Community bid for Leith Waterworld

Alternative Business Case
Best Value for the City of Edinburgh
Prepared and submitted on behalf of the community by Splashback
7 August 2012

________________________________________________________________________________________________
This business plan is confidential and should not be copied in whole or in part nor its contents communicated to any other party without the prior consent of Splashback. PAGE

1

Contents
Page
Executive Summary 1. Introduction and Vision for a Community Pool 2. Policy Context for a Community Bid 3. Community Needs Analysis 4. Competitor Analysis and Case Studies 5. Financial Sustainability and Viability 6. Strategic and Operational Management 7. Proposal 8. Conclusion Appendices: a) Waterworld Survey: Summary of Responses b) Qualitative Survey Data and Analysis c) Summary Financial Projections 3 4 9 16 19 23 26 27 28

________________________________________________________________________________________________
This business plan is confidential and should not be copied in whole or in part nor its contents communicated to any other party without the prior consent of Splashback. PAGE

2

Executive Summary
1. There is strong public support for the reopening of Waterworld. Splashback has collected around 6,500 signatures protesting at the facility’s closure. In addition, 800 survey responses have been completed, providing quantifiable backing for the leisure pool’s retention. 2. The vision for a reopened Waterworld is based on the following: a leisure destination providing a diverse range of facilities for people across the city; an inclusive hub for health and well-being, capitalising its suitability for young children, the elderly and the disabled; and a viable and financially sustainable business rooted in the community. 3. This vision will be delivered by: making more of the pool’s natural advantages, namely the beach access and warm water temperature; establishing a broader community of users across Edinburgh; and securing continued investment from City of Edinburgh Council, albeit at a lower and declining level. 4. The retention of Waterworld as a leisure pool under community-led management meets national and local policy objectives, helping to deliver key outcomes in relation to economic development, giving children the best start in life, health and well-being. This is the first real test of City of Edinburgh Council’s commitments within its New Contract with the Capital. 5. The closure of Waterworld has had a significant negative impact. 74% of survey respondents swim less since its closure. This demonstrates the leisure pool had a unique appeal and important role in the city’s swimming infrastructure. 92% of respondents would prefer to use a reopened Waterworld to an alternative pool in Edinburgh. 6. There are several ways of developing a more distinct and diverse offer for users, with greater emphasis on classes for the under 5’s, for the elderly and the disabled along with a better retail offer and special night-time events. 7. There are no direct competitors to Waterworld in the city. All local authorities in the surrounding area support a leisure pool, however these all need to be accessed by car or train. 8. There are several outstanding examples of community-led leisure pools across Scotland and the UK, including Jesmond (Newcastle), Atlantis (Oban) and the X-cel Leisure Centre in Coventry which has a high level of disabled users and has been held up as an exemplar community leisure facility by Lord Sebastian Coe. 9. A conservative approach to financial projections for Waterworld demonstrates that deploying a more efficient staffing structure, increased opening days and increased usage charge allow the level of required subsidy to be reduced to a level that is comparable to Waterworld’s wet facility peer group. This does not take into account further energy savings that would result from new plant and machinery or increased revenue streams from additional / expanded range of activities available at the pool. 10. A Scottish Charity Incorporated Organisation (SCIO) will be established, whose Trustees will take over the stewardship of the facility. It is envisaged that an operating company will be appointed to take over the day to day management of the Waterworld. 11. It is proposed that the ground lease for Waterworld is sold to this SCIO for the nominal sum of £1. Alternatively, the SCIO will take on a 25-year lease at a peppercorn rent of £1 per annum.
________________________________________________________________________________________________
This business plan is confidential and should not be copied in whole or in part nor its contents communicated to any other party without the prior consent of Splashback. PAGE

3

1.

Introduction & Vision for a Community Pool

1.1 BACKGROUND: ABOUT SPLASHBACK

Splashback originated in late November 2011 as an Edinburgh residents’ campaign to prevent the closure of the Leith Waterworld leisure pool by the City of Edinburgh Council on 8 January 2012. Over two months, from end November 2011 to end January 2012, the campaign group ran a petition against the closure which received in excess of 6,500 signatures. This response to the petition demonstrated overwhelming support from the residents of Leith and wider Edinburgh for keeping Waterworld open. The pool was closed on the 8 January 2012. That weekend, the campaign launched. The Homeless Itinerant Bathing Society – each week, campaign group members and their families visited a different pool throughout Edinburgh, and marked the amenity on a range of factors – from proximity, affordability and suitability for family swimming. On 16 March 2012, Splashback was constituted as a voluntary association. In mid-May the association launched its Waterworld user survey. Part impact study and part market research (neither of which had been undertaken for the facility by the CEC or Edinburgh Leisure prior to the decision to close), the purpose of the survey was to collect quantitative and qualitative data on the impact of the closure, past and potential usage of the facility, preferred use for the site, and potential additional revenue streams should the pool re-open.

________________________________________________________________________________________________
This business plan is confidential and should not be copied in whole or in part nor its contents communicated to any other party without the prior consent of Splashback. PAGE

4

The survey ran both online and in hard copy at events including Parents Like Us (1-3 June) and Leith Gala Day (9 June) and attracted over 800 responses. The survey findings have informed this business case throughout. Full survey results, including a selection of free field comments, are available in the appendix. The Splashback campaign has already attracted the support of a variety of community groups including Leith Community Council; Leith Links Community Council; Leith Traders Association; SENScot; Community Enterprise Scotland; SportsScotland; Community Development Trusts Association; and the public in Leith and in the wider Edinburgh community. 1.2 VISION FOR WATERWORLD

• • • • • •

Leith Waterworld had in the last year 126,000 visits. It was the most popular wet facility in the Edinburgh Leisure portfolio. It provided a space for families, living in cramped conditions, to get out from under each other’s feet and enjoy each other, building healthy relationships It provided a pool where disabled users could enter and exit with dignity, rather than being hoisted in and out It brought 48,000 people from throughout Edinburgh to Leith – think of the impact to the local economy. And 12,000 from outwith Edinburgh – it was a tourist attraction. And all this achieved without any active marketing since 2005.

We believe this gives solid grounds on which to base the pool’s future.
________________________________________________________________________________________________
This business plan is confidential and should not be copied in whole or in part nor its contents communicated to any other party without the prior consent of Splashback. PAGE

5

Splashback’s vision for Waterworld is to re-open it under community-led management and with the co-operation of the local authority; and having secured the appropriate funding, to develop and improve it so that it may become: a) A leisure destination Not just a leisure pool, but a multi-faceted local hub for residents of Edinburgh and a visitor attraction appealing, especially, to families with children visiting the city. We envisage the following improved facilities and activities being developed: • • • • • • • • • Redesigned, enlarged and greatly improved soft play area Children’s party and event room(s) Improved retail area, including snacks and drinks Daily parent & baby/toddler swimming classes Prioritisation of special schools and voluntary sector organisations supporting the disabled, and in particular children with disabilities Fitness classes including aqua-Zumba Dedicated sessions for minority and special needs groups Special events and activities including night swimming In the longer term, cafe serving healthy yet fun meals and snacks.

b) An inclusive hub for health and well-being. Waterworld was and still is unique in Edinburgh and the surrounding region as a pool with fun features and a design that makes it fundamentally friendly to a variety of user groups, in particular non-swimmers, early swimmers and those with physical impairments. The health and well-being benefits associated with regular swimming are well documented. Family swimming is a relatively inexpensive activity. With 74% of respondents to our survey declaring they are now swimming less since Waterworld closed, it is important to consider the lost health benefits below. c) A viable business rooted in the community Though City of Edinburgh Council (CEC) and Edinburgh Leisure’s main justification for closing Waterworld was financial, Splashback firmly believes that, given the chance, Waterworld can be turned into a viable not-for-profit business. As this business case shows, we believe this can be achieved by firstly reducing costs – especially staffing and energy – and maximising income from multiple income streams, including the new ones identified above. In addition, grant funding would be obtained to finance the capital developments, including installing renewable energy sources, and specific activity programmes. By combining the basics of commercial business development – including better marketing of the facility as a leisure destination (the facility has had no marketing since the decision to close in 2005) – with the principles of social enterprise, we believe Waterworld can become a viable and financially sustainable business rooted in the community. 1.3. ACHIEVING THE VISION Splashback believes that these three key elements to our vision for the future of Waterworld can be achieved by doing the following:
________________________________________________________________________________________________
This business plan is confidential and should not be copied in whole or in part nor its contents communicated to any other party without the prior consent of Splashback. PAGE

6

Make more of what we’ve got: It is possible to use the space within Waterworld more efficiently, allowing new uses and new users to be introduced. Build on the building’s central location, public transport accessibility and availability of free car parking with a more developed and diverse leisure offer. Waterworld is the city’s only leisure pool. Every other surrounding local authority area has its own leisure pool. Better marketing, better awareness of the facility across the city and a better alignment of the pool with the city’s tourism strategy are all steps that should be taken to build up Waterworld as a genuine city-wide leisure destination. Analysis by the Splashback campaign found that approximately 50 % of visits (60,000) came from Leith, 40% (48,000) from throughout the rest of Edinburgh with 10% (12,000 visits) travelling from outwith the city boundaries to use the facility. Building a Broad Community of Users: Waterworld cannot justify its survival without its management firmly embedding the facility within as broad a community users as possible with a strong focus on enhancing health, well-being and happiness. The facility can work harder to meet the needs of young families; ethnic minorities; those with disabilities; teenagers; single parents; young children; and the deprived by working with a range of organisations to bring swimming, water confidence and fun to as many people as possible. At a time when inactivity, obesity and inequality are on the rise, Waterworld can be a focal point for the city’s efforts to tackle these issues by working in partnership with local and national charities and organisations. Continued Investment by CEC: Waterworld can be a pool that is financially sustainable. As Edinburgh’s only wet-only facility, it currently requires higher than average subsidisation. The figures provided elsewhere within this business plan demonstrate that this does not have to be the case in the longer term. While it is our position that subsidising Waterworld is an investment that pays itself back through the health and well-being of its population, we can show that more efficient management, streamlined staffing, a revised structure of entry fees and other basic measures can reduce the required level of subsidy. A community-owned pool would still require support from City of Edinburgh Council in some form, however we are confident that it will be less than currently required. Once Waterworld is gone, it’s gone. Given current and future public funding constraints, no equivalent facility will be built for at least another generation. Therefore the hurdles for disposing of such a facility must be extremely high. We have seen Scottish swimmers succeed in Team GB during the London 2012 Olympics. Is CEC’s 2012 legacy set to be the loss of this unique sporting and leisure facility?

________________________________________________________________________________________________
This business plan is confidential and should not be copied in whole or in part nor its contents communicated to any other party without the prior consent of Splashback. PAGE

7

2. Policy context for a community bid
Swimming has a unique role in society today. It is one of the main sports at the 2012 London Olympics and, at the same time, enjoys the highest level of participation in the UK outside of walking. In addition to helping to deliver the Scottish Government’s health agenda, swimming as an activity provides enjoyment and valuable time together for all the family. What’s more, the ability to swim helps to make family members safer near water. In the survey conducted by Splashback, the user group which was perceived to use Waterworld most was families with young children. It is imperative that young children, particularly the under fives, are provided with valuable opportunities to engage with sport. Hannah Miley, Scottish Olympic swimmer, says: “I loved the water at a very young age, the first pool I went to was in Aviemore. By the age of three, I could swim backstroke, and with encouragement from my family, and our genuine love of this wonderful sport, I went from strength to strength and quickly progressed to where I am today… Keep swimming – whether you want to be safe, have fun or to be a competitive swimmer like me, it really is the sport for everyone!” The continuing development of swimming as an inclusive, fun and accessible physical activity delivering long-term health benefits is simply not possible without a network of well-run pools, and community enterprises will have a big part to play in this network in the future. 2.1. NATIONAL AND LOCAL PRIORITIES AND POLICIES The proposal for the community-run pool at Waterworld has support at local and national policy levels. Its re-opening will help realise the following policy priorities: 1. 2. 3. 4. Scottish Government: National Outcomes Single Outcome Agreement (Edinburgh Partnership) A New Contract with the Capital (City of Edinburgh Coalition Agreement) Edinburgh Tourism Strategy

Below, we briefly run through these priorities and show how Splashback’s proposal would respond to these. 2.1.1. & 2.1.2: National Outcome & Single Outcome Agreements (SOAs) National Outcome 1: We live in a Scotland that is the most attractive place for doing business in Europe. National Outcome 2: We realise our full economic potential with more and better employment opportunities for our people. This links with the SOA priority: Edinburgh's economy delivers increased investment, jobs and opportunities for all. Splashback response: Waterworld’s re-opening will be an investment in Leith and the wider Edinburgh economy. We believe there is additional, unused capacity in the pool for supporting local fitness and leisure businesses. The facility will help them expand, maintain and support jobs locally. It will offer additional casual employment to young people, i.e. in the cafe, and the chance to train up in a new skill. An alternative use, most likely to be retail, would impact negatively on local traders and the centre of Leith’s community.
________________________________________________________________________________________________
This business plan is confidential and should not be copied in whole or in part nor its contents communicated to any other party without the prior consent of Splashback. PAGE

8

National Outcome 4: Our young people are successful learners, confident individuals, effective contributors and and productive citizens. National Outcome 5: Our children have the best start in life and are ready to succeed. This links with the SOA Priority: Edinburgh's children and young people enjoy their childhood and fulfil their potential. Splashback response: Successful, confident, happy children need places to play and investment in meeting their needs. Waterworld is designed for children and young families in particular. Its reopening would be a positive investment in their lives. National Outcome 6: We live longer, healthier lives. National Outcome 7: We have tackled the significant inequalities in Scottish society. This links with the SOA Priority: Edinburgh's citizens experience improved health and well-being, with reduced inequalities in health. Splashback response: Our Social Return on Investment analysis (see graph below) shows that supporting Waterworld was a sound investment in health and well-being. The facility saved money in the NHS by helping us live healthier lives.

National Outcome 9: We live our lives safe from crime, disorder and danger. National Outcome 10: We live in well-designed, sustainable places where we are able to access the amenities and services we need. National Outcome 12: We value and enjoy our built and natural environment and protect it and enhance it for future generations. These tie with Edinburgh’s SOA Priority: Edinburgh's communities are safer and have improved physical and social fabric.

________________________________________________________________________________________________
This business plan is confidential and should not be copied in whole or in part nor its contents communicated to any other party without the prior consent of Splashback. PAGE

9

Splashback response: Waterworld was a safe area of play for the city’s teenagers, providing a fun indoor environment for them to socialise and spend time off the streets. It was also part of the city’s wider social and built fabric, part of our community. There is now a gap where a great, well used facility was. Re-opening it will mend this scar and make a contribution to our community’s social and built fabric in line with these policy aspirations. National Outcome 14: We reduce the local and global environmental impact of our consumption and production. Splashback response: We have identified a number ways to save money on energy costs and make the facility greener. A re-opened Waterworld will be equipped with far more energy efficient boilers and the Combine Heat and Power unit will again produce energy and heat in a more efficient manner. This will help reduce the facility’s environmental impact. In the longer term, we would look to introduce renewable heat and power with the help of grant funding. National Outcome 15: Our public services are high quality, continually improving, efficient and responsive to local people’s needs. Splashback response: The decision to close Waterworld clashes with this national goal. Its reopening will re-establish the presence of a public service that responded to local people’s needs and is not replicated anywhere else in the city.

2.1.3 New Contract with the Capital Upon its election in May, City of Edinburgh Council’s new administration released a document titled A New Contract with the Capital. This document comprises the coalition agreement between the Edinburgh Labour Party and the Scottish National Party and with the people of the city. It sets out the drivers for the coalition. There has, it states, been a breakdown of trust between the city’s people and our elected representatives. “That relationship needs to be repaired...this new contract with the Capital marks a fresh start with the Council willing to listen to local people and work together with local communities, business and the third sector. A Council where co-operation, fairness, accountability and responsibility will really matter.” Future decisions, it states, are to be consensus-based and better reflect public opinion. We see the re-opening of Waterworld as a test of the Council's commitment to this contract. The contract makes six key commitments to the city’s residents with a further 50 objectives. Those relevant are set out below. To ensure that every child in Edinburgh get the best start in life a. We will increase support for vulnerable children including help for families so fewer go into care. b. To reduce poverty, inequality and deprivation. Splashback response: In relation to vulnerable children's needs, one third of all children in Leith live in poverty. 50% of Waterworld users (according to our survey) come from the Leith
________________________________________________________________________________________________
This business plan is confidential and should not be copied in whole or in part nor its contents communicated to any other party without the prior consent of Splashback. PAGE

10

area. Waterworld is a key part of local leisure infrastructure, providing affordable opportunities for fitness, fun and family bonding. To reduce poverty, inequality and deprivation. Splashback response: In terms of reducing poverty and deprivation, our initial social investment return analysis, using the Edinburgh Leisure model, indicates that the annual investment from City of Edinburgh Council in the facility was substantially compensated for by projected future savings to the public purse in health and economic benefits. Providing for Edinburgh's economic growth and prosperity. c. We will work with public organisations, the private sector and social enterprise to promote Edinburgh to investors. d. Examine ways to source new funding to support small businesses. e. Continue efforts to develop the city's gap sites and encourage regeneration. f. To identify unused Council premises to offer on short, low cost lets to small businesses, community groups and other interested parties. g. To continue to maintain a sound financial position including long term financial planning. Splashback response: The re-opening of Waterworld will help provide for economic growth and prosperity. It has been demonstrated that community run resources are more efficient and profitable. The Council's proposed partnership working with the community for economic benefit will have an opportunity at WATERWORLD to demonstrate what this approach can do. The alternative use for the property is retail. Should a retailer move into the premises, it will impact negatively on local traders and our community. Should the property fail to attract sufficient retailer interest, the property will remain vacant, a gap site and a physical indictment of failure to support the Edinburgh community.

Strengthening and supporting our communities and keeping them safe. We will: h. Strengthen neighbourhood partnerships and further involve local people in decisions on how Council resources are used. Splashback response: Support for an ongoing leisure use at this location will strengthen the community by continuing to invest in a much loved, well used and much missed community facility in the city. It will also demonstrate that the Council has listened to the city's residents and responded to public opinion, which emphatically supports the reopening of Waterworld. Ensuring Edinburgh and its residents are well cared for. We will: i. To develop improved partnership working across the capital and with the voluntary sector. j. Continue to support and invest in our supporting infrastructure. k. To invest in healthy living and fitness advice for those in most need. Maintaining and enhancing the quality of life in Edinburgh. We will: l. Meet greenhouse gas targets. m. Encourage the development of community energy co-operatives.

________________________________________________________________________________________________
This business plan is confidential and should not be copied in whole or in part nor its contents communicated to any other party without the prior consent of Splashback. PAGE

11

Splashback response: Our quality of life has deteriorated since Waterworld closure. As is shown in our survey, 74% of Waterworld users say they are swimming less now Waterworld has closed, as there is no equivalent facility available. That is a real and sizeable impact. There is also a great opportunity to make this facility significantly more energy efficient. Discussions with Edinburgh Leisure's chief engineer have shown that the lack of investment in the physical infrastructure of the pool has left it behind in terms of energy efficiency. Waterworld will be greener under community ownership. 2.1.4 Edinburgh 2020: The Edinburgh Tourism Strategy (2012) Key points of the strategy are below: ● ● ● ● There are 3.27 million visits to Edinburgh every year, £1billion spend and domestic leisure market is estimated to grow by 2.6% per annum. Priority segments for Edinburgh are those that take short, out of season city breaks. The 25-40 age group (including those with young families) is a priority. Edinburgh is looking to develop its tourism appeal all year round and wants to maximise the use of the city’s capacity across the whole year with particular priority for growth in OctMarch. Target of 40,000 new jobs by 2018 in tourism. It is recognised that economic pressure has created opportunities in the domestic market (staycations).

● ●

The strategy also lists “enablers for growth” in the city’s tourism market. These are key factors that must be addressed in order to enable tourism in the city to flourish. One enabler is extending tourism’s footprint in the city and making visitors much more aware of what the wider city has to offer. The strategy goes on to state that “On a much more substantial scale, there is potential for the development of tourism and recreation in Leith... The focus of this project started in the mid-90’s, has diminished in recent years as a result of economic constraints...however the waterfront to offer major opportunities for new tourism related development in an area of economic need and for that reason, it remains a priority development zone for the city Council.” Splashback response: Waterworld can help meet these priorities. The pool provides an indoor facility suited to young families that is not available anywhere else in the city. It is an ideal wet weather destination for visiting families. It is centrally located (and just off one of the city’s main public transport corridors) and therefore easily accessible by tourists, while extending the city’s tourism footprint. We believe that Leith Waterworld should be promoted more strongly to visitors to the city as an ideal family activity. As it is indoor and heated, the pool is particularly suited to off-season visitors coming in the target months Oct-March. Given the stated strategy is to promote more tourism development in Leith, it seems counterproductive to close a facility with an existing tourism offer that could be expanded and developed more fully.

________________________________________________________________________________________________
This business plan is confidential and should not be copied in whole or in part nor its contents communicated to any other party without the prior consent of Splashback. PAGE

12

2.2 OTHER RELEVANT POLICIES 2.2.1 Sport Strategy Reaching Higher: Building on the Success of sport 21 is the national strategy for sport. This sets out four national priorities which are designed to build and sustain a sporting infrastructure enabling it to deliver the national outcomes, increase participation and improve performance. These priorities are: ● ● ● ● well trained people; strong organisations; quality facilities; providing player pathways

In the 2010 Knowledge, Attitudes and Motivations to Health (Scottish Household Survey), only 39% met the current recommendation of at least 30 minutes of moderate activity on most days of the week. A recent Growing up in Scotland Report: Overweight obesity and activity (Scottish Government 2012) identified the following across Scotland: ● ● ● ● 22% of children were overweight (including obese) 9% of children were obese 15% of children exercised for less than the recommended level of 60 minutes daily 31% of children had 3 or more hours screen time on a typical weekday

Participation in sports has falling over the past decade, according to the most recent Sports Scotland survey. There has been a noticeable drop in participation (at least once a month) by 1215 year olds in the period from 96% in 1998-2000 when data was first collected on children’s participation to 89% in 2005-07. The Growing Up in Scotland report underlined the importance of physical activity at an early age. The report lists that the risk factors for low physical activity were: ● ● ● ● a less physically active mother a less warm mother-child relationship mother thought children require less than 60 minutes a day of physical activity no nearby swimming pool

The proximity of a local pool, but also that pool’s appeal to mothers, is key in establishing physical activity at an early age. Waterworld clearly has a role in instilling and encouraging physical activity from an early age and helping families keep healthy. It’s particularly important for activity among girls, who are less inclined to participate in sports whilst growing up, with 43% participating at least once a month in 2005-07. Unfortunately, City of Edinburgh Council does not hold information on swimming by children under five. However, information from Edinburgh Leisure suggests that 40,000 primary aged school pupils engaged in swimming in their leisure time prior to the re-introduction of a charge for swimming in January 2010. The most recent figures suggest an alarming dip in attendance by those still at primary school, which would seem to indicate that Edinburgh will be no exception to trend identified in the recent Scottish Swimming/ Kellogg's report that found that a third of all children leave primary school being unable to swim.
________________________________________________________________________________________________
This business plan is confidential and should not be copied in whole or in part nor its contents communicated to any other party without the prior consent of Splashback. PAGE

13

Scottish Swimming’s Learn to Swim Programme sets out seven key stages, through which the learner must pass in order to develop his/her skills to swim proficiently. Stages 1-3 are particularly relevant to the argument in support of Waterworld’s reopening. Stage 1: Introduces the young non-swimmer to the water environment and establishes early floating and breathing practices whilst being supported by an adult in the water. Stage 2: The underwater environment is brought in with the introduction to submerging, whilst building on the swimmer’s confidence in being safe around and moving through the water. Stage 3: Early swimming stroke technique is incorporated into this level with beginner freestyle and backstroke practices. Floatation skills, confidence underwater and instruction on safe entry and exits from the water are reinforced and progressed. Edinburgh Leisure now recognises, partly in response to Splashback’s HIBS pool survey, that they have no fun pool in their portfolio, which is specifically designed around the needs of swimmer at those early three stages. This has left a gap in the city’s swimming offer, with implications for the promotion of swimming among Edinburgh’s youngest residents.

2.2.2. Curriculum for Excellence The benefits Waterworld brings to its community is also relevant to the Scottish Curriculum for Excellence for ages 3-18. In the principles and practices of the Health and Well-being component the Scottish government states: “Learning in health and well-being ensures that children and young people develop the knowledge and understanding, skills, capabilities and attributes which they need for mental, emotional, social and physical well-being now and in the future. Learning through health and well-being enables children and young people to…experience positive aspects of healthy living and activity for themselves [and] establish a pattern of health and well-being which will be sustained into adult
________________________________________________________________________________________________
This business plan is confidential and should not be copied in whole or in part nor its contents communicated to any other party without the prior consent of Splashback. PAGE

14

life, and which will help to promote the health and well-being of the next generation of Scottish children.” The Curriculum for Excellence also endorses the idea that the Health and Well-being of young people is the responsibility of all. Splashback believes that Waterworld can provide experiences which will help schools, with particular attention being paid to special schools, and practitioners deliver the curriculum in partnership with outside providers based within local communities. 2.2.3 Asset Transfer Over recent years, legislation and policy in Scotland has developed to encourage and support the ownership of assets by Communities. The Community Empowerment Action Plan recognised the positive benefits of community ownership (see below). This has been further strengthened by the Community Renewal and Empowerment Bill, which is currently out for consultation. The importance of ownership (or at minimum a 25-year lease) is echoed by many funding bodies which make ownership / control of an asset a prerequisite for the granting of funding. Recent research (published Sept 2011) commissioned by the BIG Lottery Fund and carried out by SQW Consulting states: ● ● ● ● ● Most Growing Community Assets (GCA) projects stated the community ownership provided increased confidence, autonomy and a legacy for the future. Community facility projects felt that they could be responsive to local needs and sufficiently flexible to make changes as their community changed. Community assets also seemed to be subjected to less anti-social behaviour. Such projects helped make communities self-sufficient, instilling pride in communities and giving them confidence to take on more projects. Community ownership helped community social enterprises earn stronger balance sheets putting them into better positions to secure funding and diversify their income.

Splashback is confident that our proposal regarding the asset transfer and community ownership of Waterworld will lead to positive changes for the local community. Thanks to the above research, it can be demonstrated that community ownership helps deliver national and local policy priorities. Asset Transfer of Sports Facilities to community based organisations is actively being encouraged by the Sports Minister and there is currently a £500,000 funding pot available with legislation being prepared around this initiative. After a pilot carried out by Development Trusts Association Scotland (DTAS) along with COSLA asset transfer support programme funded by the Scottish Government called COSS (Community Ownership Support Scheme) is supporting both local authorities and community groups. Waterworld has the potential to become a Community Sports Hub which is part of the SportScotland Commonwealth Games Legacy Plan.

________________________________________________________________________________________________
This business plan is confidential and should not be copied in whole or in part nor its contents communicated to any other party without the prior consent of Splashback. PAGE

15

3. Community Needs Analysis
The overwhelming level of public interest in and support for Splashback’s campaign to save Waterworld, since its formation at the end of November 2011, clearly demonstrates the high value placed on this unique facility by residents of Edinburgh and beyond. The damaging impact of the closure on the communities of Leith and the wider capital – especially on groups such as children, families and those with disabilities – is clearly evident from research carried out by Splashback. 3.1 PUBLIC NEED AND SUPPORT: PETITION AND SURVEY Over two months, from end November 2011 to end January 2012, the campaign group ran a petition against the closure which received in excess of 6,500 signatures. This response to the petition demonstrated overwhelming support from the residents of Leith and wider Edinburgh for re-opening Waterworld. Anecdotal evidence and conversations with the public during petitioning outside the pool indicated that: o Waterworld was widely valued, especially by families with young children and the disabled, for its unique features, including warmer water temperature and graded ‘beach’ area allowing easy access for non-swimmers, early swimmers and those with physical impairments. Half the pool’s users were from outside Leith. The facility was a city-wide leisure destination, despite minimal marketing by Edinburgh Leisure since the decision to close the pool was made in 2005. A number of users travelled to the pool from outside Edinburgh and as far afield as Peebles. These families would typically combine a pool visit with a meal and/or shopping the area, contributing to the local economy.

o

o

The strength of feeling about the pool’s closure convinced us of the value of our campaign and gave us the determination to continue and to succeed. The petition was handed in at the Full Council Meeting on 2 February 2012. Following the local authority’s decision to proceed with the closure and sell the site, Splashback continued to seek the re-opening of Waterworld. 3.2. IMPACT OF CLOSURE The user survey run by Splashback between mid-May and mid-July provides evidence that the closure of Waterworld has had a profound impact on the swimming habits of its core users: young people, families and those with physical disabilities or learning difficulties. Key findings include: 1. 74% of respondents said they are now swimming less since Waterworld closed. This figure alone is a damning indictment of the closure of Waterworld and an indication of the serious consequences it has had on swimming habits in the city. This has wider implications for health and well-being in the city, particularly on the user groups mentioned above.

________________________________________________________________________________________________
This business plan is confidential and should not be copied in whole or in part nor its contents communicated to any other party without the prior consent of Splashback. PAGE

16

Would you say you and/or your family are now swimming less following the closure of Waterworld?

Yes, swimming less often now it's closed No, the closure has not affected how often I/we go swimming

590 74% 133 17%

2. 45% of respondents are not using other pools since the closure 3. 92% of respondents would prefer to use a re-opened Waterworld to other pools in the city 4. The top five user groups for which respondents felt Waterworld was particularly important were (in order): Families with young children; Single parent families; Users with Disabilities; Teenagers; Mental health Users. 5. Free field responses cited the unique features of the pool - warmer water and graduated ‘beach access in particular, as being of irreplaceable value for non-swimmers, early swimmers and those with disabilities. There is no equivalent facility that is tailor made for these users. 6. Asked to state their preference for the use of the Waterworld site, nearly all those who answered the question wished to see Waterworld re-open, either as it was or as an improved facility. The need for a family friendly and accessible leisure facility in the Leith area is frequently cited in free field responses. A number of respondents voiced their concern about the prospect of an expanded supermarket 7. 75% of respondents agreed strongly that Waterworld was and should be an important social hub of Leith and wider communities. 8. 74% of respondents agreed strongly that Waterworld and its users had and would have a positive impact on the neighbourhood and businesses in and around the Foot o' the Walk. (only 2% disagreed with the statement). This indicates a strong perception of positive economic impact on the area, a positive impact that has been lost since closure.

To what extent do you think Waterworld and its users had and would have a positive impact on the neighbourhood and businesses in and around the Foot o' the Walk?

Very 591 74% Quite 153 19% Not 15 2%

________________________________________________________________________________________________
This business plan is confidential and should not be copied in whole or in part nor its contents communicated to any other party without the prior consent of Splashback. PAGE

17

3.3. EXISTING AND FUTURE USERS Existing Waterworld users: • Before its closure in January, the majority of users were private paying clients comprising mostly families with children. • Two parent and baby swimming classes were run on Friday mornings, and these sessions were always oversubscribed. Disabled users and their carers from day centres and support organisations from around the city used the pool regularly.

Splashback believes that Waterworld was seriously underused before its closure in January, and that potential markets of paying users were underdeveloped. Potential Future Users: The Splashback user survey showed substantial public interest in and support for an improved Waterworld offering additional facilities and activities, for families in particular. Respondents recognised there were areas that could be improved in Waterworld and supported a facility which had a more diverse offer for its users. In order of popularity, the top five facilities and activities respondents say they would use are: • • • • • Cafe Enlarged & improved soft play Parent and baby/toddler swimming classes, Children’s softplay parties and pool parties Aquafit classes

In line with this perceived public need, the leisure offering at Waterworld could be improved and expanded to draw in a solid and growing stream of private paying customers. In addition, minority and special needs groups could be catered for through the following: ● ● ● ● Female only sessions Seniors only sessions Supported swimming sessions for disabled users and their carers Single parent swim and softplay sessions, coffee mornings

The following groups, organisations and businesses would be invited to use the pool and associated facilities on a paid basis: ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● School groups and youth groups Waterbabies: private company that typically uses hotel pools with higher water temperatures. Swimeasy: swimming and coaching company that nurtures swimmers through to competitive national and international sporting activities Aquafit and Aqua Zumba franchises / instructors Scuba diving and surf schools, canoe clubs or any other providers of activities that require building up a level of water confidence Physiotherapists and Hydro-therapists who work with, for example, MS sufferers. Scottish Autism Disability support groups.

________________________________________________________________________________________________
This business plan is confidential and should not be copied in whole or in part nor its contents communicated to any other party without the prior consent of Splashback. PAGE

18

4. Competitor Analysis and Case Studies

4.1 COMPETITORS One of the justifications for closing Waterworld was that there were already a number of pools in Leith. In addition, it was stated at the time that the refurbished Royal Commonwealth Pool would provide additional leisure swimming facilities that would to some extent compensate for the loss of Waterworld. These issues are addressed below: 1. Leith Victoria: The most accessible local pool is Leith Victoria. This is a refurbished Victorian pool and has much going for it. However, it is primarily a lane swimming pool with a very small shallow area available to the youngest users. Its temperature is also not suited to less mobile swimmers (parents with small kids, those with special needs). It has no ‘leisure’ offer such as freely available toys and floats and limited /over-subscribed times for aquafit and parent/toddler classes. It is not a leisure pool but more suited to experienced / ‘serious’ swimmers who wish to focus on doing lengths. 2. Leith Academy: This pool is not accessible to members of the public. It is available to swimming clubs and for competitions. Local swimmers are not able to access it informally for an individual swim. It has no leisure offer. 3. Royal Commonwealth Pool (RCP): The RCP has a training pool with an adjustable floor which has a minimum depth of 1m. There are also a wide variety of buoyancy aids to assist
________________________________________________________________________________________________
This business plan is confidential and should not be copied in whole or in part nor its contents communicated to any other party without the prior consent of Splashback. PAGE

19

with play in the pool. However, it was never intended to use this pool to provide a leisure offer as WATERWORLD did. And for most residents in Leith and North Edinburgh, RCP is at least a half-hour bus ride away, so cannot be described as a ‘local’ leisure facility. In fact, Leith Waterworld was totally unique within the city as its only dedicated leisure pool and the only pool run by Edinburgh Leisure that offered flumes and a wave machine. It was a playpark with water rather than a swimming pool. The purpose of a re-opened Waterworld will be to emphasise the leisure aspect of swimming – fun, enjoyment, parties – and to provide more opportunities for over-subscribed classes to take place such as Aquafit, water-zumba, swimming (including privately delivered lessons such as Waterbabies) and parent and babies classes. The key advantages of this pool over others in the city – the warm temperature and the accessible beach – will allow us to explore other opportunities with disability charities and organisations for the elderly to see if a programme of classes or activities can be developed for these users as well. Alternative leisure pools Edinburgh residents can currently use (and therefore our competitors) are:

Pool Dunbar Leisure Pool

Distance from Waterworld

Details Enjoy Leisure - East Lothian Council

Facilities Beached area, wave machine, water jets and flume. The pool area is 25metres in length; health suite; gym; soft play; activity hall; creche & cafe

46.6km

Xcite Livingston

32.5km

West Lothian Leisure Pool and Teaching Pool; Council in Flumes; Health Spa; Gym; Fitness partnership with pool Classes trustees SpaceBugs Soft Play Area &Café Fife Sports and Leisure Trust 25 metre swimming pool; Cafe; Health Suite - Sauna and Steam Room; Gym; Pool Parties Twin flumes, leisure pool; separate 25m pool; Tsunami wave pool; Riptide River; Cafe; Play area & parties for U-5’s.

Beacon Leisure Centre, Burntisland

32.6km

Coatbridge Time Capsule

64.6km

North Lanarkshire Leisure Trust Limited

These are all competitors. However, given that they are all a substantial distance from the city, requiring a journey by car or train there is no reason to believe that Waterworld will not be able to capitalise on the inherent advantage of a central city-based location within Edinurgh’s population of 495,000 citizens. Furthermore, a lack of users was not the problem with Waterworld, but rather the limited revenue streams these users generated.

________________________________________________________________________________________________
This business plan is confidential and should not be copied in whole or in part nor its contents communicated to any other party without the prior consent of Splashback. PAGE

20

4.2 CASE STUDIES Successful ownership and management of assets by communities across Scotland and the UK is not new. There are hundreds of examples of projects from leisure centres to community shops; care homes to work units; small enterprises to multi million pound ones. There are many examples highlighted in the Development Trusts Association for Scotland http://www.dtascot.org.uk/content/what-is-a-development-trust who support 174 enterprising member groups in Scotland. There are currently 11 community-run sports facilities which incorporate a swimming pool. Experience from across those facilities is that: 1. It is essential to income generate via supplementary activities hence it is vital to optimise use of space and/or consider expansion. Examples include fitness gym, baby swimming classes, soft play, cafe, use of space for children's parties, surfing, canoeing and multi-use areas for classes. 2. The need to reduce expenditure in terms of heating has led most to introduce a range of renewable options including biomass boilers, solar panels and air to recovery systems. 3. The next biggest cost for most is staffing which necessitates many to consider compressed opening hours and in some cases use of volunteers e.g. Jesmond Swimming Pool and Poolewe Swimming Pool. Research is being carried out to explore how to best improve the long term sustainability of community managed swimming pools. Some examples of successful arrangements follow: Jesmond Swimming Pool, Newcastle upon Tyne This community run pool bucks the trend of the difficulties associated with running a financially sustainable pool. The key advantage Jesmond have is in terms of the size of the local catchment area, not only residential but a high, transient student population. The pool management has implemented many of the aforementioned measures to reduce costs and optimise use of space. They also see a key strength being staff culture - with each encouraged to play their part in the success of the organisation and being remunerated accordingly. Mid Argyll Swimming Pool, Lochgilphead Built and run by the local community the pool currently has an SLA for £24,500, a substantial cut from previous years. As a result it is looking to increase usage and diversify with plans including the redesign of the plant room which would provide for a soft play and roof extension cafè space. They are also in receipt of a grant from Scottish Gas to "green" the pool via the use of renewable technologies. Atlantis Leisure, Oban Established over 20 years ago this community-run sports facility initially took over running the swimming pool from the local authority in order to safeguard it for their wide rural catchment area. Unlike many, this facility has a contract with the local authority and subsidy of £300k per annum to run the pool. They are currently implementing a variety of cost saving measures and income generating actions to mitigate any reductions in funding which may be forthcoming. Facilities include swimming pool, fitness gym, large games hall, soft play, meeting room, crèche and cafè. The organisation sees its strength in the dedication of the board members who are each
________________________________________________________________________________________________
This business plan is confidential and should not be copied in whole or in part nor its contents communicated to any other party without the prior consent of Splashback. PAGE

21

required to commit considerably in terms of time and to take an active role in ensuring the forward motion of the organisation. Visions Leisure, Cumnock This pool was opened by the community 8 years ago. In addition to the pool it operates a fitness suite and has plans for a covered pitch facility which would be suitable for football, rugby and tennis. Interestingly, for the first six years of the operation the board sub contracted the management of the pool to an organisation in Kilmarnock called the Galleon Centre. They are now in the second year of managing and manning the facility themselves. X-Cel Leisure Centre, Coventry This centre which was re-opened as a community endeavour in December 2008 has a high proportion of disabled users and was given a grant of £200k from Sport England to make adaptations including warmer water temperature. There is a 25m pools plus health suites, crèche and cafè. The facility attracts over 10,000 per week. Under community provision, usage of the centre has increased by over 150%. Fitness subscriptions to the gym have increased from 480 to 1200, children on the Learn to Swim Programme have increased from 900 to 2400 and the schools swimming programme has increased from 6 to 28 schools. Adaptations to the pool include installation of a combined heat and power plant and air to pool heat recovery, thus reducing overall heating costs significantly. On opening the pool in December '08 Lord Sebastian Coe stated: "This is a fantastic example of community provision. A modern leisure facility providing many opportunities to community and disabled participants for years to come."

________________________________________________________________________________________________
This business plan is confidential and should not be copied in whole or in part nor its contents communicated to any other party without the prior consent of Splashback. PAGE

22

5.

Financial Sustainability & Viability

Our proposal for ensuring financial sustainability and viability revolves around: a) demonstrating that continuing to operate the Waterworld facility on an equivalent basis, but with changes to staffing structures and facility availability, represents good value to the community b) introducing new income streams and c) ensuring the medium term sustainability of the facility. Our summary financial analysis and projections are included as Appendix C. a) Continuing to operate on an equivalent basis This analysis of Waterworld is based on usages, revenues and costs provided by Edinburgh Leisure, and reasonable assumptions. Consistent with the Edinburgh Leisure figures, it also does not include central administration costs. These are not believed to be substantial, and will be contingent on the business model of the pool operator selected. We have included an additional capital equipment replacement provision of £60,000 per year to meet short term capital replacement requirements. Years 2 & 3 are premised on Waterworld being able to increase usage by 5%, income by 5% and control costs below 3.5%. The historical and projected operating losses for Waterworld are: • • • • • • 2009 2010 2011 Year 1 Year 2 Year 3 £460,000 £460,000 £340,000 £273,000 £249,000 £223,000

The year 1 improvement in operating loss is attributable to: More intensive use of the facility – We would open Waterworld for an extra day a week, whereas it previously operated on a three-day week outside of school holidays. Changes to the staffing structure – In establishing the minimum staffing requirement to safely operate Leith Waterworld, we have arrived at a structure which uses a higher proportion of variable to fixed staff costs, allowing us to keep FTE staff levels constant, at a lower FTE equivalent cost despite increased use of the facility. An additional increase in the rate per usage – Our Waterworld user survey demonstrated that 42% of respondents would be prepared to pay an adult rate of £6 and over, while 74% of respondents would be prepared to pay family rate of at least £12 pounds per usage. We have revised our rate per usage assumption for year 1 from equivalent basis £2.92 to £3.15, a revenue increase of £34,000. We believe that this equivalent basis and the implied subsidy required, would place Waterworld solidly within its peer group of community pool operators, especially those aimed at families and special needs groups in Scotland.
________________________________________________________________________________________________
This business plan is confidential and should not be copied in whole or in part nor its contents communicated to any other party without the prior consent of Splashback. PAGE

23

b) Introducing new revenue streams Waterworld’s non-staff costs are largely fixed, and the facility is not capacity constrained at projected usage levels. Any new revenue streams that cover additional variable rate staff costs will improve the operating loss, and provide more value to the community. We have not included projections of the additional income in our equivalent basis case, as the realisation of these will require some form of facility development, or agreement with other parties, which we have not undertaken at this stage of the bid process. Soft play dry activity: The facility has sufficient space for an improved soft play offering. Soft play activity would be beneficial to our core audience of children and special needs users. We would envisage funding the capital cost outwith the operating subsidy. Restricted use opening: The facility could be specifically opened, or the usage restricted for specialist water-based activity provision fitness sessions and early years swimming lessons. See ‘Potential future users’. Council swimming initiatives: Edinburgh council currently has a swimming initiatives budget, and we would look to win a reasonable proportion of it, especially that part intended for our target audience of young children and special needs users. See ‘Potential future users’. Improved retail offerings: Increased usage and accessibility will allow increased retail offerings such as refreshment and activity-related merchandise. The estimated improvement to operating loss of these new streams are: • • • • Soft play dry activity £52,000 Council swimming initiatives £20,000 Improved retail offering £10,000 Restricted use opening £10,000

c) Medium Term Sustainability We would look for Waterworld to continue to operate as a predominantly Wet facility. Wet facilities are capital intensive, the replacement, maintenance and upgrading of which does need to be provided for. It is envisaged that our charitable status, alignment of objectives with Edinburgh Council, and close ties with the Leith community, will all assist in obtaining the necessary financial and commercial support. Our facility is located in an area suffering multiple deprivation, supplies a unique and specialist service to our core user group, uses energy intensive plant and machinery, trains and employs a high proportion of young people, and is a gateway for first time employment. As such we believe we would be eligible for a wide range of grants and support. As operating equipment is replaced with more efficient equipment we envisage additional cost savings. Edinburgh Leisure has supplied an indicative capital replacement figure of circa £2.2million over the next 10 years. We feel grant linked funding of this quantum is realistically achievable provided we have reasonable certainty over operating subsidy levels, and tenure over the facility as typically required by grant suppliers.
________________________________________________________________________________________________
This business plan is confidential and should not be copied in whole or in part nor its contents communicated to any other party without the prior consent of Splashback. PAGE

24

POTENTIAL SOURCES OF GRANT FUNDING The capital costs of redeveloping and modernising aspects of the facility, improving energy efficiency and creating new leisure offerings and developing events programmes and other income streams may be met all or in part by grant funding. The following sources have been identified, but this is by no means a complete list:

FUNDER Comic Relief (Sports Relief) Various BIG Lottery grants programmes SportScotland

COMMENTS/DETAILS Amount limited for deprived communities. Awards for All 2014 Communities Growing Community Assets Projects must have well advanced strategic benefits. Innovative Community Projects. This body channels money donated by Littlewoods Gaming. Local philanthropist who has expressed interest in the campaign.

POTENTIAL GRANT £5,000 or higher Up to £10,000 £300 - £2,000 £10,000 to £1million Restricted potential due to competition. Up to £500,000 available. Up to £200,000 £40,000 Not established what form of support would be available. However, has invested in community facilities previously. Up to £200,000 approximately. Funds in variety of ways.

European Leader + Foundation for Sport and the Arts Tom Farmer

Gannochy Volant Trust

Supports youth and recreation development. JK Rowling charitable foundation keen to fund projects where benefit is to people in Edinburgh (particularly women and children) This could be undertaken by encouraging “crowd-sourced funding” elements of the project through websites such as Kickstarter and Spacehive.

Public Subscription

Target set by the applicant and raised by range of smaller subscriptions.

________________________________________________________________________________________________
This business plan is confidential and should not be copied in whole or in part nor its contents communicated to any other party without the prior consent of Splashback. PAGE

25

6. Strategic and operational management
It is proposed that a Scottish Charitable Incorporated Organisation (SCIO) is established to lead and manage the re-opened Waterworld. They will develop the facility to ensure it has maximum positive impact on Edinburgh’s community. The SCIO is a new legal form that helps charities enjoy the benefits of incorporation, including limited liability and legal personality, without being subject to the complex apparatus of company law and dual regulation currently faced by charitable companies. The SCIOs will be registered with and regulated by the Office of the Scottish Charity Regulator (OSCR). The constitution of this organisation will specify the number of Trustees and how they are appointed. It is anticipated that the Trustees will include representatives from Splashback, City of Edinburgh Council and other organisations that wish to be stakeholders or have an interest in insuring swimming is made available and encouraged among as wide a community as possible. A recent SCIO established to run the Crags Community Sports Centre includes Basketball Scotland as Trustees along with Castlerock Edinvar Housing Assocation. An equivalent set up would suggest the inclusion of SportScotland and/or Scottish Swimming on the board of Trustees. There is also the potential for the involvement in a Housing Association. A Service Level Agreement exists between the Crags and Castlerock Edinvar whereby the latter organisation provides caretaker and maintenance services for the sports hall. Housing Associations seek to support local facilities that benefit their tenants’ interests. Therefore, there is potential for a local housing association or other facilities provider to be involved in a similar way with Waterworld’s future. The SCIO will need to bring in external expertise to run the pool in terms of logistics, compliance, financial management and so on. Operational management The operational management of the pool is anticipated to be taken on by an experienced operating company. They would work alongside the SCIO in identifying new revenue streams, liaising with partner organisations, selling space to private clubs and fitness businesses and handling the day to day management of the facility and its staff.

________________________________________________________________________________________________
This business plan is confidential and should not be copied in whole or in part nor its contents communicated to any other party without the prior consent of Splashback. PAGE

26

7. Proposal
City of Edinburgh Council has rated Waterworld as in need of repair which would involve refurbishment expenditure (circa £2.2M) over the next 10 years. It is difficult to apply a positive asset value to the land and buildings in the context of the premises as a swimming pool requiring refurbishment. Community swimming pools are not major profit generators and, therefore, if the swimming pool were to be advertised as a going concern, it would be unlikely to find a buyer, far less achieve a substantial capital receipt. Therefore, it is proposed that Waterworld is transferred to a community organisation for the sum of £1 (see accompanying Heads of Terms letter). This could be on condition that it will be transferred back when no longer required as such a community facility. An alternative approach is to grant Splashback a 25 year lease on Leith Waterworld. Given that there is unlikely to be a surplus profit in the short to medium term, it is proposed that there is a fiveyear rent-free period, subject to review at five years, at which time a percentage of profits would be payable as rent to CEC.

________________________________________________________________________________________________
This business plan is confidential and should not be copied in whole or in part nor its contents communicated to any other party without the prior consent of Splashback. PAGE

27

8. Conclusion: Community Bid & Best Value
We believe that a community-owned leisure pool at Waterworld presents best value to the City of Edinburgh for the following reasons: Health & Well-being: The pool is uniquely suited to making a significant and increasingly vital contribution to the health and well-being of the city’s population, particularly children, those living in deprivation, those with special needs and the elderly. Economic Impact: The re-opening of Waterworld with revised business objectives will make a positive economic impact on the Leith and city-wide economy by encouraging local spending and supporting jobs locally. A community-run pool will offer local leisure businesses opportunities for growth and expansion by providing an alternative venue for water-based fitness and swimming classes. It also offers opportunities for employment, especially for young people. Tourism Impact: A strong indoor leisure destination will make a contribution to Edinburgh’s tourism offer, which is seeking to expand off-peak breaks by young families in out-of-centre locations. Community Engagement: Supporting a community bid for Waterworld would be in line with the City of Edinburgh Council's New Contract With the Capital’s commitment to take consensus-based decisions that reflect public opinion.

________________________________________________________________________________________________
This business plan is confidential and should not be copied in whole or in part nor its contents communicated to any other party without the prior consent of Splashback. PAGE

28