Joe Bruno on the Mob – Hector “Junior” Pagan Lied to the FBI This proves there is a God.

Just as this book was going to press, a bombshell went off that blasted the FBI and Hector “Junior” Pagan‟s rat-deal to bits. The rules of the FBI-rat-program plea-deal specifically state when you agree to become an informant, you have to tell the Feds your precise involvement with other crimes you may have committed in the past. Apparently, Pagan violated the rules of his deal when he forgot to tell the Feds he was the shooter in the robbery-gone-awry murder of James Donovan. Not only did Pagan not tell the Feds he was the actual shooter, but he said that the shooter was his co-conspirator Richard Riccardi, who along with Luigi Grasso and Pagan, cornered Donovan in a Brooklyn body shop and demanded he turn over a reported “tens of thousands of dollars” he had on him. When Donovan balked on giving over his money, he was shot in the femoral artery and he bled to death. The thugs reportedly took Donovan‟s money, while Donovan was bleeding, and spit it up later. However, security cameras in a Key Food store across the street from the body shop conclusively show that Riccardi never left his car, and that Pagan and Grasso were the men who actually confronted Donovan. This startling revelation may not only KO Pagan‟s deal with the government, but also result in alleged Bonanno Crime boss Vincent “Vinny TV” Badalamenti waking out of court a free man. It seems that, based on Pagan‟s treachery, Badalamenti agreed to a plea deal which would have netted him two years in the slammer. Now with Pagan‟s truthfulness in severe doubt, Badalamenti‟s plea deal could be nullified, according to his attorney Ronald Fischetti. Fischetti said in a brief he presented to the court that without Pagan‟s testimony “The U.S. Probation Department informed him that prosecutors would not have been able to prove their original charges against Vinny TV even under a much lower standard of proof than the „beyond a reasonable doubt‟ standard that is needed to convince jurors at trial.” In Fischetti‟s memo to Brooklyn Federal Court Chief Judge Carol Bagley Amon, he wrote, “Indeed, the probation report indicates that „the government advised that they are not prepared to prove by a preponderance of the evidence any criminal acts, charged or uncharged, by the defendant (Badalamenti).‟” In other words, without Pagan‟s testimony, prosecutors could not establish that Badalamenti was more likely than not to have committed those crimes. So Badalamenti might soon be on the streets and Pagan in court on trial for murder Like I said up top, this proves there is a God.

Lawyer: Vinny TV Should Walk Out Of Courthouse With Me
Acting Bonanno crime family boss Vincent (Vinny TV) Badalamenti may be able to dial the channel down a notch or two from the already sweet twoyear plea deal he cut earlier this year. If so, it will be thanks to more of the shenanigans of the mob turncoat ex-hubby of Mob Wives star Renee Graziano whose allegations led to the indictment against Vinny TV. Sources tell Gang Land that the feds have now established that Graziano’s ex – Hector (Junior) Pagan – lied to DEA agents as well as prosecutors several times about his involvement in a Brooklyn robbery-murder for which the feds finally arrested two cohorts two days ago. Sources say that Pagan finally owned up to being the triggerman in the slaying of mob-connected Luchese associate James Donovan after he was told that a video surveillance camera showed that the accomplice Pagan identified as the shooter had been driving a crash car used in the caper.

The revelation led to a U.S. Probation Department report on Badalamenti in which prosecutors acknowledged that their case against the Bonanno big was so weak they wouldn’t have been able to convict him. The bombshell report helps explain the unusually sweet deal cut by Brooklyn U.S. Attorney Loretta Lynch earlier this year when her office agreed to a meager prison term for the acting Bonanno boss to dispose of his racketeering charges.

Reality TV just got a whole lot realer. Ex-husband of “Mob Wives” star Renee Graziano squealed to cops about the role of two former associates in a murder investigation, which ultimately led to their arraignments. Hector (Junior) Pagan said that Richard Riccardi and Luigi Grasso are responsible for the July 2, 2010 Brooklyn robbery of an auto body shop in Gravesend that caused the death of Luchese associate James Donovan. Pagan also wore a hidden wire which set off a string of mobster arrests, including acting Bonanno boss Vincent (Vinny TV) Badalamenti and Pagan‟s ex-father-in-law Anthony (TG) Graziano. Pagan shot Donovan in the leg, something which he initially pinned on Riccardi. That was proven to be untrue when surveillance footage of the crime surfaced showing Riccardi never left the car. The bullet landed in Donovan‟s femoral artery and he bled to death. Now, Riccardi is accused of supplying the guns while Grasso accompanied Pagan, according to the New York Daily News. All three stand accused of heisting tens of thousands of dollars from the shop. Lawyers for the two men implicated by Pagan deny their clients are guilty. Instead, they blame Pagan. “Hector Pagan is truly the guilty party,” Riccardi‟s lawyer Joseph Benfante said, “and has been caught lying to the Brookyn district attorney‟s office as well as the U.S. Attorneys.” Riccardi and Grasso will face life in prison if they are convicted. It is unclear what punishment Pagan will receive.

The blockbuster details are also cited in court papers filed by Badalamenti’s high-powered Manhattan lawyer, Ronald Fischetti. In a sentencing memo, Fischetti revealed that the U.S. Probation Department informed him that prosecutors would not have been able to prove their original charges against Vinny TV even under a much lower standard of proof than the “beyond a reasonable doubt” standard that is needed to convince jurors at trial. To stress that fact, the lawyer italicized the probation department’s words in his memo to Brooklyn Federal Court Chief Judge Carol Bagley Amon, who is slated to sentence Badalamenti next week. “Indeed,” Fischetti wrote, “the probation report indicates that ‘the government advised that they are not prepared to prove by a preponderance of the evidence any criminal acts, charged or uncharged, by the defendant.’” In other words, prosecutors could not establish that Badalamenti was more likely than not to have committed those crimes. In January, based on tape recorded discussions that Pagan had with Vinny TV, prosecutors for U.S. Attorney Lynch obtained a racketeering indictment against Badalamenti charging him with extortion, gambling, and loansharking. While wired up by DEA agents, Junior also tape recorded conversations with his father-in-law, capo Anthony (TG) Graziano, and four others that led to similar charges against them, as well as marijuana dealing allegations. All have now copped plea deals. But the charges against Badalamenti were much ado about nothing, writes Fischetti. He argues that his client, whose plea deal calls for a sentence of between 21 and 27 months, deserves to be released from prison next week because he hasn’t committed a crime in 10 years and, most importantly, the feds admit they can’t prove that he did. That is precisely why Badalamenti “maintained his innocence and moved for a speedy trial” after he was arrested on the original racketeering indictment, says Fischetti. Only when Lynch’s prosecutors added more charges, including an allegation that he had collected an illegal gambling debt in 2002, did his client considere a plea deal. Since he had already admitted his guilt to that charge in 2003, prosecutors could

simply use that guilty plea to convict him again under the racketeering statute, wrote Fischetti. Fischetti filed transcripts of Badalamenti’s guilty plea before Amon and another in 2003 before a different judge to back up his contention that Vinny TV will be sentenced for the exact same “criminal conduct” that he admitted nine years ago and for which he has already served a 15- month sentence. “There can be no honest dispute” about that, wrote Fischetti. He stated that in 2003 “Badalamenti pled guilty to an extortion of an individual named Stanley between February and August of 2002, and in the instant matter pled guilty to the collection of an unlawful debt from the same individual during the same time-frame.” The specific technical charges are different but “it smacks of unfairness” for his client “to receive yet another sentence based upon historical conduct for which he has already been punished,” wrote Fischetti. “I believe Vinny should walk out of the courtroom with me,” said Fischetti, when contacted by Gang Land. “He served six months behind bars this year, he should get 12 months off for the time he has already served, and I believe his plea agreement guidelines should be reduced from 21 to 18 months because his current guilty plea is for the same criminal conduct as his plea in 2003. Absolutely, I believe he should walk out of the courthouse with me next week.” In his reply yesterday, assistant U.S. attorney Jack Dennehy disagreed. The crimes were different, Badalamenti is a leader of the Bonanno family, and deserves what he bargained for, wrote Dennehy, a prison term between 21 and 27 months. Meanwhile, based on evidence that Brooklyn South homicide detectives and the Brooklyn District Attorney’s office gave to the DEA and federal prosecutors, two of Pagan’s still living cohorts, Richard Riccardi, 39, and Luigi Grasso, 44, a.k.a, Ronald Petrino, were arrested Tuesday for the July 2, 2010 robbery murder of Donovan and detained without bail. “Hector Pagan is truly the guilty party in this murder,” said Riccardi’s attorney Joseph Benfante. “He has been lying to law enforcement officials about Richard and is trying to use my client as a scapegoat.”

Ex-husband of 'Mob Wives' reality star gives up two accomplices in fatal Brooklyn robbery
Hector (Junior) Pagan says Richard Riccardi and Luigi Grasso helped plan stickup of auto body shop in Gravesend. Pagan was once married to 'Mob Wives' star Renee Graziano
Read more: http://www.nydailynews.com/new-york/brooklyn/ex-husband-mob-wives-realitystar-accomplices-fatal-brooklyn-robbery-article-1.1116627#ixzz21HhMQCiX The feds murdering “Mob Wives” snitch has given up two accomplices he says joined him in a fatal robbery in Brooklyn, the Daily News has learned. It was turncoat Hector (Junior) Pagan who fired the fatal bullet into the leg of reputed Luchese associate James Donovan, but the ex-husband of “Mob Wives” reality show star Renee Graziano has played the cooperating witness card perfectly so far. Pagan‟s squealing led to the arraignment Tuesday of Richard Riccardi and Luigi Grasso on charges of planning the July 2, 2010, stickup outside an auto body shop in Gravesend. Riccardi is accused of supplying the guns while Grasso accompanied Pagan when they accosted Donovan at gunpoint, according to court papers. Donovan, a self-employed check casher and reputed Luchese associate, was shot by Pagan when he resisted the robbery -- the bullet pierced his femoral artery and he bled to death. Prosecutors say the trio fled with "tens of thousands" of dollars which they later divied up. Riccardi's lawyer Joseph Benfante said his client is "totally innocent." "Hector Pagan is truly the guilty party," Benfante said, "and has been caught lying to the Brookyn district attorney's office as well as the U.S. attorneys." Pagan initially claimed that Riccardi was the gunman, but a surveillance camera in a Key Food parking lot showed that Riccardi never got out of his car, a knowledgeable source told The News.

The feds stuck with Pagan as he wore a hidden wire leading to the arrest of a gaggle of gangsters including acting Bonanno boss Viincent (Vinny TV) Badalamenti and Pagan's ex-father-in-law Anthony (TG) Graziano, a Bonanno capo. Riccardi and Grasso were ordered held without bail by Brooklyn Magistrate Marilyn Go. They face life in prison if convicted.

Read more: http://www.nydailynews.com/new-york/brooklyn/ex-husband-mob-wives-realitystar-accomplices-fatal-brooklyn-robbery-article-1.1116627#ixzz21HhWYwhi

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