2 2 0 1 2 2 0 0 1 1 2 2 0 F 1 1 2 3 1 1 2 3 1 1 1 1 2 2 3 1 G7 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 C 0 1 0 2 0 1 0 2 0 0 1 1 0 0 3 Am 0 1 2 2 0 1 2 2 0 0 1 1 2 2 0 F 1 1 2 3 1 1 2 3 1 C 0 1 0 2 0 1 0 2 0 0 1 1 0 0 3 Am 0 1 2 2 0 1 2 2 C 0 1 0 2 0 1 0 2

3 Am

F barre 1 1 2 3 1 G7 1 1 2 3

copyright G C Hargreaves 2004

Week Two
I walk the line - Johny Cash
1 . 2 . 3 . 4 . 1 . 2 . 3 . 4 . G7 1 0 0 2 1 0 0 2 3 1 0 0 2 1 0 0 2 1 . 2 . 3 . 4 . 1 . 2 . 3 . 4 . C 0 1 0 2 0 1 0 2 0 0 1 1 0 0

month seven tune

1 . 2 . 3 . 4 .

1 . 2 . 3 . 4 . G7 1 0 0 2 1 0 0 2 3 1 0 0 2 1 0 0 2

1 . 2 . 3 . 4 .

1 . 2 . 3 . 4 . C 0 1 0 2 0 1 0 2 2 0 0 1 1 0 0

1 . 2 . 3 . 4 .

1 . 2 . 3 . 4 . F 1 1 1 1 2 2 3 . 3 . 4 . 1 0 0 3 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 1 2 2

1 . 2 . 3 . 4 .

1 . 2 . 3 . 4 . C 0 0 1 1 0 0 3 . 3 . 4 . 0 1 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0

1 . 2 . 3 . 4 .

1 . 2 G7 1 0 0 2

1 . 2 . 3 . 4 .

1 . 2 C 0 1 0 3

copyright G C Hargreaves 2004

Week Three
styles reggae
The reggae guitar rhythm is mostly off the beat. This means that the chord is played not on the count of the beat (1 2 3 4), but in the gap in between the beats. To make life easier it is a good idea to start counting to the drum beats or metronome beat in this fashion.

month seven

one - and - two - and - three - and - four - and


If you play when you are saying and, you will know that you are playing off the beat. Reggae chords are usually barre chords, and they are nearly always muted directly after playing to give a sharp shack sound. When playing chords you should also only strum the top three or four strings unless otherwise told by the tab.

exercise
exercise 1
1
Am a simple off the beat exercise using barre chords

.
5 5 5 7

.
5 5 5 7

.
5 5 5 7

.
5 5 5 7

1
Am

.
5 5 5 7

.
5 5 5 7

.
5 5 5 7

.
5 5 5 7

1
G

.
3 3 4 5

.
3 3 4 5

.
3 3 4 5

.
3 3 4 5

1
Am

.
5 5 5 7

.
5 5 5 7

.
5 5 5 7

.
5 5 5 7

1
F

.
1 1 2 3

.
1 1 2 3

3
G

.
3 3 4 5

.
3 3 4 5

1
Am

.
5 5 5 7

.
5 5 5 7

.
5 5 5 7

.
5 5 5 7

copyright G C Hargreaves 2004

exercise 2
1
Dm

First and second position bare chords

.
5 6 7 7

.
5 6 7 7

.
5 6 7 7

.
5 6 7 7

1
Am

.
5 5 5 7

.
5 5 5 7

.
5 5 5 7

.
5 5 5 7

1
C

.
3 5 5 5

.
3 5 5 5

.
3 5 5 5

.
3 5 5 5

1
G

.
3 3 4 5

.
3 3 4 5

.
3 3 4 5

.
3 3 4 5

exercise 3
1
Dm

to make the rhythm a little more interesting a very fast double strike is added.

.
5 6 7 7

.
5 6 7 7

.
5 6 7 7 5 6 7 7

.
5 6 7 7

1
Am

.
5 5 5 7

.
5 5 5 7

.
55 55 55 77

.
5 5 5 7

1
G

.
3 3 4 5

.
3 3 4 5

.
33 33 44 55

.
3 3 4 5

1
Am

.
5 5 5 7

.
5 5 5 7

.
55 55 55 77

.
5 5 5 7

exercise 4
1
Am

now add a bass not on the first beat of the bar.

.
5 5 5 7

.
5 5 5 7

.
5 5 5 7

.
5 5 5 7

1
Am

.
5 5 5 7

.
5 5 5 7

.
55 55 55 77

.
5 5 5 7

1
G

.
3 3 4 5

.
3 3 4 5

.
3 3 4 5 3 3 4 5

.
3 3 4 5

1
Am

.
5 5 5 7

.
5 5 5 7

.
5 5 5 7

.
5 5 5 7

copyright G C Hargreaves 2004

Week Four
I shot the sheriff - Bob Marley intro / bridge
7 5 7 8 5 5

month seven tune

chorus
1
Am

.
5 5 5 7

.
5 5 5 7

.
55 55 55 77

.
5 5 5 7

1
Dm

.
5 6 7 7

.
5 6 7 7

.
5 6 7 7 5 6 7 7

.
5 6 7 7

1
Am

.
5 5 5 7

.
5 5 5 7

.
55 55 55 77

.
5 5 5 7

1
Am

.
5 5 5 7

.
5 5 5 7

.
55 55 55 77

.
5 5 5 7

5 1 . 2 . 3 . 4 . F Em Am 5 0 1 5 1 0 5 0 2 7 3 2 7 2 3 5 0 1 1 . 2 . 3 . 4 . F Em Am 5 0 1 5 1 0 5 0 2 7 3 0 7 2 3 5 0 1
3 times

verse

1 . 2 . 3 . 4 . F Em Am 0 0 1 1 1 0 2 0 2 2 3 2 0 2 3 0 1

1 . 2 . 3 . 4 . Am Em Am 5 0 0 5 1 0 5 2 0 7 2 2 7 0 2 5 0

arrangement

intro - verse - chorus - bridge - chorus - intro

copyright G C Hargreaves 2004

rhythm technique summary


DOWN strum or pick. Moving your strumming hand down towards the floor. UP strum or pick. Moving you strumming hand upward away from the floor.

x
m

CLICK. Strum the strings whilst keeping them muted with the fingering hand.
We havent used a damp, it is when you mute the strings with the strumming hand after strumming them.

MUTE.

pm

PALM MUTING. Is when you rest the strumming hand lightly against the strings in order to mute them slightly. Palm muting can be done at the same time as strumming Some tablature you will come across use the m symbol to men the same as pm.

exercises
Some very simple strumming and rhythm exercises, you only need try these if you think you are struggling or just need the extra practice. Use any chord you want.

exercise 1
1 . 2 . 3 . 4 . 1 . 2 . 3 . 4 . 1 . 2 . 3 . 4 . 1 . 2 . 3 . 4 .

exercise 2
1 . 2 . 3 . 4 . 1 . 2 . 3 . 4 . 1 . 2 . 3 . 4 . 1 . 2 . 3 . 4 .

exercise 3
1 . 2 . 3 . 4 . 1 . 2 . 3 . 4 . 1 . 2 . 3 . 4 . 1 . 2 . 3 . 4 .

exercise 4

needs to be a barre chord because of the click

1 . 2 . 3 . 4 .

1 . 2 . 3 . 4 .

1 . 2 . 3 . 4 .

1 . 2 . 3 . 4 .

x x

copyright G C Hargreaves 2004

These exercises involve half beats.

exercise 5
1 . 2 . 3 . 4 . 1 . 2 . 3 . 4 . 1 . 2 . 3 . 4 . 1 . 2 . 3 . 4 .

exercise 6
1 . 2 . 3 . 4 . 1 . 2 . 3 . 4 . 1 . 2 . 3 . 4 . 1 . 2 . 3 . 4 .

x
exercise 7

1 . 2 . 3 . 4 .

1 . 2 . 3 . 4 .

1 . 2 . 3 . 4 .

1 . 2 . 3 . 4 .

m exercise 8 pm

1 . 2 . 3 . 4 .

1 . 2 . 3 . 4 .

1 . 2 . 3 . 4 .

1 . 2 . 3 . 4 .

copyright G C Hargreaves 2004

month eight

All rights reserved, unauthorized copying, reproduction, hiring, lending, redistribution and broadcast of this e-book or any part of the contents is prohibited. copyright G C Hargreaves 2004

Week One
styles blues
Blues is most known for the blues shuffle type sound (which we will look at). However blues was the starting point of virtually all modern music, and because of this fact we will studying the blues style in some depth. Blues techniques and sounds are reflected in rock, grunge, soul and motown, country and western, and numerous other types of music.

month eight

exercise
exercise 1 hoochy koochy man
1 . 2 . 3 . 4 . 1 . 2 . 3 . 4 . 1 . 2 . 3 . 4 .

2 0 2 0 0 0 . 4 .

2 0 1

2 0 0 . 0 2 2

2 0 2 0 0 . 0 0 0 . 3 .

2 0 4

2 0 0 .

exercise 2
1 . 0 2 0 1 . 0 2 0 1 . 0 2 1 . 0 2 0 0 0 0 3 2 0 2 . 3 . 4 . 2 3 . 0 0 2 3 2 0 . 0 2 4 1 0 0 . 0 0 1 . 0 2 0 0 0 3 2 2 . 3 . 1 . 0 2 2 . 0 2 . 0 0 3 0 . 3 4 . 2 0 1 . 0 2 0 0 3 2 0 0 . 3 4 . 2 2 . 2 . 3

2 3 4 . 3

2 0 4

2 0 .

copyright G C Hargreaves 2004

exercise 3

C 1 . 2 . 3 . 4 . 1 . 2 . 3 . 4 . 0 2 2 2 3 2 2 2

C 1 . 2 . 3 . 4 . 0 2 2 2 3 2 2 2

3 C 1 . 2 . 3 . 4 . 0 2 2 2 3 2 2 2

F F C 1 . 2 . 3 . 4 . 1 . 2 . 3 . 4 . 1 . 2 . 3 . 4 . 0 2 2 2 3 2 1 2 2 2 3 3 2 3 4 2 3 2 3 1 2 3 3 2 4 2 3 2 3

C 1 . 2 . 3 . 4 . 0 2 2 2 3 2 2 2

G F C 1 . 2 . 3 . 4 . 1 . 2 . 3 . 4 . 1 . 2 . 3 . 4 . 0 2 2 2 3 2 3 2 4 2 5 5 4 5 6 4 5 4 3 1 2 3 3 2 4 2 3 2 3

C 1 . 2 . 3 . 4 . 0 2 3 2 2 2 1 2

G C 1 . 2 . 3 . 4 . 1 . 2 . 3 . 4 . 3 3 0 4 2 5 3 4 5 1 2 3

C 1 . 2 . 3 . 4 . 0 1 0 2 3

Whilst this exercise is marked with chords, their is no need to play them as full chords. Bellow are suggestions of how to play the chords with the temporary fingering positions being marked in red. If you feel happier using different fingering than that suggested it perfectly acceptable.

X
2 3

X X
2 4

X X

F
2

X X

G
2

4 4

4 4

copyright G C Hargreaves 2004

Week Two
Steam roller - James Taylor
E 1 . 2 . 3 . 4 . A 1 . 2 . 3 . 4 . E 1 . 2 . 3 . 4 . E 1 . 2 . 3 . 4 .

month eight tune

2 0

4 00

5 00

2 0 4 00 0

4 00

5 00

4 00 0 2 0

4 00

5 00

2 4 00 0 0

4 00

5 00

4 00 0

A 1 . 2 . 3 . 4 .

A 1 . 2 . 3 . 4 .

E 1 . 2 . 3 . 4 .

E 1 . 2 . 3 . 4 .

2 0

4 00

5 00

2 4 00 0 0 B7 4 . 2 0 2 1 2

4 00

5 00

4 00 0 2 0

4 00

5 00

2 4 00 0 0

4 00

5 00

4 00 0

B7 B7add6 1 . 2 . 3 . 2 3 0 0 2 2 1 1 2 2

A 1 . 2 . 3 . 4 . 0 0 2 2 2 2 2 2 0 0 0

E 1 . 2 . 3 . 4 .

E 1 . 2 . 3 . 4 . 3 2 3 2 3 2

2 0

4 00

5 00

2 4 00 0 0

arrangement

verse - verse - verse

chords

X
2

B7
1 3 4

X
2

B7addG
1 3 4

C9 XX X

B9 X X X
1

copyright G C Hargreaves 2004

Week Three
exercise
exercise 1
Revise 1. the blues scale in A (5th fret). 2. the blues scale in G (3rd fret).
4

month eight

1
2

3 4
4 4

exercise 2
3 5 6 3 6 3 6

3 6

6 3

exercise 3
5 7 8 5 8 5 8

5 8

8 5

exercise 4
5 5 5 7 5 8 7 5 7 5

copyright G C Hargreaves 2004

exercise 5
5

exercise 6
8 5 8 8 5 8 8 5 8 8 5 8 5 8 5 5 8 5 5 8 5 5 8 5

8 5

8 5

8 5

8 5

7 5

7 5 7

exercise 7
5 7 8 5 8 7 5

copyright G C Hargreaves 2004

Week Four
Basic blues (again) Improvisation
Improvisation is the art of making it up as you go along. This may sound like something only gifted musician can do, who have been playing for many years, but that isnt the case. To improvise effectively you just need to know what scale to use with what chord sequence and this can be learned by anyone.

month eight tune

How to Improvise with the blues sequence in A.


1. make sure you can play the blues scale up and down from memory. 2. play the blues scale in A along with the extended blues backing. Note how it fits perfectly even if you start late or early. 3. try taking the noted of the scale out of order, perhaps in a similar way to the previous exercises, or use bits of the exercises if you want. 4. you are now improvising. Just keep practising, taking the scale out of order to produce what you are happy with. Remember everybody finds their own way to improvise and their own riffs and note preferences.

Hints.
Dont be scared to try new things You dont have to stick tightly to the rhythm. Make some notes long and others short, holding a note for a time can give you time to think about your next move. Dont worry about repeating the same notes several times, this is a technique used by most good guitarists. Listen to your favorite guitarist and see if you can pick out what they do.

copyright G C Hargreaves 2004

month nine

All rights reserved, unauthorized copying, reproduction, hiring, lending, redistribution and broadcast of this e-book or any part of the contents is prohibited.

copyright G C Hargreaves 2004

Week One
finger picking
Finger picking is a technique that can open up the way to many diversified styles such as classical, folk, flamenco and advanced rock, with tunes such as Nothing else matters - Metalica and stairway to heaven - Led Zeppelin. Unfortunately it will take a few week to master the basics, but it will be well worth the effort.

month nine

Fingers

A L

I have illustrated both hand to make clear the difference between them, however you should know the fingers of the left hand by now.

P I M A L

= primary = index = middle = annular = little

The finger names are important. Above the tab you will see something written like P I M I this tell you which finger to use.

fig.1
fig.1 The thumb rests on 1 the string. fig.2 The thumb plucks the string downwards towards the floor.

fig.2

fig.3 The fingers rest on 3 the string. fig.4 The fingers pluck 4 upward toward the roof.

fig.3

fig.4

copyright G C Hargreaves 2004

exercises
exercise 1 D
3 0 2

PIMI
3 0 3 2 3 0 3 2 3 0 3 2 3

exercise 2 C
1 3 0

PIMI
1 3 1 0

Am
1 0 1

1 0

Dm
3 0

3 0

G7
3 3 0

0 3

exercise 3a A
2 0 2

PIMI Asus
2 0 2 2 2 0 2 3 2 0 2 3 2

A
2 0 2 2 0 2 2 2

E
1 0 0 1 0 1 0 1

A
2 0 2 2 0 2 2 2

Asus
2 0 3 2 0 2 3 2

A
2 0 2 2

E
1 0 0 1

A
2 0 2 2 0

copyright G C Hargreaves 2004

exercise 3b A
0 0

PMIM
0 0 0 0

D
0

2 0

A
0

0 0

0 0 0

0 2 2 0 2 2

A
0

0 0

D
0

A
0

0 0

exercise 3 and 3a continued


For the Asus chord simply slide the third finger up by a fret, or if you prefer you can use the fourth finger. X
1

A
2 3

Asus
1 2 3

Asus
1 2 3 4

exercise 3b
you can play exercise 3a and 3b in succession to create a tune, and if you have a friend who can play the guitar you can play a duet where the guitars start on a different exercise.

GUITAR ONE GUITAR TWO

A - B - A - B - A - B B - A - B - A - B - A

copyright G C Hargreaves 2004

This tablature shows how both guitar parts would be displayed at the same time

A
2 0 2 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 2 2

Asus
0 2 3 2 0 2 3 2

A
0

D
0

2 0

A
2 0 2 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 2 2

E
1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1

A
0

A
2 0 2 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 2 2

Asus
2 0 3 2 0 2 2 0 2 2 2 3 2

A
0

D
0

A
2 0 2 2

E
1 0 0 2 0 0 1

A
2 0 0 0 2 2 0 0 0 0

A
0

A
0

copyright G C Hargreaves 2004

Week Two
Rain - Sad Fantasy
With the the Cadd9 nine chord simply place the fourth finger down in the third fret. Dont try any other fingerings for this chord because adding and removing the fourth finger is by far the quickest way to get the chord, and chord change speed is important when finger picking if you want the tune to sound smooth. For the Am add9 simply remove the first finger. Cadd9 X
2 3 4 1

month nine tune

Amadd9 X
2 3

The pause symbol This symbol is a pause and it comes from wind instruments and literally means take a breath, so when you see this symbol pause for about the time it takes to take a breath. Unlike a rest the time you pause for is down to personal interpretation of the tune.

copyright G C Hargreaves 2004

PIMI C
0 3 1 0 3 0 1 0

Cadd9
0 3 3 0 3 0 3 0

Am
2 0 1 2

Amadd9
2 0 0 2

Am
2 0 1 2 0 2 1 2

C
0 3 1 0 3 0 1 0

Cadd9
0 3 3 0 3 0 3 0

Am
2 0 1 2

Amadd9
2 0 0 2

Am
2 0 1 2 0

E
1 0 0 1 0 1 0 1

Am
2 0 1 2 0 2 1 2

E
0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0

Am
2 0 1 2 0

D
0 2 3 2 0 2 3 2

Am
2 0 1 2 0 2 1 2

D
0 2 3 2 0 2 3 2

E
1 0 0 1 0

D
0 2 3 2 0 2 3 2

Am
2 0 1 2 0 2 1 2

E
1 0 0 1 0 1 0 1

Am
2 0 1 2 0

C
0 3 1 0 3 0 1 0

Cadd9
0 3 3 0 3 0 3 0

Am
2 0 1 2

Amadd9
2 0 0 2

Am
2 0 1 2 0 2 1 2

C
0 3 1 0 3 0 1 0

Cadd9
0 3 3 0 3 0 3 0

Am
2 0 1 2

Amadd9
2 0 0 2

Am
2 0 1 2 0

copyright G C Hargreaves 2004

Week Three
finger picking. the annular finger
So far you have only picked with the PRIMARY, INDEX and MIDDLE fingers, now we will introduce the ANNULAR finger, which gets its name from the fact that it is the ring finger.

month nine

exercise 1 Am
2 0 1

PIMA
0 2 0 1 0 3 0 2 0 1 0 3 1 0 1 1 0

Dm
0 2 3

1 0 2

G7
0 3 0

C
0 3 1

E7
1 2 0

Am
2 0 1

Dm
0 2 3

1 0 2

G7
0 3 0

C
0 3 1

0 3

exercise 2 Am
0 1

PAMI
0 2 0

Dm
1 2 0

1 2 0

0 1 0

Am
0 1 0

2 0

copyright G C Hargreaves 2004

PIMAMI Em
0 0 0 0

A
0 0 0 2 2

Dsus2
0 2 3

D
3 2 0 2 3

Em
0 0 0

A
0 0 0 2 2

Dsus2
0 2 3

D
3 2 0 2 3

G
0 3 0

A7
0 0 0 2 2

Dsus4
0 2 3

D
3 2 0 2 3

Em
0 0 0

A
0 0 0 2 2

Dsus2
0 2 3

D
3 2 0 2 3

copyright G C Hargreaves 2004

Nights in white satin - Justin Hayward


This is our second look at this piece of music, so hopefully you know the chords and will therefore be able to concentrate on the finger picking aspect of the tune.

tune

verse e Em
0 0

PIMAMI D
0 0 0 0 0 2 3 2 3 2 0

Em
0 0 0 0 0

D
0 2 3 2 3 2

C
0 3 1 0 1 0

G
0 3 0 3 0 0

F
3 2 1 1 1 2

Em
0 0 0 0 0 0

A
2 0 2 0 2 2

A
2 0 2 0 2 2

C
0 3 1 0 1 0

C
0 3 1 0 1 0

Em
0 0 0 0 0 0

D
0 2 3 2 3 2

Em
0 0 0 0 0 0

D
0 2 3 2 3 2

See if you can work out the finger picking for the instrumental, the pattern should stay the same however the bass note will have to vary depending on the chord. The only thing you need to know is that the recommended bass note is the root of the chord or the first note played when you strum the chord

instrumental

Em Em Em

Em D C C Em B C repeat line

copyright G C Hargreaves 2004

instrumental continued
Am Em D Em B D Em Am C D B Em Em

arrangement

verse - verse - instrumental - verse - instrumental

Week Four
alternating bass lines
Whilst it is recommended to play the root of the chord as the bass note when finger picking, you can alternate the bass line to make a tune more interesting.

month nine

exercise 1 A
2 0 2

PIMI A
2 0 2 2 2 0 2 2 2 0 2 2 2

exercise 2 A
2 0 0

PIMI
2 2 2 0

A
2 0 2

2 2

exercise 3 Em
0 0 0

PIMI
0 2 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 2 0 0 0

copyright G C Hargreaves 2004

exercise 1 C
0 3 1

PIMA
0 2 0 0

C
0 3 1

0 2 0

Am
2 0 1

0 2 2

Am
2 0 1

0 2 2

Dm
0 2 3

1 2 0

Dm
0 2 3

1 2 0

G7
0 3 0

1 0 2

G7
0 3 0

1 0 2

exercise 2

PIMA

In this exercise the bass alternates between three strings.

G
0 3 0

3 0 2

3 0 0

3 0 2

Em
0 0 0

0 0 2

0 2 0

0 0 2

copyright G C Hargreaves 2004

exercise 3 G
0 3 0

PIMA
3 0 2 3 0 0 3 0 2 3

Am
2 0 1

0 2 2

0 2 0

0 2 2

C
0 3 1

0 2 0

0 0 3

0 2 0

D
0 2 3

2 2 0

2 0 2

2 2 0

copyright G C Hargreaves 2004

Everybody hurts - REM intro D


0 2 3

tune
G

PIMAMI
2 3 3 2 3 0 3 0 0 3 0

2 3

0 3

verse 1 D
0 2 3 2 3 3 2

G
3 2 3 0 0

0 3

x 3 times 0 0

D
0 2 3

G
3 2 3 0 0

0 3 2

chorus Em
0 0 0 0 0 0 0

A
0 0 0 2 2

0 0

2 0

Em
0 0 0

0 0

A
0 0 0 2 2

2 0

verse 2 D
0 2 3 2 2

G
3 2 3 0 0

0 3

x 6 times 0 0

copyright G C Hargreaves 2004

bridge Em
0 0 0 0 0

A
0 0 0 2 2

0 0 2 2 3 4 4 2

2 0

x 3 times

F#
2 2 3 4 4 2 3 5 5 5 3

Bm

2 3 4 4 2

2 3 4 4 2

2 3 4 4 2

x 3 times

3 3 4 5 5 3 0 1 2 2 0 0 1 2 2 0

3 5 5 5 3

3 5 5 5 3

Am

arrangement

intro - verse 1 - chorus - verse 2 - bridge - verse 1 - chorus - intro (repeat and fade)

copyright G C Hargreaves 2004

month ten

All rights reserved, unauthorized copying, reproduction, hiring, lending, redistribution and broadcast of this e-book or any part of the contents is prohibited. copyright G C Hargreaves 2004

Week One
Dm P I M A M I
0 2 3 1 3 2 0 0 0 2 3 1 3 2

month ten

C
0 3 1

Dm
0 2 3

2 0

C
0 3 1

F
3 2 1

C
1 2 3 0 1

Dm
0 2 3

2 0

F
3 2 1

C
1 2 3 0 1

Dm
0 2 3

copyright G C Hargreaves 2004

Susans song - Sad Fantasy PAMI


Am 0 0 Am 0 0 G7 1 0 2 2 1 2 Dm 1 0 C 3 2 3 C 3 2 3 G7 1 0 3 0 0 0 2 G7 1 0 3 C 3 2 3 C 3 2 3 Dm 1 0 0

tune

1 2 0

0 0 2

1 2

0 2 2

Dm 1 2 0

1 2 0

0 0 2

Dm 1 0 0

1 0 2

C 0 0 3 C 0 0 3

0 0 2

1 0 2

Am 0 0 0 E

2 0

3 G7 1

1 0 2

1 0 2

0 0 Dm 1 0 0

1 0

3 Am 0 0 Am 0 0 Am 0 0

0 2 2

Dm 1 2 0

1 2 0

0 0 2

1 2

0 2 2

Dm 1 2 0

1 2 0

0 0 2

G7 1 0 3

0 2

0 2 2

0 2 0

2 0 0

copyright G C Hargreaves 2004

Week Two
A7 P A M I M A 0 2 0 D7 0 G7 2 2 0 2 0 A7 2 D7 0 2 0 2 0

month ten

0 1 1 G7 1 1

3 C 0 1 1 0

2 E7 0 0

3 A7 0 0

2 A7 2 D7 0 0

0 D7 0 G7 2 2

0 1 1 G7 1 1

3 C 0 1 1 0

copyright G C Hargreaves 2004

House of the rising sun - The Animals PIMAMI


Am 2 0 D 0 Am 2 0 E7 1 0 Am 2 0 D 0 Am 2 0 Am 2 0 1 0 1 2 3 2 F 3 2 3 E7 1 2 0 E7 1 2 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 2 1 1 0 C 1 2 3 1 0 1 0 0 1 2 3 2 F 3 2 3 C 1 2 3 E7 0 1 2 0 1 0 0 0 1 2 1 1 0 1 2 3 1 C 0 1

tune

copyright G C Hargreaves 2004

Week Three
finger picking . two or three stings
It is not uncommon to play two or three notes at once when finger picking. This can be done by simply picking the two strings at the same time with different fingers. We can show this in the finger picking pattern like this

month ten

PIM

Here you can see the index and middle fingers both play strings at the same time.

exercise 1
C 0 1 3 G7

P IM IM
0 1 2 C 0 1 0 1 Dm 0 1 3 1 3 0 1 3 1 3

1 0

1 0 2

1 0

1 0

0 1 3

0 1 3

exercise 2 C
0 3 0 1

P I MA I
0 1

Am
0 0 2

0 1

0 1

Dm
0 2

1 3

2 0

1 3

G7
2 3 0

1 0

0 2

1 0

C
0 3

0 1

0 1

0 3 3

copyright G C Hargreaves 2004

exercise 3
A7

P IMA IMA
0 2 0 0 2 0 A7 2 D7 0 2 0 0 2 0

0 D7 0 G7 2 1 2 2 1 2

2 1 2

2 1 2

0 1 0 0 1 0 0 G7 0 1 0 0 1 0 0

3 C 0 1 0 0 1 0 E7 0 0 1 0 0 1

3 A7 0 2 0 0 2 0

2 A7 2 D7 0 2 0 0 2 0

0 D7 0 G7 2 1 2 2 1 2

2 1 2

2 1 2

0 1 0 0 1 0 0 G7 1 0 0 1 0 0

3 C 0 1 0 0 1 0

copyright G C Hargreaves 2004

Week Four
Finger picking 4/4
Whilst most of the strumming tunes we have covered have been in four four time, most of the finger picking patterns we have covered have not. Most of the finger picking patterns we have done so far have been in 3/4 time and 6/8 time. So to close the finger picking section we will take a look at 4/4 finger picking patterns.

month ten

exercise 1
G 0 3 C 0 3 1 0

PIMAMIPI
3 0 0

(note the thumb is used twice)

Em 0 2 0 D 1 0 2 0 0 2 3 0 0

2 0

exercise 2
G 0 3 C 0 3 C 0 3 D 0 2 3 1 1 0

PIMAMIPI
3 D 0 0 2 0 0 0 D 1 0 2 0 0 Am 1 0 2 0 0 G 3 2 0 2 3 0 0 3 2 1 2 3 2 3 2 3 2 0 2 2

2 0

copyright G C Hargreaves 2004

Nowhere man - The Beatles


Try these different finger picking patterns and see which one you like the most. C 0 3

tune
C

PIMAMIAM
1 0 1 0 0 1

PIMAMIMA
0 3 1 0 1 0 1

PAMIAMIA
0 3 1 0 0 1 0 0

C 0 3

PIMAIMAI
1 0 0 1 0 0

verse C F C F chorus Em Em coda C F Fm C F F Em F F G7 G Fm G Fm F C F C C F C C

arrangement

verse - chorus - verse - chorus - coda

note. Dont worry if you find yourself clicking the last note of each bar or missing it completely. This is quite normal, especially when the chord change is difficult. If you listen to the best musicians you will hear clicked bar endings which are only really noticeable if you listen for them.

copyright G C Hargreaves 2004

month eleven

All rights reserved, unauthorized copying, reproduction, hiring, lending, redistribution and broadcast of this e-book or any part of the contents is prohibited. copyright G C Hargreaves 2004

Week One
The fifth chord (power chords)
The fifth chord is the chord most used in rock and grunge. Because of the sound it produces is is also known as the power chord and certainly in barre chord form it deserves this name. We have already used power chords in the rock section of this course, though without referring to them by their correct name 5th chords. With fifth chords their is no difference between major chords or minor chords, or in other words there is no such chord as a fifth minor.

month eleven

The theory behind the fifth chord. C major scale 1 2 3

The fifth chord only has two notes in its structure, the FIRST (root) note and the FIFTH note.

1st

5th Why their is no fifth minor

A major scale

8
You can see clearly that the note that makes the difference between the major and minor chord is the thir d, so if we r emov e the thi r d, the two chords can no longer be di ffer enti ated between.

1st A minor scale 1 2 3 4

5th 5 6 7 8

1st

5th fifth barre chords


First position (E rooted) X X X Second position (A rooted) X X X 1

copyright G C Hargreaves 2004

some fifth open chords


X G5 X
1 2 3 4

A5
2

X X

C5 X 1

X X

D5
1

X
1 3 2

E5 X X X

This raises the question of how to mute a note in the middle of a chord. The simple answer to that is to let the finger on the string nest to the string to be muted hang over onto it. This will take some practice because you need to maintain the pressure on the fingered note at the same time as muting the string next to it.

exercises
tr y the following exercises, using barre chords. Remember that the underlined chords are second position. exercise 1 A5 D5 A5 D5 C5 A5 D5 E5

exercise 2 A5

Db5

G5

Cb5

A5

Db5

G5

Cb5

A5

exercise 3

A5

D5

F5

C5

G5

A5

D5

F5

C5

The slur symbol


The slur symbol means that two or more notes are joined together in some way. If a note carries across from one bar to another then a slur will occur to show that it is one note. If a note is slid or hammered to another note where the guitar is only picked once for the two notes then a slur will occur.
P sl

copyright G C Hargreaves 2004

Week Two
hammering on exercises
exercise 1
H

month eleven

First to second finger


H H H H

5
H

6 6

6
H

exercise 2
H

first to third finger


H H H H H

5
H

7 7

exercise 3

(very hard) first to fourth finger


H H H H H H

copyright G C Hargreaves 2004

Paranoid - Black Sabbath intro


A5
H

tune

x 4 times 7 7 5 7 7 5
H

7 7 5

theme one
A5
H H

7 5 G5

7 5

7 5

7 5

7 5

7 5

7 5

7 5

7 5 C5 5 5 3

7 5 G5 5 5 3

7 5

7 5 A5 7 7 5

5 3

5 3

5 3

5 3

5 3

5 3

5 3

5 3

theme two
A5 7 7 5 F5 3 3 1 G5 5 5 3 A5 7 7 5 (7) (7) (5)

theme three
A5

7 5 G5

7 5

7 5

7 5

7 5

7 5

7 5

7 5

7 5

7 5

5 3

5 3

5 3

5 3

5 3

5 3

5 3

5 3

5 3

5 3

arrangement

intro - one - two - three - one - one - one - one - two - one - two

copyright G C Hargreaves 2004

Week Three
pulling off
Pulling off is in effect the reverse of hammering on. To pull off you have to pluck the string with your left hand (fingering hand) as you take your finger off the note, remembering to have the next finger in place to allow the note to ring.
.example
P

month eleven

To pull off from the 7th fret to the 5th fret as is required by this tab. Place both the first and third finger in place then play the 7th fret note. Soon after pull the third finger away plucking the string as it leaves.

exercises
Note. The H and P symbol can appear on the tab itself or above the tab, this depends on the publisher of the music you are reading. The difference is only small and the meaning is the same.

exercise 1
P

Second finger to first finger.

6
P

6
P

6 6

5 5

exercise 2
P

Second finger to fist finger.

copyright G C Hargreaves 2004

exercise 3
P

Fourth finger to first finger.

exercise 4
H

The G pentatonic scale


H H H H

3
P

6 3

3
P

exercise 5
H

the A blues scale


H H H H H H

5
H

8 8

5
P

Note.

in this exercise you are having to hammer on and pull off two notes in a row. This can be very difficult, especially in pulloffs, so be patient and practice this exercise over several weeks or months if necessary.

copyright G C Hargreaves 2004

Manic depression - Jimi Hendrix note 3/4 time intro


5 6 7 5 6 7

tune

7 5

5 5

5 5

5 5

theme one
5 4 7 3 2 5 5 6 7

7 5

5 5

5 5

5 5

the two
0 4 2 3 2 5 5 3

5 3

3 1

1 3

1 3

1 3

1 3

intro

arrangement

intro theme 1 - theme 1 - theme 2 - theme 1 theme 1 - theme 1 - theme 2 - theme 1 - more to come

copyright G C Hargreaves 2004

Picking
directions. down, up, down, up etc. By playing alternating plectrum directions you will find that your playing is faster, smoother and more accurate. We have been using arrows to show down and up strums, however the correct way to denote plectrum directions is this; These shape come from DOWN UP a violin bow where the tip is pointed and the exercise 1 tail is square shaped Alternating plectrum directions

When you use plectrum it is a good idea to get use to playing alternating plectrum

exercise 2

Picking and hammering

H H H

H H

copyright G C Hargreaves 2004

Week Four
Zombie - The Cranberries intro
Em 0 0 0 2 2 0 Cmaj7 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 2 3 3 Gmaj6/f# 0 0 0 2 2 0 0 0 0 2 2 C5

month eleven tune

0 0 0 2 2

0 0 0 2 2 0 0 0 0 2

0 0 0 2 2 0 0 0 0 2

0 0 0 2 2 0 0 0 0 2

0 0 0 2 2 0 0 0 0 2

0 0 0 2 2 0 0 0 0 2

000 000 000

0 0 0 2 3 0 0 2 0 0 2

0 0 0 2 3

0 0 0 2 3 0 0 2 0 0 2

0 0 0 2 3

0 0 0 2 3 0 0 2 0 0 2

000 000 000

Gmaj6 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 2 3

000 000 000

0 2 0 0 2

0 2 0 0 2

000 000 000

chorus 1
E5

2 0 G5

2 0

2 0

2 0

2 0

2 0

2 0

2 0

10 8 D/F#

10 8

10 8

10 8

10 8

10 8

10 8

10 8

{ X3 TIMES FOR CHORUS 1 }

5 3 Em 0 0 0 2 2 0
H

5 3

5 3

5 3

5 3

5 3

5 3

5 3

0 2 0 0 0 2 2 0

0 2

0 2

0 2

0 2

0 2

0 2

0 2

(0)

copyright G C Hargreaves 2004

verse
Em 0 0 0 2 2 0 Em 0 2 3 Em 0 2 0 G/B 0 2 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 3 2 3 2 3 2 3 2 3 2 3 2 3 Cmaj7 0 2 0 3 0 2 0 0 0 0 2 0 2 0 2 0 2 0 2 0 C5 5 3 5 3 5 3 5 3 5 3 5 3 0 0 5

Dmaj9/F# 0 3

0 0 0 0 2 0

Dmaj9/F# 0 3

0 0 0 0

last chorus
E5 2 2 0 G5 5 5 3 Em 0 0 0 2 2 0 5 5 3 5 5 3 5 5 3 5 5 3 5 5 3 5 5 3 5 5 3 2 2 0 2 2 0 2 2 0 2 2 0 2 2 0 2 2 0 2 2 0 C5 5 5 3 D/F# 2 0 0 2 0 0 0 2 2 0 2 0 0 2 2 0 0 2 2 0 0 2 2 0 0 2 2 0 0 2 2 0 0 2 5 5 3 5 5 3 5 5 3 5 5 3 5 5 3 5 5 3 5 5 3
x 4 times

2 0 0 2

arrangement intro - chorus - verse - chorus 1 - verse - chorus - verse - last chorus

copyright G C Hargreaves 2004

month twelve

All rights reserved, unauthorized copying, reproduction, hiring, lending, redistribution and broadcast of this e-book or any part of the contents is prohibited. copyright G C Hargreaves 2004

Week One
Reading rhythm
For now when it has been necessary for you to read the rhythm we have been using counts above the tab. However in a proper music score this would not be the way to denote rhythms. Most tab either has the score in conventional music underneath it, or the tab rhythm above it, either way the rhythm is denoted in the same way. Each note has a measure of time and that measure of time is denoted as follows. Note that this is on a standard musical staff now and not tablature, which is why their are five lines.

month twelve

4 beats
1 semibreve

2 beats
2 minim

1 beat
4 crotchet

1/2 beat
8 quaver

1/4 beat
16 semiquaver

1/8 beat
32 demisemiquaver

You are already aware of the fact that music is broken down in to bars and that a bar consists of a pre-defined number of beats, Any combination of the note lengths above can be used in a bar, but they will always add up to the number of beats in the bar, and or overflow into the next bar.

copyright G C Hargreaves 2004

Try these chords using the rhythms provided. Note how the tail on the note goes down if the note is over the half way line, this doesnt effect the value of the note.

exercise 1
E

exercise 2
Em A D D

Em

A7

Em

exercise 3
G D C C

Em

Am

Am

Em

Em

copyright G C Hargreaves 2004

time signatures
Time signatures have been mentioned over and over again as we have gone through this unit and they are something you cannot ignore. A time signature tells the musician how the piece of music should be counted and they come in the form of a fraction.

4 4
The way to interpret the information given in a time signature is as follows.

The TOP number represents the number of beats in the bar. The BOTTOM number represents the value of beat.
For example we have use 4/4 time in many of the tunes you have learned, and 4/4 time is in the example above. The top 4 means that their are 4 beats in the bar, the bottom 4 tells us that the beat value is four or a crotchet. So 4/4 time means that their are 4 crotchets per bar.

List of note Values


1 2 4 8 16 32 semibreve minim crotchet quaver semiquaver demisemiquaver

examples

4 4 3 4 2 4 6 8 2 2 6 16

Four crotchets in a bar

Three crotchets in a bar

Two crotchets in a bar

Six quavers in a bar

Two minims in a bar

Six semiquavers in a bar

copyright G C Hargreaves 2004

Week Two
bends
To bend a string simply push the string upwards, or if it is one of the bottom two or three strings pull it downwards. Remember though that the you should be bending to a pre-defined note and not just into space. Nothing sound worse than a bend which does not reach a not, but is simply the string being bent out of tune.

month twelve

Bends look like this in the tab.


Bend up and then kill the note Bend up and release the bend Bend up and then hold

(5)

Most tab will tell you how far the bend is expected to be bent.

Beware and look at the tablature explanation before starting.

On some tab 1 means 1 fret or a semitone, whereas on other tab it means 1 tone which is 2 frets. We will use 1 to mean a full tone (2 frets).

exercise 1
1

This exercise will help you learn to judge when you have bent the string by a tone (2 frets), try and get your bend intune with the seventh fret note.

10

10

10

10

exercise 2
1

10 7 9

10 7 9

1 H H

(9)

copyright G C Hargreaves 2004

exercise 3
H

House of the rising sun


5 7 7 5

7
H

1 H 1

1/2

(7)

exercise 4
5

Summertime
1 P

1/2

5 7

(7)

copyright G C Hargreaves 2004

mutes and staccato


Staccato is a musical term for a very short and sharp note, and it is usually signified by a dot over the note needing the staccato. To play a staccato note simply play the note and kill it as quickly as you can, this can be done by either releasing the pressure of the string or by muting the string. We have also briefly looked at palm mutes, a palm mute being when you touch the strings slightly with the palm of you picking hand so that the string is muted. Palm muting can also be used as a form of staccato.

staccato
3 5

palm muting
3 5

pm

exercise 1
pm

5 7

8 7 7

7
pm

8 5

5 7 5 7 5 7 7 7

exercise 2
pm

exercise 3

Walking on the moon - The police

3 3 5 3

copyright G C Hargreaves 2004

Week Three
Wonderful Tonight - Eric Clapton intro
1 1 1

month twelve tune

10

(10)

8 10

10

(10)

10

(10)

8 10

7 8

8 12 10 10 13 12

sl

10

(10)

8 10

10

(10)

10

(10)

8 10

fill one
1 1 1

7 10

(10) 8 10

10

(10)

10

(10)

8 10

fill two
1 1 1 sl

10

(10)

8 10

10

(10)

10

(10)

8 10

12 13 15

17 15

10

(10)

8 10

10

(10)

10

(10)

10

copyright G C Hargreaves 2004

fill three
1 1 1

10

(10)

8 10

10

(10)

10

(10)

8 10

sl

12 10

10

(10)

8 10

10

(10)

10

(10)

8 10

7 8

8 12 10 10 13 12 12

sl

verse
G G C C D D D D C C G D D E

chorus
G G C G Em D C C G D D

coda
G D Em D C

arrangement

intro - verse - fill one - verse - chorus - fill two - verse - coda - fill three

copyright G C Hargreaves 2004

Week Four
Wonderful Land - The shadows
15 13 12 15 13 15 15 13 12 15 13 15

month twelve tune

7 7

5 5

6 6

5 7 5

5 5 5

6 5 6

777 4

5 555

6 6

copyright G C Hargreaves 2004

pm

8 10

10 8

8 9 7 10

8 10

10 8

pm

12 10 7 8

10 8 7

10

8 7 5

777 4

5 55 5

6 6

pm

8 10

10 8

8 9 7 10

8 10

10 8

pm

12 10 7 8

10 8 7

10

15

13 12

15 13 15

15

13 12

15 13 15

15

13 12

15 13 15

copyright G C Hargreaves 2004