properties in low vacancy areas are in tax foreclosure

5,812 533 378

LOW VACANCY

are owned by Wayne County Treasurer

7,780 3,414
parcels in low vacancy areas are vacant housing units in low vacancy areas are vacant

PRIVATE & PUBLIC ENTITIES

MAINTENANCE OF VACANT PROPERTIES MUST BE IMPROVED BY

are owned by the Michigan Land Bank Fast Track Authority

are owned by the City of Detroit

2,813

18,867

parcels in low vacancy areas are publicly owned

MODERATE VACANCY

properties in moderate vacancy areas are in tax foreclosure

11,199 4,094 2,969

are owned by Wayne County Treasurer

are owned by the Michigan Land Bank Fast Track Authority

are owned by the City of Detroit

20,651

36,403 24,339 39,717
parcels in moderate vacancy areas are vacant parcels in moderate vacancy areas are publicly owned housing units in moderate vacancy areas are vacant parcels in high vacancy areas are vacant

Despite the vast size of the public land inventory, it is less than half of the estimated 150,000 vacant properties in Detroit. Private owners control the majority of vacant properties. In many instances, this property is neglected, which adds to the blight and deterioration of many neighborhoods. The issues of private property maintenance are interwoven with those affecting the public land inventory. The implementation of the public land strategies depends upon our ability to successfully hold private owners accountable by increasing the cost of holding vacant land, while establishing and enforcing standards for private ownership. We can increase the cost to owners for holding vacant properties by:
1 Extending the vacant property registration ordinance to vacant land, not just vacant buildings, and making sure all properties are in the system. 2 Imposing a registration fee for vacant properties. 3 Adopting a strict vacant property maintenance code for vacant land, not just vacant buildings. 4 Enforcing city ordinances effectively and consistently for vacant land and buildings.

PUBLIC LAND

properties in high vacancy areas are in tax foreclosure

HIGH VACANCY

are owned by Wayne County Treasurer

are owned by the Michigan Land Bank Fast Track Authority

are owned by the City of Detroit

49,160 1,826 36,499 3,482 32,244 13,908
2,856

T

parcels in high vacancy areas are publicly owned

We can address the growing challenge of absenteeowned rental properties by:
1 Making sure that all rental properties are in the system. 2 Enforcing the rental registration ordinance and other licensing requirements.
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wo years ago we launched an ambitious effort to reimagine the future of one of the world’s most storied and important cities. At that time, we cautioned that success doesn’t happen by chance, but that cities from around the world have learned that they must plan ahead for positive change. It was then that the DETROIT WORks LONG TERM PLANNING — a blueprint towards a future Detroit that works for all — was born. Many of you have been there from the beginning, inserting your passion, ideas and expertise along the way. Today we are once again asking for your input. Inside are some draft strategies for one of the main elements of the plan, Public Land. These aren’t the entirety of the strategies for Public Land, but the latest of which we need to get your feedback on. After we digest this feedback, we will complete the in-depth Long Term Strategic Framework plan in the fall. We look forward to the conversation, and a brighter future for Detroit.

housing units in high vacancy areas are vacant

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On the feedback form inserted, tell us how well you think this strategy for Framework Zones can address vacant property issues.
INSPIRING CITIZENS TO SHAPE

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On the feedback form inserted, tell us how well you think this strategy for strengthened maintenance can address vacant property issues.

2929 rUSSell St. detrOIt 48207 mON-FrI 9 Am-5 Pm OFFICe (313) 259-4407

INFO@detrOItlONgterm.COm WWW.detrOItlONgterm.COm

Detroit’s Future!

STRATEGIC & COORDINATED
Vacant property in Detroit poses serious challenges to neighborhood stability, but it also represents tremendous opportunity for future improvement. By most estimates, there are around 150,000 vacant properties in the city, 40,000 to 50,000 of which are vacant buildings. Of that total number, over forty percent are held by public agencies. The scale of vacancy in Detroit, both in total numbers and in relative public ownership (“public land”), is far greater than in any other American city. Decisions related to this land form the underpinning for successful implementation of many long-term strategies necessary for economic growth, neighborhood change, and improvements to the physical environment. The city’s vacant land and buildings can become a valuable asset for the future rather than a problem. Together, public land can be strategically leveraged to knit neighborhoods back together and transform vacant land back into productive use. In order to achieve this future vision, we must coordinate decisions among multiple agencies – city, county, state, and autonomous agencies such as

USE OF PUBlIC lAND AND FACIlITIES MUST BE

the Detroit Housing Commission, Detroit Public Schools and Detroit Economic Growth Corporation – about how to best use public land. Currently, there is no consistency of policy, procedure, or mission between these agencies. At the same time, many are restricted by burdensome legal requirements and complex procedures. Coordination starts by ensuring that public entities align strategies for the acquisition (buying), management (holding) and disposition (selling) of properties. For acquisition, agencies should have shared priorities for where to purchase properties, informed by defined Frameworks Zones (see below), and should develop an ongoing joint process with the Wayne County Treasurer to identify and target properties. For management, properties should be held when there is a long-term public benefit (e.g. storm water management), or an opportunity to assemble multiple, smaller properties into a single, larger parcel, particularly in economic growth areas or areas where there will be market improvement within the next ten years. For disposition, system improvements for selling land could include a common database and information system, formal policies and procedures for all agencies, and a single “front door” for receiving and processing applications.
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SHOUlD INFORM PUBlIC lAND DECISIONS
LOW VACANCY sTRATEGIEs

FRAMEWORK ZONES

The Framework Zones, outlined in the “Neighborhoods” summary document, can inform the decisions that our public agencies will make about public land. These decisions must be tailored to meet the needs of the different types of communities in Detroit. The table below outlines the strategy for public land in each vacancy type in order to stabilize neighborhoods. See statistics on next page. HIGH VACANCY sTRATEGIEs

MODERATE VACANCY sTRATEGIEs

TARGETING Prioritize low vacancy areas for public land activities that further neighborhood stabilization and revitalization. Develop targeted strategies for each special focus area. ACQUIsITION Acquire properties in key locations, such as areas around new/ expanded school projects or high visibility sites. DIsPOsITION Dispose of individual or bundled parcels to qualified users, including side lots to adjacent homeowners and properties to neighborhood organizations and other users for green uses. Dispose of properties to developers for infill only in key locations and Low Vacancy 1 areas. Do not hold for assembly except in special cases. DEMOLITION Prioritize demolition of blighting vacant structures where they are likely to affect neighborhood stability. PRIVATELY-OWNED PROPERTIEs Implement strategies to increase maintenance standards and accountability of owners of vacant land. Implement targeted strategies to address problems of absentee landlords. Enlist neighborhood organizations and CDCs as partners to increase enforcement capacity. MAINTENANCE Provide higher level of property maintenance. Enlist neighborhood organizations and CDCs as partners. Use alternative site treatments to reduce maintenance costs and stabilize neighborhoods.

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On the feedback form inserted, tell us how well you think this strategy for strategic coordination can address vacant property issues.

TARGETING Identify key moderate vacancy areas, based on criteria such as proximity to low vacancy areas or particular physical, civic or locational assets, to prioritize public land activities that further neighborhood stabilization and revitalization. Develop targeted strategies for each special focus area. ACQUIsITION Acquire properties in key locations within priority and special focus areas. DIsPOsITION Dispose of individual parcels to qualified users, including side lots to adjacent homeowners and properties to neighborhood organizations and other users for green uses. Do not hold for assembly except in special cases. DEMOLITION Prioritize demolition of key blighting vacant structures where they are likely to affect neighborhood stability in priority areas. PRIVATELY-OWNED PROPERTIEs Implement strategies to increase maintenance standards and accountability of owners of vacant land in key priority areas. Implement targeted strategies to address problems of absentee landlords in key priority areas. Enlist neighborhood organizations and CDCs as partners to increase enforcement capacity. MAINTENANCE Provide higher level of property maintenance in key priority areas. Enlist neighborhood organizations and CDCs as partners. Use alternative site treatments to reduce maintenance costs and stabilize neighborhoods in key priority areas.

TARGETING Identify key high vacancy areas, based on criteria such as proximity to low vacancy areas or particular physical, civic or locational assets, to prioritize public land activities that further neighborhood stabilization and revitalization. Develop targeted strategies for each special focus area. ACQUIsITION Acquire selected properties in key locations within priority and special focus areas. DIsPOsITION Dispose of parcels to qualified users, including properties to neighborhood organizations and other end users for green uses. Do not hold for assembly except in special cases. Retain public ownership of land used for blue/ green infrastructure. DEMOLITION Prioritize demolition only of key blighting vacant structures where they are likely to affect neighborhood stability in priority areas. PRIVATELY-OWNED PROPERTIEs Implement strategies to increase maintenance standards and accountability of owners of vacant land in key priority areas. Implement targeted strategies to address problems of absentee landlords in key priority areas. Enlist neighborhood organizations and CDCs as partners where available to increase enforcement capacity. MAINTENANCE Maintain properties in key priority areas. Enlist neighborhood organizations and CDCs as partners. Use alternative site treatments to reduce maintenance costs and stabilize neighborhoods in key priority areas.

ACQUIRE PROPERTIES STRATEGICALLY IN KEY AREAS

ACQUISITION Target areas for assembly into buildable sites
ECONOMIC GROWTH STRATEGY

DISPOSITION developers MAINTENANCE Demolish unusable industrial buildings REUSE Maximize reuse for economic growth PRIVATE OWNERS Increase cost of holding vacant property

PUT COORDINATED & TRANSPARENT POLICIES & PRACTICES FOR DISPOSITION IN PLACE

LINK MAINTENANCE STRATEGIES TO REUSE AND LAND USE GOALS

COORDINATED PUBLIC LAND STRATEGY

ACQUISITION Target key areas, such as properties near school buildings
NEIGHBORHOOD STRATEGY

DISPOSITION Sell to individuals,NBOs, and CDCs for green reuse MAINTENANCE For more detail, see maps

LINK REUSE STRATEGIES TO FRAMEWORK ZONES AND LAND USE GOALS

ACQUISITION Target key areas for strategic assembly
HIGH VACANCY AREAS STRATEGY

REUSE reuse elsewhere PRIVATE OWNERS Targeted landlord strategies

DISPOSITION Hold for assembly or reuse MAINTENANCE For more detail, see maps REUSE Prioritize blue/ green infrastructure PRIVATE OWNERS Increase cost of holding vacant property

PUT IN PLACE STRATEGIC EFFORTS TO ADDRESS PRIVATE OWNERS OF VACANT AND PROBLEM PROPERTIES

This graph outlines the tactics that could help build a strategic and coordinate public land strategy.