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Shiamasjid.com Jafariyanews.com Islamicdigest.net Asanquran.com Jobs4shia.com Al-imam.net Alimoula110.com Al-shia.com Leader.ir Sistani.org Irfan Haider - Officail Site Shahid Baltistani - Officail Site Answering-Ansar.org Shia Discussed Online Mathematics is the academic discipline, and its supporting body of knowledge, that involves the study of such concepts as quantity, structure, space and change. The mathematician Benjamin Peirce called it "the science that draws necessary conclusions".[2] Other practitioners of mathematics maintain that mathematics is the science of pattern, and that mathematicians seek out patterns whether found in numbers, space, science, computers, imaginary abstractions, or elsewhere.[3][4] Mathematicians explore such concepts, aiming to formulate new conjectures and establish their truth by rigorous deduction from appropriately chosen axioms and definitions.[5] Through the use of abstraction and logical reasoning, mathematics evolved from counting, calculation, measurement, and the systematic study of the shapes and motions of physical objects. Knowledge and use of basic mathematics have always been an inherent and integral part of individual and group life. Refinements of the basic ideas are visible in mathematical texts originating in the ancient Egyptian, Mesopotamian, Indian, Chinese, Greek and Islamic worlds. Rigorous arguments first appeared in Greek mathematics, most notably in Euclid's Elements. The development continued in fitful bursts until the Renaissance period of the 16th century, when mathematical innovations interacted with new scientific discoveries, leading to an acceleration in research that continues to the present day.[6] Today, mathematics is used throughout the world as an essential tool in many fields, including natural science, engineering, medicine, and the social sciences such as economics and psychology. Applied mathematics, the branch of mathematics concerned with application of mathematical knowledge to other fields, inspires and makes use of new mathematical discoveries and sometimes leads to the development of entirely new disciplines. Mathematicians also engage in pure mathematics, or mathematics for its own sake, without having any application in mind, although practical applications for what began as pure mathematics are often discovered later.[7]

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Math Two mathematical subject areas that study the properties of algebraic structures viewed as a whole are universal algebra and category theory. Algebraic structures, together with the associated homomorphisms, form categories. Category theory is a powerful formalism for studying and comparing different algebraic structures.http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Abstract_algebra mathematics (mth-mtks) The study of the measurement, relationships, and properties of quantities and sets, using numbers and symbols. Arithmetic, algebra, geometry, and calculus are branches of mathematics http://www.thefreedictionary.com/mathematics

78164 06286 20899 86280 34825 34211 70679 82148 08651 32823 ... A sphere has two sides. However, there are one-sided surfaces. There are shapes of constant width other than the circle. One can even drill square holes. There are just five regular polyhedra In a group of 23 people, at least two have the same birthday with the probability greater than 1/2 Everything you can do with a ruler and a compass you can do with the compass alone Among all shapes with the same perimeter a circle has the largest area. There are curves that fill a plane without holes Much as with people, there are irrational, perfect, complex numbers As in philosophy, there are transcendental numbers As in the art, there are imaginary and surreal numbers A straight line has dimension 1, a plane - 2. Fractals have mostly fractional dimension You are wrong if you think Mathematics is not fun Mathematics studies neighborhoods, groups and free groups, rings, ideals, holes, poles and removable poles, trees, growth ... Mathematics also studies models, shapes, curves, cardinals, similarity, consistency, completeness, space ... Among objects of mathematical study are heredity, continuity, jumps, infinity, infinitesimals, paradoxes... Last but not the least, Mathematics studies stability, projections and values, values are often absolute but may also be extreme, local or global. Trigonometry aside, Mathematics comprises fields like Game Theory, Braids Theory, Knot Theory and more One is morally obligated not to do anything impossible Some numbers are square, yet others are triangular The next sentence is true but you must not believe it The previous sentence was false 12+3-4+5+67+8+9=100 and there exists at least one other representation of 100 with 9 digits in the right order and math operations in between One can cut a pie into 8 pieces with three movements Program=Algorithms+Data Structures There is something the dead eat but if the living eat it, they die. A clock never showing right time might be preferable to the one showing right time twice a day Among all shapes with the same area circle has the shortest perimeter

http://www.cut-the-knot.org/do_you_know/index.shtml.

Math Math echoes the halls everyday. When it reaches my ears, I flinch every time. Math is torture for me. Learning all about pi, square roots, formulas, and other things. Why was math invented! Why does it have to be pure torture? I hate math, no wait�I absolutely loathe math. I will never understand math and that�s final! No more math for me, it makes my brain dizzy! But I have to learn math. We have to use math everyday. Humbug! Casey Lyon

http://www.poemhunter.com/poem/math-10/ What Is Mathematics? The National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM), the world's largest organization devoted to improving mathematics education, is developing a set of mathematics concepts, or standards, that are important for teaching and learning mathematics. There are two categories of standards: thinking math standards and content math standards. The thinking standards focus on the nature of mathematical reasoning, while the content standards are specific math topics. Each of the activities in this booklet touches one or more content areas and may touch all four thinking math areas. The four thinking math standards are problem solving, communication, reasoning, and connections. The content math standards are estimation, number sense, geometry and spatial sense, measurement, statistics and probability, fractions and decimals, and patterns and relationships. We have described them and then provided general strategies for how you as a parent can create your own activities that build skills in each of these areas. Thinking Mathematics Problem solving is key in being able to do all other aspects of mathematics. Through problem solving, children learn that there are many different ways to solve a problem and that more than one answer is possible. It involves the ability to explore, think through an issue, and reason logically to solve routine as well as nonroutine problems. In addition to helping with mathematical thinking, this activity builds language and social skills such as working together.

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In an effort to get children excited about math, it�s a great idea to relate math to the real world. As you know, mathematical concepts can be found in almost every aspect of our lives. By providing students with the �glasses� to see math in the world, they will begin to notice how math infiltrates their very existence. This project is designed to show you a few ways that math can be related to the real world in the hope that you will use it as a springboard for your own ideas to bring every day math into your classroom. Never again do you have to feel imprisoned by a boring textbook or dry explanation of decimals. Lessons including money, baking, and candy will inspire even the most down trodden mathematicians. Each day, students gather into a circle to discuss different ways that they see math in the world (i.e. how much time it took to complete homework, how much change they received for purchases). As a group, students choose the juiciest example and the child who shared the example will write it in a �Math: It�s Everywhere!� binder. You�ll be amazed at how much your pupils enjoy going back through this book to read these math examples. Using http://www.weather.com to check the daily weather, students can write the temperature high and low in their math notebooks. At the end of each week, pupils create a bar graph of the weather pattern. The teacher can also use the weather as a catalyst for several other mathematical purposes including differences, averages, and temperature readings. By asking and showing children daily about where they experience math in the real world, they will begin to realize that math is indeed everywhere. http://www.teachersnetwork.org/lessonplans/curriculumgrant/Paine/a_paine.htm

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Publisher Comments: Math You Can Really Use�Every Day skips mind-numbing theory and tiresome drills and gets right down to basic math that helps you do real-world stuff like figuring how much to tip, getting the best deals shopping, computing your gas mileage, and more. This is not your typical, dry math textbook. With a comfortable, easygoing approach, it: Covers math you'll need for balancing your checkbook, choosing or managing credit cards, comparing options for mortgages, insurance, and investments, and more Includes the basics on fractions, decimals, percentages, measurements, and geometric math Clues you in on simple shortcuts Includes examples plus pop quizzes with answers to help you solidify your understanding

Features tear-out guides you can take with you for tipping and converting measurements Want to know how much 20% off is in dollars and cents? Want to figure out how much gas is going to cost for your road trip? This is the math book you'll really use! Synopsis: Covers math that we use every day, including checking, credit card calculations, loans/mortgages math, insurance math, plus more. The book will include numerous tear-out pages that readers can take with them and easily refer to; for example, a tipping card. Synopsis: One of the most practical math books ever The National Assessment of Adult Literacy reports that 22 percent of U.S. adults have a below-basic understanding of rudimentary math, and 33 percent have only a basic understanding. This practical guide uses everyday examples to teach the math that people need to know in order to balance their checkbooks, do credit card calculations, compare loan rates, compute their gas mileage, and more. Complete with tear-out reference guides such as a tipping card, this book helps adults get up to speed on the math they really need� every day. David Herzog (Easton, PA) is the author of numerous books about mathematics and over 100 educational software programs. He taught math education at Fairleigh Dickinson University, was mathematics coordinator for New Jersey� s Rockaway Township public schools, and taught in New York City public schools. Synopsis: Math You Can Really Use� Every Day skips mind-numbing theory and tiresome drills and gets right down to basic math that helps you do real-world stuff like figuring how much to tip, getting the best deals shopping, computing your gas mileage, and more. This is not your typical, dry math textbook. With a comfortable, easygoing approach, it: Covers math you'll need for balancing your checkbook, choosing or managing credit cards, comparing options for mortgages, insurance, and investments, and more Includes the basics on fractions, decimals, percentages, measurements, and geometric math Clues you in on simple shortcuts Includes examples plus pop quizzes with answers to help you solidify your understanding Features tear-out guides you can take with you for tipping and converting measurements Want to know how much 20% off is in dollars and cents? Want to figure out how much gas is going to cost for your road trip? This is the math book you'll really use back to top About the Author David Alan Herzogis the author of numerous mathematics books and over 100 educational software programs. He taught math education at Fairleigh Dickinson University, was mathematics coordinator for New Jersey's Rockaway Township public schools, and taught in New York City public schools. back to top Table of Contents

Introduction. 1 Close Enough. It�s the Big Ones That Count. Rounding Up or Down. 2 A Number of Realms of Numbers. The Realm McCoys. Once, Twice, Three Shoot. When I Was in My Prime. 3 Arithmetic of Whole Numbers. Addition. Multiplication. Hey, Hey, Take It Away. Standard Column Subtraction. Renaming in Subtraction. A House Divided. 4 Common Fractions. What Is a Fraction? Equivalent Fractions. Adding and Subtracting Fractions. Multiplying Fractions. Reciprocals. Dividing Fractions. Fractions Greater than One. Adding Mixed Numbers. Subtracting Mixed Numbers. Changing Mixed Numbers to Fractions. Multiplying and Dividing Mixed Numbers. 5 Decimal Fractions. Place Value. Extending Place Value.

Adding and Subtracting Decimals. Multiplying Decimals. Dividing Decimals. 6 Using Percents. Percent Strategies. Interest. Taxes. Tipping. On Sale, or Discounts. 7 Measurement. Linear Measure. SI Units. Cutting the Rug. The Fabric of Society. Round and Round We Go. Trounced by the Ounce. Fluids. Weighting for Godot. Comparison Shopping. Beware of Downsizing. 8 Geometry, Plane and Not So Basic Concepts. Getting A New Angle. The Parallel Universe. That Figures. Ratio and Proportion. The Pythagorean Theorem. Four Corners. Solid!

Surface Area. 9 Checkbook Math. Register, but Don�t Vote. An Alternate Strategy. 10 Credit Card Math. Take an Interest in Interest! Universal Default. Secured Credit Cards. 11 Mortgages. The $100,000 Question. An $89,000 Mortgage at 8%. A $159,000 Mortgage at 7%. Alternative Terms. Faster Payback. When to Refinance. 12 Insurance Math. Probability. Term Life. Nonterm Life. Other Risks. Automobile Insurance. 13 Simple Investing. Fixed Income Securities. Certificates of Deposit. Stocks. Bonds. Mutual Funds. The Money Market. 14 Distance Problems.

Solving Linear Equations. Distance Problems for Real. Fuel Economy. More Distance Problems. http://www.powells.com/biblio/9780470054024?&PID=31879

When you buy a car, follow a recipe, or decorate your home, you're using math principles. People have been using these same principles for thousands of years, across countries and continents. Whether you're sailing a boat off the coast of Japan or building a house in Peru, you're using math to get things done. How can math be so universal? First, human beings didn't invent math concepts; we discovered them. Also, the language of math is numbers, not English or German or Russian. If we are well versed in this language of numbers, it can help us make important decisions and perform everyday tasks. Math can help us to shop wisely, buy the right insurance, remodel a home within a budget, understand population growth, or even bet on the horse with the best chance of winning the race.

Mathematics is the only language shared by all human beings regardless of culture, religion, or gender. Pi is still approximately 3.14159 regardless of what country you are in. Adding up the cost of a basket full of groceries involves the same math process regardless of whether the total is expressed in dollars, rubles, or yen. With this universal language, all of us, no matter what our unit of exchange, are likely to arrive at math results the same way. Very few people, if any, are literate in all the world's tongues�English, Chinese, Arabic, Bengali, and so on. But virtually all of us possess the ability to be "literate" in the shared language of math. This math literacy is called numeracy, and it is this shared language of numbers that connects us with people across continents and through time. It is what links ancient scholars and medieval merchants, astronauts and artists, peasants and presidents. http://www.learner.org/interactives/dailymath/