$1.

00
(tax included)
Number 35
Volume 107
August 30, 2012
    by Laurie Hindman
   The  Board  of  Directors  for  the
Wall  Ambulance  District  met  on
Monday, August 20 at 7:00 p.m. in
the Wall Community Center meet-
ing room.
   The  July  25.  minutes  were  ap-
proved.
   Secretary/Treasurer  Carolynn
Anderson  handed  out  a  prelimi-
nary lease agreement that she has
been working on. The board went
over the agreement and discussed
changes that need to be made. The
board will sit down with the fire de-
partment to discuss the percentage
that each entity use for utilities at
the ambulance bay so that can be
added  in  the  agreement.  Correc-
tions to the lease will be brought to
the next meeting for the board to
review.  Anderson  informed  the
board the lease will need to be com-
pleted  by  December.  The  tax  levy
for the district will have to be sub-
mitted to the county by September
1st.  Board  member  Jem  Kjerstad
said, “We will have to go with the
maximum amount so we can build
up  a  reserve  to  start  replacing
equipment.” He went on to say, “We
will have to take the heat and let
the public determine through elec-
tion how the chips will fall.” Kjer-
stad was shocked at seeing what a
tough  job  this  is  going  to  be.  The
board agreed that the tax levy will
have to be set at the full amount in
order to get a base set, which usu-
ally takes two years. The board ap-
proved a motion to set the capital
outlay  and  general  fund  at  the
maximum tax levy.
   Anderson has received insurance
quotes  from  Fischer  Rounds  and
Associates  and  from  the  Work
Comp  Pool.  The  board  thought  it
best to have Fischer Rounds meet
with them at the next meeting so
they can get a better understand-
ing  of  what  the  insurance  will
cover.
   In  reviewing  the  by-laws  the
board  discussed  splitting  the  dis-
trict into wards to make it fair for
representation of the district. Kjer-
stad said, “He would like to look at
the evaluations to get a better han-
dle on the financial portion of the
district.” He noted, he would like
to see who the funding burden is
falling  on.  President  Wally  Hoff-
man would also like to see a busi-
ness person or commercial owner
from the district sit on the board
since  commercial  property  will
fund  the  majority  of  the  district.
Norman Eisenbraun asked, “how
would you define what is commer-
cial?” He went on to say that they
will have to do a study of the tax
base. Board decided whose names
will  be  recorded  on  the  checking
account  signature  card.  Kjerstad
and  Eisenbraun  feel  it  would  be
good  to  sit  down  with  the  ambu-
lance  service  and  discuss  a  few
pertinent issues. Anderson would
like to see by-laws from the east-
ern  part  of  the  state  before  they
proceed  with  finalizing  the  by-
laws.
    Anderson has received informa-
tion from a billing service. She re-
lated in 2011 the ambulance serv-
ice  billed  $136,000  and  collected
only $79,000. She went on to say
that this particular billing service
would  collect  30  percent  more  of
the  outstanding  revenue.  The
board  decided  to  ask  the  ambu-
lance service and Lucille Holsether
to  be  present  when  they  discuss
the  possibility  of  hiring  a  billing
service.
   Hoffman  will  call  John  Kitter-
man to set up a time to visit with
the ambulance service in the near
future. 
   The  board  voted  to  leave  the
name of the district as Wall Ambu-
lance Service.
   With no other business Hoffman
adjourned the meeting.
Ambulance board approves
maximum amount for mill levy
 South Dakota’s average compos-
ite ACT score remains unchanged
from last year at 21.8, where it has
been for the past three years. The
national  average  was  also  un-
changed from a year ago, sitting at
21.1 as it has for four of the past
five years.
 While South Dakota’s scores are
consistently  higher  than  the  na-
tional average by several tenths of
a point, South Dakota Secretary of
Education Dr. Melody Schopp says
there is always room for improve-
ment.
 She said efforts, such as imple-
mentation  of  the  Common  Core
State Standards, should help boost
student learning overall. With the
Common  Core,  students  will  be
challenged to engage higher-level
thinking skills in order to arrive at
a deeper understanding of the con-
cepts they are learning.
 “The  Common  Core  standards
were  designed  to  equip  students
with the knowledge and skills nec-
essary as they move into postsec-
ondary  education  and  careers,”
Schopp said.
Wall 2012 graduating class score
above State’s ACT average
 The ACT is scored on a scale of
one to 36, with 36 as the highest
possible score. Students are tested
in the areas of English, mathemat-
ics, reading and science, although
the science portion is science rea-
soning, not science-content knowl-
edge.  The  ACT  test  is  commonly
used  as  a  benchmark  for  college
entrance and readiness.
 In South Dakota, 81 percent of
graduating seniors took the ACT,
which is high for states that don’t
require  ACT  testing  for  gradua-
tion.
 The state Department of Educa-
tion offers South Dakota students
several  resources  to  prepare  for
the test, such as access to free test
preparation  materials  available
through SDMyLife.com, an online
academic and career planning re-
source hosted by the department.
 In addition, the department col-
laborates  with  the  Board  of  Re-
gents  to  identify  and  assist  high
school students whose ACT scores
indicate they will require remedi-
ation at the college and university
level.
 “We have tools in place that can
help  assist  these  students  in
shoring  up  their  knowledge  and
skills,”  Schopp  said.  “If  students
can get some of this remedial work
done  before  their  postsecondary
education, it will save them both
time  and  money  once  they  make
the transition.” 
 Average Composite ACT Scores
– South Dakota vs. National
Year South Dakota    National
2008 22.0 21.1
2009 22.0 21.1
2010 21.8 21.0
2011 21.8 21.1
2012 21.8 21.1
The  graduating  class  of  2012
from  Wall  High  School  scored
above the state and national com-
posite  ACT  scores.  Thirteen  stu-
dents took the test and scored:
   English: Wall - 23.5, State - 21.0.
Mathematics: Wall - 22.8, State -
21.8. Reading: Wall - 26.2, State -
22.1. Science: Wall - 23.9, State -
22.0. Composite: Wall - 24.2, State
- 21.8. 
Keep up the
good work!
ne of the things that makes this a great country to live
in is our dedicated workforce. This Labor Day, it`s with
pride and pleasure that we salute the working men and
women who help keep our nation strong and improve the
quality of life for all of us.
The Pennington County Courunt uill he clooed on
Monduy, Septemher 3, in ohoertunce of Luhor Duy.
We uiel o lopp, onJ eofe loliJo,
/o eter,one in our connuni/,.
Peaa¡agtoa Couaty Couraat
279-2565 · couraat©gwtc.aet/aaac©gwtc.aet
Burger Bust for Bart. Despite the rainy weather the community
turned out to reach their goal for a medical benefit for Bart Ch-
eney at the Wall park. ~Photo Laurie Hindman
Community turns out
for benefit at Wall park
Philip Motor in conjunction with Ford Motor Company held a "Drive One 4UR school" event June
2, 2012 at the Wall High School. For everyone who test drove a Ford vehicle, Ford Motor Company
donated $20. There were 175 people participate in the event which raised $3,500 for the Wall
school. Pictured from left to right ... Tyler Hauk, Colt Terkildsen, Wall Girls Head Basketball Coach
John Hess and Ryan Seager. ~Photo Beau Ravellette
Wall football game was
stopped due to lightning
Drive One 4UR school held in Wall
Wall Football team held their first game on Friday, August 24. The game was called in the second
quarter due to lightning that passed throught the area. Coach Kent Anderson said, “Stats will be
availalbe after completion of the game.” So make sure you are watching for that date.
~Photo Laurie Hindman
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Area News
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Staff Writer:
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Letters Pol¡cy
Social Security News
By Kathy Petersen
Social Security
Public Affairs Specialist
If your son or daughter is a high
school student turning 18, you’ve
probably  spent  some  time  shop-
ping  for  school  supplies  and  the
latest  fashions,  working  out  the
schedule  for  the  academic  year,
maybe even looking into colleges.
   If your young senior is collect-
ing monthly Social Security bene-
fits, here’s one more thing to add
to your “Back-to-School” checklist.
   To make sure that Social Secu-
rity benefits continue beyond age
18, eligible students must obtain
certification from school officials
that they are still in high school
and provide it to Social Security.
Otherwise, monthly Social Secu-
rity  benefits  automatically  stop
when a student turns 18. 
   For more information about So-
cial  Security  student  benefits,
visit  www.socialsecurity.gov/
schoolofficials.  The  website  out-
lines how the process works with
instructions on what the student
and school official must do to en-
sure  that  benefits  continue  past
the student’s 18th birthday. With
the appropriate certification, So-
cial  Security  generally  does  not
stop benefits until the month be-
fore the month the student turns
19, or the first month in which he
or  she  is  not  a  full-time  high
school student, whichever is ear-
lier. 
   Some  students  receive  Social
Security  survivors  benefits  be-
cause a parent is deceased. Oth-
ers  may  get  dependent  benefits
because their parent receives So-
cial  Security  retirement  or  dis-
ability benefits. Benefits for minor
children generally continue until
age 18 — or 19 if they’re still in
high school. The only exception to
this rule is if a student is disabled
and eligible for childhood disabil-
ity benefits. In that case, a sepa-
rate application for benefits is re-
quired. 
Social  Security’s  website  also
includes: 
   •a downloadable version of the
required Student’s Statement Re-
garding School Attendance (Form
SSA-1372)  that  must  be  com-
pleted by the student, certified by
the school, and returned to Social
Security; 
   •answers  to  frequently  asked
questions for school officials and
students; and
   •a field office locator to find the
address of your local Social Secu-
rity office.
So as you’re buying school sup-
plies,  trying  out  back-to-school
fashions,  and  figuring  out  when
the  holiday  break  begins,  don’t
forget the important step of visit-
ing  www.socialsecurity.gov/
schoolofficials. 
   Kathy  Petersen  is  a  public  af-
fairs specialist for Social Security,
Denver Region. You can write her
c/o  Social  Security  Administra-
tion, 605 Main, Suite 201, Rapid
City,  SD,  57701  or  via  email  at
kathy. petersen@ssa.gov. 
Does your back to school checklist
include a social security form?
   Over 70 percent of South Dakota
Farmers to be Subject to Tax--Sen-
ator John Thune (R-S.D.) says the
American  Farm  Bureau  Federa-
tion  (AFBF)  report  clearly  shows
that the Democrat-controlled Sen-
ate’s  recently  passed  tax  legisla-
tion would jeopardize the future of
71 percent of South Dakota’s fam-
ily farms because it intentionally
returns the death tax exemption to
$1  million  next  year  instead  of
keeping  it  at  the  current  $5  mil-
lion.
 Over  the  past  few  years  the
prices of all South Dakota agricul-
tural land, especially cropland, has
increased substantially.  This dra-
matic  price  increase,  along  with
the Democrats’ proposal to reduce
the death tax exemption level to $1
million, could make passing a fam-
ily  farm  of  only  a  few  hundred
acres  to  the  next  generation  eco-
nomically impossible due to death
tax liability. According to data col-
Thune: American Farm Bureau Federation Report shows
significant negative impact of Death Tax in South Dakota
lected  by  AFBF,  when  applying
2012  farm  real  estate  values,
farms and ranches larger than 714
acres  would  likely  exceed  the  $1
million exemption level. Crop pro-
ducers  would  be  particularly  im-
pacted by the lower exemption lev-
els, as farms larger than 431 acres
of cropland would be likely to ex-
ceed  the  $1  million  exemption
level.
 “This  report  outlines  just  how
devastating the Senate Democrats’
death  tax  proposal  would  be  to
South Dakota farmers and ranch-
ers,”  said  Thune.  “The  value  of
cropland across South Dakota has
increased by more than 23 percent
over the last year. According to the
data  collected  by AFBF  from  the
U.S.  Department  of Agriculture’s
National  Agriculture  Statistics
Service,  the  appreciated  value  of
cropland  throughout  the  state
means  that  nearly  71  percent  of
South Dakota farms would exceed
the  $1  million  exemption  level
under the Senate Democrats’ pro-
posal. Since many family farm and
ranch assets consist of land, live-
stock,  equipment, and small cash
reserves, this punitive tax leaves
the  next  generation  with  little
choice  but to sell family holdings
to pay the death tax. In March of
this year, I introduced the Death
Tax Repeal Permanency Act which
would permanently repeal the fed-
eral death tax and the generation
skipping  transfer  tax.  Repeal  of
this  destructive  tax  is  critical  to
keeping family farms and ranches
intact across South Dakota.”
 “Today’s  report  shows  that  the
outdated death tax would impact
over half of South Dakota’s farms
and ranches if it is allowed to re-
vert to pre-2001 levels,” said Scott
VanderWal, President of the South
Dakota Farm Bureau. “The Senate
should pass Senator Thune’s death
tax repeal bill, or at the very least,
extend  current  levels  to  protect
South  Dakota’s  agriculture  pro-
ducers from this unfair tax.”
 On  July  25,  2012,  Senate  De-
mocrats  passed  legislation  on  a
party-line  vote  of  51  to  48  that
would  increase  taxes  on  small
businesses and families. Addition-
ally, if enacted, this bill would re-
turn the current $5 million death
tax  exemption  to  $1  million  next
year, and would raise the tax rate
from the current top rate of 35 per-
cent  to  an  exorbitant  55  percent.
Senator  Thune’s  legislation,  the
Death  Tax  Repeal  Permanency
Act, has 37 cosponsors and is sup-
ported by more than 50 groups and
organizations.  Representative
Kevin Brady (R-Texas) introduced
identical legislation in the House
of Representatives and the bill has
more than 200 bipartisan cospon-
sors. 
   Parents of pre-teens and college
freshmen should check their kids’
immunizations  before  the  school
year starts, says a state health of-
ficial. 
   “Parents  should  know  that  ba-
Back to school means immunizations
for pre-teens, college freshmen
bies  and  toddlers  aren’t  the  only
ones  who  need  immunizations,”
said  Dr.  Lon  Kightlinger,  State
Epidemiologist for the Department
of Health.
   Kightlinger  said  college  fresh-
men living in dorms and unvacci-
nated  kids  entering  high  school
are at high risk for meningococcal
disease and should be vaccinated.
   A  bacterial  infection,  meningo-
coccal disease is an inflammation
of  the  tissues  covering  the  brain
and spinal cord. Symptoms include
fever, severe headache, stiff neck,
vomiting and a rash. Prompt treat-
ment  can  prevent  disability  and
death. Ten to 14 percent of people
with the disease die and up to 19
percent  of  survivors  may  suffer
permanent  disabilities  such  as
hearing  loss,  limb  amputation  or
brain disease. South Dakota typi-
cally  reports  three  cases  of
meningococcal  disease  a  year.  To
date in 2012, there have been no
cases reported.
   A pertussis, or whooping cough,
vaccine  booster  dose  is  recom-
mended  at  11-12  years  when  im-
munity begins to wane. The initial
pertussis series is given to children
at  two  months,  four  months,  six
months, 15-18 months, and four -
six years.
   Whooping cough is a serious ill-
ness  that  causes  uncontrollable
coughing,  rib  fractures,  pneumo-
nia, loss of consciousness and even
death. Young children are at high-
est  risk,  with  two-thirds  of  those
under age one who get it needing
hospitalization.  There  have  been
six  pertussis  cases  reported  in
South Dakota to date in 2012.
   Meningococcal vaccine is avail-
able  from  family  health  care
providers  and  campus  student
health  centers.  The  department
provides the vaccine for those 11-
18 years of age who are eligible for
the federal Vaccines for Children
Program (Medicaid eligible, Native
American or Alaskan Native, unin-
sured  or  underinsured).  The  vac-
cine is free for these children but
providers may charge an adminis-
tration fee.
   The  department  provides  the
childhood series of whooping cough
vaccine and the booster dose free
for 11-12 year olds. Providers may
charge an administration fee.
   To  find  a  vaccine  provider,  see
http://doh.sd.gov/LocalOffices/Vac-
cine.aspx.  Learn  more  about
meningitis  or  whooping  cough  at
http://doh.sd.gov/DiseaseFacts/.
   Improving  immunization  rates
is  a  key  objective  of  the  depart-
ment’s Health 2020 initiative.
 This is the last week. Bring your
completed Bingo cards into the Li-
brary to claim your prizes! We al-
ready  have  four  kids  with
BLACKOUT, make sure yours is
counted!
 We just received the new Sandra
Brannan book, Widow’s Might – a
Summer reading program ends this
Friday at the Wall Community Library!
Liv  Bergen  mystery,  at  the  Li-
brary. It was thoughtfully donated
by  her  proud  parents  who  are
South Dakota residents. They felt
that since she’s a local author, the
local  libraries  should  have  her
books. 
By Coach Patterson
   The  Boys  Squad  traveled  to
Douglas on Friday, August 24th to
begin their season on a hot, windy
day.   
   Nathan Patterson, a senior, ran
varsity  against  59  runners  from
AA,  A,  B  and  Wyoming  schools.
He ran a 26:00 to start his season.
   Austin  Huether,  a  sophomore,
did not compete that day due to ill-
ness. He would have ran with Pat-
terson  on  the  varsity  squad  as
well.   
   Alex  Tysdal,  a  freshman,  ran
Junior  Varsity  for  his  first  Cross
Country competition.  There were
The 2012 Cross Country
season has officially started!
59 other runners in his division as
well.  He  came  in  with  a  time  of
22.20.
   Coach's Comments: Every
year this meet is rather warm and
this year was no different. There
was a wind (like there has been all
summer)  so  running  the  hills  on
the course was a challenge.   
   The boys did well for their first
meet.  Every  course  is  a  different
challenge and the squad will con-
tinue  to  improve  as  the  season
moves  on.  Thursday  we  head  to
Spearfish for a 3:00 p.m., start and
Friday  to  Faith  for  a  10:00  a.m.,
start. Busy but fun!
   Members  who  were  Overall
Achievement  Day  winners  from
the Cedar Butte Challengers 4-H
Club were:   
   •Computers and Technology:
Junior - Katy Bielmaier and Sen-
ior - Monica Bielmaier.
   •Home Environment: Junior
- Jaicee Williams.
   •Visual Arts Chalk Carbon
Pigment: Junior - Elle Moon and
Senior - Monica Bielmaier.
   •Handmade Jewelry: Begin-
ner - Jenna Elshere.
   •Fashion Review: Constructed
Outfit: Purple - Abbie Moon and
Elle Moon.   
   •Top Beginner: Abby Moon.   
   •Top Junior: Elle Moon.      
   •Overall Construction In-
centive Award: Elle  Moon,
sewing machine from the Sewing
Center.
   Ribbons earned by Cedar Butte
Challenger  4-Hers  for  their  ex-
hibits at the fair were:
   •Clothing Construction: Pur-
ple - Aby Moon, Elle Moon; Blue -
Aby Moon and Jaicee Williams.
Cedar Butte Challengers
4-H members do well at
Central States Fair
   •Selected Outfit: Purple - Elle
Moon and Jaicee Williams.
   •Computer and Technology:
Purple  -  Jacob  Bielmaier,  Katy
Bielmaier,  Jaicee  Williams  and
Monica Bielmaier.
   •Foods: Red - Abby Moon.
   •Home Environment: Purple -
Jaicee Williams; Blue - Abby Moon
(2) and Elle Moon.
   •Photography: Purple  -
Jaicee  Williams  and  Katy  Biel-
maier (2); Blue - Monica Bielmaier
(3), Katy Bielmaier (2), Abby Moon
(2), Jenna Elshere, Elle Moon (5),
Jaicee  Williams  amd  Jacob  Biel-
maier.
   •Visual Arts: Purple  -  Jaicee
Williams (2), Jenna Elshere ; Blue
-  Katy  Bielmaier,  Jenna  Elshere,
Elle  Moon  (4)  Trista  Reinert  (3),
Monica Bielmaier (2), Abby Moon
(4) and Tacia Osterberg (2); Red -
Elle Moon (4), Katy Bielmaier (3),
Monica Bielmaier (3), Jacob Biel-
maier and Tacia Osterberg.
   •Welding: Purple  -  Jaicee
Williams;   Blue - Jacob Bielmaier.
   •Wood Science: Purple - Trey
Elshere.
   •Qualifying  for  Static  Judging
Teams  at  State  Fair  was:  Abby
Moon, Jacob Bielmaier, Tacia Os-
terberg, Katy Bielmaier, Elle Moon
and Jaicee Williams.
   •Qualifying  to  Demonstrate  at
State Fair was: Elle Moon, Jaicee
Williams,  Katy  Bielmaier  and
Jacob Bielmaier.
   •Competing  at  the  State  4-H
Rodeo Finals were:  Trista Reinert
in  Poles,  Goats,  and  Break Away
Roping;  and  Jaicee  Williams  in
Goats.  
Email us
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to courant
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your printing
needs!  859-2516
Area News
Pennington County Courant • August 30, 2012• Page 3
courant@gwtc.net
Aug. 31, Sept. 1-2-3:
Diary of a Wimpy Kid:
Dog Days (PG)
Fri: 8:00 p.m. Sat: 8:00 p.m.
Sun: 1:30 p.m. Mon: 7:00 p.m.
Gem Thea¡re
SS9-2000 - PbIIIp
September 7-8-9-10:
The Campaign (R)
September 14-15-16-17:
ParaNorman (PG)
September 21-22-23-24:
Hit & Run (R)
September 28-29-30-October 1:
Hope Springs (PG-13)
ALL types!

Backhoe
Trenching
Directional
Boring
Tire Tanks
Located in
Kadoka, SD
Home: (605) 837-2945
Cell: (605) 381-5568
Excavation work of
rhythms,  and  more.  And  isn’t  it
paradox that a person filled with
fear and panic is often less able to
avoid  the  very  thing  for  which
they are afraid. 
   Take the nervous speaker who,
without confidence, loses his con-
vincing  quality as  the  apprehen-
sion comes out in his voice or even
paralyzes him. Sometimes it’s just
as FDR said it: “The only thing we
have  to  fear  is  fear  itself.”  For
those  who  are  limited  by  fear,
there are medicines and counsel,
which can help.
   “No Fear” is not a basic truism;
it’s just an advertisement, for fear
can be a very normal and protec-
tive emotion. However it can also
be very harmful, and then we need
to be bold enough to seek help, and
conquer  fear  rather  than  letting
fear conquer us.
   Dr. Rick Holm wrote this Prairie
Doc Perspective for “On Call®,” a
weekly  program  where  medical
professionals  discuss  health  con-
cerns for the general public.   “On
Call®” is produced by the Healing
Words  Foundation  in  association
with the South Dakota State Uni-
versity  Journalism  Department.
“On  Call®”  airs  Thursdays  on
South  Dakota  Public  Broadcast-
ing-Television at 7 p.m. Central, 6
p.m. Mountain. Visit us at OnCall-
Television.com. 
The Prairie Doc Perspective
By Richard P. Holm MD
Most of us so-called normal peo-
ple travel through our lives trying
to  overcome  our  fears.  Kids  deal
with  monsters  under  the  bed,
lightning  and  thunder,  the  dark,
bullies  on  the  playground;
teenagers  deal  with  rejection  by
friends,  asking  for  a  date,  drop-
ping the ball, reporting bad grades
to parents. As we mature the fears
become  more  individual  such  as
fear of heights, or snakes, or blood.
   Sometimes helpful, fear is there
to protect children while crossing
a busy street or teenagers wanting
to drive a motorcycle too fast. Fear
brings the feelings of stomach but-
terflies, sweaty palms, and racing
heart, all a result of adrenalin in-
ternally  injected  into  the  blood
stream  enhancing  survival  in
times of real danger, helping the
individual ready herself for com-
bat or escape. When a tiger is com-
ing through the brush, this natu-
ral  hormone  diverts  blood  to  the
large  muscles,  brings  out  sweat,
and dilates the pupils all in order
to prepare for fight or flight. 
   But when there is no tiger in a
so-called civilized world, there can
be more danger from the body’s re-
action  to  fear  itself,  and  all  the
consequences  of  that  adrenalin
surge.  Take  for  example  high
blood  pressure,  abnormal  heart
Fear and Phobia
   In addition to the three rounds
of bronc riding, the wild ride fea-
turing five cowboys, Cristy Willert
of  Kadoka  made  her  debut  trick
riding.  Her  husband,  Jamie,  was
also  a  contender,  but  had  tough
luck in the first round.
   The  top  winners  in  round  one
were:
   1st) Lane Stirling - Newell, SD -
71 points - $720.00
   2nd) Travis Nelson - Philip, SD -
69 points - $540.00
   One  hundred  and  six  campers,
along with over 70 volunteers, took
part  in  the  four  day  camp.  The
campers receive two days of rodeo
instruction  in  events  of  their
choice  and  then  they  compete  in
the  final  days  in  two  rodeo  per-
formances.
   Each  day  the  campers  also  at-
tend chapel, take part in small de-
votional  groups,  participate  in
games and enjoy music.
   Tie Down Roping: 1st) Rolly For-
tune,  Interior;  2nd)  Taylor
Morrison’s hosted the 7th Annual Badlands Match
Bronc Riding in Kadoka Friday, August 17
Levi Hapney from Quinn, SD on Spud Creek Rodeo's Stallion
#335 Bootlicker during the Final Round.
~Photos provided by Greg Walker
Christy Willert from Kadoka, SD showcasing her Trick Riding.
She is married to Jamie Willert of Kadoka.
   3rd/4th) Dillon Schroth - Buffalo
Gap, SD - 68 points - $270.00
   3rd/4th) Jade Blackwell - Wall,
SD - 68 points - $270.00
   Also scoring in that round were:
Wyatt  Kammerer  and  Trey  For-
tune  of  Philip,  Levi  Hapney  of
Quinn,  Cody  Taret  of  Rapid  City
and Travis Schroth of Buffalo Gap.
   The  top  four  winners  who  ad-
vanced  in  the  second  round  took
home money as well.
   1st) Lane Stirling - Newell, SD -
75 points - $720.00
   2nd) Jade Blackwell - Wall, SD -
71 points - $540.00
   3rd) Levi Hapney - Quinn, SD -
69 points - $360.00
   4th)  Wyatt  Kammerer  -  Philip,
SD - 67 points - $180.00
   In  the  short  go,  it  was  winner
take all and with his 80-point ride,
Wyatt  Kammerer  collected
$1,000.00.
   This year’s event was a part of
the Badlands VS Sandhills Bronc
Riding Challenge. 
   The bronc riders also competed
in  Valentine,  NE  on  Wednesday
night, August 15, just two days be-
fore the match in Kadoka. 
   The bronc rider with the highest
total  score  from  both  events  was
awarded  with  a  bonus  $1,000.00
and a championship buckle.  
   Lane  Stirling  from  Newell,  SD
was  the  Badlands  VS  Sandhills
Champion Bronc Rider with a total
of 447 points after six rounds win-
ning  $3,340.00  between  the  two
events. 
The Badlands Cowboys for Christ Rodeo Bible
Camp was held on August 6-9 at the Kadoka arena
Schmidt, Sturgis; 3rd) Jason Hap-
ney, Harrold; 4th) Klay O’Daniel,
Kadoka.
   Bull  Riding:  1st)  Jordan  Hunt,
Faith;  2nd)  Norman  Chantry,
Hayes;  3rd)  Casey  Heninger,  Ft.
Pierre;  4th/5th)  Ryan  Schlabach,
Kadoka  and  Brady  Jandreau,
Lower Brule.
   Barrel Racing: 1st) Hanna Hos-
tutler, Midland; 2nd) Bobbie Till,
Dupree; 3rd) Brooke Howell, Belle
Fourche;  4th)    Alex  Smiley,
Kadoka.
   Goat  Tying:  1st)  Tawny  Berry,
Carter;  2nd)  Becca  Lythgue,
Colton;  3rd)  Vanzi  Knippling,
Chamberlain;  4th)  Bailey  Tibbs,
Ft. Pierre.
   Breakaway  Roping:  1st)  Elsie
Fortune,  Interior;  2nd)  Bree  Al-
bers, Hartford; 3rd) Kecia Miller,
Newell;  4th)  Kamira  Miller,
Newell.
   Bareback:  1st)  Trig  Clark,
Meadow;  2nd)  JD Anderson,  Hill
City; 3rd) Dylan Riggins, Kadoka;
4th) Denver Paul, Carson, ND.
   Saddle Bronc: 1st) Jordan Hunt,
Faith; 2nd) Reed Johnson, Philip;
3rd) Chantry Norman, Hayes; 4th)
Jason Hapney, Harrold.
   Steer  Wrestling:  1st)  Taylor
Schmidt, Sturgis; 2nd) Ryne Baier,
Buffalo;  3rd)  Logan  Christensen,
Kadoka; 4th) Jason Hapney, Har-
rold.
   Team  Roping:  1st)  Rolly  For-
tune,  Interior  and Austin  O’Dea,
Philip;  2nd)  Tayle  Brink,  Newell
and  Sadee  Hurst,  Buffalo;  3rd)
Reed  Johnson,  Philip  and  Rance
Johnson,  Philip;  4th)  Elsie  For-
tune,  Interior  and  Garrett  Mur-
phy, Torrington, WY.
   Pole Bending: 1st) Brianna Sex-
ton,  Bison;  2nd)  Justina  Cvach,
Midland;  3rd)  Becca  Lythgue,
Colton;  4th)  Hanna  Hostutler,
Midland.
   Girls  All-Around:  Becca
Lythgue, Colton.
   Boys  All-Around:  Taylor
Schmidt, Sturgis.
   Perseverance  Award:  Dustin
Hicks, Allen.
   Cy and Dorothy Porch Memorial
Bibles:  Justina  Cvach,  Midland
and Ryne Baier, Buffalo.
Elsie Fortune won first place
and the buckle in breakaway
with a time of 7.58 on two. She
and Garrett Murphy of Torring-
ton, WY, won fourth place in
team roping.
~Photo by Robyn Jones
NU1ILL
Wutt PtH§ Fhutmu£y
will be closed
M0Huuy, ó£þÍ£mD£t dtu
in observance of
LuD0t Puy
W£ Wttt t£SHm£ 0Ht t£§Htut
h0HtS 1H£Suuy, ó£þÍ£mD£t üÍh.
  The  South  Dakota  Game,  Fish
and Parks Department is planning
two upcoming trainings for the Na-
tional Archery in the Schools Pro-
gram (NASP).
   NASP  allows  schools  in  South
Dakota  to  incorporate  archery  in
their school curriculum safely and
at no cost to school districts.
   Trainings  are  currently  sched-
uled for Oacoma/Chamberlain on
September  21  and  Rapid  City  on
October 19. Each session will run
from 8 a.m.- 5 p.m.
   Upon  successful  completion  of
the training, schools will be eligi-
ble to receive free archery equip-
Free Archery training
provided to schools
ment from GFP.
   Teachers  wishing  to  introduce
archery instruction in their schools
must  pre-register  for  training  by
email  at  outdoorprogramming@
gmail.com or by phone at 605-220-
2130. Space is limited so registra-
tions  should  be  made  as  soon  as
possible.
   The  South  Dakota  Game,  Fish
and Parks Department is offering
an  exciting  new  opportunity  for
schools to introduce conservation
and  safety  training  in  their  cur-
riculum.
   Two  training  sessions  are
planned this fall that allow schools
to participate in the HuntSAFE in
the Schools Program.
   Trainings  are  currently  sched-
uled for Fort Pierre on September
19 and Sioux Falls on October. 15.
The full-day trainings are open to
all educators in South Dakota who
HuntSAFE training
available for schools
work with youth ages 11-15.
   There is no charge for the train-
ing.  Upon  successful  completion,
teachers  will  be  able  to  provide
HuntSAFE  certification  to  their
students  who  complete  the
HuntSAFE course.
   Teachers wishing to register for
the  HuntSAFE  in  the  Schools
training should email their contact
information  to  outdoorprogram-
ming@gmail.com  or  call  605-220-
2130. Space is limited so registra-
tions  should  be  made  as  soon  as
possible.
Email your
social news,
obituaries,
wedding &
engagement
announcements
to:
annc@gwtc.net
Pennington County Courant • August 30, 2012 • Page 4
Socials
Wall News
Gathered by Frances Poste
   Friday,  August  24,  was  Steve
Eisenbraun’s  75th  birthday,  and
the celebrating began on Sunday,
August 19 and continued all week,
as family and friends began arriv-
ing from all over the country: sis-
ters Margaret Hoeft and Claudia
and  Dave  Keyser  from  Texas;
Norma and Bob Juedes, Tina and
Dewey  Fortune  and  Magdalena
Garcia from Arizona; Lil and Mar-
vin  Fitzwater  from  Florida;
brother Walt from California; sons,
Travis,  Beth  and  Isaiah  from
Mitchell, and Tyler and Axton from
Nebraska; aunt Mabel Schweigert,
and  cousins,  Larry  and  Janice
Schweigert,  Donna  Harrison  and
Maryann  Watts  from  eastern
South  Dakota;  John  and  Kathy
Drewitz,  Hilda,  Carmela  and
Emilia Olson, Pam Giese, Ed and
Linda Eisenbraun, and Wanda and
Steve  Goodrich  from  Rapid  City;
Nathan  and  Ashley  Eisenbraun
from Sommerset; Jeff and Skyler
Eisenbraun from Piedmont; Angie,
Shelby and Wyatt Nellen from Hot
Springs;  Dale  Eisenbraun  from
Hill  City;  and  Agnes  and  Dick
Sabel  from  Nekoosa,  Wis.  Many
other  local  relatives  and  friends
joined  them  for  the  party  on  Fri-
day evening, August 24, at Steve
and Gayle’s home.
   The  big  news  is  the  most  wel-
comed  rain  on  Friday  evening  —
various amounts depending where
you are, but very, very nice! Wall
had around two inches. We needed
it but keep on praying.
   Also, great news is that Marilyn
Keyser has come back from Texas,
where she has been taking treat-
ment.  She  has  been  staying  with
her granddaughter, Lorrae Aker at
Sommerset,  but  this  week  (Mon-
day through Friday) will be visit-
ing  Gary  and  Ruby  Keyser.  We
wish you well, Marilyn.
   May it be noted that the Senior
Citizens  (YAH)  will  not  meet  on
September 3rd, Labor Day, but will
meet  the  following  Monday,  Sep-
tember 10th. See you then.
   Everyone said the “burger bust”
fundraiser for Bart Cheney on Fri-
day evening was a great success.
We hope with the matching funds
that it will mean a quick recovery
for Bart.
   Also on Friday evening was Wall
Eagles  first  football  game  of  the
season. White River were the op-
ponents but the game wasn’t fin-
ished — got rained out. Now, isn’t
that a new one for a football game
in  Wall?  They  still  plan  to  finish
the game.
   Mark,  Darlene,  Amanda  and
Kristina Poste stopped in Wall to
see Frances on their way to Brook-
ings on Saturday. They were going
to get Amanda settled in the dorm
at SDSU for the new school term.
   Anita  Peterson,  Philip,  picked
up Edith Paulsen on Sunday to go
visit Bernice Anderson in the Good
Samaritan  Home  in  New  Under-
wood. They continued on their way
to Rapid City to shop.
   Donna  Jedlicka  had  company
last week — son Mike and his wife
Cheryl  came  from  Sioux  Falls  on
Thursday.  They  had  to  leave  on
Saturday  to  be  on  hand  to  take
their  son  Nathan  to  Madison,
where he will be attending school.,
On  Sunday,  David,  Kathy  and
Haley  Jedlicka  came  from  Rapid
City  and  Casey,  Shirley  and
Chance  Trask  were  also  visitors.
All were helping Donna celebrate
her birthday.
   Dan  and  Bev  Dartt  and  Dave
and Linda LaFee went to the “Kool
Deadwood  Nights”  car  parade  on
Sunday morning.
   Denny  and  Karen  Carmichael
came on Sunday to visit Dave and
Arla Olson and Merlin and Mary
Jane  Doyle.  Sunday  night,  they
were guests of the Olson’s for sup-
per  where  Brenda  Carmichael
joined them. At noon on Monday,
the  group  had  lunch  at  Doyle’s.
The Carmichaels left Monday af-
ternoon on their way to Wyoming
to visit the Enders and on to Col-
orado to see Tom Carmichael and
family.
   Dean  and  Marcine  Patterson
celebrated their 50th anniversary
in grand style. The buffet supper
was super with your choice of cake
served.  Everyone  liked  the  band,
“Break Even”. Will have to tell —
one  92  year  old  man  who  walks
with  a  walker,  but  he  got  caught
up with the beat and was swinging
in  the  corner  with  his  daughter.
Great to see! Again, congrats to the
Pattersons!
   This is the last week of August
—  summer  is  mostly  over.  The
forecast  has  some  hot  tempera-
tures for the first part of the week,
so it isn’t over yet.
   “There is no right way to do the
wrong thing.” ~Anonymous
interior.
   All  three  cars  are  air  condi-
tioned,  have  fuzzy  dice  dangling
from their rear view mirrors and
display  their  clubs  logo  decals  in
their rear windows — ROOSTERS
ROOS.
   We enjoyed their visit so much.
   Ray and Jamy williams went to
the White River Celebration with
Jamy’s mother, and all enjoyed it.
   Sunday was rest and relaxation
at the Cheyenne River. Ray did a
little fishing and caught a nice cat-
fish  which  they  enjoyed  for  their
supper  and  Jamy  searched  for
treasures and found an interesting
fossil.
   The  Williams  baby,  Maverick
will be making his appearance in a
couple weeks (due date September
12)  and  while  Jamy  feels  well,
there is that point when it is hard
to get comfortable! The conversa-
tion  turned  to  gardens  and  the
frustration of dealing with the four
legged critters that think they are
entitled to just help themselves to
anything they choose!
   Friday night, was a very impres-
sive “sky show”. Dark clouds came
rolling into Wasta quickly followed
by lightning and rolls of thunder.
The lightning would sometimes be
to the west, the east and the south
seemingly at the same time. It was
an  awesome  sky!  No  rain,  but
what entertainment.
   Lawrence  Burke  from  up  Elm
Springs  way,  called  to  learn  how
much rain we got because he was
watching the storm from his place!
   I had to say that we had just a
sprinkle. All that power overhead
and  those  clouds  held  onto  their
precious moisture and took it with
them to Wall. Well, darn!
   Happy Trails!
Business & Professional
D · I · R · E · C · T · O · R · Y
Re11Þ D. Mo1er
General Dentistry
348-5311
Hours: 8-5, Mon.-Fri.
506 West Boulevard, Rapid City, SD 57701
A A Meeting
Tuesday & Friday, 8 p.m.
Methodist Church Basement East Entrance
When anyone anywhere reaches out for heIp, I want the hand
of AA aIways to be there. And for that I Am ResponsibIe.
West RIver ExcavatIon
Ditching and Trenching of all types
Craig CoIIer 837-2690
Kadoka, SD
Bud!unds AutomotIve
For all your automotive needs.
Jerry & Bev Mooney
Phone: 279-2827 or 279-2733
Wall, SD
Boaald 0. Maaa, 00S
Ionil, Den/ie/r,
2nd, 3rd & 4fh Wodnosdny of onch monfh
Hours: 8:30 - l2:30 nnd l:00 - 5:00
605-279-2172
Rove11e11e Pub11oo11ons, 1no.
PennIngton County Courant
For All Kinds of Priniing & Advcriising .
Co11 us 1odog!!
605/279-2565 · Wall, SD
NOW AVAILABLE
NEW UNITS
Call for various
sizes.
CaII: Eric Hansen, 279-2894 · WaII, SD
279-2955
DaIe Patterson
WaII, SD
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Serting ,ou eince 1969
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Submitted by
Lloyd & Margee Willey
   It seems the sumer heat is eas-
ing up on us. Of course it could be
that  it  is  just  less  miserable,  but
seems pleasant compared to what
we’ve  known  for  so  many  days.
Well,  whatever,  we  can  ponder
that this winter.
   I  am  pondering  now  how  the
weeks go by so very quickly!
   Ash  Grenstiner  said  they  went
to the fair in Rapid City, Tuesday,
Wednesday  and  Friday.  They  en-
joyed the 4-H and FFA exhibits, es-
pecially the rabbit and poultry ex-
hibits  and  attended  some  of  the
concerts. Ash will be in the school
band this coming year, Madi is in
the  band  now,  plays  the  drums.
Perhaps  Ash  will  as  well,  but  is
still considering.
   Hazel Kalkbrenner attended the
fair, Friday, with specific garden-
ing seminars in mind and a plant
swap.
   The  Old  Hotel  at  Wasta  had
guests  Wednesday  evening  and
night.  Lloyd  became  acquainted
with  Gene  Tweedy  in  Maricopa,
Ariz.  a  few  years  ago.  Gene  is
building a dwarf car and has built
two other classic cars, one of which
he drove from his home in Pleas-
ant Hill, Mo., to Deadwood (stop-
ping in Wasta) for the “Cool Dead-
wood Nights” there. He was joined
by  four  friends  and  their  classic
and  sooo  nice  cars.  Gene  Tweedy
from Pleasant Hill, and his friend
Janet  Friedrich  from  Independ-
ence, were in Gene’s 1957 Chevro-
let Bel-Air, David and Brenda Bet-
tis from Blue Springs, Mo., in their
1965 Ford Falcon and Bobbie Suhi
in his 1936 Chevrolet. These cars
made the Old Hotel look very fine!
Technical information is provided
by Lloyd:
   Gene Tweedy: ‘57 Chevy Bel Air,
two door hard top. New Chevy V8
Crate  engine,  with  700  R4  auto-
matic transmission and posi-trac-
tion  rear-end.  Gene  installed  the
complete interior from a ‘88 Cadil-
lac Eldorado! Now it has  all  elec-
tric windows, seats and a console
and door locks. He painted it a soft
silver  blue.  She  rides  on  mag
wheels,  is  lowered  two  inches  all
around, has skirts and full length
lakes pipes.
   David  Bettis:  ‘65  Ford  Falcon,
two  door  hard  top.  Late  Model
Ford 302 V8 coupled to a five speed
transmission. She is black as shiny
wet  coal  with  a  bright  red  full
length body stripe. All new red in-
terior with chrome dash insert and
trim. Sits stock with mag wheels
accented with black.
   Bobbie Suhi: ‘36 Chevy two door
Sedan - a true hot rod! It is pow-
ered by a 450 horse power Chevy
V8  with  a  700  R4  transmission
and a GMC posi-traction rear-end.
The front suspension is Ford Mus-
tang II. The rear Ford axles have
been splined to fit the GMC rear-
end  so  his  polished  mag  wheels
have  the  same  bolt  pattern.  It  is
mini-tubbed  and  wears  18’  wide
pie  cut  tires  on  the  rear.  She  is
painted  autumn  maple  metallic
and finely pin striped. All 12 volt
electrical system with electric ex-
haust cut outs. Yet to be finished
Wasta Wanderings
You are invited to the…
Huether Family Reunion
Sunday, September 2nd
Wall Community Center
Doors open at 9:00 a.m.
Potluck Dinner at 12 noon
September 5th
She may not jump as high
but she’s still full of pep!
Stop in and wish her a
Happy 50th Birthday at
Black Hills Federal Credit Union
in Wall.
from your family
SanDee’s
Daily Lunch Specials
Aug. 30th: Crispy Chicken Wrap
w/Fruit Salad
Aug. 31st: Taco
& Super Nachos
Sept. 3rd: Closed
Sept. 4th: Chicken Sandwich
w/Frogeye Salad
Sept. 5th: Patti Melt
w/French Fries
Call 515-0084 for delivery • Wall
It’s A Girl!
Born: June 30, 2012 Weight: 7 lbs. 9 oz. 19 3/4”
Parents: Mindy Haerer & Kelly Jones
Maternal Grandparents:
Darwin & Betty Haerer, Wall
Paternal Grandparents:
Bonnie & the late John Jones, Sturgis
Maternal Great-Grandparents:
The late Samuel (Mike) & Emma Root,
Midland
Wayne & Eldena Haerer, Sturgis
Paternal Great-Grandparents:
The late Donald & Georgia
Jones, White River
Sponsored by
Grandpa Darwin & Grandma Betty
E
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J
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s
Good sense for
sensitive skin
Sensitive  skin  is  a  problem  for
millions of people. The uncomfort-
able feelings of stinging, burning,
itching, redness and tightness can
occur  when  certain  ingredients
found in everyday household prod-
ucts react to delicate skin after con-
tact.  Being  mindful  of  chemicals
your  skin  comes  in  contact  with
and  incorporating  more  natural,
gentle products into your daily rou-
tine  can  help  reduce  these  un-
wanted reactions.
"When it comes to choosing prod-
ucts,  I  recommend  those  that  are
hypoallergenic and have been clin-
ically  proven  to  be  gentle  on  the
skin," said dermatologist Dr. Eliza-
beth  Hale,  Ph.D.  "Skin-friendly
products  include  those  that  are
mild in nature and free of alcohol,
preservatives and dyes."
Instead  of  disrupting  your  skin
with  irritants  found  in  everyday
household  items,  you  can  choose
more gentle, dermatologist recom-
mended products to keep your skin
healthy and comfortable: 
•Soap - Washing hands with an-
tibacterial soap strips the natural
oils and can result in dry, chapped
skin.  Choose  mild  soap,  free  of
heavy scents or artificial dyes and
wash  hands  with  warm,  not  hot,
water. 
•Household  cleaners  -  When  it
comes to household cleaners, it can
be  difficult  to  avoid  harsh  chemi-
cals.  To  ensure  your  skin  is  pro-
tected, wear rubber gloves and long
sleeves  when  it's  time  for  heavy
cleaning. Look for products labeled
for sensitive skin or consider mak-
ing  at-home  cleaners  with  every-
day products like baking soda for
an all-natural alternative.
•Laundry products - If you've ex-
perienced  discomfort  where  the
skin  is  covered  by  clothing,  there
may be something in your laundry
products causing the irritation. Try
dye-free  or  skin-friendly  scented
options  such  as  ARM  &  HAM-
MERTM Sensitive Skin Plus Scent
Laundry Detergent which removes
tough grime and odors from dirty
clothes without sacrificing scent for
sensitivity.  You  can  learn  more
about skin-friendly laundry choices
at www.armandhammer.com. 
•Facial  creams  -  Wrinkle
creams,  skin  peels  and  cleansers
can  sometimes  cause  more  prob-
lems  than  they  solve.  Check  the
label for common irritants such as
ascorbic  acid,  paraben  preserva-
tives, and the alpha hydroxyl acids
glycolic acid, malic acid and lactic
acid.  Test  a  new  product  by  dab-
bing  a  small  amount  behind  your
ear  and  leaving  it  on  overnight
each day for five days.
•Clothing  -  Rough  fabrics  such
as  wool  can  cause  itchiness  and
rashes. Wear clothing made of soft,
smooth, natural fabrics like cotton
and silk. Clothing should be loose
fitting,  but  with  a  minimum  of
creases and folds, which can cause
more irritation.
If you're unsure of how your skin
will react to certain products, talk
to your dermatologist. Taking good
care of your skin just makes good
sense. And taking a few simple pre-
cautions  can  keep  your  sensitive
skin feeling good.
Apple Hazelnut
Linzer Cookies
2 cups all-purpose flour 
2/3 cup finely ground hazelnuts
(about 2 oz.)
1/4 teaspoon ground nutmeg
1/4 teaspoon salt
1 cup (2 sticks) butter, softened
2/3 cup granulated sugar
1 egg
1/2 teaspoon pure vanilla extract
1/2 cup apple butter 
Red Icing Color, optional
Confectioners’ sugar, optional
In  small  bowl,  combine  flour,
hazelnuts,  nutmeg  and  salt;  set
aside.  In  large  bowl,  beat  butter
and sugar with electric mixer until
light  and  fluffy.  Add  egg  and
vanilla;  mix  well.  Add  flour  mix-
ture;  mix  only  until  combined.
Form  dough  into  2  disks,  about  1
in. thick; wrap in plastic wrap. Re-
frigerate  2  hours  or  until  firm
enough to roll.
Preheat oven to 350°F. Line two
cookie  sheets  with  parchment
paper.
On  floured  surface,  roll  out
dough 1/8-in. thick (keep dough in
refrigerator  until  ready  to  roll).
Using  square  Linzer  Cutter,  cut
half of the dough with 3-in. cutter
and place on prepared pan. Cut re-
maining  dough  with  3-in.  cutter
with insert; transfer to second bak-
ing sheet. Form scraps into a disk,
chill at least 30 minutes and reroll. 
Bake 7-9 minutes or until light
golden brown. Cool on cookie sheet
2 minutes; remove to cooling grid
and cool completely. Tint apple but-
ter with red icing color, if desired.
Spread  whole  cookies  with  apple
butter; if desired, lightly dust cook-
ies  with  cut-outs  with  confection-
ers’  sugar  and  gently  sandwich
cookies together.
Makes about 32 sandwich cook-
ies.
we don’t
charge…
Obi tuaries, engagements and
wedding wri te-ups are published
free of charge. Call 279-2565
or e-mail annc@gwtc.net.
Need a print
job done fast?
Call us for all your
printing needs.
Ravellette
Publications, inc.
605-859-2516
Offices in Philip, Wall,
Kadoka, Murdo, Faith, Bison,
& New Underwood.
Pennington County Courant • August 30, 2012 • Page 5
Religious
Wall Bldg.
Center
279-2158
Wall, SD
De's Tire
& Muffler
279-2168
Wall, SD
Hustead's
Wall
Drug
Store
Call 279-2565 to be a
sponsor on this church
directory.
Rush Funeral Home
Chapels in Philip, Wall & Kadoka
Jack, Gayle & D.J. Rush
www.rushfuneralhome.com
Dowling Community Church
Memorial Day through Labor Day
Service 10:00 a.m.
Badlands Cowboy Church
Wall Rodeo Grounds
Wednesdays, 7 p.m.
Evangelical Free Bible Church
Wall
Ron Burtz, Pastor
279-2867 • www.wallfreechurch.com
Wednesdays: Good News Club, 2:45 p.m.,
Awana 4:45 p.m., Youth Nite, 7:00 p.m.;
Sundays: Sunday School &
Adult Bible Fellowship, 9 a.m.,
Sunday Worship Service, 10:30 a.m.,
Women’s Bible Study, 6:30 p.m.
interior Community Church
Highway 44 East
Sunday School 9:30 a.m.;
Sunday Worship Service 10:30 a.m.
Scenic Community Church
Pastor Ken Toews
Services - 2nd and 4th Sundays
9:00 a.m.; Sept. through May.
First Baptist Church
new Underwood
Pastor James Harbert
Bible Study, 9:00 a.m.;
Sunday Services, 10:00 a.m.
Wall United Methodist Church
Pastor Darwin Kopfmann • 279-2359
Sunday Worship 10:00 a.m.
Wasta
Services Sundays at 8:30 a.m.
new Underwood Community Church
Pastor Wes Wileman
Sunday School 9 a.m.;
Adult & Children Service 10 a.m.;
Youth Fellowship: Wed. 7 - 8:30 p.m.
St. John's Catholic Church
new Underwood
Father William Zandri
Mass: Sundays at 11:00 a.m.;
Wednesdays at 9:30 a.m. at
Good Samaritan Nursing Home;
Reconciliation before Sun. Mass
First Evangelical Lutheran Church
Wall
Pastor Curtis Garland
Sunday Service, 9 a.m.
Emmanuel Lutheran Church
Creighton
Services 11:00 a.m. Sunday morning.
St. Patrick's Catholic Church • Wall
Rev. Leo Hausmann
Masses: Saturday 5 p.m., Sunday 8 a.m.
Weekdays refer to Bulletin
St. Margaret Church • Lakeside
Mass: Saturday 7 p.m. even number months or
Sunday 10 a.m. odd number months
Holy Rosary Church • interior
Mass: Saturday 7 p.m. odd number months or
Sunday 10 a.m. even number months
By Pastor Cornelius R.
Stam
Every true Christian
should understand that the
truth costs. If you don’t
think so, make it your own,
value it, defend it, stand for
it, and see if it doesn’t cost.
Before you are through it
may cost you far more than
you had thought — hours
of ease and pleasure,
friends and money. Yes,
the truth costs. Salvation is
gloriously free but the truth
costs — that is, if you want
it for yourself. Many who
know the truth won’t buy it.
They won’t pay what it
costs to say: “This is what I
believe. This is my convic-
tion.” The truth isn’t worth
that much to them.
But in Prov. 23:23 God’s
Word urges us: “Buy the
truth”! Not, “Buy it if you
can get it at a bargain; if the
price is not too great.” No,
“Buy the truth”! Buy it at
any price. It is worth far
more than anything you
can give in exchange for it.
And when you have
bought it: “sell it not.” How
many, alas, have bought
the truth only to sell out
again! For a while they val-
ued and defended some
God-given light from His
Word, but presently they
sold it again for something
that seemed more valu-
able. Perhaps it was peace
with others, or position, or
popularity or some other
temporal gain. They still
gave mental assent to it but
it formed no part of them. It
was no longer a conviction.
Such should read again
the Spirit’s counsel: “Buy
the truth, and sell it not.” He
does not say: “Don’t sell it
unless you can get a very
good price for it.” He says:
“Sell it not.” Sell it not at
any price. Buy it, no matter
what it costs and when it is
yours do not sell it for any
price or under any consid-
eration.
It is because the truth is
so little valued in this indif-
ferent age, that many of
God’s people have become
so spiritually powerless.
They hold opinions instead
of convictions, because
they have given the infalli-
ble, unchangeable Word of
God little place in their
lives. God blesses and
uses those who “buy the
truth and sell it not.”
BUY THE TRUTH AnD SELL iT nOT
Obituaries
TWO MINUTES
With The Bible
Berean Bible Society
PO Box 756
Germantown, WI 53022
www.bereanbiblesociety.org
tDM excavation
& Heavy Haul
Cell: 685-3283 • Wall
•Trackhoe •Trenching
•Repair Dams & Roads
•Heavy Haul Trailer
•Dozer
•Site Cleanup
todd Sieler
Hunt Safe ClaSS
  The 2012 Hunt Safe Class will be held September 14 and
15, at the West River Electric Association conference room
in Wall. The class will be held 6:00 p.m. to 9:00 p.m. on Fri-
day, September 14 and 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. on Saturday,
September 15. Students will need to bring a sack lunch for
Saturday’s class. Parental release forms will be available at
the beginning of class and must be signed prior to the stu-
dent taking the course. Any youth that will be 12 years of
age on or before December 31, 2012 is eligible to participate.
All students are required to attend both classes to obtain
their certification. Parents are welcome to accompany their
child if they would like. If you have any questions contact
Josh Brainard, Conservation Officer with SD Dept. of Game
Fish  and  Parks  at  605-279-2078  or  email
josh.brainard@state.sd.us. 
West River Electric
Appreciation Days
West River Electric encourages all of our members to visit your
local office for our Appreciation Days. We will have employees on
hand to answer questions and visit with you about the different
programs that we offer in all three offices.
Capital Credit checks will be available at all three locations.
•Member Day in New Underwood: September 4, 3 - 7 p.m.
We will have “Katchup the Clown”, High Voltage trailer demonstration;
South Dakota Wind Energy and Western Community Action.
Serving Sloppy Joes, Chips & Ice Cream. Come out, enjoy the day
and visit with your Board of Directors employees.
•Member Day in Enning: September 6, 3 - 7 p.m.
We will have Life Flight, Rural Meade County Ambulance will be doing blood pressure
checks and we will have the high voltage trailer demonstration. Operation Round-up
Funds will be presented. Serving Sloppy Joes, Chips & Ice Cream. Come out, enjoy the
day and visit with your Board of Directors and local employees.
•Member Day in Rapid City: September 14, 11 a.m. - 7 p.m.
Wall Health
Services Inc.
will be closed in observance of
Labor Day,
Mon., Sept. 3rd
We will resume our regular hours
Tues., Sept. 4th.
You’re invited
to celebrate the
marriage of
Teri Ann Ramsdell
& Lonnie Arneson
at a Wedding Reception
Saturday, September 15th
at the Elm Springs Hall
Supper at 6:00 p.m.
Dance at 8:00 p.m.
FINANCIAL FOCUS
KEEP INCOME PRODUCERS
WORKINg HARD...EVEN
WHEN RATES ARE LOW
Richard Wahlstrom
www.edwardjones.com
   Next  week,  we  observe  Labor
Day,  which  honors  all  the  hard-
working  men  and  women  in  the
United  States.  As  an  investor,
you’d like to think that all your in-
vestments  are  working  hard,  too
— including the ones that are pro-
ducing  income.  But  can  your  in-
come-oriented investments be pro-
ductive when short-term interest
rates are at historic lows? Or can
you find other investment possibil-
ities  that  could  potentially  boost
your cash flow? 
   The answer to both these ques-
tions is “yes” — but you may have
to take a closer look at where you
stand  on  the  risk-reward  spec-
trum. 
   For example, you might need to
consider  longer-term  income  pro-
ducers, which typically pay higher
yields  than  shorter-term  equiva-
lents. Longer-term fixed-rate secu-
rities,  such  as  bonds,  must  pay
these  higher  rates  to  reward  in-
vestors,  who  face  both  interest-
rate risk — the possibility that in-
terest rates will rise, causing the
value  of  existing  bonds  to  fall  —
and inflation risk, the threat of los-
ing purchasing power by the time
long-term  bonds  have  matured.
Still, you may be willing to accept
these  risks  in  exchange  for  the
higher  yields.  However,  you  may
be  looking  for  income  producers
that can work hard for you without
having to hold them for a long pe-
riod  to  maturity.  This  is  because
the  “yield  curve”  —  the  line  that
plots  the  relationship  between
yield  and  maturity  —  is  fairly
steep right now, which, in English,
means  you  can  gain  noticeably
higher yields just by modestly in-
creasing  the  maturity  of  your  in-
vestments. Your financial advisor
can suggest some short-term and
intermediate-term  vehicles  that
may be appropriate for your needs.
And while these rates will still not
be  as  high  as  those  offered  by
longer-term vehicles, they do offer
flexibility — along with less inter-
est-rate risk and inflation risk. 
   You can also help protect your-
self from these risks by building a
“ladder” consisting of short-, inter-
mediate-  and  longer-term  bonds
and  certificates  of  deposit  (CDs).
Once  you’ve  built  your  ladder,  it
can help you weather changing in-
terest-rate  environments.  When
market  rates  are  low,  you’ll  still
have your longer-term bonds and
CDs earning higher interest rates.
And when market rates rise, you’ll
be able to reinvest your maturing
short-term  investments  at  the
higher levels. If you need the cash,
you  can  liquidate  the  maturing
bonds and CDs. 
   Thus  far,  we’ve  only  looked  at
fixed-rate investments — but you
may also be able to boost your in-
come  by  owning  dividend-paying
stocks. Some companies have paid
—  and  even  increased  —  their
stock dividends for many years in
a row. If you’re not in need of the
cash,  you  can  reinvest  the  divi-
dends  and  boost  your  ownership
stake, which is a key to increasing
your wealth. But if you do need the
money, you can take the dividends
as cash. Keep in mind that income
producers  are  not  a  “sure  thing”
because  companies  can  decide  to
reduce, or even discontinue, their
dividends at any time. In addition,
history tells us that you may expe-
rience  more  price  volatility  from
stocks, and they can be worth more
or  less  than  the  original  invest-
ment when sold.
   As  you  can  see,  you  can  find
ways to keep income-producing in-
vestments  working  hard  for  you,
despite the prevailing low interest
rates.  So  consider  your  options,
weigh the risks — and then work
with  your  financial  advisor  to
make those choices that are right
for you.
Gladys A. Smith_________________
    Gladys  A.  Smith,  age  92,  of
Quinn,  died  Tuesday,  August  28,
2012, at the Hans P. Peterson Me-
morial Hospital in Philip.
    Survivors include her husband,
Richard Smith of Quinn; five sons,
Larry Smith and his wife, Linda, of
Philip, Melvin Smith and his wife,
Beth, of Philip, Steven Smith and
his  wife,  Roxie,  of  Ordway,  Colo.,
Arlan Smith of Casper, Wyo., and
Kieth Smith and his wife, Deb, of
Quinn;  four  daughters,  Colleen
Simmons and her husband, Ken, of
Forsythe,  Mont.,  Joyce  Buchholz
and  her  husband,  Ed,  of  Belle
Fourche, Barbara Coy and her hus-
band, Mike, of Sundance, Wyo., and
Janet Lurz and her husband, Ken-
neth,  of  Wall;  several  grandchil-
dren and great-grandchildren; one
great-great-grandchild; and a host
of other relatives and friends.
    Gladys was preceded in death by
her  parents,  Gustave  “Gus”  and
Lois  (Lathrop)  Knodel;  a  grand-
daughter,  Audra  Smith;  and  a
grandson, Christopher Lurz.
    Funeral  services  are  pending
with  the  Rush  Funeral  Home  of
Philip.
    A complete obituary will appear
in next week’s issue.
Wall School District
#51-5
Breakfast & Lunch Menu
Sept. 4 - Sept. 12, 2012
Tuesday: Breakfast: NA.
   Lunch:  Steamburger,  Cheese
Slice,  Chips,  Baked  Beans,
Fruit, Milk.
   Wednesday: Breakfast: NA.
   Lunch:  Chicken  Noodle  Hot
Dish, Green Beans, Fresh Fruit,
Roll, Milk.
Thursday: Breakfast: NA.
   Lunch: Goulash, Pears, Corn,
Baby Carrots, Roll, Milk.
   Friday: No School.
Monday: Breakfast:  French
Toast,  Cheese  Stick,  Milk  or
Juice.
   Lunch: Chicken Sandwich, Po-
tato Salad, Cookie, Watermelon,
Milk.
Tuesday: Breakfast:  Waffle,
Sausage, Milk or Juice.
   Lunch:  Taco  Salad,  Black
Beans,  Refried  Beans,  Fresh
Fruit, Bread Stick, Milk.
   Wednesday: Breakfast:  Ce-
real, PB Toast, Milk or Juice.
   Lunch:  Pepperoni  Pizza,
Chocolate  Chip  Bar,  Lettuce
Salad, Oranges, Milk.
Lana Faye Sanftner______________________________
    Lana  Faye  Sanftner,  age  47  of
Kadoka, S.D., died Sunday, August
26,  2012,  at  the  Rapid  City  Re-
gional Hospital.
    Lana  Faye  Jones  was  born  on
August  11,  1965,  in  Kadoka,  the
daughter of Tom and Mary (Stotts)
Jones. 
    She attended school at Midland,
graduating  in  1983.  She  lived  in
Hico,  Texas,  and  Ft.  Lauderdale,
Fla., where she lived her brother,
Tommy.  While  in  Florida,  she
earned a degree in music and voice. 
    She  moved  to  Kadoka,  in  1991
where she was employed at differ-
ent  businesses.  She  was  also  an
Avon consultant. 
    Lana  married  Tim  Sanftner  in
2002.  To  this  union  a  daughter,
Tejai Rae, was born on August 10,
2004. 
    Lana always wanted to travel to
the tropics. In May, she got that op-
portunity, going to Punta Cana, Do-
minican  Republic  with  her  niece
Marinda. We heard several funny
stories of their adventure. Anyone
who was with Lana always had a
funny story to tell. 
    Lana was a joy to be with, a very
loving  and  giving  person. And  we
will  never  forget  her  beautiful
singing voice. Lana will also be re-
membered for her infectious laugh
and her smile for everyone. 
    Survivors include her daughter,
Tejai Sanftner of Kadoka; her son,
Ryder  Sanftner  of  Kadoka;  two
brothers,  Thomas  Rex  Jones  of
Midland and Jesse Paul Jones and
his wife, Karen, of Hico, Texas; two
sisters, Mary Jo Jones of Midland,
and  Jane  Adeline  Romero  of
Kadoka;  and  a  host  of  other  rela-
tives and friends. 
    Lana was preceded in death by
her father Tom Jones on January
11,  2003,  and  her  mother  Mary
Jones on September 9, 2007. 
    Visitation will be held from 5:00
to 7:00 p.m. Thursday, August 30,
at  the  Rush  Funeral  Home  in
Philip.
    A celebration of life service will
be  held  at  11:00  a.m.  Friday, Au-
gust 31, at the Midland School Au-
ditorium.  
    Private  family  interment  will
take  place  at  the  Midland  Ceme-
tery.
    Arrangements  are  with  the
Rush Funeral Home of Philip.
    Her  online  guestbook  is  avail-
able at www.rushfuneralhome.com
Pennington County Courant • August 30, 2012 • Page 6 Classifieds
Classified Advertising
CLASSIFIED RATE: $6.50 minimum for first 20
words; 10¢ per word thereafter; included in the
Pennington County Courant, the Profit, & The
Pioneer  Review,  as  well  as  on  our  website:
www.pioneer-review.com.
CARD OF THANKS: Poems, Tributes, Etc. … $6.50 minimum for first 20
words; 10¢ per word thereafter. Each name and initial must be counted sep-
arately. Included in the Pennington County Courant and the Profit.
NOTE: $2.00 added charge for bookkeeping and billing on all charges.
DISPLAY AD RATE: $8.00 per column inch, included in the Pennington
County Courant and the Profit. $5.55 per column inch for the Pennington
County Courant only.
PUBLISHER’S NOTICE: All real estate advertised in this newspaper is
subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act of 1968, which makes it illegal to
advertise “any preference, or discrimination on race, color, religion, sex, or
national origin, or any intention to make any such preference, limitation,
or discrimination.”
   This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate
which is a violation of the law. Our readers are informed that all dwellings
advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis.
WANTED: Pasture for up to 100
cows or would like to rent grass.
Call 837-2589. K50-4tc
LOST
LOST: Large white Lab cross dog
with black collar, comes to the
name of “Dodger.” Call Carissa,
580/380-8582 or Jace, 685-
5964. WP1-2tc
GARAGE SALES
MOVING SALE: August 31: 9
a.m. to 6 p.m. Sept. 1: 9 a.m. to
3 p.m. 122 Golf Course Road,
Wall. Lots of household/kitchen
items, furniture, tables and
chairs, clothes sizes 10-14,
kids – all sizes, Halloween out-
fits, books, ’70s Rapid City Jour-
nals, Nat’l. Geographics, knick-
nacks, decorations, shoes and
many more items too numerous
to list. WP1-1tc
LARGE MULTI-FAMILY RUM-
MAGE SALE: Saturday, Sept. 8,
at K-gee's building downtown
Philip, 8 a.m. - 1 p.m. Toys,
books (cooking, quilting, home
repair, romance, kids); Lots of
baby items and kids clothes
(girls - 0-5, boys 0-2); Coats,
shoes, men's & women's clothes
(M-1X); home décor, household
items (some very old), lamps,
desks, XBOX games, trumpet in
excellent cond. CoCaLo Plum
crib bedding set (very nice) and
MUCH MORE!! P38-2tc
RUMMAGE SALE: Sept. 15, 9
a.m. to 2 p.m., 210 S. Auto,
Philip, Gartner’s shop east of
Midwest Co-op. Baby clothes,
girls 0-5T, grain & bale moisture
testers, blankets, misc. kitchen
items, some furniture, home
décor, much more by sale day.
P38-3tc
HELP WANTED
HORSESHOE BAR, Interior,
needs winter bartender. Free
housing. 441-0156. P38-2tc
DAKOTA MILL & GRAIN is look-
ing for a Commercial Applicator
for its Murdo, SD location. Class
A CDL w/clean record. Compet-
itive wage w/benefits. Call Jack
at 381-0031 or stop in at the El-
evator and talk with Doug.
WP52-2tc
DAY CARE IN INTERIOR needs
a manager and helpers. Call
Linda Livermont, 433-5323, or
send resumé to: Box 63, Interior,
SD 57750. P37-2tp
HELP WANTED: Part-time
cashier, 2-10 shift. Friendly,
positive work environment, flex-
ible schedule. Permanent posi-
tion. Must be 21. Apply at
Kadoka Gas & Go. K37-2tc
GREGORIAN INC. in Lemmon,
SD, is seeking a full-time welder.
Excellent starting wage. Includes
benefits such as group health
and life insurance, profit shar-
ing, and paid vacation. Call 374-
3841 or 1-800-658-5534 or send
resumé to: Gregorian Inc., PO
Box 209, Lemmon, SD 57638.
Equal Opportunity Employer.
P37-2tc
AUTOMOTIVE
FOR SALE: 1993 GMC 1/2 ton
4x4, $3,500. Call 685-4085, Je-
remy Noteboom. P38-2tc
FOR SALE: 2001 Yukon XL
2500, $6,500; 2007 Copper
Canyon Bunkhouse, $16,500.
Call 685-5624 or 441-0895, lo-
cated in Wall. PW38-1tp
FOR SALE: 60 ft. boom spray
truck. Call 685-4085, Jeremy
Noteboom. P38-2tc
BUSINESS & SERVICES
ROUGH COUNTRY SPRAYING:
Specializing in controlling
Canada thistle on rangeland.
ATV application. ALSO: prairie
dogs. Call Bill at 669-2298.
PR41-23tp
HILDEBRAND STEEL & CON-
CRETE: ALL types of concrete
work. Rich, Colleen and Haven
Hildebrand. Toll-free: 1-877-
867-4185; Office: 837-2621;
Rich, cell: 431-2226; Haven, cell:
490-2926; Jerry, cell: 488-0291.
K36-tfn
TETON RIVER TRENCHING:
For all your rural water hook-
ups, waterline and tank installa-
tion and any kind of backhoe
work, call Jon Jones, 843-2888,
Midland. PR20-52tp
BACKHOE AND TRENCHING:
Peters Excavation, Inc. Excava-
tion work of all types. Call Brent
Peters, 837-2945 or 381-5568
(cell). K3-tfn
GRAVEL: Screened or rock. Call
O'Connell Construction Inc.,
859-2020, Philip. P51-tfn
WEST RIVER EXCAVATION will
do all types of trenching, ditch-
ing and directional boring work.
See Craig, Diana, Sauntee or
Heidi Coller, Kadoka, SD, or call
837-2690. Craig cell: 390-8087,
Sauntee cell: 390-8604;
wrex@gwtc.net K50-tfn
FARM & RANCH
LIKE NEW: 6-panel tubular
fencing: (2) 2”x16’ Ranch King;
(27) 1-3/4”x12’ HW Brand HP
660; (1) 4’ arch gate Ranch King;
(1) 6’ arch gate Ranch King.
Value: $2,700; will sell for
$2,000. Call 494-0254.
PR1-2tc
FOR SALE: Pullet hens, started
laying. Call 484-5411.
PR52-2tp
FOR SALE: 250 acres of stand-
ing corn, to be baled or cut for
silage. Milesville, SD. Call 859-
2943 or 685-5157. P36-tfn
PART-TIME FALL HELP
WANTED at the Wall Golf
Course. Call Stan at 381-2861.
WP51-tfn
WAITRESS NEEDED at Red
Rock Restaurant in Wall. Call
Lori at 279-2387. WP51-3tc
HELP WANTED: Cook/clean/
stock, 9-5 shift, 2-3 days a week,
some weekends, flexible sched-
ule, permanent position. Apply
at Kadoka Gas & Go.
K37-2tc
GREGORIAN INC. in Lemmon,
SD, is seeking a full-time form-
ing and finisher. Excellent start-
ing wage. Includes benefits such
as group health and life insur-
ance, profit sharing, and paid
vacation. Call 374-3841 or 1-
800-658-5534 or send resumé
to: Gregorian Inc., PO Box 209,
Lemmon, SD 57638. Equal Op-
portunity Employer.
P37-2tc
GREAT SUMMER JOB! Sales
experience preferred but will
train. Salary plus commission.
Possibility of up to $12.00 per
hour wage. Housing is supplied
in Wall. You will make great
wages, meet lots of people and
have fun. Position available May
1, 2012. Apply at GoldDiggers on
Mt. Rushmore Road in Rapid
City or call factory at 348-8108
or fax resumé to 348-1524.
P14-tfn
MISC. FOR SALE
FOR SALE: Several nice used re-
frigerators. Del’s, I-90 Exit 63,
Box Eldder. 390-9810. P38-4tp
FOR SALE: Full size Yamaha
electric organ (double keyboard)
and bench. Instruction book and
sheet music included. Excellent
condition. Asking $150. 462-
6238. PR52-3tc
FOR SALE: Alto Saxophone.
Yamaha YAS 23. New pads re-
cently, great condition. Checked
over by Haggerty’s last month.
Comes with alto sax case, neck
strap, cork grease, cleaning
pieces. Call 859-3271.
PR52-2tc
FOR SALE: Rope horse halters
with 10’ lead rope, $15 each.
Call 685-3317 or 837-2917.
K44-tfn
NOTICES/WANTED
CREIGHTON HALL BAZAAR:
Sunday, October 7, 2012, from 1
to 4 p.m. Call 457-2543 to re-
serve tables. PW38-2tc
NOTICE: There will be a Hoff-
man family reunion, Sept. 8th at
the Quinn Community Center.
Lunch will be potluck.
WP52-2tc
VENDORS WANTED for Philip’s
annual craft show, September
8th. Call Julie at 441-9305.
P37-3tc
REAL ESTATE
FOR RENT OR SALE: Two bed-
room home with garage, located
on Wood Ave. in Philip. Call 484-
5409. PR52-2tp
HOUSE FOR SALE IN PHILIP:
Make an offer! 2 bedrooms, 1
bath, dining room, appliances,
fenced back yard. 859-2483 or
859-3095 or leave messge.
PR52-tfn
FOR SALE: 3 bedroom + office,
1-1/2 bath mobile home,
$17,000. Call 685-4085, Jeremy
Noteboom, Philip. P38-2tc
HOUSE FOR SALE: 307 Myrtle
Ave., Philip, SD. 3 bedroom, 1-
1/2 bath. Open concept with
laminate hardwood floors, stain-
less steel fridge and stove and
washer/dryer all included. New
roof, windows and front deck.
Large fenced-in backyard with
storage shed and covered con-
crete patio. Close to school. Call
859-2470, leave a message if no
answer. P36-4tc
MOBILE HOME FOR SALE:
1999 Redman 28’x72’ 3 bed-
room, 2 bath, 150’x75’ lot, shed,
double carport, Midland. Call
Paula, 441-6967. $49,500 (nego-
tiable). K50-4tp
LOCATION! PRICE! Central
air/heat, country kitchen, 3
bdrm house for sale. 2 garages,
sun porch. 700 9th St., Kadoka.
837-1611. K35-tfn
RENTALS
HOUSE FOR RENT: 3 bed-
rooms, 2 baths, close to Wall.
$500 per month/$500 deposit.
Call 430-5051. WP1-2tp
FOR RENT: 1 bedroom apart-
ment in Philip, $275/month
plus deposit. Call 391-3992.
PR45-tfn
APARTMENTS: Spacious one
bedroom units, all utilities in-
cluded. Young or old. Need
rental assistance or not, we can
house you. Just call 1-800-481-
6904 or stop in the lobby and
pick up an application. Gateway
Apartments, Kadoka. WP32-tfn
RECREATION
FOR SALE: 2009 Polaris 500
ATV, 4WD, purchased Sept. ’09
and rode very little due to health.
Excellent shape. Call 843-2516
or 515-3150.
PR52-2tc
CLASSIFIED POLICY
PLEASE READ your classified
ad the first week it runs. If you
see an error, we will gladly re-
run your ad correctly. We accept
responsibility for the first in-
correct insertion only. Ravel-
lette Publications, Inc. requests
all classifieds and cards of
thanks be paid for when ordered.
A $2.00 billing charge will be
added if ad is not paid at the
time the order is placed. All
phone numbers are with an
area code of 605, unless other-
wise indicated.
Deadline for Classifieds &
Cards of Thanks
is 11:00 a.m. on Tuesdays
AUCTION
VOGEL FARMS - Feed, Livestock,
and Haying Equipment Auction.
Saturday, Sept. 8, 1 pm, Onaka,
SD, www.mandrauction.com,
www.sdauctions.com, M&R Auc-
tions, Gary 605-769-1181, Lewis,
605-281-1067, Sam 605-769-
0088, Home 605-948-2333,
Kevin Vogel 605-281-0336.
BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY
WANT A WAY TO PAY off that
summer vacation? Join our
team! Sell Avon! Work from
home. Earn 40% on your first 4
orders. 1-877-454-9658.
EMPLOYMENT
PIERRE AREA REFERRAL SERV-
ICE EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR
This full-time position is respon-
sible for the organizationís con-
sistent achievement of its mis-
sion and financial objectives. For
more details and an application:
http://www.pierreareareferral.or
g.
AUTOMOTIVE TECHNICIAN.
Health care, paid vacation, retire-
ment plan, wages DOE. Send re-
sumé: Fritz Chevrolet, Inc., Box
800, Clear Lake, SD 57226,
email: fritzchev@itctel.com or call
Duke: 605-874-2440.
CONTROLLER. CENEX IN
KILLDEER ND is seeking an ex-
perienced Controller. Responsi-
bilities include directing all ac-
counting functions and person-
nel management. The controller
will be accountable for financial
procedures, controls and report-
ing systems. Qualifications de-
sired, bachelorís degree in ac-
counting, 3-5 years of accounting
experience, supervisory experi-
ence, strong communication and
computer skills, and Agriculture
background is helpful. Salary
based on experience. Benefits in-
clude Blue Cross Blue Shield In-
surance, 401K, Life Insurance,
Short term disability, PTO. Send
resume with salary requirements
to joswalt@ndsupernet.com.
DOUGLAS COUNTY COMMIS-
SION is taking applications for
full-time Douglas County High-
way Superintendent. Must have
valid Class A Driverís License.
Experience in road/bridge con-
struction/maintenance pre-
ferred. For application contact:
Douglas County Auditor (605)
724-2423.
MAINTENANCE MECHANIC po-
sition located in Sioux Falls. Pre-
ventative maintenance on
trucks/trailers used to haul fuel.
Send resume: Harms Oil Com-
pany, Attention: Human Re-
sources, Box 940, Brookings SD
57006.
NOTICES
ADVERTISE IN NEWSPAPERS
statewide for only $150.00. Put
the South Dakota Statewide
Classifieds Network to work for
you today! (25 words for $150.
Each additional word $5.) Call
this newspaper or 800-658-3697
for details.
OTR & DRIVER OPPORTUNITY
$1500.00 SIGN-ON BONUS!
EXP. OTR Drivers, TBI, 33¢/34¢,
$375 mo., health ins., credit, 03¢
safety bonus, Call Joe for details,
800.456.1024, joe@tbitruck.com.
FOR SALE
MOTORHOME FOR SALE. 2005
Itasca 36 ft. Diesel 350HP.
Mileage 27,423. Two-slides,
loaded with extras. 605-224-
2784 or 605-222-0804. Pierre,
SD.
PUREBREAD GERMAN SHORT-
HAIR female pups. Strong breed-
ing line, $400. 605-354-3632.
LIVESTOCK
F1 RAMBOUILLET - SOUTH
African Meat Merino (SAMM)
Yearling Rams. Highbred vigor
19-21 micron white wool. High
lambing percentage, range-ready
rams, monetary and herd bene-
fits. vckellyranch@sdplains.com.
605-788-2261.
aPaRtMentS
aVaIlaBle
Wall Ridge Apts.
in Wall
1 Bedroom
on-site laundry
facility
PRO/Rental Management
605-347-3077
1-800-244-2826
www.prorentalmanagement.com
www.freerentersguide.com
THANK YOUS
A big thank you to all my fam-
ily, friends and neighbors who
sent emails, called me on the
phone or sent a card and gift for
my birthday card shower. It was
good to hear from so many people
and I will have great memories of
this special day.
Thanks Again!
Gene Crosbie
Thank you to the many busi-
nesses and individuals in Wall
and surrounding communities for
making the “Burger Bust for Bart”
medical benefit a huge success.
With your support and the guid-
ance of Agents Donald Haynes
and Nicole Hahne the $2500
matching funds sponsored by
Modern Woodmen of America
was reached. Again thank you to
each of you for your generosity!
Burger Bust for Bart Committee
Thanks for all the nice cards I
received for my 80th birthday. It
made the day so much more spe-
cial.
Audrey Hoffman
f0ll·1lM0
F08lll0ß 0¢0ß
Web & Sheetfed
Press Operation
seeking full-time help.
We are willing to train.
APPLICANTS SHOULD BE
HIGHLY ORGANIZED AND
DETAIL-ORIENTED.
****
CaII Don or Beau
859-2516
or pick up an appIication at
the Pioneer Review in PhiIip
Pennington County Courant • August 30, 2012 • Page 7
nOTiCE OF HEARinG
BEFORE THE PEnninGTOn
COUnTY
PLAnninG AnD ZOninG
COMMiSSiOn
Notice is hereby given that the following
petitioners have applied to the Penning-
ton County Planning and Zoning Com-
mission under the provisions of the Pen-
nington County Zoning Ordinance as fol-
lows:
Vergil Kjerstad has applied for a Condi-
tional Use Permit to allow for a Vacation
Home Rental in a Suburban Residential
District located on Lot 31, Block E, Edel-
weiss Mountain Development, Section
20, T1N, R5E, BHM, Pennington County,
South Dakota, 125 Heidelberg Lane, in
accordance with Sections 208, 319, and
510 of the Pennington County Zoning Or-
dinance.
Vergil Kjerstad has applied for a Condi-
tional Use Permit to allow for a Vacation
Home Rental in a Suburban Residential
District located on Lot 15 (also in Section
17), Block D, Edelweiss Mountain Devel-
opment, Section 20, T1N, R5E, BHM,
Pennington County, South Dakota, 260
Danube Lane, in accordance with Sec-
tions 208, 319, and 510 of the Pennington
County Zoning Ordinance.
Marvin Botz has applied for a Conditional
Use Permit to allow the existing residence
to be used as a temporary residence
while constructing a new single-family
residence in a General Agriculture District
/ Highway Service District located on Lots
3-4; E1/2SW1/4, SE1/4 less Right-of-
Way, Section 30, T1S, R16E, BHM, Pen-
nington County, South Dakota, 23965
Highway 240, in accordance with Sec-
tions 204-D, 205, and 510 of the Penning-
ton County Zoning Ordinance.
Mark and Mary Hansen have applied for
a Conditional Use Permit to allow for a
Vacation Home Rental in a Suburban
Residential District located on Lot 28,
Block E, Edelweiss Mountain Develop-
ment, Section 20, T1N, R5E, BHM, Pen-
nington County, South Dakota, 120 Hei-
delberg Lane, in accordance with Sec-
tions 208, 319, and 510 of the Pennington
County Zoning Ordinance.
Mike Dressler has applied for a Condi-
tional Use Permit to allow for a Vacation
Home Rental in a Low Density Residen-
tial District located on Lot 4R (also in Sec-
tion 13), Block 3, Alpine Acres Meadow,
Section 14, T2N, R4E, BHM, Pennington
County, South Dakota, 22521 Deer
Meadow Drive, in accordance with Sec-
tions 207, 319, and 510 of the Pennington
County Zoning Ordinance.
Rita and Albert Chapman have applied for
a Conditional Use Permit to allow for a
Vacation Home Rental in a Suburban
Residential District located on Lots 5-10,
Block 2, Silver City, Section 31, T2N,
R5E, BHM, Pennington County, South
Dakota, 9209 St. Joseph Street in Silver
City, in accordance with Sections 208,
319, and 510 of the Pennington County
Zoning Ordinance.
Rita and Albert Chapman have applied for
a Conditional Use Permit to allow for a
Vacation Home Rental in a Suburban
Residential District located on Lots 9-12,
Block 3, Silver City, Section 31, T2N,
R5E, BHM, Pennington County, South
Dakota, 9307 St. Joseph Street in Silver
City, in accordance with Sections 208,
319, and 510 of the Pennington County
Zoning Ordinance.
Notice is further given that said applica-
tions will be heard by the Pennington
County Planning and Zoning Commission
in the County Courthouse at 9:00 a.m. on
the 10th day of September 2012. At this
time, any person interested may appear
and show cause, if there be any, why
such requests should or should not be
granted.
ADA Compliance: Pennington County
fully subscribes to the provisions of the
Americans with Disabilities Act. If you de-
sire to attend this public meeting and are
in need of special accommodations,
please notify the Planning Department so
that appropriate auxiliary aids and serv-
ices are available.
Dan Jennissen
Planning Director
Published August 30, 2012, at the total
approximate cost of $37.80.
nOTiCE OF PUBLiC
HEARinG
On APPLiCATiOn
FOR A TEMPORARY On-SALE
ALCOHOL BEVERAGE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT: the
City Council in and for the City of Wall,
South Dakota, on the 6th day of Septem-
ber, 2012, at 6:30 p.m., MDT will meet in
regular session to consider the following
application for a temporary On-sale Alco-
hol Beverage License, to operate within
the municipality on September 7 & 8,
2012 in the Community Center, at 501
Main Street, which have been presented
to the city council and filed in the office of
the finance officer.
ON-SALE ALCOHOL BEVERAGE
Two Bit Saloon, Quinn, SD
NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN THAT any
person, or their attorney may appear and
be heard at said scheduled Public Hear-
ing who are interested in the approval or
rejection of any such applications.
Dated at Wall, South Dakota, on the 29th
day of August, 2012.
Carolynn Anderson
Finance Officer
City of Wall
Published August 30, 2011, at the total
approximate cost of $12.07.
annc@gwtc.net
Legal Publication
Deadline is
11:00 a.m. on FRIDAY
80 years ago…
Martin  Overholt  is  suffering
from injuries received in an auto-
mobile  accident  which  occurred
east  of  town,  Wednesday  after-
noon. Mr. Overholt was returning
to Wall when a rear tire blew out
causing him to lose control of his
car  which  swerved  into  the  ditch
and rolled over several times. He
received several cuts and bruises
and  a  crushed  chest  which  has
kept  him  bedfast  since  the  acci-
dent. A  case  of  eggs  that  he  was
carrying in his car was completely
scrambled. Sunday afternoon, an-
other  accident  occurred  between
Wall  and  Quinn.  In  this  case  a
woman with four children driving
a late model Chevrolet ran off the
grade  and  turned  turtle.  No  one
was  injured  and  a  broken  wind-
shield and a dented top was the ex-
tent of the damage to the car.
The  Smith  Construction  Com-
pany from Nebraska was granted
the contract to build the road from
Wall  to  the  Pinnacle  Highway.
Bids were opened by the Highway
Commission, Tuesday of last week
and  were  let  the  following  day. A
total of seven bids were made for
this  section  of  road,  which  was  a
greater number than for any other
road project. The Smith Company
because of having the lowest bid,
$25,908.37, were given the work.
Their bid was considerablely lower
than  our  local  contractor,  N.  J.
Olson, whose figure was approxi-
mately  $35,000.  The  highest  bid
was $41,000.
70 years ago…
   The  Wall  School  District  clerk,
M. E. Bradley, stated Tuesday that
Supt. R. B. Bartlett, coach M. Mc-
Quirk and band director Mr. Wa-
terman  have  all  signed  contracts
to  teach  the  coming  school  year
and that none of them have given
the board any official statement of
their  desire  for  resignation.  At
present,  he  stated,  a  Home  Eco-
nomic  teacher  has  not  been  ob-
tained,  nor  have  they  found  a
teacher  for  the  intermediate
grades. It may be impossible to se-
cure a qualified teacher for Home
Economics, he stated, but feel that
the board can easily find one to fill
the grade position. The Wall school
is scheduled to start August 31.
   Mr. Clarence Humphrey, son of
Mr. and Mrs. Elmer Humphrey of
Viewfield, and Miss Jessie Strom,
daughter  of  Chris  Strom,  of
Owanka,  were  married  at  the
Presbyterian Manse of Rapid City,
Saturday  afternoon,  Rev.  Rew
Waltz officiating with the ring cer-
emony. They were attended by Mr.
Ernest  Strom  of  Viewfield,  and
Miss  Lucille  Humphrey  of  View-
field.
   Little  Jimmy  Peterson,  small
son of the Nathan Peterson’s, had
his  leg  broke  last  week  when  he
was kicked by a horse. He was at
Philip for several days, but his par-
ents took him to Rapid City, Sun-
day, as he was not doing so well.
   
60 years ago…
   A  flat  tire  on  a  luggage  trailer
towed by a car caused a fire which
burned  about  40  acres  of  range-
land near Wasta, Tuesday, accord-
ing to Bryce Kennedy, who helped
put  out  the  fire.  Three  tanks  of
water from Wall and Wasta, and a
truck from the Air Base arrived at
the  scene  and  had  the  fire  under
control by 2:30 p.m.
   Two tourists reported that they
had  been  held  up  and  robbed  by
three  armed  youths  early  yester-
day  morning.  The  victims  had
been sleeping in their car about a
mile  south  of  Quinn  and  were
awakened  by  a  gun  butt  rapping
on  their  window.  Before  opening
their car doors they tried to start
their  motor  but  found  that  the
bandits  had  removed  the  spark
plug wires. The two men, Walter J.
Dearth of Circleville, Ohio and his
nephew,  Richard  Cameron  of
Columbus, Ohio, stated their loss
to  be  about  eighteen  dollars  in
cash  and  a  camera.  The  Ohio
tourists  were  able  to  give  only  a
meager  description  of  the  three
men or the car that they were driv-
ing,  according  to  C.  M.  Best  who
investigated.
   
50 years ago…
   Scores  of  youngsters  both  old
and  young,  were  disappointed
when the Sells Bros. 3-Ring Circus
failed to show in Wall as scheduled
Sunday. No direct word has been
received here from circus officials
as  to  why  they  failed  to  show  in
Wall. The contact for showing had
been  made  with  G.  W.  Shelton,
president  of  the  Wall  Swimming
Pool Assn. The Circus truck cara-
van  passed  through  Wall  early
Sunday  morning  and  reported
here to have gone to Sturgis. Ad-
vertising in the Courant had been
ordered and was run on schedule.
A circus representative was also in
Wall  about  ten  days  ago  and
pasted  posters  around  the  town.
Advanced  tickets  had  also  been
sold  by  the  Swimming  Pool  fund
committee  and  totaled  approxi-
mately  $80.  Shelton  conferred
Tuesday with a Rapid City attor-
ney  but  as  yet  has  not  contacted
any  of  the  officials  of  the  Sells
Bros. Circus.
   Miss Violet Eisenbraun, daugh-
ter  of  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Rudolph  H.
Eisenbraun of Creighton, is one of
the twenty-seven graduates of the
Pierre School of Practical Nursing,
who  received  diplomas  of  cere-
monies held on Sunday, August 19
at the S.D.E.A. Auditorium. Gov-
ernor  Archie  Gubbrud  presented
the graduation address and A. A.
Thompson, City Superintendent of
Schools, granted the diplomas. Fol-
lowing the completion of the one-
year nursing program, Miss Eisen-
braun plans to return to the New
Underwood Hospital after a short
vacation.
   Wall firemen were called about
9:00  p.m.  Monday  to  the  Tom
Bourne place in north Wall. A de-
fective  stove  in  a  small  trailer
home  had  caused  the  fire  which
damaged curtains and smoked up
the place. The fire was under con-
trol when the firemen arrived.
40 years ago…
   The W.R.E.A. directors at their
regular meeting in Wall, Tuesday,
accepted  the  Unions  two-year
wage agreement for linemen which
gives  them  a  5.7  percent  wage
boost this year, and a 5.2 increase
the second year.
   Three judges set out Monday to
select  the  annual  Soil  and  Mois-
ture Achievement winner. After a
full  day  of  inspection  of  the  four
places  that  had  been  selected  by
the East Pennington Conservation
Supervisors,  the  judges  unani-
mously chose the place of Leonard
Kjerstad.  The  other  three  places
were a close second — Donald An-
derson, Melvin Harnisch and Bill
Pippert. A recognition banquet for
those  who  have  excelled  in  farm
and  ranch  conservation  practices
is  expected  to  be  held  later  this
fall.
   Bill Pippert with the help of his
son Scott, his friends, and neigh-
bors  and  their  sons  —  George
Hauk, Bill Clark, Lavon Shearer,
Darwin  Hook,  Gary  Keyser,  Ken
Deidrich and Pewee Hook — built
a  lighted  arena  at  the  Pippert
place and held a “grand opening”
Sunday  afternoon  and  evening.
Dick Wendt of Pierre, a brother of
coach  Don  Wendt,  was  Master
Chef for the open-hearth barbecue.
The  250  pound  hog  was  dressed
out and put on a pit, Saturday af-
ternoon.  Roasting  started  that
evening  and  after  an  all-night
vigil,  by  the  next  evening  the
porker was done to a “T”. A big iron
kettle of beans completed the main
portion of the meal.
30 years ago…
   As  of  June  1,  Claude  Ramsey
has  purchased  his  father  Chuck
Ramsey’s part of the Wall Grocery
and Restaurant. Ramsey said this
week that the transaction was not
finalized  until  a  week  ago  due  to
legal  complications.  Chuck  Ram-
sey has been a part owner of Wall
Grocery and Restaurant for almost
two  years,  during  which  time
Claude managed the store. Some
plans  that  Ramsey  has  for  his
business include future expansion.
He said that this will involve mak-
ing the restaurant section smaller
and  the  grocery  store  bigger  in
order  to  enlarge  the  produce  and
meat departments.
   Glenn  Denke  completed  his
studies  at  Concordia  Theological
Seminary at Fort Wayne, Indiana,
receiving the degree Master of Di-
vinity on July 28. Denke is a 1968
graduate of Wall High School and
a 1976 graduate of South Dakota
State  University.  He  will  be  or-
dained  into  the  office  of  the  holy
ministry  on  August  29  at  First
Lutheran Church, Wall and will be
installed  as  pastor  of  St.  Paul’s
Lutheran  Church  at  Bridgeport,
Neb. on September 5. Denke is the
son  of  Tillila  and  the  late  Robert
Denke of Wall.
20 years ago…
   The annual Wall City Open Golf
Tournament was held on Sunday,
August 16, with 36 men and nine
women  participating.  The  flag
prizes  were  won  by  the  following
people: 1st Hole - Longest Drive:
men  -  Lyle  Carmichael,  women  -
Kathy Beach; 2nd Hole - Close to
Pin in 1: men  -  Gary  Keyser,
women - Donna Crown; 3rd Hole
- Close to Pin in 3: men  -  John
Kitterman,  women  -  Donna
Crown; 4th Hole - Most Strokes:
men  -  Ryan  Patterson,  women  -
Barb  Patterson;  5th Hole -
Longest Putt: men - Ryan Patter-
son,  women  -  Carol  Paulsen;  6th
Hole - Close to Outhouse: men -
Sean  Patterson,  women  -  Donna
Crown; 7th Hole - Close to Pin
in 2: men - Bob Johnson, women -
Kathy Beach; 8th Hole - Close to
Pin in 1: men  -  Richard  Hauk,
women - Kathy Beach; 9th Hole -
Longest Putt: men - Terry Peters,
women  - Armista  Sebade;  Men’s
Championship: 1st  place  Butch
Beach, 2nd place Gary Keyser, 3rd
place Pete Dunker; 1st Flight: 1st
Bob  Thorson,  2nd  Bob  Johnson,
3rd Stan Mettler; 2nd Flight: 1st
Gale Patterson, 2nd Wayne Davis,
3rd John Kitterman; 3rd Flight:
1st Veryl Schroeder, 2nd Sean Pat-
terson; Women Championship:
1st Kathy Beach, 2nd Evelyn Kjer-
stad; 1st Flight: 1st Armista Se-
bade, 2nd Wanda Johnson.
   Visitation to Badlands National
Park this July decreased 0.3 per-
cent from July 1991. Visitation to
the  park  during  July,  1992  was
273,554  compared  to  274,361  for
the same period in 1991. For 1992
to  date,  park  travel  is  639,460,  a
slight increase of 1.6 percent over
1991’s record totals. The unusually
cool summer weather continues to
attract higher number of campers.
While July showed slight declines
from 1991 in overall travel, visitor
traffic at Badlands National Park
is still on pace with 1991’s record
totals.
10 years ago…
   Last  May,  Ann’s  Motel  started
work on six cabins along the west
side of the motel. Ann Kitterman
had come up with the idea of mak-
ing rooms out of cabins after see-
ing some cabins in Rapid City one
day. July 25th makes the first day
the cabins were available to rent.
   BIRTH: Born  July  11,  2002,  a
son,  Cedar  Cayton,  to  Jeff  and
Heather Gabriel, Cottonwood. Lit-
tle Cedar weighed in at 8 lbs. and
measured  19  3/4  inches  long.  He
joins  his  big  sister  Sage  Tai  at
home.  Proud  grandparents  are
Roger and Bonna Fortune, Quinn,
and Charlotte and Larry Gabriel,
Cottonwood.  Great-grandparents
are  Wayne  and  Eldena  Haerer,
Quinn,  Edna  Fortune,  Quinn,
Tressa Gabriel, Philip, Jean Burns
and  Howard  Pihlagla,  both  of
Philip.
The Looking Glass of Time
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   For many years I was all caught
up in the "hype" of Positive Mental
Attitude, then reality hit me like a
brick. Things in life are not all pos-
itive.  Life  is  full  of  breakdowns,
negatives, fall-a-parts, and glitches
in the system. The key is how we
respond  to  these  negative  chal-
lenges.  We  can  continue  to  look
through the rose colored glasses of
Positive  Mental  Attitude  or  take
those  glasses  off  and  charge  into
the challenges with an attitude of
taking negatives and turning them
into positives.
   The minute I discovered the con-
cept  of  Proper  Mental Attitude  it
was  a  revolutionary  shift  for  me,
and my thinking, about the circum-
stances in life. A Proper Mental At-
titude is right kind of thinking. For
example a person who has no tal-
ent for singing-no matter how pos-
itive  their  attitude-will  probably
not become a famous singer. If you
are only five feet tall, chances are
that  having  a  positive  attitude
alone  will  never  turn  you  into  a
star forward in the NBA. Here, ob-
viously skill and knowledge level,
aptitude,  and  being  honest  with
ones self comes into play.
   The "right kind of attitude" will
take  stock  of  your  strengths  and
weaknesses. A Proper Mental Atti-
tude begins with an honest look at
who  you  are,  where  you  are  at,
where you are going, and how you
are  going  to  get  there.  Having  a
Proper  Mental  Attitude  means
daily shifting paradigms and mind-
sets due to the fact that we are liv-
ing  and  operating  in  a  changing
world.  Nothing  ever  stays  the
same. We must be willing to shift.
   Today, consider approaching life
with a Proper Mental Attitude. You
will find that you are able to over-
come  obstacles  more  effectively.
You will discover that you can face
fear  with  more  courage,  you  will
sincerely  enhance  your  relation-
ships, and you will get much more
out  of  life  so  that  you  will  have
much  more  to  give.  I  affirm  that
this  is  all  proper,  positive  and
healthy.
Positive Mental Attitude
vs. Proper Mental Attitude
WEBSITE ADDRESS:
www.phiIipIivestock.com
EmaiI: info@phiIipIivestock.com
TO CONSIGN CATTLE OR HAVE A REPRESENTATIVE LOOK AT YOUR CATTLE, GIVE US A CALL:
THOR ROSETH, Owner
(605} 685.5826
BILLY MARKWED, FIeIdman
Midland · (605} 567.3385
JEFF LONG, FIeIdmanJAuctIoneer
Fcd Owl · (605} 985.5486
Ccll. (605} 515.0186
LYNN WEISHAAR, AuctIoneer
Fcva · (605} 866.4670
DAN PIROUTEK, AuctIoneer
Milcsvillc · (605} 544.3316
STEVEN STEWART
Yard Foreman
(605} 441.1984
BOB ANDERSON, FIeIdman
Siurgis · (605} 347.0151
BAXTER ANDERS, FIeIdman
Wasia · (605} 685.4862
PHILIP LIVESTOCK AUCTION
(60S) SS9:2S??
www.pbIIIpIIvestock.com
lkllll ll\läIê|K 1||IlêK
lkllll, äê|Ik 01KêI1
Upoom1ng Co111e So1es:
TUESDAY, SEPT. 4: FECULAF CATTLE SALE.
SALE TIME. WEICH-UPS. 10.00 A.M.; DFED
CATTLE. 12.00 P.M. (MT}.
EARLY CONSIGNMENTS:
BRED CATTLE:
HENRY BRUCH - 80 DLK MIXED ACE COWS;
DFED. DLK; CLV. 3-10 FOF 80 DAYS
MOR£ CONS1GNM£NTS BY SAL£ DAY. CALL THOR ROS£TH
AT tDS-SS9-2S?? OR tDS-tSS-SS2t FOR MOR£ 1NFO.
TUESDAY, SEPT. 11: SPECIAL FEEDEF CATTLE SALE & FECULAF
CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, SEPT. 1S: SPECIAL STOCK COW & DFED HEIFEF SALE &
FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, NOV. 2?: SPECIAL ALL-DFEEDS CALF SALE & FECULAF
CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, DEC. 4: SPECIAL ALL-DFEEDS PFECONDITIONED CALF
SALE & FECULAF CATTLE SALE. CALVES FOF THIS SALE, MUST DE
WEANED, AT LEAST 6 WEEKS, & HAVE PFECONDITIONINC SHOTS (FOUF-
WAY, PASTEUFELLA, 7-WAY, & HAEMOPHILUS}.
TUESDAY, DEC. 11: SPECIAL STOCK COW & DFED HEIFEF SALE &
FECULAF CATTLE SALE & WELLEF ANCUS ANNUAL DULL & FEMALE
SALE
TUESDAY, DEC. 1S: SPECIAL ALL-DFEEDS CALF SALE & FECULAF
CATTLE SALE & THOMAS FANCH FALL DULL SALE
TUESDAY, DEC. 2S: NO SALE
2DJ2 Horse So1es:
SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 22: DAD FIVEF FALL
EXTFAVACANZA HOFSE SALE. CO TO WWW.PHILIP
LIVESTOCK.COM TO VIEW CATALOC OF CALL PLA AT
605-859-2577.
TUESDAY, SEPT. 2S: SPECIAL FEEDEF CATTLE, ALL-DFEEDS CALF
SALE & FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, OCT. 2: SPECIAL ALL-DFEEDS CALF SALE & FECULAF
CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, OCT. 9: SPECIAL ALL-DFEEDS CALF SALE
WEDNESDAY, OCT. 10: SPECIAL STOCK COW & DFED HEIFEF SALE &
WEICH-UP COW, DULL & HFFT. SALE
TUESDAY, OCT. 16: SPECIAL ALL-DFEEDS CALF SALE
WEDNESDAY, OCT. 1?: WEICH-UP COW, DULL & HFFT. SALE
TUESDAY, OCT. 23: SPECIAL ALL-DFEEDS CALF SALE
WEDNESDAY, OCT. 24: WEICH-UP COW, DULL & HFFT. SALE
TUESDAY, OCT. 30: SPECIAL ALL-DFEEDS CALF SALE
WEDNESDAY, OCT. 31: WEICH-UP COW, DULL & HFFT. SALE
SATURDAY, NOV. 3: SPECIAL STOCK COW AND DFED HEIFEF SALE &
WEICH-UP COW, DULL & HFFT. SALE
TUESDAY, NOV. 6: SPECIAL ALL-DFEEDS CALF SALE & FECULAF
CATTLE SALE
WEDNESDAY, NOV. ?: WEICH-UP COW, DULL & HFFT. SALE
TUESDAY, NOV. 13: SPECIAL ALL-DFEEDS CALF SALE & FECULAF
CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, NOV. 20: SPECIAL STOCK COW & DFED HEIFEF SALE &
FECULAF CATTLE SALE
VIEW SALES LIVE ON THE INTERNET! Go to: www.pbIIIpIIvestock.com. UpcomIng saIes & consIgnments can be
vIewed on tbe Internet at www.pbIIIpIIvestock.com, or on tbe DTN: CIIck on SALE BARNS NORTH CENTRAL
PLA |s now qua||f|ed to hand|e th|rd party ver|f|ed
NhT6 catt|e (Non-hormona| Treated 6att|e}.
Reep suppor11ng R-CALF USA! R-CALF USA 1s
our vo1oe 1n governmen1 1o represen1 U.S.
oo111e produoers 1n 1rode morKe11ng 1ssues.
]o1n 1odog & Þe1p moKe o d1]]erenoe!
PhiIip Livestock Auction, in conjunction with
Superior Livestock Auction, wiII be offering
video saIe as an additionaI service to our consignors,
with questions about the video pIease caII,
Jerry Roseth at 605:685:5820.
859-2577
PhiIip, SD
CATTL£ R£PORT - TU£SDAY, AUGUST 2S, 2DJ2
A b1g run o] o11 o1osses o] oo111e ]or our speo1o1 so1e. A b1g oroud o]
bugers on o verg Þo1 dog. A 1o1 o] oompe1111on on 1Þe geor11ngs ond
s1ooK oous.
FEEDER CATTLE:
LLOYD FREIN - PHILIP
134 ........................................................DLK STFS 754= ................$148.75
65 ..........................................................DLK STFS 751= ................$148.50
75................................................DLK & DWF STFS 679= ................$153.25
18 .................................................DLK OPEN HFFS 738= ................$135.50
BRANDON ROCK - LONG VALLEY
60................................................DLK & DWF STFS 857= ................$142.00
57................................................DLK & DWF STFS 920= ................$137.00
57................................................DLK & DWF STFS 930= ................$136.75
SHORTY & MAXINE JONES - MIDLAND
138.....................................FED & DLK OPEN HFFS 757= ................$138.00
80 ...............................................FED & DLK HFFS 674= ................$140.25
ROSETH CATTLE COMPANY - PHILIP
64................................................FED & DLK STFS 769= ................$147.50
57................................................FED & DLK STFS 839= ................$140.50
LANDERS LIVESTOCK CO - HOT SPRINGS
72................................................DLK & DWF STFS 830= ................$144.00
64................................................DLK & DWF STFS 876= ................$139.00
65................................................DLK & DWF STFS 880= ................$138.50
65................................................DLK & DWF STFS 895= ................$137.00
SID FAIRBANKS - PHILIP
120 ........................................................DLK STFS 982= ................$130.75
DARRELL STEFFES - VALE
49 ..........................................................DLK STFS 977= ................$131.60
49 ..........................................................DLK STFS 1001= ..............$129.50
48 ..........................................................DLK STFS 978= ................$130.85
48 ..........................................................DLK STFS 995= ................$129.25
50 ..........................................................DLK STFS 902= ................$136.60
JON & BREE2Y MILLAR - NEWELL
29 .................................................DLK OPEN HFFS 921= ................$130.00
RAPID CREEK RANCH - CAPUTA
31.................................................FED OPEN HFFS 877= ................$130.75
JEFF HUNT - DUPREE
22 ..............................................CHAF & DLK STFS 667= ................$153.75
26......................................DLK, FED & CHAF HFFS 661= ................$136.25
DANNY & BOBBIE ARNESON - UNION CENTER
45 .................................................DLK OPEN HFFS 849= ................$133.25
SCHULTES RANCH LLC - HOWES
68 .................................................DLK OPEN HFFS 828= ................$133.85
74 .................................................DLK OPEN HFFS 769= ................$135.50
14 .................................................DLK OPEN HFFS 825= ................$131.00
OLSON LIVESTOCK & SEED - HAIGLER, NE
121.....................................DLK & DWF OPEN HFFS 794= ................$132.25
56.......................................FED & DLK OPEN HFFS 722= ................$137.75
SHERYL MICHAEL - PHILIP
11 ..........................................................DLK STFS 846= ................$142.25
GREG & JACE SHEARER - WALL
24 .................................................DLK OPEN HFFS 837= ................$133.00
13 .................................................DLK OPEN HFFS 714= ................$136.00
JOHN EISENBRAUN - KADOKA
13 ..........................................................DLK STFS 770= ................$148.50
LARRY KEHN - BATESLAND
42 .................................................DLK OPEN HFFS 674= ................$140.00
BLAINE KROGMAN - WHITE RIVER
11 .................................................DLK OPEN HFFS 860= ................$131.75
STANLEY & MATT PORCH - WANBLEE
10 .................................................DLK OPEN HFFS 867= ................$131.00
MADER & STANGLE - NEW UNDERWOOD
30 .................................................DLK OPEN HFFS 852= ................$130.00
MICHAEL MCPHERSON - BOX ELDER
11 ......................................DLK OPEN & SPAY HFFS 819= ................$133.25
MARK & JUDITH RADWAY - PHILIP
10 .................................................DLK OPEN HFFS 804= ................$132.50
JOHN & JUSTIN LONG - UNION CENTER
13 ......................................DLK OPEN & SPAY HFFS 671= ................$138.25
LARRY & SCOT EISENBRAUN - WALL
38 ................................................DLK OPEN HFFS 766= ................$135.75
KIETH, TUCKER & LINCOLN SMITH - QUINN
30.......................................FED & DLK OPEN HFFS 861= ................$129.75
SCHOFIELD BROTHERS - PHILIP
22.......................................FED & DLK OPEN HFFS 897= ................$129.00
ROSS WILLIAMS - PHILIP
24.................................................FED OPEN HFFS 957= ................$128.25
BOB HELMS - CREIGHTON
17.......................................FED & DLK OPEN HFFS 719= ................$136.50
COLBY PORCH - WANBLEE
15 .................................................DLK OPEN HFFS 813= ................$135.00
GUNN RANCH - WASTA
7 ...................................................DLK OPEN HFFS 829= ................$132.25
H&T BIES CATTLE CO - RAPID CITY
12.......................................FED & DLK OPEN HFFS 873= ................$131.25
LON PETERS - MURDO
10 .................................................DLK OPEN HFFS 900= ................$129.50
WELLER RANCH - KADOKA
20 .................................................DLK OPEN HFFS 898= ................$129.50
OWEN FERGUSON - LONG VALLEY
14 ......................................DLK & DWF STFS (FALL} 638= ................$150.75
15 ................................................DLK HFFS (FALL} 594= ................$137.50
KJERSTAD FAMILY FARM & RANCH - WALL
19 ..........................................................DLK STFS 582= ................$150.50
13..........................................................DLK HFFS 562= ................$142.00
GRANT SHEARER - WALL
7 ...................................................DLK OPEN HFFS 698= ................$135.00
ROD LAMONT - STURGIS
4............................................................DLK STFS 760= ................$149.00
6............................................................DLK HFFS 766= ................$132.00
SAM JOHNSTON - ELM SPRINGS
6..................................................FED & DLK STFS 833= ................$142.00
8............................................................DLK STFS 678= ................$152.50
6 .........................................DLK & DWF SPAY HFFS 647= ................$135.00
ROXY RICHARDSON - LONG VALLEY
12................................................FED & DLK STFS 951= ................$126.50
BRED COWS:
JERRY NELSON - PHILIP
44..................................DLK 5 YF OLD DFED COWS 1318= ...........$1,350.00
24..................................DLK 5 YF OLD DFED COWS 1318= ...........$1,325.00
29...............................DLK 6-7 YF OLD DFED COWS 1418= ...........$1,200.00
WEIGH-UPS:
JOHN EISENBRAUN - KADOKA
1 ............................................................DLK COW 1665= ................$86.00
1 ............................................................DLK COW 1365= ................$82.50
2...........................................................DLK COWS 1425= ................$82.00
2...........................................................DLK COWS 1253= ................$81.00
MATT BROTHERS - ELM SPRINGS
1 ............................................................DLK COW 1520= ................$86.00
1 ............................................................DLK COW 1195= ................$81.50
1............................................................DWF COW 1345= ................$81.00
2...........................................................DLK COWS 1348= ................$79.50
GABE GROPPER - LONG VALLEY
1............................................................FED COW 1740= ................$85.50
1............................................................FED COW 1490= ................$82.00
WILLIAM ECKERT - OKATON
1 ............................................................DLK COW 1420= ................$84.00
MARC SCARBPOROUGH - HAYES
7...............................................CHAF & DLK COWS 1389= ................$83.00
5...........................................................DLK COWS 1243= ................$81.25
5...............................................CHAF & DLK COWS 1278= ................$77.50
9 ................................................DLK & DWF COWS 1338= ................$74.00
JORDAN KJERSTAD - QUINN
1 ............................................................DLK COW 1605= ................$82.50
KENNY MATT - ELM SPRINGS
1 ............................................................DLK COW 1415= ................$82.00
HERB SIELER - QUINN
2...........................................................DLK COWS 1210= ................$82.00
MATT VANDERMAY - LONG VALLEY
1 ............................................................DLK COW 1500= ................$81.50
1 ............................................................DLK COW 1555= ................$81.00
STERLING RIGGINS - WANBLEE
1............................................................DLK DULL 1775= ................$99.50
KYLER MATT - ELM SPRINGS
1............................................................FED COW 1475= ................$81.00
MARK KIEFFER - RAPID CITY
1............................................................DLK DULL 1890= ................$98.50
1............................................................DLK DULL 2220= ................$95.00
EILEEN HEINSOHN - KADOKA
1 ...........................................................FED DULL 1730= ................$98.50
DUFFY DUCHNEAUX - EAGLE BUTTE
1............................................................DWF COW 1480= ................$80.00
JEFF HUNT - DUPREE
1..........................................................CHAF DULL 1695= ................$97.00
STEPHEN RIGGINS - KADOKA
1 ............................................................DLK COW 1680= ................$79.50
DAN NELSON - CREIGHTON
1............................................................DLK DULL 1745= ................$96.50
TOMMY TIFFT - UNION CENTER
1 ............................................................DLK COW 2060= ................$78.00
Pennington County Courant • August 30, 2012 • Page 8
Labor Day weekend
events wrap up summer
   Labor  Day  weekend  marks  the
unofficial  end  of  the  summer,  and
South  Dakota  State  Parks  invite
you  to  come  out  and  enjoy  special
weekend events.
   •Labor Day Patriotic Camp-
site Decorating Display,  Oak-
wood Lakes State Park near Volga
and Lake Poinsett Recreation Area
near Arlington, Aug.  31  –  Sept.  3.
Campers, bring supplies to decorate
your  campsites!  Judging  takes
place  on  Saturday.  Prizes  for  all!
Info: 605-627-5441
   •Techno-Treasure Hunt (Be-
ginning geocaching),  Pierson
Ranch Recreation Area near Yank-
ton,  Aug.  31,  7  p.m.  CDT.  Learn
about the GPS craze that has Amer-
ica  searching  for  treasure  in  the
great  outdoors.  We'll  provide  in-
struction and a limited number of
GPS units. Info: 605-668-2985
   •Southern Hills Triathlon,
Angostura  Recreation  Area  near
Hot  Springs,  Sept.  1,  at  7  a.m.
MDT. Athletes can participate in a
kids’  triathlon,  sprint  triathlon,
Olympic  distance  triathlon,  or
duathlon. Participate as an individ-
ual or a team. Info: 605-745-6996
   •Bike Rodeo, Sept. 1, 9:30 a.m.
CDT  at  North  Point  Recreation
Area  and  11  a.m.  CDT  at  Randall
Creek  Recreation  Area  both  near
Pickstown.  Saddle  up  those  bikes
and  join  us  rip  roaring  fun  time.
Info: 605-487-7046
   •Labor Day Leftovers,  Chief
White Crane Recreation Area near
Yankton, Sept. 1, 11 a.m. CDT. Take
a walk in the park in the dark and
learn about nocturnal animals and
how  they  live  at  night.  Info:  605-
668-2985
   •Monarch Butterfly Tagging,
Palisades State Park near Garret-
son, Sept. 1, 2 p.m. CDT. Learn the
life cycle of the monarch butterfly
then help in identifying, recording,
tagging and releasing butterflies on
their way to Mexico. Info: 605-594-
3824
   •Walk in the Park in the
Dark,  Big  Sioux  Recreation  Area
near Brandon, Sept. 1, 9 p.m. CDT.
Take a walk in the park in the dark
and learn about nocturnal animals
and  how  they  live  at  night.  Info:
605-582-7243
   •Bicycle Parades,  Sept.  2,  at
9:30  a.m.  CDT  at  North  Point
Recreation  Area  and  11:30  a.m.
CDT  at  Randall  Creek  Recreation
Area  both  near  Pickstown.  Kids
need  to  bring  only  their  bikes,  as
decorations will be provided for this
end-of-the-summer event! Info: 605-
487-7046.
   •Newton Hills Riddle Hunt,
Newton Hills State Park near Can-
ton, Sept. 2, 10 a.m. CDT. This ac-
tivity is the perfect opportunity to
get  to  know  the  park  better  and
learn  about  nature.  The  riddle
hunts will be available in the wel-
come center at 10 a.m. Participants
can pick up the forms any time dur-
ing the day. Then, try to find the lo-
cation  that  answers  the  riddle.
Those  who  complete  the  hunt  can
bring it back to the welcome center
by  4  p.m.  to  collect  a  prize!  Info:
605-987-2263
   •Lake Vermillion Dutch Oven
Chili Cook-off,  Lake  Vermillion
Recreation  Area  near  Canistota,
Sept. 2, 4 p.m. CDT. Cookers of all
ages will compete for the best Dutch
Oven Chili. Cookers of all levels are
encouraged to participate. There is
no  registration  required.  Cookers
can meet at 4 p.m. and judging will
start at 6 p.m. Info: 605-296-3643
   For  more  information  on  the
South  Dakota  State  Parks,  please
visit  www.gfp.sd.gov  or  call  605-
773-3391. To learn about park pro-
grams  in  your  area,  contact  your
local state park office.
Spacious 1 bedroom
units are available for the elderly
(62 years or older)
and/or disabled/handicapped adults
(18 years or older)
OF ALL INCOME
LEVELS.
CALL 1-800-481-6904
TDD-Relay
1-800-877-1113
GATEWAY
APARTMENTS
301 1st AVE. SW
KADOKA, SD
FOCUS ON THE FAMILY
with Dr. James
Dobson
Dr. Dobson Answers
your Questions
   QUESTION: I can't tell you how
often  my  spouse  has  hurt  my  feel-
ings  with  careless  and  cutting  re-
marks.  When  I  protest,  he  laughs
and says he's only teasing or tells me
I'm too sensitive. Unfortunately, it's
no joke to me. What can I do to re-
solve this problem?
   ANSWER: Sadly,  many  couples
suffer from a perpetual case of indi-
vidual  or  mutual  heartlessness.
Even more tragically, a good number
of them seem to regard this state of
affairs as "business as usual." This
is a huge problem, especially for hus-
bands and wives who claim to be be-
lievers in Jesus Christ. The Bible re-
peatedly  instructs  us  to  treat  each
other with kindness, honor and re-
spect.  These  commands  were  de-
signed to be applied to any relation-
ship,  but  they're  especially  impor-
tant  in  the  marital  context.  Mar-
riage is sacred to God, and we can be
sure  that  it  displeases  Him  to  see
spouses haphazardly wounding each
other's  spirits  with  potshots  like,
"Can't  you  do  anything  right?"  or
"You always make dumb choices like
this!"  or  "You  act  just  like  your
mother!"
   That  said,  we  should  point  out
that  ongoing  patterns  of  hurt  feel-
ings in marriage can stem from two
possible  sources:  a  hypersensitive
spouse or an insensitive one.
   Being overly sensitive can be just
as destructive as its opposite. If you
take  offense  at  every  perceived
slight,  your  spouse  probably  will
walk around on eggshells, trying not
to  upset  you.  People  who  live  with
hypersensitive mates often respond
by withdrawing, becoming resentful
or  being  terrified  to  say  or  do  any-
thing.  We'd  suggest  that  you  ap-
proach  this  problem  by  examining
yourself,  seriously  and  honestly,  to
see whether you might fall into the
hypersensitive category.
   Hypersensitivity  is  common  in
people who allow what they feel to
become the primary factor in deter-
mining how they see themselves and
others, and how they respond to crit-
icism and perceived threats. It can
be  a  precursor  to  deeper,  more  de-
structive  emotional  and  relational
problems. It can also be a symptom
of Avoidant Personality Disorder, a
condition  marked  by  timidity,  low
self-esteem and excessive sensitivity
to rejection. If you or your spouse fits
the criteria for this disorder, profes-
sional intervention in needed.
   The opposite of being too sensitive
is insensitivity, which can be just as
debilitating.  An  insensitive  person
"throws" his thoughts, words and be-
haviors out there and lets the chips
fall where they may. Insensitive peo-
ple are habitual violators of the com-
mand to "be kind and compassionate
to one another, forgiving each other,
just  as  in  Christ  God  forgave  you"
(Ephesians  4:32).  Insensitivity
sometimes  indicates  a  serious  per-
sonality disorder called narcissism.
People with this problem are exces-
sively self-centered, lacking concern
or empathy for others. Often they're
unable  to  recognize  when  they've
hurt  another's  feelings.  If  you  be-
lieve your spouse can be described as
narcissistic,  we  suggest  that  you
urge them to seek professional help.
Without it, they won't be able to con-
trol their hurtful behavior.
   Apart from personality disorders,
if you or your mate has allowed in-
sensitivity or hypersensitivity to set
up  camp  in  your  marriage,  you
should be aware that it can destroy
your relationship if left unattended.
There's  just  one  way  to  avoid  this
negative  outcome:  by  making
changes  in  attitude,  behavior  and
spiritual  direction,  including  gen-
uine remorse and repentance.
   Start by educating yourself about
the  problem,  whether  it's  yours  or
your  spouse's.  Knowledge  often
leads  to  understanding,  which  in
turn can facilitate resolution. Once
you feel clear on the causes behind
the  problem  you're  facing,  make
your concerns known to your spouse
in a non-threatening way. Don't use
accusatory language. Instead, for ex-
ample, describe how you feel when
your  mate  uses  hurtful  words  and
how  these  hurt  feelings  may  influ-
ence you to respond inappropriately
—  perhaps  by  withdrawing  or  be-
coming resentful. Be as honest and
transparent  as  you  can  about  your
own sensitivity or insensitivity.
   Throughout  this  process  remem-
ber that God will judge us according
to the way we treat others. As Jesus
said, "I tell you that men will have
to  give  account  on  the  day  of  judg-
ment  for  every  careless  word  they
have spoken" (Matthew 12:36). If the
problem is chronic, or if you feel that
insensitivity has actually escalated
into verbal abuse, locate a Christian
psychologist or psychiatrist who can
assess  and  treat  personality  disor-
ders.  Even  if  your  spouse  doesn't
want  to  participate,  a  professional
therapist can often offer direction on
how  to  live  with  someone  who  has
verbally abusive tendencies and how
to manage the situation.

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