WILKES-BARRE, PA $1.

00 Sunday, September 2, 2012
Blind since birth
Caitlin Best to get
Phillips Award.
>> PAGE 3
Exhibit of photos
from 2011 flood to
open Saturday.
>> PAGE 4
Classic car club
puts on show to
benefit local vet.
>> PAGE 36
Honor well
deserved
The flood
in photos
Plains Boys
show toys
COMPLETE HS SPORTS COVERAGE BEGINS PAGE 46
BILL TARUTIS/FOR THE SUNDAY DISPATCH
Gettin’
his licks
James Masulis, 21
months, of Pittston,
takes a lick of a
chocolate ice cream
cone at the Oblates
of St. Joseph
Chicken Barbecue
last Sunday.
More photos, 32, 33..
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Life was a pain for Michael
Sherrill. Literally. Mostly a
headache, sometimes a back-
ache, but always a pain.
Michael was born in pain and
when, at a few weeks old, doc-
tors diagnosed him with hydro-
cephalus, everyone knew why.
The literal translation of
hydrocephalus is “water in the
head.” It’s caused by a build up
of cerebrospinal fluid. That
build up can do a lot of nasty
things to a body, but mostly it
just plain hurts.
I met Michael when he was
18 years old and a brand new
student at Luzerne County
Community College. I don’t
remember exactly when I first
learned about his headaches but
I know it was not on the first
day of class. He simply wasn’t a
complainer.
The first time we sat down
and talked about his pain was
the first time he had to tell me
he’d be missing a week or so of
school due to surgery. That’s
when I found out that surgery
was away of life for him – he
had had dozens of operations,
mostly on his head, always to
try to relieve the pressure – and
that, I suppose, is when I found
out he had to put up with a
headache every single day of
his life. And every minute of
every day.
Michael wanted to be a jour-
nalist and he would have been a
darned good one. He had all the
qualities: a natural curiosity, a
genuine concern for people, a
love of the English language,
and a willingness to learn. I
never saw a student more com-
fortable in an interview sit-
uation. Michael would think
nothing of sitting down with the
college president and firing one
tough question after another.
But the one quality that made
me think “this kid’s a journal-
ist” was his sense of humor.
You must have one of those –
and in good measure – to work
in this business.
When Michael returned to
school following his 57th oper-
ation, he told us all, “You can
start calling me ‘Heinz’ now,
I’m at 57.”
And in the summer of 2006,
before consenting to his 91st
surgery – the one that would be
his last – he was still joking.
After the 90th operation,
Michael had made a pronoun-
cement: no more surgeries.
He’d had enough.
So he had to be talked into
the next one. His doctor told
him the choice was his but if he
did not have it, he could wind
up a vegetable.
“I can’t be a vegetable,” Mi-
chael said. “I can’t.”
“I understand,” the doctor
said. “I couldn’t either.”
“No, you don’t understand,”
Michael said. “You’ve never
seen my mother’s garden. If I
was a vegetable, she’d forget to
water me.”
Michael’s mom told that
story on the day he died. She
enjoyed telling it because she
wanted everyone to know that
her son kept his sense of humor
right to the end. In his final
hours, he asked his mom to
have a private viewing. “I don’t
want a bunch of strangers
standing by my coffin telling
you how good I look,” he told
her.
That spoke to another quality
we journalists seem to have:
cynicism.
Mrs. Sherrill honored her
son’s request.
Michael Sherrill was more
than just an LCCC student. He
was part of the family. He had
taken classes for nine years. His
health situation kept him from
ever taking a full load, and
often he’d need to ask for a
grade of ‘incomplete’ because
of an emergency surgery.
But he never stopped going
to school, never lost his love of
learning, never gave up on his
dream to earn a college degree.
When Tom Leary, now
LCCC president but then vice
president of student devel-
opment, learned that Michael
might be near death, he went
over his transcripts and discov-
ered that Michael – although he
did not realize it – was eligible
to graduate. He had indeed
earned his degree.
It was mid-summer. Leary
had an official LCCC diploma
shipped overnight and on a
rainy Friday afternoon, he,
along with Michael’s counselor
Deb Boyson, department chair
Tom McHugh, and professors
Ron Reino, Andy Petonak and
I, arranged to gather at Mi-
chael’s home in Larksville for a
private graduation ceremony.
We arrived two hours after
Michael had died. He was 27.
“Don’t say you’re sorry,” his
mom interrupted each of us as
we tried to express our condo-
lences. “This is a happy day for
Michael. He is finally free, free
from pain. He was alert ‘til the
end and he was so happy to
know that he was finally a col-
lege graduate. You know what
that meant to him. LCC was his
life. He loved going to school.”
Mrs. Sherrill said Michael’s
diploma would be placed in the
coffin with him. Even though
he never got to see it or hold it,
she said it was his most prized
possession.
Ed Ackerman, optimist
eackerman@psdispatch.com
For those who hate school
Arline Phillips Award........................................3
Flood photo exhibit..........................................4
Felittese Festival ...............................................6
Local Chatter ....................................................8
Peeking into the Past .....................................10
Editorial /Cartoon ...........................................14
Maria Heck........................................................15
Nutrition............................................................15
Avoca reunion.............................................16, 17
Maria remembers............................................31
Town News ......................................................39
Sports ..............................................................46
Obituaries........................................................59
School menus.................................................B2
Religion ........................................................B4-7
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C
aitlin Best likes to tell
friends that she has three
eyes, “but only half of
one works.”
Best, 26, has beenlegallyblind
since she was
born three
months prema-
ture on April 13,
1986, weighing
less than two
pounds. Her left
eye sees only
light. Her right
eye can see
shapes and col-
ors and can dis-
tinguish the big
“E” on an eye
chart.
Her third eye is an indication
of her sense of humor. It’s a tat-
too of an Egyptian-style eyeball
on her wrist.
Best will receive the Arline
Phillips Award, which honors a
blind person who is independent
anda role model for others, at the
Wilkes-Barre Association of the
Blind Annual Dinner set for
Sept. 12 at the Woodlands Inn.
Three months after she was
born, Best appeared in a photo
on the front page of The Sunday
Dispatch with her parents after
they brought her home from the
Geisinger Danville Medical
Center where she had been in
neo-natal care for 12 weeks, hav-
ing undergone open heart sur-
gery.
Her heart is okay, the only last-
ing effect of the surgery being,
she said, “An
awesome scar.”
Her eyes,
though, were vic-
tims of being
three months
premature. The
retinas did not
have time to
form completely.
Best said her left
eye usedtobe her
better eye, but
she lost most of
the vision in it after a series of
operations for retinal detach-
ment, glaucoma and cataracts.
“The left still tries to be dom-
inant. I have to try to focus with
my right. My eyes work inde-
pendently.”
Best’s parents, Ken and Sue,
never coddled her. She went to
Pittston Area High School, tak-
ing a regular curriculum and
joining the volleyball team.
“Volleyball was a different expe-
rience and definitely challeng-
ing since I don’t have depth per-
ception. At the time, my vision
was a lot better as far as seeing
distances so I was able to see the
ball and learned how to judge
where the ball was. Overall, it
was really fun.”
Friends helped her get around
school. “Once I knew my way
around, I was able to walk
around on my own. Once I knew
where a classroom was I was set
or if I wasn’t sure, I’d ask some-
one,” she said.
“Even with a disability, it was
pretty normal,” she said of her
high school days. “It was chal-
lenging reading the board and
papers and books, but I got
through it.”
She went to Misericordia Uni-
versity after high school as a
dorm student, a first step toward
independence. With the help of
sighted friends and enlarged
books and books on tape, she
graduated with a degree in infor-
mation systems and now works
at Tobyhanna Army Depot as an
Equal Employment Opportunity
Assistant.
Though moving home was an
option after college, Best instead
moved into an apartment in Pitt-
ston. “I wanted to be on my own
and be independent,” she said.
“My mom was kind of nervous.
But both my parents were under-
standing and helpful.”
BL I ND ASSOCI ATI ON HONOREE
She sees things differently
Caitlin Best's ` third eye' is a tattoo on her wrist.
‘Third eye’ shows sense
of humor of Pittston girl
who’s been blind since birth
By JACK SMILES
jsmiles@psdispatch.com
PHOTOS PROVIDED
Caitlin Best says her dog Teka has given her more independence.
With the help of sighted
friends and enlarged books
and books on tape, she
graduated with a degree in
information systems and
now works at Tobyhanna
Army Depot as an Equal
Employment Opportunity
Assistant.
See BEST, Page 7
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L
ast September Jamie
Smith was living in New
York City with his wife
Jenni and two-month-old baby
when they were forced to evac-
uate due to a hurricane. They
came here to stay in a family
home in Falls only to run into
Tropical Storm Lee and wind up
stranded without power in the
flood.
When the water went down,
Smith – a professional photogra-
pher who opened the T.W. Shoe-
maker Art Gallery in Wyoming
last April – toured West Pittston
and took some post-flood pho-
tos.
On Saturday, Sept. 8, Smith
will open an exhibit called “One
Year Later: A retrospective look
at the flood in the Susquehanna
River in West Pittston” at the
Shoemaker Gallery.
The event will include a gal-
lery reception from 1 p.m. to 4
p.m. and a neighborhood side-
walk sale to benefit the West
Pittston Library.
The exhibit will run through
October 27.
The T.W. Shoemaker Gallery
is at 312 Wyoming Ave. in
Wyoming where Jamie’s great-
grandfather T.W. Shoemaker op-
erated a plumbing and hardware
business from the early 1900s
THE F LOOD OF 2011
JAMIE SMITH
Jamie Smith says this is one of his favorite flood aftermath photos because of the mammoth task ahead for a young boy hammering away at the walls of the kitchen in his
flooded home.
Flood photo exhibit opens Saturday in Wyoming
Event will also include a sidewalk sale to benefit the West Pittston Library
By JACK SMILES
jsmiles@psdiaptch.com
JAMIE SMITH
Sweeping away water froma hardwood floor in a West Pittston
home following the flood last September.
WHAT Flood photos exhibit opening
WHEN Sat., Sept. 8
RECEPTION1 to 4 p.m.
WHERE Shoemaker Gallery, 312 Wyoming Ave., Wyoming
I F YO U G O
See EXHIBIT, Page 9 S
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Former Luzerne County District Attorney
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As he stepped to the no. 1tee at
Fox Hill on the morning of his
90th birthday, Louis Mischianti
was the youngest guy in his four-
some.
Mischianti was golfing with
three of his long-time friends -
Elmo Clemente, Howard Rott-
man and Sam Gelso - all World
War II veterans, successful re-
tired businessmen and regular
golfers. They were all of born in
1922 and turned 90 years old this
year.
The four have been Fox Hill
members for a combined 211
years. Gelso, who grewup in the
Oregon section of Pittston and
lives in Jenkins, has been a mem-
ber for 63 years.
Gelso graduated fromold Pitt-
ston High in 1940, where he was
a 140-pound guard on the foot-
ball team blocking for Charley
Trippi. “He used to say, ‘Sammy,
gimme a foot.’ He’d slice
through and be gone.”
Gelso and Trippi, who lives in
Georgia, are still friends and talk
to each other regularly.
Gelso was a Staff Sergeant in
the Army Air Corps in WWII,
serving in England and Germa-
ny. He and his father ran the No.
14 Coal Company in the 1950s.
At peak production, they em-
ployed 550 men and pulled 1500
tons of anthracite out of shafts in
Ports Blanchard. Later, he own-
ed the Brocca Garages company.
He also built and owned Avenue
Lanes in Exeter, now Modern
Lanes.
Gelso and his wife, Theresa,
have a son, a dentist in Massa-
chusetts and four grandchildren.
Howard Rottman grew up in
Wilkes-Barre and lives in King-
ston. He’s been a Fox Hill mem-
ber for 58 years. In WWII, he
was a Tech Sergeant in the Army
Air Corps stationed in Cairo,
Egypt assigned to the Air Trans-
port Command.
He owned and operated the
Wyoming Valley Garment Com-
pany, a manufacturer of men’s
trousers, in Kingston. His wife is
deceased. He has a son and four
grandchildren.
Elmo Clemente grew up in
Wilkes-Barre and lives in King-
ston. He and his wife, Terry, have
five sons and three grandchil-
dren. Elmo’s brother was well
known in Pittston where he ran
Pat’s Shoe Repair on Broad
Street. Elmo was a partner in the
accounting firm of Snyder and
Clemente which has 28 employ-
ees. “I still go in once a week to
get a check,” he said, cracking up
his buddies.
Clemente’s been a Fox Hill
member for 50 years. In WWII,
he was a Navy Lt. First Grade
serving in the Pacific as an Exec-
utive Officer on board an am-
phibious assault ship or LSM
(Landing Ship Medium) and
landed tanks and combat troops
during the assault on Okinawa.
Mischianti said to Clemente,
“Maybe you landed me.”
Maybe he did. Mischianti was
a Marine combat PFC who
fought in the most famous Pacif-
ic battles at the Marshall Islands,
Iwo Jima, Saipan and Tinian.
Mischianti’s first wife is de-
ceased. He lives in Plains with
his second wife, Jan. He has
three children, eight grand chil-
dren and five great-grandchil-
GOL F I NG MARVEL S
JACK SMILES FOR THE SUNDAY DISPATCH
Ninety-year-old golfers, fromleft,Howard Rottman, Elmo Clem-
ente, SamGelso and Louis Mischianti enjoy a day at Fox Hill
Country Club.
Fox Hill foursome is
still shooting in the 90s
By JACK SMILES
jsmiles@psdispatch.com
See FOURSOME, Page 7
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It’s been over a 100 years since
the families of many Old Forge
residents immigrated here from
Italy, but for one weekend every
year those individuals get a sense
of what home felt like for their
ancestors.
The Felittese Association will
put on the annual Felittese Fes-
tival on Friday through Sunday,
Sept. 7 through 9, at the Felittese
Chapel grounds. This year
marks the 25th anniversary since
the festival was revitalized in
1987.
“The founding families came
over here with their faith…and
they had a chapel built, and the
first picnic was a celebration in
1907,” said Joe Terruso, Felittese
Association board member.
The festival is modeled after
one that is being held the same
weekend in Felitto, a province in
the town of Salerno, Italy.
Both festivals are held to hon-
or Our Lady of Constantinople,
who has been venerated in the
town of Felitto since 1790. The
Felittese Festival in Old Forge is
designed to bring descendents of
Felitto together for a weekend of
good food, music and prayer,
with a Mass scheduled for Sun-
day, Sept. 9, at Prince of Peace
Parish at 10 a.m., followed im-
mediately by a procession of the
carrying of the statue of Our La-
dy of Constantinople to the
chapel grounds.
“It goes back to the old days,
after the procession…everybody
used to make a dish and take it. It
was kind of a festive gathering,”
said Charles Saleski, Felittese
Association member.
Those involved were forced to
halt the festival in 1939, due
largely to World War II. Terruso
said that even though they could
no longer hold the festival, mem-
bers of the association still hon-
ored and celebrated Our Lady of
Constantinople.
“Prayer still went on at the
church during those years,” said
Terruso.
The fact that the festival is
rooted in something more than
just entertainment is what Terru-
so believes has kept it going as
long as it has.
“That’s the only reason it’s
lasted. If it wasn’t God, it
wouldn’t last. Things don’t last
when they’re just quick and not
steeped in religion, not steeped
in the faith,” said Terruso.
While those in the association
still continued the Mass, there
were many who missed the cam-
araderie that the festival created,
and when the land that the Felit-
tese Chapel grounds is currently
located on became available in
1987, the association assumed
ownership of it and brought the
festival back to the delight of
those living in Old Forge, and
some who have left the area.
“People fromthe town, former
residents, that are actually Felit-
tese origin, they come from all
over the United States just to
come back, see people in the
town, meet people and families,
there’s a lot of local interest in it,”
said Saleski.
Having the festival has also
created an interest in the celebra-
tion from those in the communi-
ty who do not belong to Felittese
Association.
“The whole community, not
just members of the association,
is behind it. Tens of thousands of
hours have beendonatedover the
last 25 years by volunteers who
have given their free time,” said
Terruso. “Everyone gives as
much as they can, and that’s the
fuel that makes it go.”
In addition members of the Fe-
littese, members of the Sons of
Italy, Prince of Peace Parish and
the community will be donating
their time this weekend to the
event. Many began volunteering
as early as last year, helping to
Steeped in tradition
Felittese Festival in Old Forge celebrates 25th anniversary next weekend
DON MCGLYNN
dmcglynn@golackawanna.com
DON MCGLYNN/GO LACKAWANNA
Lou Febbo, Sons of Italy; Charles Saleski, Felittese; Christina Mordente, Felittese; and Lou Terruso,
Felittese are all volunteering their time to the Festival of the Felittese.
DON MCGLYNN/GO LACKAWANNA
Felittese Association members like Teddy Giglio will be volunteering their time in the kitchen for the
fundraiser for Brian Budzak, scheduled for Sunday, August 5.
WHAT 25th annual Felittese Fes-
tival
WHEN Friday through Sunday,
Sept. 7 through 9
WHERE Felittese Association, 145
3rd St., Old Forge
INFO http://www.facebook.com/
mobileprotection#!/
events/110422559104909/
I F YO U G O
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After a year in the apartment,
Best bought a house in Pittston
Township where she lives with
her roommate Teka, a female 3-
year-old black lab service dog.
“Oh yeah,” she said of howTe-
ka has changed her life in the
year and a half she’s been with
her. “It was kind of scary at first.
We had to develop a bond and
learn to trust each other. She’s
given me a lot more freedomand
independence. I used to use a
cane and I’m amazed at how
much faster I’m able to get
around now.”
Best enjoys activities like
“watching” TV and movies, us-
ing a computer and traveling.
“I’ve gone to a lot of big cities
and enjoy traveling, though
sometimes I have to ask people
for help reading a street sign,”
she said.
She can use a computer with
special software that magnifies
the screen.
“When I watch TV, I’m pretty
much listening to it,” she said.
She can see big screen movies
better.
“It might seem weird,” she
said, “but I really like, art, pho-
tographyandtattoos.” She saidat
an art show, she can see the ex-
hibits if she can get close
enough. “If not, I have one of my
friends describe it to me.”
She’s also a hockey fan and
goes to Wilkes-Barre/Scranton
Penguins games. “Everything
looks like blobs, but I pretty
much can see what’s going on.”
One of her favorite pastimes is
listening to music. “I love music.
Alternative, metal, punk and Ja-
panese music.” Her current fa-
vorites are the Japanese band
Chemical Pictures and the Ata-
ris.
Best is still debating with her-
self about what she will say in
her acceptance speech at the
Blind Association dinner.
Maybe she’ll tell themthe sto-
ry about the third eye.
Best
Continued fromPage 3
dren, one of whom is a college
student. He’s an avid reader and
is currently reading the newly-
released Joe Paterno biography.
Mischianti has been a Fox Hill
member for 40 years, which
means, unlike the other three he
has to pay dues.
Fox Hill waives dues for 50-
year members. Mischianti joked
that he was going to get the other
three to chip in for his member-
ship.
Mischianti grew up in Old
Forge. He owned and operated
Hi-Grade Pants in Taylor.
The golfing buddies also en-
joy playing gin at the club and
poker at Mohegan Sun.
The obvious question for the
foursome: Can you shoot your
age?
Clemente pointed at the birth-
day boy Mischianti and said,
“Louis can.”
Mischianti laughed and said,
“It’s easier now that I’m 90. I
don’t have to shoot in the 80s.”
Foursome
Continued fromPage 5
plan and prepare this year’s me-
nu, which includes tripe, sofritto,
gnocchi, meatball platters, por-
ketta sandwiches, sausage and
pepper sandwiches, portabella
mushroomsandwiches, pasta fa-
gioli, as well as Italian pastries,
including cannolis, biscotti,
cheesecake, cookies and the piz-
za fritta.
The extensive menu is de-
signed to satisfy the estimated
15,000 people who will be stop-
ping by over the weekend.
“It gets very busy,” said Chris-
tina Mordente, vice president of
the Festival Felittese.
Mordente and the other volun-
teers are confident they’ll have
enough food to cater to the
crowd, having most of the cook-
ing done, with 2,400 pounds of
gnocchi, 7,000 meatballs and
600 pounds of tripe all ready to
go.
The homemade dishes, as well
as the live entertainment, have
helped make the festival a suc-
cess over the last two decades.
This year’s lineup includes per-
formances by Fuzzy Park on Fri-
day, Gold Dust on Saturday and
The Poets on Sunday. All per-
formances begin at 6:30 p.m.
And, even though the associ-
ation is confident this year will
be as successful as in year’s past,
they aren’t resting on their lau-
rels.
In an effort to improve on the
yearly event, this year the festival
will include the inaugural Race
for Our Lady of Constantinople.
“I wanted to do this way back,”
explained Lou Terruso, race co-
ordinator. “This year I finally de-
cided I want to try it.”
The two-mile race and fun
walk will be held on Sunday,
Sept. 9, beginning at the Old
Forge HighSchool football field,
located at 3011st St., and ending
at the Felittese Chapel grounds,
145 3rd St., Old Forge.
Prizes will be given to the top
finishers in each age group.
Registration will begin at the
high school at 8 a.m., with the
race scheduled to begin at 9 a.m.
Cost to participate in the race is
$15.
Proceeds fromthe race and the
festival will benefit Our Lady of
Constantinople Chapel, Prince
of Peace Parish and local char-
ities.
For more information on the
Festival of Felittese, visit http://
www.facebook.com/mobilepro-
tection#!/
events/110422559104909/
For more information on the
race, email Felitteseassocia-
tion@gmail.com.
Felittese
Continued fromPage 6
PHOTO PROVIDED
Charles Saleski preparing the
food at a previous festival.
LOCALCHATTER
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What are you chattin’ about? Call 602-0177 or email sd@psdispatch.com and let us know.
Taylor High School Class of
1937 recently celebrated the 75th
anniversary of its graduation.
They reunited every five years
after graduation and since 1997
have been meeting every single
year. Shown here at the most re-
cent get together are classmates
Mrs. Mary Rowlands, Taylor,
standing, and Mrs. Lillian Gold-
stein, Duryea, seated. Absent at
the time the photo was taken
were Edward Grabowski, An-
drew Kavulich and Lila Sclawy.
This year’s celebration was at
La Casa Trattoria Restaurante.
Mary and Lillian have enjoyed
a lifetime friendship. They
planned the first Taylor Class of
’37 reunion in 1942. When de-
parting from this year’s party
they looked at each other and
said, simply, “See you next year.”
Of course, they will see each
other many times in between.
Campenni a starter
Julian Campenni, former
Wyoming Area grid standout
who is a red-shirt freshman at
UConn, is starting at defensive
tackle for Thursday’s game
against UMass.
Meets deejay
Mia Rinaldi of Pittston Town-
shiprecentlymet DJ PaulyDand
his friend Jerry Gialanello while
on vacation in Newport, Rhode
Island. She is pictured with Pau-
ly D while signing bottles of his
REMIX at Haxton’s Tollgate Li-
quors in Warwick, RI.
Happy birthday
Birthday wishes go to Gene
Anderson, Hughestown, and
Stephen Pomichter, of Pittston,
who celebrated August 28; He-
lyne O’Malley and Tracy Tigue
Ashby, both of Hughestown,
who celebrated on August 29.
Happy birthday to Margaret
Monk, Hughestown Borough
Historian, who celebrated on
September 1; and Theresa Val-
enti, Exeter celebrating on Sep-
tember 7.
Today at Frances Slocum
Today Sunday, Sept. 2, Franc-
es Slocum Park will present
three programs. At 2 p.m. it’s
Butterflies for Little Guys. Pre-
schoolers ages 3 to 5 and their
adults will learn about caterpil-
lars and butterflies.
At 4 p.m. Nature Bingo is for
kids of all ages and all those
young at heart don’t want to miss
this fast paced program as we
learn about local plants and ani-
mals.
At 7 p.m. enjoy Music in the
Woods with Jim Weiss, on gui-
tar, fiddle, and mandolin at
Campground amphitheater
In the event of inclement
weather amphitheater programs
will be cancelled. Call to con-
firm program is still being held .
570-696-9105.
Taylor Class of ’37 celebrates 75th anniversary
Another celebrity dined in Pittston at Palazzo 53 recently. Remember earlier in the year Paul
Sorvino dined there.
On Friday, August 24, the celebrity was Federico Castelluccio, who is better known as Furio
Giunta, the character he played on the hit HBO series The Sopranos.
He dined with his companion Yvonne Maria Schaefer and some other friends. Yvonne is an
actress/model and film producer.
Castelluccio was born in Italy and moved with his family to New Jersey as a child. He is also an
accomplished Renaissance-style fine art painter.
Pictured is Palazzo 53 owner and chef Chris Barcia with Castelluccio.
Sopranos star dines at Palazzo 53
Mia Rinaldi of Pittston Township with DJ Pauly D S
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ANNOUNCEMENT
Jeffrey P. D’Andrea, D.O., F.A.C.C.,
is pleased to announce the opening of his
newcardiology practice.
Dr. D’Andrea will continue to see current and newpatients in temporary
locations until the upcoming grand opening of his newoffice.
Patients may call Dr. D’Andrea at 570-602-7865
Please leave a message with the answering service.
Your call will be promptly returned to schedule an appointment or
to have any questions answered and, howto make arrangements
for the transition to the newlocation.
Dr. D’Andrea is committed to ensuring
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until his death in the 1940s. It
was also the site of Snyder’s
Hardware.
In an email, Smith explained
howhe came up with the idea for
the flood photo exhibit.
“In West Pittston I obviously
witnessed a great deal of heart-
ache and destruction. However, I
was also moved by the spirit of
many of the residents who were
determined to clean up and by
the support from others in the
community who donated food,
or helped with the clean up ef-
forts.
“The more I walked around, I
saw that people were devastated
but in high spirits and welcom-
ing. I wanted to help, but I’mnot
a plumber or electrician. I’m a
photographer and I thought, I
better photograph this.”
As he shot, Smith wasn’t sure
what he would do with the pho-
tos. As he put it, “it had to mar-
inate for a while.”
Finally, he decided to create
the exhibit and also to have a
sidewalk sale in conjunction
with the exhibit to raise money
for the West Pittston library. He
will be selling stuff from the
hardware store and donated ga-
rage sale type items.
Though it was not Smith’s in-
tention when he created the ex-
hibit to post the photos for sale,
he will sell if asked and then do-
nate 50 percent of the proceeds
to the library.
One of Smith’s favorite images
is of a young boy hammering
away at the kitchen walls, which
had to be ripped down to the
studs to get rid of mold.
“The scale of clean up was
hard to illustrate,” Smith said.
“That’s why I like the image of
the boy and a hammer trying to
take apart the entire room.”
To donate to the sidewalk sale
visit facebook.com/twshoemak-
er or email Jamie at jamie@ja-
miesmith.com
JAMIE SMITH
Smith describes this photo. It's from the house of an older woman
who was a piano teacher. She lost three pianos in the flood in-
cluding the baby grand in the photo. I didn't get to meet her, she
was evacuated, but her daughter seemed to be in charge of a
house full of grand children who were working tirelessly to clean
out the house. I went back to the same neighborhood a week later
and most of the people were still at it.
Exhibit
Continued fromPage 4
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Question #1
In September
1970, what event
caused an estimated
10,000 people to
show up in Pittston
on a Thursday morn-
ing?
1950 – 62 Years Ago
Sergeant Michael F. Garzella, of
Pittston, serving with the Heavy Mor-
tar Co., 109th Infantry of Pittston as
unit administrative assistant, was com-
missioned a warrant officer junior
grade. Garzella served for 42 months
during World War II and was dis-
charged in 1945.
He re-enlisted in the local National
Guard unit. Garzella joined Fred
O’Malley and Owen Golden, both of
Avoca, as one of three local officers
of the Heavy Mortar Company to be
commissioned “from the ranks.”
Neighbors Dominick Vincelli and
Joseph Walsh had a common prob-
lem, a towering 60-foot silver maple
situated in an eight-foot area between
their homes located at 110 and 108
Ann St. in West Pittston.
The roots of the 150-year-old tree
were causing foundation damage to
both properties and the men were
desperate to find a company willing
to take on the tree’s removal.
Up stepped Robert Bell of Bell
Tree Company of Coxton.
With great precision, Robert and his
brother, whose name was not given,
cut the tree down without any diffi-
culty much to the amazement of Vin-
celli, Walsh and their neighbors
The annual Kehoe-Berge Coal Com-
pany clambake was scheduled to be
held at the Kehoe estate in Harding.
Clams, corn freshly picked at the
Kehoe farm and refreshments were on
the menu.
Entertaining the “thousands of coal
men and old timers of the Anthracite
region” was the American Legion
Band of West Pittston, the Scotch
band of Philadelphia and Irish band of
New York, vocalists Harry Stanton,
Henry Morgan, Billy Kerwin, Pat
Curry, James Corbett, James Walsh,
Ted Dove, Jimmy McNey and James
Brady. Con McCole dispensed jokes
while John J. “Butch” McDevitt was
the renowned “millionaire for a day.”
According to northernfield.info.com
in 1950, Kehoe-Berge had 11 operating
mines, 1,224 employees and a total
production of close to 600,000 tons of
coal.
The Sunday Dispatch Inquiring Pho-
tographer asked, “What would you say
was a typical American?”
Dolores Delicati, of Pittston, an-
swered, “He’s always rushing, looking
for security, wants a good time and to
marry and raise a family.”
Mrs. Franklin Huffsmith, of Hugh-
estown stated, “The typical American
is bound to a routine, save money,
help out a friend and is of the opin-
ion his country is the best in the
world.”
Jim Connors, of Pittston, added,
“He goes to work to provide for his
family, goes to church and expresses
himself without fear of reprisals.”
1960 – 52 Years Ago
Retired railroad worker Frank
Lankowski and his wife Bertha, of
Duryea, made something beautiful out
of empty beer cans.
Mr. Lankowski painstakingly cut the
can into thin strips and Mrs. Lank-
owski patiently sculpted the shredded
metal into beautiful miniature chairs,
patiently weaving and curling each
strip into a delicate ribbon effect cre-
ating the arms, legs and back.
Each chair was then given a velvet
seat and a coat of gold paint. After
seeing a set made by a woman from
California, the couple became in-
terested in the craft and set about
creating over 200 chairs.
Marine First Lieutenant William
Kurtz, of Duryea, was presented the
Bronze Star Medal with Combat Rib-
bons. He was awarded the star for
meritorious service as a platoon com-
mander with the First Marine Divi-
sion, Vietnam.
Lieutenant Kurtz facing heavy ene-
my fire maneuvered his position to
aid in deploying his men to hold off
the enemy until reinforcements could
arrive.
The Avoca American Legion Little
League team members Jim Mullins,
Steve Turel, Billy Gibbons, Jay Cie-
less, Rich Rubble, George Aldrich,
Pat Feeney, Bill Baclasky, Gary Ro-
gan, Carl Craig, John Satkowski,
Joe Rogan, Mike Brogan and Tom
Maciorowski had a 10-5 record for
the season going into the playoffs of
the Avoca Little League championship.
The team came away with honors
by beating the V.F.W. team. Joe Casp-
er and assistant Ron Casper coached
the Legion team to their victory.
Two large school buildings in Avoca
were set to be razed. The Avoca No.
1 on Main Street and Cleveland in the
Oregon section had fallen into dis-
repair. Joseph L. Nowakowski was
contracted to dismantle Avoca No 1
and Pearage Brothers in Duryea
would handle demolition of the Cleve-
land School.
Question #2
In 1980, who was the young Pitt-
ston woman to be the recipient of a
“first ever” title?
1980 – 32 – Years Ago
In their first season, local amateur
soccer team Greater Pittston Red Dev-
ils placed third in post-season play-
offs.
Sal D’Amico, having played the
sport in France for many years, orga-
nized the team with his two brothers,
Lou and Joe, also experienced play-
ers.
Born and raised in Dublin Ireland,
Pat Coleman, of Duryea, scored 37
goals in the season.
Local residents Franco Aptiliasi-
mov, a native of Bulgaria, and Peter
Sartorio, a native of Tunisia, added
their expertise scoring goals and
working the defense. Pittston Area
Senior Roberto Bianco grew up in
Chile and possessed a great deal of
soccer ability.
The rest of the team members con-
tributing to the win in their first year
of play were Bill Gilmartin on de-
fense, Mike Caputo, goalie.
Rounding out the team were Brian
McDade, Bernie Dessoye, Paul Men-
ichini, Guy Querci, Karen DeMark,
Ned Trady, Gino Cadden, Guy
Chiazza and Ray Doran.
With two Masters degrees in music,
Arlene Kunigel, of Duryea, opened
the 33rd annual Little League World
Series in Williamsport by singing the
National Anthem.
Organized in 1947, the tournament
was called the National Little League
Tournament.
It was later renamed the Little
League Baseball World Series. Garry
Sheffield, retired New York Yankees
hitter, played in the 1980 Little
League championships.
His team lost to Chinese Taipei.
1990 – 22 Years Ago
Louis Biagotti, of Exeter, was the
subject of a Spotlight article, which
appeared in The Sunday Dispatch on
Sept. 2, 1990.
At the age of 85, Mr. Biagotti was
known as the oldest working barber in
Greater Pittston and possibly the
northeast region.
Biagotti, who had been cutting hair
since 1917, opened his shop at 1176
Wyoming Avenue, Exeter in 1930.
When he started, haircuts were 50
cents, but as time went on, a price
war erupted among the local barber-
shops and the cost went down to 5
cents a cut with a free cup of coffee
thrown in.
He and his wife, the former Marie
Antoinette Ciotola, belonged to the
Golden Age Club of St. Anthony’s
Parish and had two children, Thomas
Joseph and Theresa Ann Lewis, and
five grandchildren.
Answer #1
Two Pittston Police officers were
overwhelmed with the throng of peo-
ple that showed up to make purchases
at the J.C. Penney Company fire sale
held in the former Acme Store build-
ing.
Estimated at over 10,000 the crowds
began lining up hours before sale time
to cash in on the bargain items stored
at the temporary site.
The Penney store had sustained fire
damage to its location on Main Street
and manager Gordon McNeill said
none of the fire-related merchandise
would be returned to the renovated
store.
The city hired extra police to han-
dle the crowds on subsequent sale
days.
Answer #2
Donna Azarovich, of Pittston, re-
ceived the “first ever” title Of Miss
Harvey’s Lake.
An avid water skier and excellent
student at Pittston Area, she took the
title based on appearance, poise and a
composition that she wrote on the
history of the lake.
According to www.harveyslake.org
from 1950 to 1964, the Harvey’s Lake
Lions Club sponsored an annual “La-
dy of the Lake” beauty contest.
The local contest was created to
choose a possible entrant for a Lions
International competition with contes-
tants from 27 countries.
In 1964, the final year of the Lion’s
contest, Gloria Wright, of Pittston,
took first runner-up. Gloria had also
competed as Miss Northeastern Penn-
sylvania in the Miss Universe contest.
The object of education is to pre-
pare the young to educate themselves
throughout their lives.
Robert Maynard Hutchins
Kunigel sang at LL World Series in ‘80
Peeking
into the past
With Judy Minsavage S
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“Viva la Bedda Madre di lu
Rosario!”
For the past 89 years, the tradi-
tional Sicilian section of Pittston
has shouted this familiar refrain.
The Feast of the Mother of the
Rosary has always been a grand
occasion for those with ancestral
ties to Montedoro, Sicily and has
a long history of revelry on both
sides of the Atlantic.
In Pittston, the celebration’s
high point is a procession of the
Blessed Mother’s statue through
the neighborhoods of Columbus
Avenue and Oak, Railroad and
Pine Streets. Community mem-
bers accompany the statue on its
journey and marching music
from Paci’s
Band provides
an Old World
serenade. The
procession
stops regularly
along its route
to allow the
faithful to pin
donations to
the statue.
Those dona-
tions returned
to St. Rocco’s
Church, the
origin of the
procession
route. When St.
Rocco’s doors
were closed
earlier this
year, some
feared that
long-standing
traditions
would be abandoned. But now,
members of the community are
coming together to resurrect the
long-dormant Montedoro Socie-
ty. As the new Mother of the
Rosary Society, this multi-gen-
erational group seeks to preserve
customs that will be celebrated
for the 90th time this year.
“It’s something you grow up
with. It’s been there since before
we were born,” said Charlie “I”
Infantino, a longtime musician
and participant in the annual
procession. His father, Joey “I,”
was instrumental, both figura-
tively and literally, in the festiv-
Mother of the Rosary Society continues tradition
90th annual procession scheduled for Oct. 6 in South Pittston
By SAMCHIARELLI
Dispatch correspondent
SAM CHIARELLI/FOR THE SUNDAY DISPATCH
Planning the 90th Mother of the Rosary celebration for Oct. 6 are, fromleft, first row, Clementine LaTorre Arcadu, Josephine Serpe
Dubinski, Cary Arena Walsh, George C. Murphy, Nicole Arena Lazowski. Second row, Carmen Falzone, Charlene Arena, Coreen Milaz-
zo, Lisa Joyce, Charlie ` I' Infantino, Gioranna Arcadu Kush and Danny Argo.
Members of
the Mother of
the Rosary
Society ask
for participa-
tion and do-
nations to
keep their
traditions
alive. Checks
can be made
payable to the
Mother of the
Rosary Socie-
ty and sent to
25 New Str.
Pittston, Pa
18640.
See PROCESSION, Page 12
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ities for many years. But all of
the members of the new society
have family ties to the celebra-
tion.
Gioranna Arcadu Kush recalls
fond memories of musicians, in-
cluding society member Danny
Argo, regaling her family with
Italian music. “I remember them
playing in my grandmother’s
kitchen,” said Kush. “Danny
played ‘Mama’ standing on a
chair and it meant so much to my
grandmother because it remind-
ed her of her mother that she left
behind in Sicily. Now it means a
lot to me. This brings everybody
back to life. That’s why I look
forward to it.”
Danny Argo
is still playing
Italian music
for the Feast of
the Mother of
the Rosary. He
spoke with en-
thusiasm about
the traditional
“Midnight Ser-
enade” that
once awoke Si-
cilian families
on the eve of
the procession.
At midnight, men of the commu-
nity would gather at the old
Orioles Club and set off fire-
works to mark the beginning of
the festivities. They would then
sing and play traditional Italian
music at any houses with lights
on.
“This was all to get people in
the proper frame of mind,” said
Argo. “It was a tradition in Sicily
and it was the same here. The
families made cookies and pas-
tries for the men who were mak-
ing their rounds. And this lasted
until at least 4:00 in the morn-
ing.”
At 9 a.m. the following morn-
ing, the party resumed when the
full complement of Paci’s Band
visited the Montedoro Society
and the other Sicilian clubs,
those of Serradifalco and San
Cataldo. The men sang loudly
and set off more fireworks.
“WhenI tell youbigtime, I mean
big time,” Argo said, smiling at
the memory.
After 11 a.m. Mass was cele-
brated at St. Rocco’s Church,
preparations began for the an-
nual procession. In Montedoro,
the procession of the Blessed
Mother begins at 9 p.m. In order
to link the two ceremonies, Pitt-
ston’s statue (which was made in
Montedoro) starts her proces-
sion at 3 p.m. Although separat-
ed by thousands of miles and the
differences of night and day, the
two traditions are simultaneous.
To the members of the Mother
of the Rosary Society, these ac-
tions are among the high points
of their year. George Murphy
feels so strongly about the event
that several years ago, he took
leave from Iraq to march in the
procession.
“My plane was delayed out of
Atlanta,” said Murphy. “I called
and said, ‘Hold the band! I’m in
Avoca!’”
Society member Nicole Arena
Lazowski added a curious mete-
orological mystery to the list of
procession attractions. “Wheth-
er it’s raining or storming, as
soon as they get to the Orioles
field, the sun comes out.”
It seems that even without an
active St. Rocco’s, the proces-
sion will see the sun for its 90th
anniversary this year. Argo was
quick to point out that the par-
ish’s newhome at St. Joseph Ma-
rello welcomes the Feast of the
Mother of the Rosary to its com-
munity.
“Father Joe Sibilano is 100
percent in favor of continuing
this,” said Argo. “He under-
stands what it means to the peo-
ple. He believes in these tradi-
tions from the Old World.”
In recent years, the “Midnight
Serenade” has evolved into an
indoor dinner at St. Rocco’s au-
ditorium. This year the dinner
will be held on Saturday, Oct. 6
and will include plenty of tradi-
tional Italian music from Danny
Argo, Frankie “G” & Friends
and Paci’s Band.
Tickets are $20 per person and
include a catered dinner buffet,
along with coffee and cake. The
event is BYOBand BYOSnacks.
To attend the dinner, send pay-
ment to Lisa Infantino Joyce at
25 New St., Pittston, PA 18640.
Deadline for reservations is
Sept. 28. Walk-ins will not be al-
lowed.
The Mass in honor of the
Mother of the Rosary will be
held at 11 a.m. that day at St. Jo-
seph Marello Parish, WilliamSt,
Pittston. It will be followed by
the annual procession from St.
Rocco’s Church at 3 p.m.
Members of the Mother of the
Rosary Society ask for participa-
tion and donations to keep their
traditions alive. Checks can be
made payable to the Mother of
the RosarySocietyandsent to25
New Str. Pittston, Pa 18640.
Those who would like to march
in the procession or become a
part of the society are asked to
search for the group on Face-
book, e-mail motheroftheros-
ary@hotmail.com, or call Lisa
Infantino-Joyce at 654-6230.
The society hopes to continue
its traditions for many years to
come. “This keeps us centered,”
said Gioranna Kush. “It makes
us who we are.”
Procession
Continued from Page 11
The dinner
will be held
Oct. 6 and will
include tradi-
tional Italian
music from
Danny Argo,
Frankie “G” &
Friends and
Paci’s Band.
The annual car show on Unit-
ed Methodist Homes’ Wesley
Village Campus, 209 Roberts
Road in Pittston runs from noon
to3p.m. onSunday, Sept. 9, with
a special church service sched-
uled for 10 a.m.
View antique and classic cars,
trucks and motorcycles.
The show averages 160 vehi-
cles.
Craft and food vendors also
participate, offering ice cream,
hot dogs, burgers and more.
For more information about
United Methodist Homes, visit
www.unitedmethodisthome-
s.org or www.facebook.com/
UnitedMH.
Wesley Village car
show next Sunday S
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The Pittston High School
Class of 1947 reunion committee
is planning the 65th anniversary
reunion for 1 to 4 p.m. on Satur-
day, Sept. 22 at Cooper’s Sea-
food Restaurant, Kennedy Bou-
levard, Pittston. Classmates in-
terested in attending are asked to
contact Joseph Reggi at 287-
3376 or San DeSalvo at 299-
5954. From left, seated, are Matt
Gillis, Jane Ryman and Tina
Cumbo. Standing, Tony Aquli-
na, Jasper Reggie, Sam DeSalvo
and Ed Viola.
PHS
Class of
’47 sets
reunion
Shoppers at the Pittston Farm-
er’s Market will be given the op-
portunity to enter a free drawing
of harvest baskets containing
vegetables and fruits grown in
the area along with baked goods,
relishes, popcorn and a print of
Pittston on Tuesday, Sept. 4,
from10 a.m. until l p.m.
Vendors sponsoring the draw-
ing are Golombs Farms and
Greenhouses, Dymond Farms,
Braces Orchard, Paul Plum,
Creekside Bakery, Bruce Bar-
tuska Relishes, Reba Ronk’s
Popcorn, and James Busacco.
Shoppers need not be present
to win. Winners will receive a
telephone call and must pick up
the baskets at the vendor’s stand.
Free parkingis available onthe
Tomato Festival lot adjacent to
the Pittston Firehouse. Vouchers
from the PA Department of
Agriculture are still being ac-
cepted.
The Friends of the Pittston
Memorial Library will sell raf-
fles on a 50lb. basket filled with
fall and school supplies.
Rain date is Tuesday, Sept. 11.
Farmers market
vendors offering
free drawing
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Be a laborer
great or small
do it well
or not at all
This anonymous quote says much
about the American laborer who built this
country.
From auto workers, to farmers, to gar-
bage collectors, to surgeons, Americans
were always noted for taking pride in their
work.
So it stands to reason that there is a holi-
day dedicated to these dedicated Ameri-
can worker.
According to the United States Depart-
ment of Labor website, Labor Day is
“dedicated to the social and economic
achievements of American workers. It
constitutes a yearly national tribute to the
contributions workers have made to the
strength, prosperity, and well-being of our
country.”
The website continues that “the form
that the observance and celebration of La-
bor Day should take was outlined in the
first proposal of the holiday —a street pa-
rade to exhibit to the public ‘the strength
and esprit de corps of the trade and labor
organizations’ of the community, fol-
lowed by a festival for the recreation and
amusement of the workers and their fam-
ilies.”
The holiday has changed over the years
since its adoption as a federal holiday in
1894.
Parades are rare these days and so are
community festivals dedicated to the day.
But as what has become the semi-offi-
cial last holiday of summer, Labor Day is
still a time of celebration.
During our cookouts on Monday, we’d
do well to at least for a moment contem-
plate these words of the DOL website:
“The vital force of labor added materi-
ally to the highest standard of living and
the greatest production the world has ever
known and has brought us closer to the re-
alization of our traditional ideals of eco-
nomic and political democracy.
“It is appropriate, therefore, that the na-
tion pay tribute on Labor Day to the cre-
ator of so much of the nation’s strength,
freedom, and leadership —the American
worker.”
Honor the
American
worker
On Sunday, Sept. 9, at 11 a.m. the First United Presbyterian
Church of West Pittston will mark the anniversary of the 2011
flood by gathering to worship in its Sanctuary at 115 Exeter Ave-
nue.
The pews will be pushed back to the walls. Comfortable-cush-
ioned-winter-worship chairs will be arranged in the center. The
pulpit and Communion Table will be brought in from their ref-
uge in the nursery. Comfort facilities will be placed in the park-
ing lot near one of the doors. Extension cords from our tempo-
rary service outside will give us power for light and sound.
And we will worship God!
We’ll thank God for the churches who welcomed us those first
post-flood Sundays (First Methodist and Second Presbyterian),
and for St. Barbara’s Parish who welcomed us so kindly to St.
Cecilia’s.
We will express gratitude for the individuals, organizations
and churches who helped us clean up, fed us, sent donations and
offered prayers and words of encouragement.
We will bear witness to the providence of God which has en-
abled us to continue to meet our ministry and mission commit-
ments while maintaining most if not all of our regular programs,
projects and activities.
We’ll pray for God’s guidance as we persevere through our
“season of discernment” seeking to discover what God has in
mind for us in the future.
If it is chilly that day, bring a sweater. If it is cloudy, bring a
flashlight.
We plan to have a time of fellowship and share updates after
worship.
Sunday, Sept. 16, we’ll return to our haven at St. Cecilia’s in
Exeter.
Rev. James E. Thyren
Flood to be remembered at First United Presbyterian
OUROPINION
YOUROPINION
The fact that many don’t consider Social Security and Medi-
care as entitlement but rather as life and death issues speaks vol-
umes for what the American people see as necessities of life. It
drives me nuts that working people actually defend the move by
conservative Republicans to destroy these programs as we know
them.
They have actually taken on an effort to change the meaning of
the word entitlement as we have always known it. To me, entitle-
ment means that I earned and deserve something and I’m entit-
led to it.
The Republican Conservatives have changed that definition to
mean welfare for some other form of handout that we don’t de-
serve or didn’t work for. Entitlement means we earned it and
don’t let the representatives of the 1% representatives tell you
anything different.
The Republican PR spin on the Paul Ryan budget backed by
Mitt Romney is designed to lull our country’s seniors into ac-
cepting their plan because their selling point is that it does not
affect anyone over age 55. That isn’t a selling point, it is a pre-
diction of life style destruction for our children and grandchil-
dren.
Economists are telling us that our children and grandchildren
will not live as well as we do and personally, I knowpeople who
could not survive without both programs and I want those to
come after us to live a decent life.
I don’t understandhowthese goalongworkingclass conserva-
tive wannabe’s don’t scream about the cost of war or the cost of
sending money to other countries in the form of foreign aide or
Says Republicans have changed definition of entitlement
See ENTITLEMENT, Page 26 S
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Do you ever feel like my entire life is a freak
show … and you have front row seats? Lucky,
lucky you! Pull up a chair (or toilet seat) and enjoy
the latest installment in the series I call: “Maria’s
Breast Case Scenario”.
Having a double mastectomy can be a one-time
deal, that is, opting not to go forward with an im-
plant and further reconstruction.
And that’s fine. In fact, that’s pretty much the
road I was traveling until I realized a few things: 1.
Even my undershirts were billowing around my
chest area; 2. NothingGAPoffers fits me anymore,
unless I moved into the boys toddler section, and I
have; and 3. There was nothing “there” to catch my
invariable spilling and drooling during happy hour.
And, who knew breasts were such great crumb-
catchers? Well when
they’re gone, you know.
Thus began the slow
process of building back
up what was dismantled. I
did get implants, if you re-
call, and I thought, that
was that. Not too big, not
too small…quite the right
size for this Goldilocks. I
was content and my un-
dershirts fit.
Then there came the
episode when all hell liter-
allybroke loose andthe donor tissue whichactedas
a nesting hammock for my implant came apart
from my chest wall and leaked, creating a larger
puddle at my feet than an unfortunate episode at
PSU involving a six pack of Malt Duck and my
inability to drink it efficiently.
That little snafu earned me a surgical do-over
and several days drug-induced siesta in the hospi-
tal. It wasn’t a hoot and all I remember is vomit the
length of the dirty, naughty Susquehanna.
Apparently, alongwithMalt Duck, I have trouble
holding my anesthesia. But heal I did and went on
with my life.
Afewweeks ago, I was having some discomfort
surrounding the left implant. I visited my friendly
neighborhood plastic surgeon and as he examined
the culprit of my neurosis, he wondered aloud why
I never completed my reconstruction.
Well, in my mind I did! What the hell was he
talking about?
Oh … nipples.
Aren’t they just, I don’t know, sort of extraneous,
store-front displays … like inflatable cows at Blue
Ribbon Dairy? You knowthey don’t produce milk,
but they’re almost an expected accouterment. I
don’t know…was I up for more surgery?
After discussing it with my friend, Denise, she
offered this nugget: “Every picture deserves a
frame. That’s your frame.”
Wow. Heavy.
She also said: “Snooki is about to have her ba-
by…” but I was just hearing “nipples and frames”.
Okay. I was game. But first, I talked it over with
the offspring.
Fromthe very first moment of diagnosis I talked
to them about every step of the process. Against
their wishes, I lifted my shirt and gave thema tuto-
rial about what will take place and what has taken
place.
For us, it’s about the frankness of the cancer dis-
cussion; demystifying the unknowns. In my mind,
this eases the fright our kids feel. And they all do.
An open dialogue encourages them to think of
breast cancer as an inconvenience rather than a
death sentence. They’re better informed about this
disease and subsequent surgeries, and can better
educate their peers.
There’s too much misinformation out there be-
cause we women are
loathe to discuss it. Why,
I will never understand.
Perhaps it’s our upbring-
ing.
I suppose because my
father is a pharmacist,
there was never a body
part and its matching
function not verbally dis-
sected around the dinner
table. In the girl-heavy
Jiunta house, very little
else was actually dis-
cussed. My brother was the most educated male in
the Valley on all female operating instructions. He
knew my monthly cycle better than I.
My message is this: share the expedition and
flight plan with your kids. I swear to you, it will
eradicate their defenses and anxieties. If they know
what to expect, then when they walk into the bath-
room and you’re in the tub, they’ll be less likely to
run screaming in fear and disgust. (Oh, wait, that
was my husband, not my kids. My mistake).
Share it, don’t hide it.
I just completed my final reconstructive surgery.
I can’t go into further detail because I’ve probably
already pushed the envelope too far with the men-
tion of “ni&*#es”, but suffice it to say they are the
size of a Tic Tac and not a Good n’Plenty, and
therefore, perfect.
Sure they’re non-operational … but so is an or-
nament hanging from your Christmas tree, and we
still need them to complete the whole enchilada,
correct?
Last stop on the Breast Cancer Express?
Tattooing!
Stay tuned for that little adventure because I’m
certain I won’t let it go by without forcing you to
read every excruciating detail. Buy your ticket
early to get a good seat for what I hope will be the
final installment in the BC Parade.
MOTHER’S DAZE
Maria Jiunta Heck
Final destination
Fortunately for Dispatch readers, Maria Heck
doesn’t hesitate to share her life in her column
which appears in this space every other week.
I suppose because my father is a pharma-
cist, there was never a body part and its
matching function not verbally dissected
around the dinner table. In the girl-heavy
Jiunta house, very little else was actually
discussed. My brother was the most edu-
cated male in the Valley on all female op-
erating instructions.
The yellow schools buses are back on the road. Crossing guards
have their signs up and the young’ns and teens are out of the house
once again! So how does that effect food in the house? For most
families with school aged children, lunch is now being eaten out of
the house for five days of the week.
Lunch for some is breakfast. Depending on the age of the child, it
might take a fewweeks for breakfast to get on the routine schedule in
the morning. It is veryimportant as mylast columns have notedso. (If
you have missed them, read them on line). For most children at
school, lunch is a time of freedom. Lunch monitors try to keep that
freedomintact, however, doesn’t always happen. We knowthat lunch
is a social hour; we only hope that children refuel their bodies to get
them through the next several hours of the school day.
So what does lunch look like? Some children insist that they pack;
some insist that they buy school lunch. Whether they pack or buy,
lunches should look the same through the eyes of a nutritionist. This
school year, the nutrition guidelines have changed.
The United State Department of Agriculture oversees the nutrition
of school lunches. This year USDA is focusing more on whole
grains, fruits, and vegetables along with low-fat or non-fat milk; and
less sodium and fat. Here are some of the changes.
Maximum calories have been set for the first time.
Only 1% and skim milk are served.
Trans fat have either been eliminate or minimized.
Whole grains have been increased.
During the next 10 years, sodium will be reduced.
To be a reimbursable meal for the school; the child must take either
a fruit or vegetable or both.
Once the children step off the bus or come around the corner par-
ents and or grandparents have numerous questions. How was your
day? How much homework do you have? When is your next test?
Two new questions to ask are “Who did you sit with for lunch and
what did you eat?”
If you child chooses to pack a lunch, take a look at the newrequire-
ments above. Does the pack lunch fit?
After school snacks are important part of the day’s total meals also.
Here is a chance to boost your child’s vegetables and whole grains.
Mini After School Pizzas
Whole Grain Pita or English muffin cut in half lengthwise
1/2 cup Pizza Sauce
Chopped broccoli, peppers and onions (or your child’s favorite
veggies)
11/2 Shredded cheddar cheese
1 tablespoon oregano
1 teaspoon garlic powder
Olive oil for brushing
Pre-heat oven to 350 degrees and place oven rack in middle-high
position. Brush all bread slices lightly with olive oil and spread each
with 11/2 tablespoons sauce.
Carefully spoon vegetable mixture equally onto muffin or pita.
Sprinkle with seasonings and cheese. Bake about 5-7 minutes until
bread is brown on the edges. Serve immediately.
To learn more, visit WWW.fns.usda.gov/healtheierschool-
dayandwww.tinyurl.com/schoolnutrtionstandards21012. Both web
sites are filled with valuable tips and youtube videos.
NUTRITION
CORNER
Mary Ehret, MS, RD, LDN
Penn State Cooperative Extension
Your child’s lunch at school,
Does it match up?
Mary R. Ehret, M.S., R.D., L.D.N., is with Penn State Cooperative
Extension, Luzerne County, 16 Luzerne Ave., West Pittston, Pa., 18643.
(570) 825-1701/602-0600. Fax (570) 825-1709. mre2@psu.edu.
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The Avoca High School class
of 1962 was the last of its kind.
The small borough had run its
own school district since 1871
when it was known as Pleasant
Valley and there were six neigh-
borhood schools and six teach-
ers, one for each building.
But by 1962 small town
schools were out. The era of
mergers, mandated by state law,
was in.
Avoca was absorbed by the
Northeast jointure in July of
1962. The Avoca high school on
Grove Street, which had been
openedin1926, was turnedintoa
Northeast elementary school,
while the Avoca high school stu-
dents were shipped off to Duryea
and Hughestown.
Cathy Appnel – a freshman in
’62 and one of the reunion orga-
nizers – remembers 1962 as a
time of turmoil when disagree-
ments surfaced about everything
from building use to school col-
ors.
That merger was one topic of
conversation at the reunion of
former students of Avoca high
school to commemorate the 50th
anniversary of school district
closing on August 25 in St. Ma-
ry’s school auditorium, which
was decorated in Avoca’s green
and gold.
Another topic was the 1956
teachers’ strike, which was so
rare in those days that it made
news all over the state.
St Mary’s, also a closed
school, was an appropriate place
for the reunion because the old
Avoca high lacked an auditorium
and had used St. Mary’s for its
BILL TARUTIS/FOR THE SUNDAY DISPATCH
Avoca High School Classes of the '60's Party planning committee, fromleft: John Cavalari, Elaine Frushon, Nelda Cavalari, Ken Bennett, Nancy Cavalari, Carol Ash, Cathy
Kiesinger Appnel, Ned Jones, Marie Androscavage, Margie Klepaldo, Pauline Bartush, and Cindy Ridgley.
Going old school in Avoca
Alumni gather on 50th anniversary of final Avoca High graduating class
By JACK SMILES
jsmiles@psdispatch.com
BILL TARUTIS
The cake at the Avoca High School reunion speaks for itself.
See AVOCA, Page 17 S
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proms and graduations.
About 80 people attended the
reunion, among them some of
the 38 members the class of ’62,
where they exchanged memo-
ries, danced to ‘50s and ‘60s mu-
sic, and enjoyed pizza.
Lead reunion committee
members, Marie Androscavage
Payne and Appnel and others,
collected a display of school
memorabilia including photos,
artifacts and clothing. Some old
Avoca students who had not reg-
istered for the reunion walked in
to tour the memorabilia.
Father Phillip Sladicka, pastor
of Avoca’s Queenof the Apostles
Parish which oversees auditori-
um activities, served as event
host and led attendees in prayer
and a tribute to deceased class-
mates.
The Avoca high school build-
ing on Grove Street was demol-
ished in the late 1970s.
BILL TARUTIS/
FOR THE
SUNDAY
DISPATCH
An Avoca High School Memories Book and pen that reads 'AVO-
CA HIGH SCHOOL - I'MFROMTHE OLD SCHOOL.'
Avoca
Continued from Page 16
Cathy Kiesinger Appnel, of Avoca, makes announcements to the
guests before dinner at the Avoca high School reunion.
Ned Jones, of Duryea, holds up his just-opened
bottle of wine at the Avoca school reunion.
Jim'Thinker' Thomas, left, and Nancy Cavalari
Grella, both of Avoca.
Jean Kiesinger, left, and Mary Kay Jones, both of
Avoca, chat during the Avoca High School party.
Cindy Hogan, of Pittston, left, shares a laugh
with Patsy O'Malley Miles, of Cape Coral, Fla.
Howard 'Ome' Doran, left, and JimJumper, both
of Avoca, chat before dinner.
Grace Marie of Avoca, left, and Patsy O'Malley
Miles of Cape Coral, Fla., pose for a photo.
Helene McLaugh-
lin of Avoca looks
over memorabilia
at the Avoca High
School Classes of
the '60's reunion
party at the former
St. Mary's School
in Avoca last Sat-
urday night.
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DAVIDBLIGHT
SCHOOL OF DANCE
159 Rear S. Main St. • Pittston, PA • 654-5100
“Do It Right At David Blight”
Class Openings For 3 Year Olds &Up
• Tap • Jazz • Ballet • Hip-Hop
• Pageant Training
Open Competition Group Auditions
ENROLL NOW!
CLASSES START AUGUST 27
Downtown Pittston Since 1956
Home of:
Miss Pennsylvania/America
Miss Pennsylvania/Teen
Miss Tomato Festival
The Pittston Senior Center
will be closed on Monday, Sept.
3 for the Labor Day holiday.
Learn to crochet classes with
Katherine will begin at 10 a.m.
on Monday, Sept. 17 and contin-
ue until noon every Monday. If
you would like to learn how to
crochet or would like to join this
class, call the center at 655-5561
to register.
A speaker from AARP will
talk on “internet safety” and also
give Consumer Tips at 11:15 a.m.
on Thursday, Sept. 6.
Reservations are open for the
followingtrips: BloomsburgFair
on Monday, Sept. 24; “Viva Ital-
ia!” on Tuesday, Oct. 9; Penns
Peak on Wednesday, Oct. 24.
To make a reservation or for
further details, contact Connie
Andrews at 655-5561.
Active Aging Day will be held
on Thursday, Sept. 13 on Public
Square in Wilkes-Barre. An
early bird Bingo will be held
from9to10a.m. at the Charles T.
Adams Senior Center. Activities
on the Square will begin at 10
a.m. and end at 2 p.m.
Bag lunches may be ordered
for anyone attending this event
but must be ordered at least one
day in advance by calling the
center by 1 p.m.
Door prizes, information ta-
bles, Zumba Gold and Polka
demonstrations as well as Stan-
key and The Coal Miners are just
some of the events that will take
place.
For further information, con-
tact Connie or Hazel at 655-5561
The Pittston Senior Center is
seeking new members. Anyone
60 years of age or older or with a
spouse who is 60 years of age or
older can stop in or call the cen-
ter at 655-5561. A complimen-
tary dinner voucher will be given
to each new member when they
join as well as a free gift for join-
ing.
SENI OR CI TI ZENS
Trip to Bloomsburg Fair among activities
The Falls Senior Center spon-
sored by the Area Agency on
Aging for Luzerne/Wyoming
Counties invites men and wom-
en 60 plus to the following activ-
ities:
Wed. Sept. 5 - 9:30 a.m.,
Walking Club.
Fri., Sept. 7 - 9:30 a.m. Walk-
ing Club; 1 p.m., the St. David’s
all-male choir will do a vocal
presentation of folk and patriotic
songs as well as a sing-a long.
Mon., Sept 10 – 9 a.m. to 2
p.m., Annual picnic . at Frances
Slocum State Park. RSVP by
noon the day before.
Wed. Sept 12 - 9:30 a.m.,
Walking Club; 11:30 a.m. - a pre-
sentation on flu prevention by
Keith Simonson RN, BSN from
the Dept. of Health.
Thurs. Sept.13 – 10 a.m. to 2
p.m., Annual health fair with
free glaucoma, vision, blood
glucose, blood pressure and
stress screenings. Flu shots will
be available on site and lots of
health information as well as a
free drawing for a gift basket.
Fri. Sept. 14 - 9:30 a.m., Walk-
ing Club.
The center offers daily free un-
limited coffee, as well as activ-
ities including Wii, shuffleboard,
Scrabble, card games and rock
Painting.
The center is located on State
Route 92 in West Falls and is
open from9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Mon-
day through Friday on SR 92
West Falls.
Falls seniors
list activities S
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Attorney
John J. Terrana
400 Tird Avenue, Kingston
283.2990
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• Auto Accidents • Slip & Fall Injuries
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WE OFFER 36# HOUSE PACK WINE GRAPES, 6.0 GAL PAILS
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GRAPE & JUICE SEASON IS HERE
Some things in life can be complicated, but taking
medication properly should not be one of them.
Taking multiple medications?
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Each card contains medications in a convenient, tamper evident, easy-to-use punch card.
• Immunization Services • Convenient Drive-thru • FREE Delivery
299-5150
201 S. Main Street • Pittston, PA
Mon.-Fri. 9 to 6 • Sat. 9 to 1 • Closed Sun.
Orientation dates are set for all
children attending Nursery
School Classes at The Cookie
Corner this fall.
For three and four-year-olds,
orientation will be held on
Thursday, Sept. 6, between the
hours of 9:30 and 11:30 a.m. for
the morning class and between 1
and 3 p.m. for the afternoon
class.
Pre-Kindergarten orientation
is set for Friday, Sept. 7, between
the hours of 9:30 and 11:30 a.m.
for the morning group and be-
tween 1 and 3 p.m. for the after-
noon session.
Each child must be accompa-
nied by a parent/adult to assist
with a craft.
There are a limited number of
openings in each of the above
groups. Interested parents are
asked to call 693-3556 for more
information.
Nursery School Classes at The
Cookie Corner will commence
on Monday, Sept. 10. Pre-Kin-
dergarten Morning session will
begin at 9 a.m. and afternoon
session at 1p.m. Dismissal times
are 11:30 a.m. and 3:30 p.m., re-
spectively.
Tuesday/Thursday groups
start on Tuesday, Sept. 11, at 9 to
11:30 a.m. and 1 to 3:30 p.m.
There remains a limited num-
ber of openings in each group
and interested parents are asked
to call the school at 693-3556.
Cookie Corner orientation sessions start Sept. 6
Applause Theatre Co. Inc. is
conducting an open casting call
for the classic musical “Wizard
of Oz” from6 to 9 p.m. on Tues-
day and Wednesday, Sept. 4 and
5 in the auditoriumof the former
Seton Catholic high school, 37
William St., Pittston. Those au-
ditioning are asked to enter on
the Church Street side.
Parts for munchkins are open
to all ages and will rehearse on
Saturdays only. The show also
needs dancers, ensemble cast
and chorus and small speaking
parts. No singing audition is re-
quired for bit parts.
The main roles are for males
andfemale ages 8toadult. Those
auditioning are asked to be pre-
pared to read and sing. Music
will be provided or participants
may bring sheet music. No CDs,
no A Capella and no memorized
monologues will be allowed
This is a non-fee production.
Call Applause director Wally
Kulick 313-2548 for more infor-
mation.
The show dates are Nov.16, 17
and 24, 25 and 26 at the Pittston
Downtown Arts Center in the
former St. Casmir’s Church, 65
Church St., Pittston.
Call for auditions for Wizard of Oz
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Tis Week’s Dining Guide Feature:
JULY
DINING GUIDE
WINNER
D.J. ALBERT
of Wyoming
To Advertise In Te Dining Guide Call:
Jill Andes • 970-7188 Steve Morris • 829-7290
ENTER TOWIN
THIS MONTH’S
GIFT CERTIFICATE:
Fill out and deliver
or mail entry to:
Te Sunday Dispatch
Dining Guide
109 New Street
Pittston, PA 18640
Name:____________________
Address:___________________
__________________________
City:______________________
State:______________________
Zip:_______________________
Phone:____________________
• COOPER’S WATERFRONT
• DENTE’S CATERING
• FIRE & ICE
• NARDONE’S RESTAURANT
• SAVO’S PIZZA & RESTAURANT
Look On Te Following Pages For
Tese Advertiser’s Weekly Ads S
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in the Pittston Commons, Pittston By-Pass, Pittston
& Family Restaurant
Since
1964
655-0001
OPEN WEEKDAYS 11 TO 9;
FRI. & SAT. 11 TO 10;
SUN. 12-9
NEW MENU ITEMS
COUPON SPECIAL
When you buy 12 cuts at the regular price. Price
does not include sales tax. Cannot be used with
other specials. Good for our Red Pizza only.
EXPIRES 9/30/12
12 CUTS OF PIZZA
ONLY
$
4.99
DELIVERY, PICK-UP OR EAT-IN COUPON
• Buffalo Bites • Garlic Parm Wings
• Cheesesteak Pizza • Cobb Salad
MONEY SAVING SPECIALS
7 DAYS A WEEK
All First Responders
And Service Connected
Personnel In Uniform
Will Receive A
15
%
Discount
Cannot be used with other specials or discounts
Eat-In Only
www.savospizza.com
SUN., MON., TUES.
7 A.M.-3 P.M.
WED., THUR., FRI., SAT.
7 A.M.-8 P.M.
509 Exeter Ave., West Pittston
“The Best Breakfast Around”
• Overstuffed Omelets • Huge Frittatas
• Fluffy Buttermilk Pancakes • Hand Dipped FrenchToast
Voted “Best Value”...”Most Affordable”... and Favorite Restaurant” by our loyal customers
Serving Affordable Home-Cooked Meals • Eat-In or Take-Out
Call For Our Daily Specials, 654-2536
Check Out Our Breakfast Specials:
• Mon. - Fri. only
$
3.99 incl. FREE COFFEE
• Sat. & Sun. Reg. FREE COFFEE with breakfast special
570-696-3580
www.FIREandICEonTobyCreek.com
RT 309, Trucksville Just North of Sheetz
SUNDAY
DISPATCH
To Advertise
in the
Dining Guide
Steve Morris
829-7290
Aubree Armezzani
970-7291
C
a
l
l
1/2 Pound
Brazilian Lobster Tail
served with potato,
vegetable and
fresh baked bread
$
19
99 $
29
99
One Pound
Brazilian Lobster Tail
served with potato,
vegetable and
fresh baked bread
WATERFRONT
304 KENNEDYBLVD. | PITTSTON
654-6883
300 BOTTLED BEERS AND
OVER 20 ROTATING DRAFT BEERS
3 Dozen Steamed Clams
$
5
99
$
5
99
50 Steamed Mussels
40¢ UPEEL SHRIMP
$1 OYSTERS ON THE HALF
SHELL • 40¢ BUFFALO WINGS
MILLER LITE &
LAGER DRAFTS $2.00
Biagio A. Dente, CEC,AAC, HOF
Blaise Alan Dente, CCC, HAAC
655-0801 • www.dentescatering.com
DENTE’S CATERING
TABLE TALK
50th Anniversary
Berries are the official fruit for more
than a dozen states. Blackberries are
most popular in Alabama, strawberries
reign in Oklahoma, and blueberries
have their place in Maine.
Dente’s Tent
and
Rental Co.
Celebrating Our
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Market Street Pub
29 Market St., Jenkins Twp.
570-655-8091
Owen Street Pub
245 Owen St., Swoyersville
570-287-6074
WEDNESDAY
at our
MARKET
STREET PUB
BIG
and
BLUE
NIGHT
Any 1/2lb Burger on the menu
w/ fresh cut fries $6.95
23oz Labatts Blue
$3.00 ALL DAY
ALL OF OUR
Awesome Salads $2.00 OFF
WE HAVE THE NFL/NCAA FOOTBALL PACKAGES
THURSDAY
at our
OWEN
STREET PUB
BUST
ARIB
NIGHT
14 oz Prime Rib Dinner
served w/ fries & homemade slaw $14.95
Prime Rib Foccacia
w/ fresh cut fries $7.95
Sam
Adams
Pints
$2.00
ALL DAY
Customer’s Favorite
Rack of Ribs on Special
plus many more BBQ Items
POTTERY•JEWELRY
ACCESSORIES•HANDBAGS
WIRE SCULPTURES
SILK SCARVES
HANDMADE LOVELIES
68 Main St., Dallas • 570-690-6399
facebook.com/earthandwearsstore
Mon-Tues-Wed-Fri 10am-5:30pm
Thursday 10am- 7pm
Saturday 10am-5pm
has limited openings for
Call for info: 693-3556 www.cookiecornerchildcare.com
in our Fall ‘12 Nursery School
THE C KIE C RNER
Developmental Program • Professional Staff
First Aid/CPR Certified
Private Drive • Fenced-In Play Area
**Licensed by Dept. of Education & Dept. of Child Welfare**
Tues. A.M.
Group: 3½ to 4 Year Olds
Tues. P.M.
Group: 3 to 3½ Year Olds
M/W/F P.M.
Group: 4½ to 5 Year Olds
Venture Crews 3701 from
Avoca and 2025 of Bear Creek
Twp. recently completed Ven-
ture Crew Week at Goose Pond.
Venturing is a national high ad-
venture program for youth age
14-21.
Crews participated in water
skiing, rock climbing, canoeing,
kayaking and wilderness surviv-
al.
J.P. Meyers, Tiffany Smith and
Irene Magdon demonstrated
strong swimming skills when
they completed the mile swimon
Goose Pond.
For information on Venturing,
join Crew3701on sign up nights
set for Sept. 5 and 12 at St. Mary
Queen of Apostles Church in
Avoca, call Janice at 472-3253or
log on to YouTube for two videos
called NER Area Venturing
Rendezvous or Why Venture
Crew.
Locals complete Venture Crew Week
Venture Crews 3701 from Avoca and 2025 of Bear Creek Twp. recently completed Venture Crew
Week at Goose Pond. From left, first row, are Janice Sepcoski, Advisor; Sarah Gromalia, Bridget
McGowan, Irene Magdon, Tiffany Smith and Caitlin Croke. Second row, John Sepcoski, Council
Venturing chair; James Quick , Advisor; J.P. Meyers and Tyler Sepcoski. S
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P inna cle R eh a b ilita tion A s s ocia tes
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Don’t just watch a movie, experience it!
All Stadium Seating and Dolby Surround Sound
ALL FEATURES NOW PRESENTED IN DIGITAL FORMAT
825.4444 • rctheatres.com
• 3 Hrs. Free Parking At Participating Park & Locks with Theatre Validation
•Free Parking at Midtown Lot Leaving After 8pm and All Day Saturday & Sunday.
(Parenthesis Denotes Bargain Matinees)
All Showtimes Include Pre-Feature Content
Avoid the lines: Advance tickets available from Fandango.com
Rating Policy Parents and/or Guardians (Age 21 and older) must
accompany all children under 17 to an R Rated feature
*No passes accepted to these features.
**No restricted discount tickets or passes accepted to these features.
***3D features are the regular admission price plus a surcharge of $2.50
D-Box Motion Seats are the admission price plus an $8.00 surcharge
First Matinee $5.25 for all features (plus surcharge for 3D features).
The Possession in DBOX Motion
Code Seating - PG13 - 100 min.
(2:45), (5:00, 7:20, 9:30
*Lawless - R - 120 min.
(2:05), (4:55), 7:35, 10:05
*Oogieloves in the Big Balloon
Adventure - G - 90 min.
(2:50), (4:50), 7:00
**Hope Springs - PG13 - 110 min.
(2:10), (4:35), 7:30, 9:50
**Premium Rush - PG13 - 100 min.
(2:30), (4:55), 7:20, 9:45
***ParaNorman in RealD 3D - PG -
100 min.
(2:40), 7:10
ParaNorman - PG - 100 min.
(5:00), 9:20
2016 Obama’s America - PG -
100 min.
(2:00), (4:10), 7:15, 9:25
Expendables 2 - R - 110 min.
(2:15), (4:50), 7:05, 9:25
Hit and Run - R - 110 min.
(2:15), (4:40). 7:50, 10:10
The Bourne Legacy - PG13 - 145 min.
(3:00), 7:00, 10:00
The Odd Life of Timothy Green - PG -
110 min.
(2:25), (4:45), 7:15, 9:35
The Campaign - R - 95 min.
(2:20), (4:30), 7:30, 9:40
Apparition - PG13 - 90 min.
(2:30), (5:00), 7:10, 9:10
The Dark Knight Rises - PG13 -
165 min.
9:00
Brave - PG - 105 min.
(2:00), (4:15)
Marvel’s The Avengers - PG13 - 150
min.
7:00, 10:00
COCCIA
FORD
LINCOLN
ANNOUNCEMENT
Coccia Ford, Lincoln, 577 East Main Street
in Plains, is pleased to announce that
Frank Vieira has joined our sales team.
Frank began his career at
Coccia Ford - Lincoln in the
Internet Department and is now
transitioning to the sales floor.
Frank Vieira
You can reach Frank Vieira
at 570-823-8888.
An Army Veteran of 10 years
and the son of an Auto Dealer,
Frank brings a combination of
sales experience and values
such as Honor and Integrity, to
our organization
MEISTERS • PARTS • RENTALS S M
BEER SOLUTIONS
EISTERS • PARTS • RENTALS S MEISTERS PARTS RENTALS S M
825-5509
BEER & WINE MAKING SUPPLIES
WINE MAKERS
California, Italy &
NewYork
Grapes &Juices
Over 60 Varieties
of Grapes & Over 60
Varieties of Juices
Taking Multiple Orders Thru Sept.
Grape Orders Must Be In Early
BEER SOLUTIONS INC.
PA Intermediate Center
Free and reduced lunch appli-
cations were sent home with
your child on the first day of
school. Applications are due by
October12. If youhave anyques-
tions, please contact Daniel
Mancini at 654-2415 ext. 2111.
This year our school lunches
will consist of more fruits, veg-
gies, and whole grains. Under
newFederal Guidelines, a school
lunch consists of five foods: pro-
tein, grains, vegetables, fruit,
and milk. This year, your child
must select a serving of a fruit or
vegetables.
Daily Arrival andDeparture
Car and walking students may
begin to arrive at 8:20 a.m. Early
arriving third grade students are
to report to the cafeteria. Early
arriving fourth and fifth grade
students are to report to the gym.
All students will report to their
classrooms at 8:40 a.m.
Car and walking students will
dismiss at 3:20 p.m. through the
Middle School Main Entrance.
Bus students will report to their
bus rooms at 3:25 p.m. and will
board the buses at 3:30 p.m.
If there is a change in howyou
child will go home, parents are
asked to send in a note to your
homeroom teacher.
Morning Arrival Procedure
All parents who drive their
child to school in the morning
are reminded to use the driveway
in front of the Intermediate Cen-
ter’s Main Entrance. In order to
keep our students safe, they are
not allowed to be dropped off in
the parking lot.
Dress Code
The Pittston Area School Dis-
trict has a structured dress code
for all students. Parents and stu-
dents are reminded to reviewand
to observe the district’s structur-
ed dress code policy. The policy
is available through the district’s
website at www.pittstonarea-
.comor a copycanbe obtainedin
the Intermediate Center’s Office.
Attendance
Parents are reminded contact
the Intermediate Center Office
prior to 9:30 a.m. on the day your
child will be absence from
school. Upon return to school, a
written excuse/medical excuse
must be provided to your child’s
homeroom teacher.
Back To School Night
The Annual Intermediate
Center’s Back to School Night
for parents will be held on
Wednesday, Sept. 19, at 7 p.m.
During the Back to School
Night, all parents will have the
opportunity to meet with admin-
istration, faculty, and staff.
PTO News
The first PTO Meeting for the
2012-2013 school year will be
heldonWednesday, Sept. 26, at 7
p.m. in the Middle School’s cafe-
teria. The PTO officers are:
Heather Cebula, president; Kelly
Copp, Vice Preseident Interme-
diate Center; Amy Merlino, Vice
President Kindergarten Center
and Primary Center; Jenna
Gronka, Secretary; and Michelle
Christ, Treasurer.
Save the Date
Sept. 3 – School Closed (La-
bor Day Holiday)
Sept. 4 – Classes resume
Sept. 19 – Annual Intermedi-
ate Center’s back to School
Night
Sept. 21 – Act 80 Day (Stu-
dents will be dismissed at 1:30
p.m.)
Sept. 25 & 26 – School Pic-
tures
Sept. 26 – PTO Meeting at 7
p.m. at the Middle School Cafe-
teria
Kindergarten Center
Bus Information
Bus pick up and drop off times
are approximate. Children
should be at the bus stop at least
15 minutes before scheduled
time. The bus ride will be longer
until the driver gets comfortable
with bus stops. No student will
be let off the bus unless a parent
is present. If a parent is not at the
stop it will be their responsibility
to pick up the child at the bus
company.
Dress CodeThe Pittston Area
School District requires all stu-
dents in grades K-12 dress ac-
cording to structured dress code.
Parents were given a copy of the
policy at registration. To get a
copy call the office at 654-0503.
Labor Day Break
There will be no school on Fri-
day, September 1 and Monday
September 3 for the Labor Day
weekend. School resumes Tues-
day, September 4.
PTO
The PTO is holding its annual
membership drive. Dues for the
year are $5 per family. Member-
ship forms were sent home via
the red folder. The school is re-
questing parents return the com-
pleted registration by September
22.
Box Tops
The school is collecting Gen-
eral Mills Box tops for Educa-
tion logos for the 2012-13 school
year and is asking parents of stu-
dents to collect box tops and
bundle them in sets of 50.
SCHOOL NEWS
Back to School Night Sept. 19 at PA Intermediate
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TRUCKS WANTED
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Free Pickup. Call Anytime.
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HAPPY BIRTHDAY
JANE SABATELLE
“Pittston’s
Favorite
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Now Offering - Smokehouse Fries!
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~ Catering Available ~
Peters Valley Craft Center an-
nounced that Scranton artist,
Jenn Bell, will be included as
one of the exhibitors in their
42nd Annual Fine Craft Fair,
Sept. 29 & 30 at the Sussex
County Fair Grounds in Augus-
ta, NJ.
Bell, originally from West
Pittston, has made her home and
studio in Scranton since graduat-
ing from Kutztown University.
This will be her second time
exhibiting her unique enameled
metal wall tiles in this presti-
gious juried art fair.
While she is quick to admit
that being an artist is, “not all
glitter and wine”, she has en-
joyed dedicating her life to beau-
tifying other people’s surround-
ings with her tile installations
and never gets tired of seeing
people react to them.
While buying from an artist
may come with a slightly higher
price tag, the benefits and plea-
sure of uniquely hand made
items is hard to deny. The experi-
ence of meeting the artists when
visiting an art fair is also unde-
niably cool.
“Big box stores are great for
necessities, but when it comes to
creating a home or a style, a
handmade object adds depth to
your world,” Bell said. “It’s a
connection with not only the art-
ist, but when someone asks you
where you got it, it’s a story to
share. Hopefully we’re all mak-
ing objects that will last and are
meant to be passed down to re-
mind future generations that
there was more going on than
Ikea; that when someone asks
your granddaughter where you
got this or that, it’s a whole other
story to tell.”
Bell and Peters Valley invite
everyone to come and see her
work in person and say hello.
The Fine Craft Fair is open 10
a.m. to 6 p.m. on Saturday and10
a.m. to 5 p.m. on Sunday, hosts
150 exhibiting artists, live music
and artist demonstrations
throughout each day, great food
and a kids art activity area. Ad-
mission is $9.00/person.
More information about the
craft fair as well as the organiza-
tion and a $1.00 off coupon can
be found on their website
www.petersvalley.org.
Visit www.jennbell.com to
learn more about her work.
WP native to exhibit artwork in New Jersey
ALEX CENA
West Pittston native Jenn Bell in her art studio in Scranton. S
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188 North Main Street Pittston • 299-7506 • 299-7507
Lg Pie & 12 Wings $9.99
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Breakfast •Lunch • Dinner
Sunday Breakfast is served from 7 a.m. to 1 p.m.
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Dinner is served Wed. - Sat., 4 p.m. ’til close
Now booking parties on & of premises catering for any occasion…
Anniversaries • Graduations • Birthdays • Etc.
We will beat any price in town
Call For Reservations 602-7766
Our Deck Is Open!
8 oz. Drafts, Wed. to Sat., 5 p.m. til close
Italian
Restaurant
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Angelo’s Weekly Specials:
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Wednesday Zuppe de Clams
Thursday Tripalinni
Friday Calamari with Chick Peas
Saturday 12 oz. Lobster Tail
with 1 side..........................$21.95
Come to Parente’s Oasis for Olde Fashioned Ways
at Olde Fashioned Prices
Select from Imported Olive Oils and Olives, Authentic Italian Artisan Breads,
Fresh Baked Cookies
• We have the Area’s Largest Selection of Italian Pastas, Featuring Raviolis,
Stuffed Rigatoni and Gnocchi
• Plus Italian Cured Meats such as Salami, Mortadella, Capicola, Braciole,
Proscuitto to name a few!
I
n spite of its name, the hard-
ware services depot recently
opened by technology com-
pany C3i is more than a ware-
house.
You might call it a high-tech
hub.
Morristown N.J.-based C3i
engineers, services and repairs
computers and applications used
by companies in the life sciences
industry, including pharmaceuti-
cal companies, clinical research
organizations and health indus-
try software vendors.
Besides warehouse and ship-
ping workers, the depot’s 75 full-
time employees include software
engineers, hardware repair tech-
nicians and managers, who re-
ceive, repair and distribute com-
puters fromthe depot at the Cen-
terPoint East Commerce &
Trade Park.
Between 10 and 40 contract
employees also work at the depot
as needed for specific projects,
C3i co-founder and CEO Joel
Morse said at a ribbon cutting
Tuesday.
The opening of the depot com-
pletes the consolidation of C3i’s
U.S. support personnel in North-
eastern Pennsylvania, a process
that beganin2007withthe open-
ing of a call center in Plains
Township that employs 125 cus-
tomer service workers and man-
agers.
C3i also employs 55 at a client
site in Swiftwater, Monroe
County.
Morse said the company’s
move to Jenkins Township was
influenced by a local workforce
familiar with the service indus-
try and the site’s close proximity
to the call center in Plains Town-
ship. It was also heavily swayed
by an attractive state incentive
package, he said.
“It’s pro-business growth,”
Morse said. “We have seen really
excellent support by Pennsylva-
nia and Luzerne County … ”
That support included state
opportunity and job-training
grants totaling $560,000 and
$454,000 in job creation tax
credits, according to Steve Yo-
kimishyn, regional director of
the Governor’s Action Team.
The depot occupies 41,000
square feet in a 92,400-square-
foot building leased from Meri-
cle Commercial Real Estate.
Morse said having a pre-con-
structed, modifiable space to
move into played a major role in
the company’s decision to relo-
cate.
“As we looked around and we
needed to make decisions in a
short time period, this building
had to be ready, it had to be emp-
ty and ready for us to come in
and design it the way we wanted
to design it, and so without the
building, we could not be here.”
Greater Pittston Chamber of
Commerce President Joseph D.
Burke said he was optimistic the
company’s consolidation in the
area could spur future job oppor-
tunities.
“At the end of the day we think
that C3i will create the opportu-
nity for jobs, and good job op-
portunities,” Burke said. “I think
it would be quite appropriate to
say that this acts as a beacon to
other companies that might con-
sider investing here and carrying
out their work in the communi-
ty.”
According to its website, C3i,
headquartered in Morristown,
N.J., has about 1,400 employees
in its operations in the United
States, Bulgaria, China and In-
dia.
GREATER PI TTSTON BUSI NESS
‘High tech hub” opens in CenterPoint
By MATT HUGHES
The Times Leader
PETE G. WILCOX/THE TIMES LEADER
Bjarni Nermoe, left, senior director at C3i, gives a tour of the company's recently opened hardware depot in CenterPoint East in Jenkins
Township on Tuesday.
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FACTS OF
LAW
Brought to you as a paid public service by
the Law Offices of Dominick P. Pannunzio,
294 Main Street, Dupont, 655-5541
By
Dominick P.
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Tennessee has a new “academic
freedom” law guaranteeing teachers
won’t be disciplined for challenging
the tenets of science in areas such
as evolution and global warming.
Louisiana passed a similar bill in
2008, and Oklahoma has one under
consideration.
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The California Supreme Court has
issued a clarifcation regarding
California Labor Code 512(a), which
requires employers to provide meal
and rest periods to employees. In
its decision, the court specifed, “an
employer must relieve anemployee of
all duty for a meal period, but is not
obligated to ensure that the employee
does no work.” In the decision, the
court also stated the employer would
only have to pay for time worked if
it “knew or reasonably should have
known” the employee was working
through their provided meal break.
***
The Maryland Court of Appeals has
issued a decision that prohibits DNA
collectionfromsuspects charged - but
not yet convicted - of violent crimes.
***
Under a new federal law, students
must have a high school diploma or
GED in order to receive Federal Title
IV funding, or a Pell Grant.
ATTENTION:
FLU SHOTS
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Mon., Tues & Thurs. from 12 pm - 6 pm
Wed. & Fri. from 9 am - 4 pm
NO APPOINTMENT NECESSARY!
1099 S. Township Blvd. Pittston
Pittston Medical
Associates Patients
the no bid military contracts but
they want to take from us and
give to others. What are they
thinking?
As one of the wealthiest coun-
tries in the world, why can’t we
put us first and others second?
Why should we suffer any loss
in life sustaining programs?
Wake up people, wake up be-
fore it’s too late.
I heard Paul Ryan in a video
saying he thinks Americans
should have the same benefits
and pay for the same benefits
that Congress has. OK, Mr.
Ryan, but howabout if youtake a
pay cut to that of the average
American?
Why are Congress members
entitled to such large salaries?
He has been on the taxpayer’s
ride for so long that he actually
thinks that’s howAmericans live.
Wake up people! They’re
coming for us.
Wil Toole
Dupont
Entitlement
Continued fromPage 14
The Fallen Warrior Commit-
tee hosted the first Angels in
the Outfield Softball Tourna-
ment on Aug. 11 at Exeter
Little League.
Our tournament was a great
success thanks to community
members who came out to
support it.
There were many businesses
and people who donated their
time, money and food items.
We would like to take this
opportunity to recognize three
local businesses whose gener-
ous donations played a large
role in the success of our soft-
ball tournament.
We would publicly like to
thank Sabatini’s Pizza, Fetch’s
and Silveri’s Catering.
Your generosity and support
of the community is greatly
appreciated.
The Fallen Warrior
Committee
YOUR OPI NI ON
Fallen Warrior
committee grateful
Soon the kids will be back,
With schedules and books, they have to keep
track
Their minds are not to be wasted,
And lunches should be eaten, not tasted.
These are the best of times,
When a person is young, strong, good mind,
don’t need rhymes
Friendships and careers are developed,
One’s new spectrums have been enveloped
Love interests can also be found
Just get your feet first on the ground
Enjoy ones times in school,
And if you’re lucky, swim in the family pool.
Remember, during summer everything flourish-
es,
From your garden or store, it nourishes.
Enjoy the fun of summer
Don’t dread winter, but sometimes it could be a
bummer
There is a beauty at that time just look
Soon children will have to open that first book.
Ronald Voveris
Yatesville
Poet reflects on back-to-school
On behalf of the board mem-
bers andFriends of the Wyoming
Free Library, I would like to
thank the Sunday Dispatch, the
United Methodist Church and
Little Miss Library, Grace Wash-
ney, for helping to make our re-
cent book sale, Hi Five hand-
prints and t-shirt sale a success.
Being one of the smallest li-
braries in the system, we receive
less money and, therefore, we
have to work harder to fund our
projects and needs.
You can still get t-shirts or
make Hi Five handprints at the li-
brary.
We look forward to seeing
evenmore bookbuyers andcom-
munity support at our November
sale.
Sandra Touw,
Board Secretary
Wyoming Library says
thanks for successful event S
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Atty. F. Charles Petrillo, of
Wilkes-Barre, will make a pub-
lic presentation on Tuesday,
Sept. 4, at 7 p.m. at a meeting of
the Huber Breaker Preservation
Society.
The talk will take place in the
conference room of Earth Con-
servancy Inc., 101 So. Main
Street, Ashley.
Atty. Petrillo will discuss his
ongoing research on the “last
days” of deep mining in the
Wyoming Valley, and then show
two short anthracite-related
films.
The first part of his presenta-
tion will be an update on his talk
to the HBPS last January during
Mining History Week.
Then he will show a film pro-
duced in 1915 titled, “The Price
of Carelessness,” sponsored and
produced by the Delaware,
Lackawanna, & Western Rail-
road’s Coal Division (later the
Glen Alden Coal Company), and
partly filmed at Concrete City,
Nanticoke.
This will be followed by a sec-
ond early film that deals with
mining techniques and methods
in the Wyoming Valley.
The films are being shown in
cooperation with the National
Canal Museum, Easton, and the
Anthracite Heritage Museum,
Scranton.
Atty. Petrillo is a former board
member of both organizations
and is currently working with
them on preserving the Wyom-
ing Valley’s early coal film heri-
tage.
The presentation is open free
of charge to the public.
Members and prospective
members are urged to attend a
brief business meeting at 6:30.
Refreshments will be served.
Petrillo to discuss last days of deep coal mining
Presentation slated at
meeting of Huber Breaker
Preservation Society
The Friends Association of the
West Pittston Library has sched-
uled a wine and cheese event for
2 to 5 p.m. on Sunday, Sept. 9 at
the library, corner of Warren and
Exeter Avenues.
Ticket donations are $20 per
personor $35for couples andare
available at the library or from
any Friends member.
Cheese and crackers will be
offered as well as light snacks
and finger food desserts.
There will be a basket raffle in
addition to the wine event.
For tickets or new member in-
formation, call Sara Kelly at
883-7079; email sarashanekel-
ly@gmail.com or call the West
Pittston Library at 654-9847.
WP Library friends wine
and cheese event Sept. 9
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Greater Pittston AMVETS
Post 189 held its annual family
picnic at the Plains Pavilion with
the Veterans fromthe GinoMerli
Veterans Administration home
as guests of honors.
The fun-filled day included
award presentations, live enter-
tainment and was attended by
many state and local command-
ers of the AMVETS organiza-
tion.
SAM CHIARELLI/FOR THE SUNDAY DISPATCH
At the annual Greater Pittston AMVETS family picnic and awards ceremony, left to right, Luzerne County Manager Robert Lawton, Luzerne County Council TimMcGinley,
Ron Faust, Post 189 Commander and Eastern Region Commander Bernie McDonald, Honorable Fred Pierantoni, Dept. of PA State Commander Steve Ryersbach, rar right,
Honorable Lisa Gelb, PDC Jerry Gurnari, and all of Post 189 members.
AMVETS gather for picnic, awards celebration
PHOTO SUBMITTED
Michael Schwab, Pittston Area student, 1st Place Winner in the essay contest sponsored by the
Greater Pittston AmVets. Left to right, State Commander Steve Ryersbach, award winner Michael
and a special presentation made by Luzerne County Judge Fred Pierantoni.
PHOTO SUBMITTED
Michael Truszkowski, representing Post 59 Hanover Twp, opens
the celebration with the National Anthem. S
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SAM CHIARELLI/FOR THE SUNDAY DISPATCH
Student essay and poster contest winners were recognized. First row, left to right, Tiffany Tubioli, 1st
Place Essay Contest; Chloe Andricks, 1st Place Flag Drawing Contest; Jessica Zaladonis, 1st Place
Americanism Poster Contest; Bria Brombacher, 1st Place Americanism Poster Contest. Second row,
Luzerne County Council Tim McGinley, Dept. of PA State Commander Steve Ryersbach, Honorable
Fred Pierantoni, Luzerne County Manager Robert Lawton, AMVETS Post 189 Commander and East-
ern Region Commander Bernie McDonald.
SAM CHIARELLI/FOR THE SUNDAY DISPATCH
At the AMVETS family picnic, from left, Luzerne County Manager
Robert Lawton, Luzerne County Council Tim McGinley
Post Commander 189 and Eastern Region Commander, Bernie
McDonald, Honorable Fred Pierantoni, Dept. of PA State Com-
mander Steve Ryersbach; back row, members of Post 189.
SUBMITTED PHOTO
Members of the AMVETS: Jerry Gurnari, Post 189 Greater Pitt-
ston; Steve Ryersbach, State Commander Post 293, Lebanon; Ivy
Cook, National President Junior AMVETS; Amy Stopyra State
President Ladies Auxiliary Post 224, Chambersburg; Cass De-
Salvo, State Secretary of the Ladies Auxiliary Post 77, Philadel-
phia; Art Stahl, Past District Commander Post 59 Hanover Twp.
Second row, Bernie McDonald, Eastern Region Commander Post
189; E.Jean Lipponcoot, State Department Treasurer of the Ladies
Auxiliary Post 77, Philadelphia; Jim Hummer, State Vice Com-
mander Sons of AMVETS Post 59,Hanover Twp; Joe Stopyra, Past
National Commander-Chambersburg, Post 224; John Pliska, State
Finance Officer Post 189 Greater Pittston; Bille Slabinski, 2nd Vice
Commander, Easter Region Post 59-Hanover Twp.
PHOTO SUBMITTED
Bria Brombacher, Pittston
Area, 1st place winner 4th
grade division of the Poster
Contest. Bria shows off her
winning poster with her mom,
Karen Brombacher.
Tom Skrzysowski, 1st Vice
Commander of AMVETS Post
189 Greater Pittston, and Ar-
lene Skrzysowski.
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The Wyoming Area Class of
1982 will hold a reunion from 1
to6p.m. today, Sunday, Sept. 2at
the Checkerboard Inn, 385 Carv-
erton Road, Trucksville with
food, refreshments and music by
“Old Friends.”
For more information, call Pa-
trice at 881-0135.
St. John’s ‘62
Members of the 1962 class of
St. John the Evangelist High
School are making plans for
their 50thclass reunion. The first
meeting will be held on Wednes-
day, Sept. 5, at 7 p.m. at the Tipsy
Turtle, 29 Market Street in Jen-
kins Township.
All class members are invited
to attend this meeting.
If you knowof any class mem-
bers in or out of the area who
would like to attend the reunion
but are unable to attend the meet-
ings, please call Millie (388-
0935), Bob or Mary (654-1070)
or Tom (654-7974).
Volunteers needed
Heartland Hospice is recruit-
ing volunteers to augment hos-
pice services.
Volunteers offer support, com-
panionship and practical support
to patients and their families, in-
cluding running errands, reading
or staying with a patient so fam-
ily members can take a break.
Comprehensive training is re-
quired and free of charge. Con-
tact Louise McNabb, volunteer
coordinator, at 654-0220 for
more information.
EVENTS, MEETI NGS, BRI EFS
WA Class of ’82 to reunite today
See BRIEFS, Page 34
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I
t was a glorious day, the sun
shone but did not blister, a
gentle breeze flowed with a
cooling touch, birds chirped and
butterflies gracefully glided
among the blooming flowers.
It was a perfect day as the
members of “Bloom and Bub-
bles of Greater Pittston” a Red
Hat Society Chapter gathered to
celebrate their tenth birthday an-
niversary in the garden setting of
Queen Mother, Barbara Insala-
co’s Home.
They came to celebrate with
their usual fun loving spirit, ca-
sually attired carrying or wear-
ing a red hat. Maybe the steps
were not as peppy or spry but
their sense of adventure in spite
of the canes and walkers was not
hampered. Each sister arrived
carrying a favorite food dish to
share. The day was for sharing
and remembering.
After a most enjoyable lunch
filled with laughter and chatter,
Barbara Insalaco also known as
Hysterian Hat, keeper of re-
cords, presented a scrap book of
mementos, pictures and articles
regardingthe chapter since its in-
ception on August 28, 2002.
It was then the memories
flowed.
And so the tale began with
yours truly, Maria Capolarella
Montante, relating how the so-
ciety came into existence with a
few women deciding to greet
middle age with verve, and hu-
mor.
Sue Ellen Cooper, (founder of
the Red Hat Society) bought a
bright red fedora at a thrift shop
for no other reason than it was
cheap. Shortly afterwards she
read the poem “Warnings” by
Jenny Joseph and decided that
her birthday gift to her dear
friend would be the red hat and a
copy of the poem.
The idea spread between
friends and they decided to go to
tea as the poem suggested,
“Wear purple dress and a red hat
which doesn’t go, and doesn’t
suit me….”
The Red Hat Society was
born.
“Blooms and Bubbles” came
into existence in the same man-
ner. I broached the idea to Ann
spirational, flow with meaning
encompassing each of us as her
prayer is lifted up.”
Josephine Lazzari, a peppy
and spry 99 years of age, laugh-
ingly stated, “I joined the Red
Hats tofinda man. I’mstill look-
ing! Joining the Red Hats is my
best medicine.”
We bowed our heads in silence
and prayer to remember our Red
Hat Sisters who graced us with
their presence in life giving us
the opportunity to knowand love
them: Mary Ann Endres, Juanita
Miller, Mary Ann Daley, Connie
Zamerowski, JoanCostello, Vic-
toria Moore, Carmella Chimento
and Dorothy Ostrowski.
It was the second meeting that
Ann Corcoran attended. She had
a grand time.
Members not in attendance
were: Eileen Burns, Katie Casey,
Jean Evans, Joanne Herron, Ma-
rie Lucarella and Kay Thornton.
We gathered round and sang
“Happy Birthday to Us” as Bar-
bara Insalaco lighted the candles
on our tenth birthday cake.
Bubbles floated through the
air carrying our good wishes for
many more birthdays together.
As the ladies began to leave I
reflected on the changes that
time has inflected on each of us.
We may not be able to kick up
our heels as we once didbut what
was most evident is the closeness
and caring of “Blooms and Bub-
bles Red Hat Sisters”.
ma.
Barbara Insalaco enjoyed at-
tending committee meeting that
were relaxing and fun and was
always amazed how everything
came together perfectly.
Carol Piotroski quite seriously
stated she was rejected by a
Wilkes-Barre chapter and was
happy to be part of our group. It’s
great; like family. She also re-
calls the dress she
created with toast-
ed bagels as “Toast
of the Town” for a
mock fashion
show. Chuckling,
“I think I ate one or
two on the way
home.”
Mary Doran at-
tended her first
meeting at Maria-
nacci’s and was at
ease and very hap-
py. She comment-
ed, “I had a hard
time finding a red
hat. At the next
meeting I was giv-
en one of Mary Ann Endres’ hats
and felt very honored.”
Darlene Wheeler stated she
was most interested in joining a
Red Hat group. Her wish was
fulfilled when moving to Pitt-
ston and meeting Edythe Kepics
who invited her to join “Blooms
and Bubbles”.
Alice Zura recalls the festive
Christmas luncheons at Fox Hill
with Edythe Kepics, Prayer Hat,
saying Grace. “Her words are in-
riding in a trolley and using the
bubble machine and hearing her
name called along the route. The
other was the year she, Lois De-
tato and Ann Marie Conroy were
going to ride bicycles. It rained
that day. They ditched the bikes
and chose to walk with umbrel-
las instead.
Delores Delia fondly remem-
bers the many rehearsals filled
with laughter for the Mr. Sand-
man pantomime that she per-
formed at the Pittston Senior
Center with Sara Walker and
Lois Detato. It was the year we
presented a “Talent Show” and
Joann Herron was the pianist.
Carolee Aycock recalled the
pleasure she and her husband
Tom had in preparing two after-
noon teas in her home. Tom
served as the butler each time at-
tending to keeping the teacups
full.
Bev Brydon thanks Jean
Evans for inviting her to join. “I
love the calendar and look at it
often. Also my elegant silk dress
made of nylon stocking and
panty hose I modeled at the
Mock Fashion Show are favor-
ites of mine.”
Ann Alaimo loved our Hallo-
ween parties held at Andy’s Din-
er where we paraded for the cus-
tomers. She recalls Carmella
Chimento dressed in a blown up
ballerina costume finding it dif-
ficult tosit andwhat funCarmel-
la had. It was at that party that an
unidentified cowboy had every-
one stumped. At unmasking, we
discovered it was Columbia Stel-
Marie Conroy, Ann Rose and
Juanita Miller, who all thought it
was a great idea. We meet light in
spirit and armed with a sense of
humor to discuss and plan at Pa-
pa John’s in West Pittston. We at-
tended our next meeting in full
regalia each inviting a friend to
join us. They were: Gertrude
Manganaro, Fran Getz, Evelyn
Reles and Betty Kasulanis. Each
new member
invited a
friend and
that’s how our
numbers
grew.
Asharing of
memories be-
gan with
Edythe Kep-
ics, Prayer
Hat, who re-
lated each
time she looks
at the calendar
we made in
2007 she is in-
spired and
grateful for all
the new friends.
The first meeting I attended
without a red hat and was direct-
ed to the Dollar Store where they
were selling for $l.00. The hat
was just a hat and I wanted to frill
it up so I went to Quinn’s Florist
on North Main Street in Pittston.
When I went to pick it up my dol-
lar hat cost me $22.00.
Ann Rose, as a founder, spoke
of our early beginnings and also
rememberedwhenposingfor the
calendar for the month of May
on the lawn in West Pittston with
the Cherry Blossom Trees in
beautiful full bloom the ladies
pictured were attired in beautiful
dress shoes and she in sneakers.
“I had recently had knee sur-
gery.”
Columbia Stelma posed a
question. “Maria, whatever hap-
pened to the photo that was taken
on Sara Walker’s dock for the
month of June with the three of
us draped in purple towels?” (I
swore Ann Marie Conroy to se-
crecy that the photo did not de-
velop for the print was a disas-
ter.)
Sara Walker loved the parades.
She had two favorites. The one
MARIA REMEMBERS
by MARIA CAPOLARELLA-MONTANTE
Red Hat birthday anniversary celebration
The first meeting I attended
without a red hat and was directed
to the Dollar Store where they
were selling for $l.00. The hat was
just a hat and I wanted to frill it
up so I went to Quinn’s Florist on
North Main Street in Pittston.
When I went to pick it up my dollar
hat cost me $22.00.
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BILL TARUTIS/ FOR THE SUNDAY DISPATCH
Gene Cameli, of Pittston, left, and Emory Guffrovich, of Jenkins Township, prepare to remove the barbequed chicken at the Oblates of
St. Joseph End of Summer Chicken Barbecue last Sunday afternoon at the Oblates of St. Joseph Seminary, Laflin.
Nico Antoniacci, 3, of Moosic, tries out
Paglianite and Patty Gubitose, both of P
They
at Oblates of S
Sofia Gonzales of West Pittston, right, completes a cartwheel inside the bounce house.
Kara Miller, 10, of Pittston launches her
Oblates of St. Joseph Chicken Barbecu
Anthracite Rose Country-Western Danc
Blakeslee, left, Jayne Mattern of Dunmo
Carol Stanczak of Inkerman dance to th
Mary and Vince DeGiusto of
Plains Township look over
items at the basket raffle.
Oblates Vice-rector Rev. Daniel
Schwebs, OSJ, left, and Sharyn
Ardier of Exeter sell tickets to
the basket raffle. S
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the Tiki Toss as game attendants Jean
Pittston, assist.
People pack the dining tent at the Oblates of St. Joseph last Sun-
day.
Barbara Monroe of Blakeslee, right, and Jayne Mattern of Dun-
more fan themselves as they listen to the Jeanne Zano Band.
y do chicken right
St. Joseph End of Summer Chicken Barbecue
Jeanne Zano performs with her
band at the Oblates of St. Jo-
seph Chicken Barbecue.
Eight-year-old Myatalia Barna of Mountain Top, left, rides 'Otto' as Judy Heller of Sweet Valley escorts themaround the grounds at the
Oblates of St. Joseph Seminary.
frog at one of the games booths at the
ue.
cers instructor Barbara Monroe of
ore, Phyllis Bonomo of Yatesville, and
he music of the Jeanne Zano Band.
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$20 per person • $35 per couple
includes wine, cheese, hors d’oeuvres and dessert
visit wplibrary.org or call 654.9847 for more info
Brought to you by
The Friends of the
Hosted by Ray Bartolai of
Bartolai Winery in Harding, Pa
Sunday
Sept. 9th
2:00 - 5:00
Wyoming Farmers’ Market
The Wyoming Farmers’ Mar-
ket in the Park is held at 9 a.m.
every Saturday in the Butler
Street Park, off Eighth Street.
Craft and food vendors will also
be on hand.
Additional vendor spaces are
still available. Call the borough
office at 693-0291 to register.
The event is sponsored by
Wyoming Borough and the
Wyoming Recreation Board.
Pizza Sale
The First United Methodist
Church of West Pittston will
hold a pizza sale on Friday, Sep-
tember 7. Pizzas can be ordered
baked or unbaked with or with-
out onions.
Cost for a tray of pizza is $11.
Toppings of sweet red pep-
pers, pepperoni or sausage can
be added for $2 each. Specialty
pizzas – broccoli and tomato and
garlic are $14 per tray.
Vegetable pizza for $13 in-
cludes tomatoes, onions, brocco-
li, red peppers and mushrooms,
no cheese.
Call the church office at 655-
1083 to place an order.
Post 477 Auxiliary
The American Legion Auxil-
iary Pittston Post 477 is meeting
at 203 Vine St. Pittston on Sept.
8 at 5 p.m.
Charity train ride
The Greater Pittston Charity
Train Ride railroad excursion to
Jim Thorpe is Sunday, Sept. 9.
The excursion in a 1920s era
open window coach pulled by a
diesel locomotive will depart at 9
a.m. from Duryea and return at
approximately 6:45 p.m.
Tickets are $65 each. Checks
should be made payable and sent
to the Greater Pittston Charity
TrainRide c/oPittstonMemorial
Library, 47 Broad St., Pittston,
PA18640.
For more information, call
Gloria at 693-0766 or Tina at
407-0579. Tickets are limited
andavailable ona first come first
seated basis.
Taste of
Greater Pittston tickets
Tickets are now available for
the first “ATaste of Greater Pitt-
ston” set for 2 to 5 p.m. on Sept.
23 on the Pittston Library
grounds.
Tickets are $30 each and avail-
able at the library.
Jenkins Lions Dinner
The Jenkins Township Lions
Club annual HamDinner will be
held Sunday, Sept. 30 fromnoon
to 5 p.m. at the Jenkins Twp.
Hose Co. on Second Street be-
hind Tony’s Pizza.
Cost is $8 for adults and $4 for
children.
For tickets call Stephen 655-
5307, Jack 654-4977 or Bob
655-1632. Tickets will also be
available at the door.
Those attending the dinner are
asked to bring canned goods for
the Greater Pittston Food Pantry.
Lions brooms will also be
sold.
Bus trip to playhouse
The United Methodist Women
of the First United Methodist
Church of West Pittston are
sponsoring a bus trip to Hunter-
don Hills Playhouse in New Jer-
sey on Thursday, Oct. 4.
The title of the play is Every-
body L oves Opal. The total cost
of the trip including the tip is
$85.00. For more information,
contact Doris Dushok at 654-
2689 or Karen Weed at 654-
4446.
Today at Slocum
Today Sunday, Sept. 2 Frances
Slocum Park will present three
programs.
At 2 p.m. it’s Butterflies for
Little Guys. Preschoolers ages 3
to 5 and their adults will learn
about caterpillars and butterflies
as we close out our programming
season at the campground am-
phitheater.
At 4 p.m. Nature Bingo is for
kids of all ages and all those
young at heart don’t want to miss
this fast paced program as we
learn about local plants and ani-
mals while playing nature bingo
at the campgroundamphitheater.
At 7 p.m. enjoy Music in the
Woods with Jim Weiss, on gui-
tar, fiddle, and mandolin at
Campground amphitheater
In the event of inclement
weather amphitheater programs
will be cancelled. Call to con-
firm program is still being held
before driving to the park. 570-
696-9105
Briefs
Continued from Page 30 S
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The annual PALS (Prevent
ALS) of Jimmy Duffy get-to-
gether to commemorate Jimmy’s
life was held Sunday, August 26,
at Alan Hanczyc’s house, 219
Rock Street, Hughestown. Past
PALS benefits were held at
Lackawanna County Stadium
but this year the stadium is
closed for repairs.
Jimmy died of ALS. Amyo-
trophic lateral sclerosis is a dis-
ease of the nerve cells in the
brain and spinal cord that control
voluntary muscle movement.
ALS is also known as Lou Geh-
rig’s disease. Proceeds from the
outing go to the Philadelphia
ALS Association.
For more information or to
make a donation, phone Mary at
947-9120 or Florence at 655-
1763.
Remembering Jimmy Duffy at annual fundraiser
BILL TARUTIS/FOR THE SUNDAY DISPATCH
Chase Duffy, 9, of West Pittston, floats in the pool at the ALS Pal's fundraiser in Hughestown last Sunday afternoon.
Abby Lazecki, 8, of Jenkins Township, goes
for a slide.
Two-year-old Cash Duffy of West Pittston has a bite to
eat.
Anthony Bantell of Hughestown, right, chats with TomCampenni
of West Pittston in front of Uncle Buck's BBQ grill.
Joseph Mullen of Dupont, right, Kathy McHale of Pittston, and
Jeanie Bantell of Hughestown at the fundraiser.
Jimmy Duffy's son Jay Duffy of
West Pittston, left, and sister
Mary Jo Chiampi of Jenkins
Township.
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T
he Plains Boys’ Club, a
classic car club in the
Wyoming Valley, held its
5th annual Helping Hands Car
Cruise last Sunday to benefit a
local veteran in need. This year’s
recipient is Rich Belles Jr. of
West Wyoming.
Belles is a 1988 Pittston Area
graduate and U.S. Navy veteran
who served in Kuwait. He lost
most of his armin a tragic indus-
trial accident.
The event was staged at the
Polish American Veteran’s Club
on Oak St. in the Hudson section
of Plains.
Muscle cars, antique cars,
trucks and motorcycles were on
display.
All proceeds and donations
will be used to assist in Belles’
continued rehabilitation.
This event is sponsored by The
PL AI NS BOYS CLUB
BILL TARUTIS/FOR THE SUNDAY DISPATCH
Maryann Day of Plains Township gets out her fiancee's 1972 Firebird at last Sunday's classic car show.
Classic cars for a cause
Car show last Sunday benefits PA grad and veteran Rich Belles Jr.
Mike and Tracey
Olson of Miners
Mills peruse the
vehicles at the
classic car show
at the Polish
American Veter-
ans' Club in Hud-
son last Sunday
afternoon.
See CARS, Page 37 S
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Plains Boy’s ClubandThe Polish
American Veteran’s Club,
Plains.
For more information or to
make a donation call Joe Rogal-
ski (The Plains Boy’s Club Presi-
dent) at (570) 362-1526.
Jeff Piatt and Bruce Searles, both of Dallas, look over a 1957 Chevrolet Bel Air.
TomLello of Moosic gets into his 1966 GTO convertible. Sheryl Samuels and Rob Metcalf of West Wyoming.
Jack and Judy Thomas of Morton, Delaware County, left, and
Carol Yezilski of Dallas at the classic car show.
Cindy Collura of Plains Township, left, and Kerry Urban of Lu-
zerne share a laugh under the pavilion.
Cars
Continued fromPage 36
Linda Carr of Dallas gets
dunked a little prematurely at
the classic car show.
Chad Regan, 10, of Wilkes-
Barre, winds up for a throw at
the dunk tank.
Gary Belles of the Joe Martin
Trio performs under the pavil-
ion at the classic car show at
the Polish American Veterans'
Club in Hudson. Joe Martin and
Billie Fink, not shown, are also
in the group.
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The West Pittston Cherry
Blossom Festival Committee
members recently presented
yearly donations to West Pittston
Tomorrow, West Pittston Ambu-
lance, West Pittston Hose Com-
pany and Fallen Warriors Schol-
arship Fund.
Cherry Blossom Committee makes yearly donations
Right, members of the West
Pittston Cherry BlossomCom-
mittee present a check to West
Pittston Tomorrow. Fromleft,
first row, are Lori DeAngelo,
Amy Strobel, Robert Messina,
Patrick Messina, West Pittston
Tomorrow committee member
Judy Stevenson, Toni Valenti,
Millie Vasil, George Taggart,
Charlotte Keeney.
Left, West Pittston Cherry Blos-
somCommittee members pre-
sent a check to West Pittston
Ambulance. Fromleft, first row,
are Amy Strobel, West Pittston
Ambulance members Marissa
Dushok and Richard Dushok.
Second row, Robert Messina,
Lori DeAngelo, Toni Valenti,
W.P. Ambulance member Barry
Hosier Sr., Patrick Messina,
Millie Vasil, George Taggart,
Charlotte Keeney.
Right, members of Cherry Blos-
somFestival Committee pre-
sent a check to West Pittston
Hose Company. Fromleft, first
row, are Lori DeAngelo, W.P.
Hose Co. members Marissa
Dushok and Richard Dushok.
Second row:, George Taggart,
Amy Strobel, Toni Valenti, W.P.
Hose Company President Gary
Slusser, Patrick Messina, Millie
Vasil, Charlotte Keeney, Robert
Messina.
Left, West Pittston Cherry Blos-
somCommittee members pre-
sent a check to the Fallen War-
riors Scholarship Fund. From
left, first row, are Mary Claire
Borzell, Jack Borzell, Julianna
Borzell, Gina Chipolis, Steve
Chipolis. Second row, George
Taggart, Lori DeAngelo, Amy
Strobel, Toni Valenti, Melissa
Dolman, Richard Dushok, Ma-
rissa Dushok, Charlotte Kee-
ney, Robert Messina, Millie
Vasil, Ralph Salerno. S
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In the towns
The Avoca Lions Club will
have its monthly food bank from
4 to 7 p.m. on Thursday, Sept. 6
at the Bethel United Methodist
Church, 532 Main St.
Volunteers are needed at 1:30
p.m. to help unload the truck. At-
tendees are asked to bring boxes.
Celebrating
Happy birthday to Dave Jones
who celebrated his birthday on
Aug. 29.
Happy 31st wedding anniver-
sary to Babe and Jeanne Gutow-
ski, of West Avoca.
Fire drive
The Avoca Fire Department’s
fund drive is underway. All prop-
erty owners have been sent a do-
nation packet.
Only 40 percent of Avoca’s
propertyowners participatedlast
year, causing the department to
operate at a deficit.
Please support this year’s drive
in order to keep the department
running and the town safe.
In addition to submitting do-
nations via mail, they can also be
made online at www.avocafire-
.net.
Prayers for recovery
The family of Debbie Gula, of
Moosic, is requesting prayers
from the community for her re-
covery.
Debbie, who is in very serious
condition, has been hospitalized
locally and at the University of
Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, for
nearly a month.
She is the wife of former Du-
ryea resident John Gula.
The couple has three children.
Queen of Apostles news
Queen of the Apostles Parish’s
choir practices take place from7
to 9 p.m. Mondays at St. Mary’s
Church, 715 Hawthorne St.
New members are welcome.
Please use the handicapped en-
trance on the right side of the
church.
The parish has Adoration of
the Blessed Sacrament from 8
a.m. to 8 p.m. every Tuesday. Eu-
charistic Adorers are needed for
the 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. and
the 12:30 to 1:30 p.m. time slots.
If you can help, call Ann Jake
at 457-3521 or the parish office
at 457-3412.
The Rosary and the Litany of
the Sacred Heart of Jesus is
prayed for the intentions written
in the adoration and lobby books
along with the special intentions
of those present at 7:30 p.m. fol-
lowed by Benediction.
The parish will have its First
Friday Healing Mass at 7 p.m. on
Sept. 7.
Faith formation classes will
resume on Sunday, Sept. 9 and
Monday, Sept. 10 at St. Mary’s
School, 742 Spring St.
The First Eucharist class will
meet from 9 to 10:30 a.m. on
Sept. 9 and students in grades
K-8 will meet from 4:30 to 5:45
p.m. on Sept. 10. Registration
forms need to be returned by
Sept. 2.
The youth group will meet on
Sunday, Sept. 9. Contact Lori
Ostrowski at 457-8840 for more
details.
The women’s guild will meet
at 2 p.m. on Sunday, Sept. 9 in St.
Mary’s School auditorium, 742
Spring St.
Refreshments will be served.
There will not be a meeting on
September 11 in order for mem-
bers to attend the 9/11 Memorial
Mass at the church.
The pastoral council will meet
at 7 p.m. on Monday, Sept. 10 in
the rectory, 715 Hawthorne St.
Memorial Mass
The parishioners of Queen of
the Apostles Parish and the Avo-
ca Fire Department will pay trib-
ute to the victims of the Septem-
ber 11 terrorist attacks at their
11th Annual September 11 Me-
morial Mass at 7 p.m. on Tues-
day, Sept. 11 at St. Mary’s
Church.
Members of local fire and po-
lice departments, emergency
medical personnel, military per-
sonnel, veterans, Avoca Boy
Scout Troop 316, Cub Scout
Troop 316, Venture Crew 3701,
the Ancient Order of Hibernians,
Avoca Division; American Le-
gion Post 607, V.F.W. Ladies
Auxiliary, Post 8335; state Rep.
Michael Carroll, former state
Rep. Thomas Tigue, borough of-
ficials and bagpipers will proc-
ess from the Avoca Fire Depart-
ment to St. Mary’s Church.
The procession route will be-
gin at the Avoca Fire Depart-
ment, 740 Main St., pass under a
fire truck ladder arch which will
be raised over Hawthorne Street
and end at St. Mary’s Church.
The procession will assemble
at 6:45 p.m. at the fire depart-
ment and process to the church
shortly thereafter.
During the Mass, all of the
participants will receive a spe-
cial blessing from the Rev. Phil-
lip J. Sladicka, pastor.
Following the Mass, there will
be a reception in St. Mary’s
School auditorium.
The back to school and Cate-
chetical Sunday Mass will take
place at 11 a.m. on Sept. 16 at St.
Mary’s Church.
The youth group will sponsor
a “Make Your Own Smoothie
Party” in St. Mary’s School audi-
torium following the Mass.
The worship committee will
meet at 7 p.m. on Monday, Sept.
17 in the rectory.
The social concerns commit-
tee will meet at 8 p.m. on Mon-
day, Sept. 17 in the rectory.
The buildings and grounds
committee will meet at 6:30 p.m.
on Monday, Sept. 24 in the recto-
ry.
Parishioners are currently sell-
ing the harvest edition of their
“Pot of Gold Match the Daily
Number” raffle tickets.
For just $10 per ticket, you will
have a chance to win $75 daily
and $100 on Fridays throughout
October.
There will also be $250 prizes
on Oct. 1 and 10 and $1,000 on
Halloween.
The winning number is based
on the evening daily number of
the Pennsylvania Lottery. To
purchase a ticket, call the rectory
at 457-3412, andit will be mailed
to you.
St. John’s Class of ’62
Members of the St. John the
Evangelist High School class of
1962 are planning their 50th an-
niversary reunion.
The first planning meeting
will take place at 7 p.m. on
Wednesday, Sept. 5 at the Tipsy
Turtle, 29 Market St., Jenkins
Twp.
Classmates who reside in or
out of the area who would like to
attend the reunion but are unable
to attend the planning meetings
are asked to call Millie at 388-
0935, Bob or Mary at 654-1070
or Tom at 654-7974.
Garbage collection change
Due to the Labor Day holiday,
Waste Management will collect
garbage on Friday, Sept. 7 in-
stead of Thursday, Sept. 6.
VFWAuxiliary meeting
Due to the Labor Day holiday,
the V.F.W. Ladies Auxiliary to
Post 8335’s regular monthly
business meeting has been
moved to 7 p.m. on Monday,
Sept. 10 in the post home, 915
Main St.
President June Fitzgerald will
preside over the meeting and
Paula Regan and Wendy Radle
will be the hostesses.
VFWBBQ
Members of the Avoca V.F.W.
Post 8335 will have their chicken
barbecue dinner from1to 5 p.m.
on Saturday, Sept. 15 at the post
home, 915 Main St. Takeouts
will be available.
Tickets are $9 each and avail-
able by calling the post home at
457-7673.
Avoca Lions Club food bank distribution Thursday
AVOCA
JACKIE BORTHWICK-GALVIN
457-3351
avocahappenings@verizon.net
Newspapers will not be col-
lected in Hughestown Borough
on Monday, Sept. 3 due to the
Labor Day holiday.
Branches and yard wase may
be put at curbside on Wednes-
day, Sept. 5 along with other
similar items.
Gas line connections
Borough council wishes to
announce that if residents wish
to connect a gas line to their
home to call Sandy at 830-
1256.
Tax collection
Council members Wayne
Quick and Marie Griglock at-
tended meetings to support
Berkheimer as the County Tax
Collection Agency.
The members reported that
they were satisfied with ser-
vice the company had sup-
plied.
Street signs
Council asks that if there are
any further problems regarding
street signs to call 654-2061.
A number of signs have been
placed throughout the borough.
No recycling
on Labor Day
HUGHESTOWN
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VALLEY MEAT & DELI
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most major credit cards.
White American Cheese.......................................... $2.99 lb.
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Cooked Ham............................................................. $2.99 lb.
Polish Ham................................................................ $4.99 lb.
Ham off the Bone ..................................................... $5.99 lb.
Healthy Choice Turkey Breast ............................... $5.99 lb.
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HOT LUNCH
SPECIALS
DAILY!
All are invited to Holy Mother
of Sorrows PNCC two day event
next Saturday and Sunday start-
ing with a Giant Flea Market
from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Satur-
day, Sept. 8andthenfrom11a.m.
to dusk on Sunday, Sept. 9 for the
36th Annual Dozynki/Harvest
Festival.
Each will be held on the parish
grounds on Wyoming Avenue.
In addition to the many vendors
under the big white tent, the flea
market will also have a Country
Store of fresh fruits and vegeta-
bles and a variety of Polish
foods. The Annual Harvest Fes-
tival will have a variety of home-
made ethnic foods: pierogi, pota-
to pancakes, gołubki, kluski,
kiełbasa, sausage, soups andfun-
nel cakes, etc. as well as Amer-
ican foods of hot dogs and ham
burgers. Homemade baked
goods, including pies and cakes,
will be available.
Live music will be performed
by Joe Lastovica and the Polka
Punch from 3 to 6 p.m. Other at-
tractions at the Festival are: 50/
50 Bingo, Big Raffle, Chinese
Auction, Arts and Crafts, Chil-
dren’s and Youth Stand. T
he Traditional Blessing of
Harvest Wreath Ceremony will
be held at 2 p.m. in the church
followed by a procession taking
the wreath outdoors to the festiv-
al grounds for a brief program
and where everyone will be
greeted as you past the wreath
with a taste of bread, cheese and
wine and a small token of good
luck, a wheat boutonniere tied
with red and white ribbon.
Polish Club meeting
Scheduling conflicts make it
necessary to reschedule the Pol-
ish American Citizens Club for-
merly slated for 2 p.m. on Sun-
day Sept. 9 to the following Sun-
day, Sept. 16 at the club home.
PACC active members are en-
couraged to attend. Refresh-
ments will be served after the
meeting.
The Polish American Citizens
Club will resume its annual golf
tournament this year on Satur-
day, Sept. 22 at Edgewood in the
Pines with a shotgun start at 9
am. Format will be Captain and
Crew. Cost per person will be
$80. Prizes, dinner and refresh-
ments will be served after the
outing at the Polish American
Citizens Club, Elm Street, Du-
pont. Signups will be heldfrom6
to 8 p.m. every Friday at the club.
Hole sponsors are welcome. All
proceeds benefit the Dupont
Children’s Fund. For more infor-
mation, contact Bill McDermott
at 655-9311, Dan Lello at 654-
6819, Ken Barnak at 237-5922
or Tom Piechota at 654-9229.
Party in the Park t-shirt
There have been requests by
residents for 2012 Party in the
ParkT-shirt. Aminimumorder is
required and anyone interested is
asked to call Patty at the munici-
pal office as soon as possible.
Also left over from the party are
lighted mining helmets for kids
as part of this year’s Party in the
Park theme for $6. Batteries are
included.
Sacred Heart news
Scheduled meetings for Sep-
tember at Sacred Heart of Jesus
Church:
Women’s Society will meet at
6:30 p.m. on Tuesday, Sept. 4 in
the church hall. Holy Name So-
ciety will meet at 7 p.m. on
Wednesday, Sept. 5 in the church
hall. CCD Teachers will meet at
7 p.m. on Monday, Sept. 10 in the
lower level of the rectory
The appreciation dinner for all
who worked the Sacred Heart
picnic will be held from 5 to 9
p.m. on Sunday, Sept. 23 at the
Dupont Hose Company. There
will be a social starting at 5 p.m.
anddinner servedat 5:30p.m. To
make a reservation, clip out the
form in the church bulletin or
call the rectory office at 654-
3713. Reservations must be
made no later than Sept. 17.
Registration for CCD Reli-
gious Education at Sacred Heart
of Jesus Church: Students in
grades 1 and up registration will
take place from 8 to 10 a.m. on
Sept. 9 and from 6 to 7 p.m. on
Sept. 12 in the church hall. This
year is especially important for
students in grades 5 and up since
Sacred Heart will celebrate Con-
firmation in early fall 2013. If
students do not take part in this
school year’s sessions, they will
not be eligible for Confirmation
until 2016. There will be a meet-
ing for all Parents of Confirma-
tion students (in public and Ca-
tholic school) at 7 p.m. on
Wednesday, Sept 19 in the
church hall.
The first CCD class of this
school year will be Monday,
Sept. 24. All students will meet
in the church at 6 p.m. and will
process to their classrooms with
their teachers. Dismissal will be
at 7:15 p.m. into the courtyard
between the school building and
the rectory. The CCDprogramis
always looking for adult volun-
teers. Anyone interested in as-
sisting the program as a class-
room aide, substitute teacher or
helping with making phone calls
or special projects is askedtocall
Elaine Starinski at 654-6952.
The Annual Holy Name Ziti
Dinner at Sacred Heart Church
sponsored by the Holy Name So-
ciety will take place from 4 to 6
p.m. on Saturday, Sept. 29 in the
church hall. Take-outs will be
available from3to5p.m. Tickets
are $7 for adults and $3 for chil-
dren under 12 years of age. Tick-
ets can be obtained fromany Ho-
ly Name member or by calling
the rectory office at 654-3713.
The Parish Family is helping
friend and fellow parishioner,
Cathy Wruble and is asking for
your help. Cathy has been put on
the waiting list for a new kidney
and you can help by bringing in
the tabs from your soda/beer
cans! There will be a basket in
the church lobby or tabs can be
dropped off on the back porch of
the rectory . For more informa-
tion, contact Carol at the parish
office at 654-3713.
Eco-tip
Here is Joey’s eco-tip of the
week: If you go to bed while
watching television, set your
sleep timer instead of keeping
your TV on all night. This saves
energy!
Applicants for council seat
Dupont Borough has received
five letters of interest to fill the
vacant council seat. Applicants
are from Josephine (Pina) Han-
sen, Mike Baldwin, Mike Davis,
Stanley Golembiewski and Mar-
tin Kuna Jr. Only one letter of in-
terest for the board seat on the
Lower Lackawanna Valley Sani-
tary Authority was sent in by
Mary Susan Riccetti. Dupont
Borough Council will hold a
special meeting at 7 p.m. on
Tuesday, Sept. 4 at the James
Cocco Council Chambers to in-
terview the candidates.
Venture Crews news
Venture Crews 3701 from
Avoca and 2025 of Bear Creek
Twp. recently completed Ven-
ture Crew Week at Goose Pond.
Venturing is a national high ad-
venture program for ages 14-21.
For information on Venturing, to
join Crew 3701, sign up nights
are from 6 to 7 p.m. on Sept. 5
and 12 at St. Mary Queen of
Apostles Church, Avoca or call
Janice Sepcosk at 472-3253.
Gas service
Applications for gas service
are available at the Dupont Mu-
nicipal offices during regular
business hours. UGI representa-
tive Mike Trussa stated at the
April Council meeting that for
the company to have program
approval for placement of gas
lines, residents’ applications
must be filed with UGI. For
more information, contact Mike
at 829-8664.
WAC book fair
Wyoming Area Catholic
School will hold its annual Book
Fair the weekend of September
15 and 16. Special shopping
hours are scheduled from 4 to 7
p.m. on Saturday, Sept. 15 and
from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. on Sunday,
Sept. 16 in St. Cecilia’s Parish
Center.
Dupont Borough asks resi-
dents with large trees on their
propertyconsideringtree remov-
al or tree trimming to register
with the borough office. In an ef-
fort to help the community, the
office is contacting a number of
tree cutting service companies
for proposals to give a better rate
to residents based on the number
of people registering for the ser-
vice
VFW news
The V.F.W. Post 4909 will
meet at 7:30 p. m. on Monday,
Sept. 10 at the post home. Com-
mander Gary Carwardine will
preside. Home Association
meetingwill follow. Foodandre-
freshments will be served.
The VFW Post 4909 will host
a blood drive for the American
Red Cross from 12:30 to 6 p.m.
on Tuesday, Sept. 25 at the post
home on Main Street. To donate
blood and platelets through the
American Red Cross ,individu-
als must be at the least 17years of
age, weigh at least 110 pounds
and be in general good health.
For additional information re-
garding donor eligibility, call 1-
800-RED-CROSS or visit red-
crossblood.org.
PNCC Dozynki/Harvest Festival next weekend
DUPONT
ANN MARIE PADDOCK
407-0231
dupont.news@comcast.net
See DUPONT, Page 41 S
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DELI
201 Foote Avenue, Duryea
FREE DELIVERY! CALL 457-8881
OPEN DAILY: 6 a.m.-7 p.m. • Saturday & Sunday ‘til 5 p.m.
REHOSKI’S MARKET
Boneless Chuck Roast ........................... $2.99 lb.
Lean Stewing Beef ................................ $2.99 lb.
Butt Porketta......................................... $2.99 lb.
Butt Steaks ........................................... $1.99 lb.
Fresh Cut Minute Steaks........................ $4.99 lb.
Smoked Bacon...................................... $4.99 lb.
Hatfield Cooked Ham ........................... $4.99 lb.
Hard Salami .......................................... $4.99 lb.
Provolone Cheese................................. $4.99 lb.
Former Duryea resident Carey
Wickizer was recently promoted
tothe rankof Major inthe United
States Army Reserve.
Carey, who has been serving
our country for 23 years, cur-
rently resides in Richmond, Va.
where she is employed as an oc-
cupational therapist at the Hun-
ter Holmes McGuire VA Medi-
cal Center. She is the daughter of
Bob and Joan Wickizer, Duryea.
Excelsior hose meeting
The Excelsior Hose Co. No. 2
will have its regular monthly
meeting at 7 p.m. on Thursday,
Sept. 6 at the hose company, 798
Foote Ave.
Happy birthday
Happy birthday to Dave Jones
who celebrated his birthday on
Aug. 29.
rayers asked
The family of Debbie Gula,
Moosic, is requesting prayers
from the community for her re-
covery. Debbie, who is in very
serious condition, has been hos-
pitalized locally and at the Uni-
versity of Pennsylvania, Phila-
delphia, for nearly a month. She
is the wife of former Duryea res-
ident John Gula. The couple has
three children.
Little League sends thanks
The Duryea Little League
thanks the Duryea American Le-
gion for sponsoring the recent
trip to the Little League World
Series. It was trulya great dayfor
the children and their parents.
Their generosity was greatly ap-
preciated.
Tax bills mailed
The 2012 school tax bills have
been mailed. Anyone who did
not receive one should call Du-
ryea Tax Collector Marty Hanc-
zyc at 457-2482. The discount
period ends on Sept. 20.
Street Dept closed Monday
The Duryea Borough Street
Department will be closed on
Monday, Sept. 3inobservance of
Labor Day. Garbage will be col-
lected one day late this week.
Yard waste will be collected on
Friday as usual.
St. John’s Class of ’62
Members of the St. John the
Evangelist High School Class of
1962 are planning their 50th an-
niversary reunion. The first
planning meeting will take place
at 7 p.m. on Wednesday, Sept. 5
at the Tipsy Turtle, 29 Market
St., Jenkins Twp.
Classmates who reside in or
out of the area who would like to
attend the reunion but are unable
to attend the planning meetings,
are asked to call Millie at 388-
0935, Bob or Mary at 654-1070
or Tom at 654-7974.
Scout Troop 285 meeting
The Duryea Boy Scouts Troop
285 will begin to have their
weekly meetings at 6 p.m. on
Thursday, Sept. 6 at the Ameri-
can Legion Brennan Regan Post
585 hall, 329 Main St. New
members are always welcome to
join.
Plans are being finalized for
the 20-mile hike to Jim Thorpe
on Saturday, Sept. 15; the Main
Street cleanup on Saturday, Sept.
22; the Court of Honor Recep-
tion on Thursday, Sept. 27 and
the NEPA Council Traveling
Camporee to Boston in October.
For more information, contact
Troop Chairman Ann Edwards
at 457-8402.
Cub Pack 375 meeting
Duryea Cub Scout Pack 375
will have their first meeting on
Monday, Sept. 10 at the Sacred
Heart of Jesus Hall, 529 Ste-
phenson St. Registration for new
members will beginat 6p.m. and
all Dens will meet at 7 p.m. Reg-
istration is $16. Boys in grades
1-5 are invited to join.
Pack night will take place at 7
p.m. on Monday, Sept. 17 for all
Dens at the SacredHeart of Jesus
Hall. The Webelos Scouts will
host the meeting.
For more information, contact
Ann Edwards at 457-8402.
Sewer authority meeting
The Duryea Sewer Authority
will meet at 7 p.m. on Monday,
Sept. 10 at the Duryea Municipal
Building, 315 Main St. The pub-
lic is invited to attend.
Water shut off will begin Sept.
4 for past due accounts.
For more information, contact
the office during regular busi-
ness hours: 8:30 to 11:30 a.m.
and noon to 3 p.m. Monday
through Friday.
Polish Falcons meeting
The members of the Polish
Falcons, Nest 128 will meet at
7:30 p.m. on Saturday, Sept. 15 at
the post home, 631 Main St.
Holy Rosary golf outing
Holy Rosary School will have
its fourth annual golf classic
Sunday, Sept. 16 at Edgewood in
the Pines, Drums. Registration
for the captain and crew event is
at noon and the shotgun start be-
gins at 1 p.m. Singles will be
placed on a team. The cost is
$100 per player which includes
lunch and dinner at the club.
Awards will be given for several
golfing contests. There will also
be prizes awarded throughout
the day.
There are also several tourna-
ment sponsorship opportunities
available at various donation lev-
els. For more information, con-
tact Debbie Davis at 451-1762.
The Holy Rosary Craft Fair
will take place from10 a.m. to 4
p.m. on Sunday, Sept. 23 at Holy
Rosary School, 125 Stephenson
St. There will be vendors on
hand as well as food, raffles and
goodies. For more information
or to reserve vending space, call
Debbie Davis at 451-1762, Sha-
ron Chase at 457-4450 or Holy
Rosary School at 457-2553.
Sons of Legion news
The Sons of the American Le-
gion, Squadron 585 (S.A.L.s)
will have its monthly meeting at
3 p.m. on Sunday, Sept. 9 at the
Brennan Regan Post home, 329
Main St. Installation of officers
and the upcoming clam sale will
be discussed at this time. Dues
will also be collected.
The Sons of the American Le-
gion, Squadron 585 will have a
clam sale beginning at noon on
Sunday, Sept. 16 at the Brennan
Regan Post home. Clams are $6
per dozen. There will also be
other food items for sale. Take-
outs will be available.
The Sons of the American Le-
gion, Squadron 585 will host a
children’s Halloween costume
party from3 to 5 p.m. on Sunday,
Oct. 28 at the Brennan Regan
Post home. Children and grand-
children of members of the Le-
gion, S.A.L.s, the ladies auxilia-
ry and social members are invit-
ed to attend. Attendees will be
treated to food, beverages and a
treat bag. There will also be a
costume contest. The winners
will receive prizes.
Reservations are required.
Call the post home at 457-4242
for details.
Germania breakfast Oct. 7
The members of the Germania
Hose Company will have an all-
you-can-eat country style break-
fast from 7 a.m. to noon on Sun-
day, Oct. 7 at the hose company,
430 Foote Ave. The menu in-
cludes eggs, bacon, home fries,
biscuits, sausage, gravy, coffee
and juice served buffet style.
Tickets, which are $9 for
adults and $6 for children, can be
purchased from any hose com-
pany member or at the door. For
more information, visit
www.germaniafire.net.
Wickizer promoted to Major in the Army Reserve
DURYEA
JACKIE BORTHWICK-GALVIN
457-3351
duryeahappenings@verizon.net
County recycling collections
The Luzerne County Solid
Waste Management Department
and the Pennsylvania Depart-
ment of Environmental Protec-
tion will conduct tire recycling
collectionevents from9a.m. to3
p.m. on Saturday, Oct. 6 at the
Butler Township road Dept., 14
W. Butler Dr., Drums and from9
a.m. to 3 p.m. on Saturday, Oct.
13 at Hanover Area Junior /Se-
nior High School, 1600 Sans
Souci Parkway, Hanover Twp.
Dupont Borough will have a
collection of tires for residents
interested with a two-tire limit.
You must register will the mu-
nicipal office by calling Bor-
ough Manager Patty McDonald
at 655-6216. Dupont Public
Works Department will pick up
tires on Friday, Oct. 12 and them
to the Hanover Recycling loca-
tion on Saturday.
Residents can also participate
and take their tires to one of the
two locations but must have a
registration number: To register
contact, Elizabeth DeNardi, Lu-
zerne County Recycling Coordi-
nator, at 1-800-821-7654 or
email beth @luzernecounty.org.
Public works schedule
The Dupont Public Works De-
partment will be closed on Labor
Day, Monday, Sept.3. Please
note the modified service sched-
ule for the week of Sept. 2:
Tuesday, Sept. 4 - Refuse
Wednesday, Sept. 5 – Recy-
cling, including cans and bottles
Thursday, Sept 6 - Yard waste
Dupont
Continued fromPage 40
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Pack 310 will hold registra-
tion for Cub Scouts at 6 p.m.
on Sept. 10 at the Exeter Scout
Home and Community Center
on Lincoln Street, Exeter.
The Scout Home is attached
to the Exeter Borough Build-
ing. The pack will welcome
boys in the first thru fifth
grades from any local town or
school district.
Registration fee which in-
cludes insurance and a Scout
book is $30 for current mem-
bers and $35 for new members.
A parent or guardian must
attend with each boy.
For further information, con-
tact Lorraine Backoby by call-
ing 693-3724 or by email at
Lbacko @aol.com.
Saint Barbara’s
Christian Women
Saint Barbara’s Christian
Women Organization will hold
its monthly meeting at 6:30
p.m. on Tuesday, Sept. 11 at the
church hall.
All women of the parish are
invited to attend as the upcom-
ing year will be discussed.
The meeting will begin with
the recitation of the rosary.
WA College Night
The Wyoming Area Guid-
ance Department is having Col-
lege Night at 6:30 p.m. on
Thursday, Sept. 6 in the high
school library.
All the local colleges and
universities as well as Pennsyl-
vania private schools and state
schools along with the commu-
nity college and a PHEAA rep-
resentative will be present.
It is imperative that seniors,
juniors and sophomores along
with their parents attend this
program.
Ninth-grade parents and stu-
dents are also invited to attend
to learn more about college op-
tions.
The program will move to
the multi-purpose room at 7:30
p.m. for a mini College Fair at
which time parents and stu-
dents can speak individually
with college reps.
At that time, more specific
information can be obtained as
well as the opportunity to ad-
dress specific questions with
the college reps.
For more information, call
Mrs. Rabel at 655-2836, ext.
2339.
Exeter Classic 8-9
Tournament
The 2012 Exeter Classic 8-9
Tournament wrapped up on
Friday, Aug. 3 with the Back
Mountain Navy team beating
Nanticoke in the championship
game. Besides the players and
coaches, the tournament could
not have been a success with-
out the help from people in the
Exeter Lions Little League and
the community.
The league thanks to EZ-
Flow Drain Service for spon-
soring the tournament.
The league also sends thanks
to following people for taking
the time out of their summer to
help in the concession stand,
prepping the fields for play and
helping with the score keeping
and pitch counts:
Mary Jo Cunningham, Juel-
Anne Klepadlo, Ronald Klepa-
dlo, Jeanie Pugliese, Kevin Pu-
gliese, Thomas Brennan.
Also, Chris Hizynski, Owen
Hizynski ,Chuck Bierlein, Jacki
Kasa, John Morgan, Michelle
Morgan, Tammy Noone, Bill
Noone, Casey Noone, Brady
Noone , Kelli Jones, Maria
Mathis, Kathy Pelleschi, Steve
Pelleschi.
Also, Joann Skoronski, Don
Benton, Brian Graham, Mary-
beth Graham ,Jerry Zezza, Do-
reen Zezza, Aaron Zezza ,Tra-
cy Wright, Debbie Wright,
Matt Wright.
Also, Charlie Rome,Tina
Rome, CJ Rome, Olivia Rome
,Frank DeAngelo, Anthony
DeAngelo ,Kristi Layland,
Marc Layland, Michael DeAn-
gelo, Nate Miller.
Also, Alecia Panuski, Tara
Bonin, John BoninLinda Gush-
ka, Nick Gushka, Sharon Mar-
ranca.
Also, Dave Mead, Stan Egan,
Matt DillonWA Students: Serra
Degnan, Lexie Coolbaugh,
Hope Crawn.
Also, Skyhe Sciandra, Leo
Skoronski, Tia Brown, Kiersten
Gregorio, Val Bott, Greg Cajka,
John Bankus, Ally Shatrow-
skas, Kate Kross, Alex Holtz,
Eric Smith.
Also, Jared Saparito, Eric
Walkowiak, Brian Wisowati,
Jordan Chiavacci, Amanda
Hannis.
Also Charles Adonizio for
allowing the league to use his
lot for parking and Exeter Bor-
ough for bringing the fire
trucks to water the fields dur-
ing the heat wave.
Players from the Exeter 2012
Tournament team were:
Owen Hizynski, Casey
Noone, Jack Mathis, Lynzie
Skoronski, Zachary Pitcavage,
Nico Sciandra, John Morgan,
Drew Mruk, Ethan Kozden,
Matt Pelleschi, Jesse Mikolic-
zyk, Connor Wrobleski, Za-
chary Houston, Manager: John
Morgan, Coaches: Bill Noone,
Chris Hizynski, Steve Pelleschi,
Dave Mathis
St. John’s
Class of ’62 reunion
Members of the 1962 class of
St. John the Evangelist High
School are making plans for
their 50th anniversary class re-
union.
The first meeting will be
held at 7 p.m. on Wednesday,
Sept. 5 at the Tipsy Turtle, 29
Market St., Jenkins Township.
Anyone who knows class
members who would like to at-
tend the reunion but are unable
to attend the meetings are
asked to call Millie at 388-
0935, Bob or Mary at 654-1070
or Tom at 654-7974.
Borough notes
Street sweeping is conducted
the first Friday of every month.
There will be a parking ban in
effect on Wyoming Avenue.
Cars will be ticketed by the
police department if not moved.
Residents are not to take
their recyclables to the recy-
cling building.
They are to be placed curb-
side for pick-up on Mondays.
Also, yard waste is to be
placed curbside on Thursdays.
Businesses in town which
have not purchased a recycling
or refuse sticker for 2012 will
no longer have recyclables
picked up and will be cited by
the police and subjected to a
fine. Anyone who has a private
dumpster must report their ton-
nage to Karen Szwast, recy-
cling coordinator, at 654-0933.
Reunion notice
The Wyoming Area Class of
1977 will hold its 35th anni-
versary reunion from 1 to 8
p.m. on Sept. 29 at The Check-
erboard Inn, Carverton Road,
Trucksville. Cost is $40 per
person.
Reservations can be made by
sending checks payable to WA
Class of ’77, c/o Cindy Yudiski
Lynch, 355 Susquehanna Ave.,
Exeter, PA 18643 or by visiting
the Wyoming Area Class of ’77
Facebook page.
Scholarships sought
Wyoming Area School Dis-
trict is beginning to make plans
for its fourth annual scholar-
ship and award celebration
which will be held on May 23,
2013.
Any civic organization, busi-
ness, athletic group, individuals
or families that would like to
offer a scholarship or gradua-
tion award are welcome to join
the celebration.
For further information and/
or help in developing a scholar-
ship/award, call Mrs. Rabel in
the guidance office at 655-
2836, ext. 2339.
Over 75 awards were granted
with approximately 360 people
in attendance at this year’s pro-
gram.
Since Wyoming Area’s in-
ception, over $1million has
been awarded at graduation.
These are just the local
awards.
This year’s awards amounted
to over $95,000. One of the
awards is valued at approxi-
mately $44,000. It is given ev-
ery four years.
Cosmopolitan Seniors
The Cosmopolitan Seniors, a
Project HEAD Club, will meet
again at 1 p.m. on Tuesday,
Sept. 4 at St. Anthony Center
in Exeter.
Host/hostesses are George
Mislan, Terri Mislan, Frank
Onda, Ed Stankoski and Flo-
rence Stankoski.
Forty nine members attend
the previous meeting.
After the call to order by
President Malinowski, VP Kle-
back led the group in prayer,
Pledge of Allegiance and a pa-
triotic song while accompanied
by Bill Kull on the organ.
Secretary Terri Mislan read
the minutes of the last meeting.
In the absence of the treasurer,
President Vic announced the
bank balance.
After the meeting, the group
enjoyed refreshments and sang
the old tunes played by Bill
Kull.
Bingo was played.
Charlie Cheskiewicz won the
special game prize. Mary Cole-
man won the Bingo jackpot.
Fifty/fifty winners were Ro-
semary Golenski, Terri Mislan,
Veronica Wyandt, and Helen
Zarychta.
Travel coordinator Johanna is
accepting reservations for a trip
to Mount Airy Casino on
Wednesday, Sept. 12 with pick-
ups in Exeter and Pittston.
Non-members are welcome.
Details can be obtained from
Johanna at 655-2720.
St. Barbara’s news
The 2013 Mass Book will be
open as of Sept. 4.
Because of the increased
number of parishioners of St.
Barbara Parish and to ensure
that Masses are available to all
parishioners, Masses will be
scheduled for three months at a
time.
Mass intentions are sched-
uled on a first-come/first-
served basis.
Also, Mass intentions may be
changed based on the availabil-
ity of a priest or if there are any
unforeseen changes in the daily
Mass schedule.
Religious Education (CCD)
classes will start at 9 a.m. on
Sunday, Sept. 23 in the parish
center at St. Barbara’s.
All students must be regis-
tered to attend.
Registration forms will be
available in either church or at
the office.
There is a $16 book fee for
any child registered after Aug.
31.
Anyone interested in assist-
ing with the Religious Ed pro-
gram is asked to contact Jim
Rose at the parish office.
Registration for Scouts, Cubs scheduled Sept. 10
EXETER
EILEEN CIPRIANI
287-3349
ecipriani@comcast.net S
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West Pittston High School Class of 1950 held its 62nd
anniversaryclass reuniononFriday, Aug. 17at Glenmau-
ra Country Club.
A pizza party followed on Saturday, Aug. 18 at the
home of George Miller and a brunch at Fox Hill Country
Club concluded the weekend celebration on Sunday,
Aug. 19.
Those in attendance included, fromleft, first row, Val-
da Huthmaker Raker, Jasmine Chechele Mikita, Janet
Howell Dymond, Muriel Phethan Allford, Marie Nuzza-
lo Melvin, Angela B. Pellicotti, Carmella Insalaco Dix-
on, Elaine Oliver Murphy. Second row, Michael Cerisci,
Dean Morgantini, WilliamMusto, George Brown, Char-
lotte Sima Bierley, Paul Minnelli, George L. Miller, Ri-
chard Sorcelli, William Prebola and Robert Pugliese.
West Pittston High class of 1950 reunites
The Friends Association of the
West Pittston Library has sched-
uleda Wine andCheese event for
2to5p.m. next Sunday, Sept. 9at
the library, corner of Warren and
Exeter Avenues. Ticket dona-
tions are $20 per person or $35
for couples and are available at
the library or from any Friends
member.
Cheese and crackers will be
offered as well as light snacks
and finger food desserts. There
will be a basket raffle in addition
to the wine event. For tickets or
new member information, con-
tact Sara Kelly at 883-7079; sa-
rashanekelly@gmail.comor call
the West Pittston Library at 654-
9847.
Police issue reminder
The West Pittston Police De-
partment reminds residents to
keep house and automobile
doors locked.
The department is investigat-
ing three entries into homes
within only several streets of one
another, occurring in the past
week. Two of the homes had
their doors unlocked/ajar at the
time of entry and in the third in-
cident a screen was cut to gain
entry.
The West Pittston Police will
remain on vigilant patrol to en-
sure protection, but residents
must help by following common
sense procedures. Should any-
one see or hear something suspi-
cious, they are asked to call 911.
Motorcycle Run for Eric
Eric Speicher, an eigh-th grad-
er at Wyoming Area from West
Pittston, was diagnosed with
Ependymoma, a type of brain tu-
mor, had surgery and subsequent
therapy in his recovery. The past
March, the tumor resurfaced and
is being treated at Sloan Ketter-
ing Hospital in New York City.
To help defray medical and
travel expenses, a motorcycle
ride/picnic will be held in Eric’s
honor at 11 a.m. on Sept. 9 at
Four Seasons Golf Club, Shoe-
maker Avenue, Exeter. The pic-
nic will follow. Registration is at
10 a.m.
Advance registration for riders
of $20 includes a t-shirt and
wristband for food and drink;
passenger fee is $15. Day of
event registration is $25 for rid-
ers and $18 for passengers. Non-
rider t-shirts are $12 and $1, de-
pending on size. Non-rider pic-
nic wristband is $10 and includes
food and drink
For more information, call Ed
or Amanda Shedlock at 655-
4336.
Church marks
flood anniversary
The congregation of the First
United Presbyterian Church of
West Pittston will mark the anni-
versary of the September 2011
flood by gathering at 11 a.m. on
Sunday, Sept. 9 in the sanctuary
at 115 Exeter Ave. Worship will
be led by the Rev. James E. Thy-
ren, pastor, who will preach a
sermon entitled “Let Endurance
Have Its Full Effect!”
The building has been cleared
of mold and structural repairs
have been made. Decisions re-
garding long-term repairs are
still pending so the group will
worship in primitive conditions.
Damaged pews will be pushed to
the side and comfortable chairs
will be in their place. Comfort
facilities will be provided out-
side the structure.
Post 542 meeting
1st Lt. Jeffrey DePrimo Amer-
ican Legion Post 542, West Pitt-
ston, will hold its regular bi-
monthly meeting at 6 p.m. on
Thursday, Sept. 13 at the Moose
on Exeter Avenue with Com-
mander Richard Simonson, Sr.
presiding. The meeting will in-
clude formal installation of offi-
cers and buffet dinner. The cost
is $11 per person. Reservations
are necessary and can be made
by calling Ron Gitkos at 654-
2261.
College Night
The Wyoming Area Guidance
Department will hold College
Night at 6:30 p.m. on Thursday,
Sept. 6 in the Secondary Center
library.
All the local colleges and uni-
versities as well as Pennsylvania
private schools and state schools
along with the community col-
lege and a PHEAA representa-
tive will be present. It is imper-
ative that seniors, juniors and
sophomores along with their
parents attend this program.
Ninth-grade parents and stu-
dents are also invited to attend.
Library wine and cheese event next Sunday
WESTPITTSTON
Tony Callaio
654-5358
tonyc150@verizon.net
See WEST PITTSTON, Page 44
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West Wyoming Tax Collector
Robert Connors would like to re-
mind residents planning to make
payments by means of install-
ments to make their first pay-
ment by Wednesday, Sept. 5. If
the first installment payment is
not received by then, the pay-
ment must be made at the rebate
or face amount. For more infor-
mation, call 693-0130.
Trash pick-up
West Wyoming residents are
advised that weekly trash pick-
upwill be scheduledfor Tuesday,
Sept. 4 due to Labor Day.
Please place containers or
bags curbside on Monday eve-
ning.
Also, yard waste pick-up will
be scheduled for Friday, Sept. 7.
Residents are reminded to place
open containers curbside on
Thursday evening. Pick-up will
be Atherton Park up to but not
including Eighth Street.
Zoning hearing
The Luzerne County Zoning
Hearing Board will meet at 7
p.m. on Sept. 4 in the Luzerne
County Courthouse. On the
agenda for that meeting will be
the decision on the permit appli-
cation of UGI Energy Services
for a utility special exception to
construct a gas compressor sta-
tion in West Wyoming.
Flood risk mapping
To help residents and busi-
nesses be better prepared for the
risk of flooding, the Department
of Community and Economic
Development (DCED) has
launched a website containing
the new Digital Flood Insurance
Rate Maps established by the
Federal Emergency Manage-
ment Agency (FEMA). West
Wyoming Borough will adopt
the new FIRM mapping in No-
vember along with an updated
Flood Plain Ordinance. The new
website, www.pafloodmap-
s.com, contains a digital version
of FEMA’s floodplain maps es-
tablished to designate specific
areas that are special hazards or
risk premium zones in order to
determine whether flood insur-
ance is required.
The site provides information
to municipal officials, residents
and insurance agencies and bro-
kers. It also alerts users to the po-
tential risks and responsibilities
associated with being located in
a floodplain. The website also
features an interactive risk-iden-
tification tool that allows users
to enter an address and access in-
formationrelatingtothat proper-
ty. Users will also be able to de-
termine if a property is in a
floodplain, specific building
code regulations that pertain to a
property, and if there is a manda-
tory flood insurance require-
ment for that address
Legion Morning Star
The meeting of the West
Wyoming American Legion
Morning Star Post 904 has been
changed to 6:30 p.m. on Sept. 13
at the West Wyoming Hose Co.
No. 1 hall with the new com-
mander Jerome Domkowski.
Compost yard
The compost yardwill be open
from10 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Satur-
days.
Yard waste containers should
not exceed 30 pounds. No plastic
or recyclable bags, stones or dirt
are allowed. Residents are asked
not to dumb their yard waste out-
side the fence.
Recycling reminder
West Wyoming recycling con-
tainers are located behind Hose
Company #1.
Recycling can be dropped off
any day of the week.
The following is the list of ac-
ceptable items for recycling:
commingled food and beverage
containers, plastic containers (all
number recyclables are accept-
ed), cardboard, newspaper and
office paper.
First tax payment installment due Sept. 5
WESTWYOMING
The program will move to the
multi-purpose roomat 7:30 p.m.
for a mini College Fair at which
time parents and students can
speak individually with college
reps. At that time, more specific
information.
For more information, call
Mrs. Rabel at 655-2836 ext.
2339.
St. John’s Class of ’62
Members of the Class of 1962
of St. John the Evangelist High
School are making plans for
their 50th anniversary class re-
union. The first meeting will be
held at 7 p.m. on Wednesday,
Sept. 5 at the Tipsy Turtle, 29
Market St., Jenkins Township.
Anyone knowing of class
members who would like to at-
tendthe reunionbut are unable to
attend the meetings, please call
Millie at 388-0935, Bob or Mary
at 654-1070 or Tomat 654-7974.
Street department
Yard waste will be picked up
from Montgomery Avenue to
Erie Street onMondays andfrom
Montgomery Avenue to Susque-
hanna Avenue on Tuesdays.
Residents are asked to place
yard waste in open containers.
No plastic bags will be picked
up.
Tree limbs should not exceed
four feet in length or 1/2-inch in
diameter and must be tied in
bundles.
Any resident requesting chip-
ping of tree limbs is asked to call
the Public Works Building at
655-7786 to be placed on a
schedule.
Tax collector
George L. Miller, tax collec-
tor, announces the Wyoming Ar-
ea school taxes have been
mailed. The rebate period is until
Oct. 3 and the face value until
Dec. 3.
The borough tax penalty peri-
od will be honored through De-
cember.
Office hours during rebate are
from 6 to 8 p.m. Tuesday and
Wednesday.
It is the property owner’s re-
sponsibility to forward tax bills
to their financial institution for
payment.
If a receipt is requested, please
include a self-addressed/
stamped envelope with payment.
For appointments, call 655-
3801 or 655-7782 ext. 232.
Birthday notes
Celebrating this week: Barb
Gillespie, Kevin McDonnell,
Jared Jordan, Karissa Kross,
Sept. 2; Ralph Salerno, Sept. 3;
Christine Holtz, Ann Culp, Sept.
4; Saundra Colwell, Bobby Lica-
ta, Paula Denisco, Sept. 5; Ni-
cole Dobash, Tammie Morgan,
Sept. 7; Donna Piccirilli, Abby
Decker, Sept. 8.
Thought of the week
A science which does not
bring us nearer to God is worth-
less.
Quote of the week
“Live daringly, boldly, fear-
lessly. Taste the relish to be
found in competition - in having
put forth the best within you.”
Henry J. Kaiser,
American industrialist
Bumper sticker
Writing is nothing more than
a guided dream.
West Pittston
Continued fromPage 43
The Jenkins Township Board
of Supervisors has cancelled the
public work session for Wednes-
day, Sept. 12 scheduled due to
prior commitments of the board
of supervisors.
The regular meeting of the
board will be held at 7 p.m. on
Wednesday, Sept. 12.
Yard waste collection
Township has joined the Grea-
ter Pittston Joint Municipal
Compost Facility and residents
must follow several changes in
the collection of yard waste.
The Jenkins Township Public
Works Department will collect
only yard waste and tree branch-
es suitable for grinding and
mulching.
No rocks, dirt, garbage, rub-
bish, plastic, glass, boards, pipes
or other materials may be co-
mingled with yard waste and/or
branches.
No tree trunks will be accept-
ed for pickup.
If any prohibited materials as
listed above are in the weekly
yard waste collection, the Jen-
kins Township Public Works De-
partment will reject all of the
yard waste and/or tree branches
placed for collection.
It is veryimportant that the un-
acceptable items listed above be
eliminated to insure that com-
post facility machinery does not
become damaged and result in
the closing of the compost facil-
ity for a period of time.
Single streamrecycling
Since Jenkins Township
changed to single stream recy-
cling in 2012, the Jenkins Town-
ship Board of Supervisors is ask-
ing residents to separate their
newspapers magazines and card-
board for recycling collection.
Newspapers and magazines can
be bundled in manageable bun-
dles on the ground next to recy-
cling containers. The cardboard
should be broken down, tied and
placed on the ground next to re-
cycling containers. Recycled
junk mail can be placed in be-
tween newspapers or magazines
or put in a grocery bag so the pa-
pers do not blow around the
neighborhood.
Supervisors to meet Sept. 12
JENKINS TOWNSHIP S
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Wyoming Borough officials
advise visitors to the Midway
Shopping Center and the Wyom-
ing Dike area that there have
been a series of vehicle break-
ins.
Valuables were stolen after the
actor(s) smashed a window to
enter the vehicle or entered the
vehicle while it was left un-
locked.
The best advice is do not leave
valuables in vehicles when using
the levee system trail
Anyone observing suspicious
activity in these areas is asked to
call 911.
Scout news
Cub Scout Pack 366, spon-
sored by St. Monica’s Parish and
serving the Wyoming/West
Wyoming Area will hold regis-
tration at 6:30 p.m. on Wednes-
day, Sept. 5 and Thursday, Sept.
13 at the West Wyoming Bor-
ough Building, corner of West
Eighth Street and Shoemaker
Avenue.
All boys in first through fourth
grades are invitedtobecome part
of the Scouting program. Regis-
tration and insurance fees for the
year is $25 plus $9 for the pro-
gram book.
For further information, con-
tact Mrs. Stahley at 693-1425.
Boy Scout Troop 366, spon-
sored by the West Wyoming
Hose Company is open to any
boy 12 years of age or older. The
troop meets on the second Floor
of the West Wyoming Borough
Building on the corner of West
Eighth Street and Shoemaker
Avenue from 6:30 to 8 p.m. ev-
ery Tuesday. Boys are welcome
to attend a meeting to decide if
they wish to be a Scout. Scout-
master is Douglas Kaminski.
Orientation dates
Orientation dates are set for all
children attending Nursery
School Classes at The Cookie
Corner this fall.
For 3 and 4-year-olds, orienta-
tion will be held from 9:30 to
11:30 a.m. on Thursday, Sept. 6
for the morning class and from1
to 3 p.m. for the afternoon class.
Pre-Kindergarten orientation
is set for 9:30 to 11:30 a.m. on
Friday, Sept. 7 for the morning
group and from1to 3 p.m.for the
afternoon session. Each child
must be accompanied by a par-
ent/adult to assist with a craft.
PTO meeting
The next Wyoming Area 10th
Street PTO meeting will be held
at 7 p.m. on Thursday, Sept. 6 in
the school cafeteria.
WA College Night
The Wyoming Area Guidance
Department is having College
Night at 6:30 p. m. on Thursday,
Sept. 6 in the high school library.
All the local colleges and uni-
versities as well as Pennsylvania
private schools and state schools
along with the community col-
lege and a PHEAA representa-
tive will be present.
It is imperative that seniors, ju-
niors and sophomores along
with their parents attend this pro-
gram. Ninth-grade parents and
students are also invited to at-
tend.
The program will move to the
multi-purpose roomat 7:30 p.m.
for a mini College Fair at which
time parents and students can
speak individually with college
reps.
For more information, call
Mrs. Rabel at 655-2836, ext.
2339.
Wyoming/West Wyoming
Seniors
The Wyoming/ West Wyom-
ing Seniors will meet at 1:30
p.m. on Tuesday, Sept. 4 at St.
Monica’s meeting rooms with
Frank Perfinski presiding.
Servers are Charlotte Piezola,
Helen Markert and Nancy Mar-
cy.
The 50/50 winners from the
last meeting were Angie Mas-
truzzo, Helen Markert, Frank
Perfinski and Joan Kwasny. The
Bingo jackpot winner was Ma-
ryAnn Paluck.
Plans were discussed for the
Halloween Social and the Christ-
mas dinner.
Night at the Races
The members of West Wyom-
ing Hose Company #2 will hold
a Night at the Races on Saturday,
Oct. 6. Doors open at 6 p.m. and
post time is 7 p.m.
Members are currently selling
horses. Cost of a horse is $10.
Horse owners receive admission
to the races as well as free food
and drink for the evening.
Horses can also be purchased
by calling the fire department at
287-1182.
All proceeds will benefit the
fire department.
St. Johns Class of ’62 reunion
Members of the 1962 class of
St. John the Evangelist High
School are making plans for
their 50th anniversary class re-
union. The first meeting will be
held at 7 p.m. on Wednesday,
Sept. 5 at the Tipsy Turtle, 29
Market St., Jenkins Township.
Anyone knowing of any class
members who would like to at-
tendthe reunionbut are unable to
attend the meetings can call Mil-
lie at 388-0935, Bob or Mary at
654-1070 or Tom at 654-7974.
Dems golf tourney
The Luzerne County Demo-
cratic Committee will host a golf
tournament on Sunday, Sept. 16
at the Blue Ridge Trail Golf
Club, Mountaintop.
Registration begins at noon
with a shotgun start at 1 p.m.
The fee is $125 per person and
includes green fees, cart, dinner,
refreshments and a gift.
To register, mail a check to Lu-
zerne County Democratic Com-
mittee, 39 Public Square, Suite
1000, Wilkes-Barre, PA 18702.
Corporate checks cannot be ac-
cepted.
Hole sponsorships are also
available for $100.
For additional information,
contact John Bolin, tournament
chairperson, at 760-6137 or jbo-
lin110@gmail.com.
Reunion notice
The Wyoming Area Class of
1977 will hold its 35th anniver-
sary reunion from1 to 8 p.m. on
Sept. 29 at The Checkerboard
Inn, Carverton Road, Trucks-
ville.
Cost is $40 per person. Reser-
vations can be made by sending
checks payable to WA Class of
’77, c/o Cindy Yudiski Lynch,
355 Susquehanna Ave., Exeter,
PA 18643 or by visiting the
Wyoming Area Class of ’77
Facebook page.
Farmers’ market
There will be fresh local pro-
duce this Saturday at the Farm-
ers’ Market inthe Park. The mar-
ket opens at 9 a.m. every Satur-
day in the Butler Street Park off
Eighth Street.
Craft and food vendors will al-
sobe onhand. Additional vendor
spaces are still available. Call the
borough office at 693-0291 to
register.
The event is sponsored by
Wyoming Borough and the
Wyoming Recreation Board.
Compost yard schedule
The West Wyoming compost
yard will be open from10 a.m. to
2 p.m. on Saturdays for residents
of West Wyoming and Wyoming
Boroughs.
The compost yard accepts
brush, branches, leaves and
grass. Residents are reminded to
take care that yard waste does
not contain plastic or recyclable
bags.
The compost yard does not ac-
cept stones or dirt.
Compost is also available free
of charge to residents of both
towns.
St. Monica’s news
A Women’s Evening of Re-
flection will be held at 6 p.m. on
Monday, Sept. 10. Mass will be
celebrated and will be followed
with a Conference at 7 p.m. giv-
enbySister Joanof the Capuchin
Sisters of Nazareth.
Other Capuchin Sisters will
join her.
At 8 p.m., there will be a social
in the Church Hall. At 8:45 p.m.,
Sung Compline (Night Prayer of
the Church) will be held. A reg-
istration sheet will be available
in the church hall.
Anyone who would like to at-
tend may call the parish office a
693-1991 or Diane at 362-3661
or Pat at 762-5568.
Up & Over Retreat Weekend
will be held Friday, Sept. 14
through Sunday, Sept. 16 at the
Fatima Renewal Center in Dal-
ton for seventh and eighth grad-
ers.
The weekend includes a num-
ber of activities and events, Mass
and movie, all-you-can-eat buf-
fet style meals and private
rooms.
For more information, visit the
Fatima website at www.fatima-
renewalcenter.org.
St. Monica’s sweat-shirt/t-
shirt sale offers red t-shirts at
$10, crew sweatshirts at $18,
hooded sweatshirts at $26 and
zip-up hooded sweatshirts at
$30.
These are available in both
youth and adult sizes. Adult siz-
es 1X and up require additional
charge.
Order forms are at the entranc-
es of each church site. For more
information, contact Tom Tom-
sak at 237-2188.
Library news
The Book Sale at the Library
last weekendwas a huge success.
The High-Fived event gave pa-
trons a hands-on experience that
was fun for all ages. Bags and
boxes left the sale to be enjoyed
for years to come.
The board members, the direc-
tor of the library and all the
friends of the library wish to
thank the community for its sup-
port for this event and ask their
support for many interesting
events planned for the near fu-
ture, one of which is the Mixed
Bag Designs Fundraiser.
Men, women and children will
delight at the colorful bags for all
occasions, shopping, travel,
school and many other occa-
sions.
Watch the library web page
and the newspapers for more in-
formation for this September
event.
The Wyoming Free Library
now offers Wi-Fi. Bring your
laptops and study away.
For more information, log on-
to www.wyominglibrary.org or
call 693-1364.
The library is located at 358
Wyoming Ave. Hours are10 a.m.
to 6 p.m. Monday through Fri-
day, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesday
through Thursday and 9 a.m. to 4
p.m. Saturday.
Cops warn of vehicle break-ins at levee trail lot
WYOMINGNEWS
EILEEN CIPRIANI
287-3349
ecipriani@comcast.net
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Sports
Saporito, Saporito & Falcone
Attorneys At Law
490 N .M a in Street,Su ite 202,Pittston • 654-4643
BestofL u c k to All Area Tea m sThis Sea son.
The tone was set just two plays
in.
Pittston Area’s young quarter-
back Kyle Gattusso made a mis-
take, and Abington Heights’ se-
nior captain Jerry Langan made
it hurt.
The linebacker picked off the
errant pass and returned it 42
yards for the score just 45 sec-
onds into the contest. The Come-
ts went on to punch one in the
end zone once each quarter as
Abington shut out the Patriots,
28-0, at The Pit yesterday.
If you are Joe Repshis, you
can’t ask for anything more out
of his defense.
Abington (1-0) picked off
three passes, two that were re-
turned for touchdowns, and kept
constant pressure on a duo of
Pittston quarterbacks, forcing
two sacks and multiple quick
passes on routes not yet estab-
lished– especially on key mo-
ments whenPittstonwas driving.
“That was a big play for us
early on because it got some
STEPHANIE WALKOWSKI/FOR THE SUNDAY DISPATCH
PA's Kyle Gattuso picks up some yardage Saturday against Abington at The Pit.
Patriots
shut out
Saturday
PA running back Justin Wilk finds running room against Abington
in Saturday's game at The Pit.
By TOM FOX
Dispatch correspondent
See PATRIOTS, Page 47 S
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The Wyoming Area and Pitt-
ston Area girls and boys cross
country teams run together each
week in the same cluster with
GAR.
The first week, that’s coming
up Wednesday, the cluster runs
alone, meaning the teams will
score against each other for the
only time each season.
So there will be two Bridge
points available Wednesday at
GAR.
Wyoming Area Boys
Last season the Wyoming Ar-
ea boys did not, could not, win a
meet as they didn’t have the re-
quired minimum five runners.
Things are different this season
as first year coach Mike Stefan-
ick has eight boys running.
Among then are his top returners
Eric Filipak and Stephen Barush
who look like number one and
two. The rest of the squad is se-
nior Michael Harding, junior
Chris Wall, sophomores Nick
Hromek and Zachary Gibbons
and freshmen Joseph Buczynski
and Nico Vasquez.
“We built the program up so
now we can compete, and our
goal is to be competitive in the
Wyoming Valley Conference,”
Stefanick said. “We have a
younger team on the boys side,
and I am expecting some of my
younger runners to step up and
help to contribute to the team.
Filipak and Barush are our se-
nior leaders. Filipak is coming
off his best season in track , and
is carrying that attitude right into
the cross country season. Ste-
phen Barush has rededicated
himself to cross country and is
really pushing himself at prac-
tice.
“Hromek, Buczynski, Gib-
bons and Vasquez are all adjust-
ing from the 3k to the 5k. Wall
and Harding are new to cross
country, but they are dedicated
and have potential.”
Wyoming Area girls
On the girls side,” Stefanick
said. “We are looking to improve
on last year’s record of 5-14. This
team is extremely young with
only one senior. What we lack in
experience, we gain in motiva-
tion, and hard work.
Amanda Ostrowski is that se-
nior and she’s the leader. There
are no juniors. The rest of the
girls are sophomores Myiah
Custer, Melissa Mazzitelli, Ste-
phanie Schultz, Lauren Sokirka ,
Haley Stackhouse, Emily Wolf-
gang and freshman Mackenzie
Bilbow.
“Bilbow is adjusting to life on
varsity,” Stefanick said. “And
has potential to turn some heads
this year. Schultz and Custer are
working extremely hard. Wolf-
gang, Mazzitelli, Sokirka, and
Stackhouse all have potential.
“While we might have some
defined number one and two
runners for the boys and girls,
our goal for Wyoming Area
Cross Country is to come togeth-
er as a team. If we continue to
work hard at practice, I think we
have a good chance to improve
from last year, and continue to
growas a team, and build up our
cross country program.”
Pittston Area girls
Coming off a 14-3 season and
with all the top runners back the
Lady Patriots are expected to be
contenders in the league and
District 2. They Patriots six se-
niors -- Kaitlynn Kuchta, Olivia
Lanza, Catherine Lombardo
,Kristen Lombardo, Emily Sea-
mon, Kristen Fereck – have been
running together since junior
high.
Coach Joe Struckus said the
seniors are a leadership bunch.
“We are returning the core
runners from last year’s team,”
Struckus said. “And are looking
to the seniors to lead the way
through the season. We are look-
ing to improve on last season’s
record and have an excellent
showing at Districts.”
The Patriots have seven under-
classmen runners in juniors
Christine Briggs and Megan
Dougherty and sophomores
Mackenzie Carroll, Megan Mur-
tha, Anna Rogers and freshmen
Tara Johnson and Abby Sheerer.
Pittston Area boys
The PA boys lost two key run-
ners to graduation in Dave
McLeanandJamie Connors who
are bothrunningat Misericordia.
This year coach Dave Jiunta, in
his ninth year, has two seniors in
McLean’s brother Cody McLean
and first-year runner Kyle Ber-
linski.
“Right now,” Jiunta said, “Di-
mitri Shea, our junior captain, is
looking like our no.1. He’s our
most experienced runner. But
sophomore Mike Harvilla will
battle for number one.”
Five other sophomores round
out roster. They are Eric Sklanka
and Pat Cadden who game
through the JV program; Bran-
don Zaffuto, who ran varsity as a
freshman last season, and first-
year runners Brandon Winters
and Spencer Saxon.
“Last year was our first losing
record in my eight seasons. This
year I expect a winning record.”
WA/PA/GAR Cluster
Sept. 5
WA, PA at GAR
Sept 12
WA/PA/GAR at Tunkhan-
nock/Meyers
Sept 19
Coughlin/Holy Redeemer/
Wyo. Sem at WA/GAR/PA
Sept 26
Crestwood/Dallas/MMI at
PA/GAR/WA
Oct. 3
WA/PA/GAR at Nanticoke/
Hazleton/Hanover
Oct. 10
WA/PA/GAR at Berwick/Val-
ley West/Northwest
H I G H S C H O O L C R O S S C O U N T R Y
PA, WA teams off and running on Wednesday
Two Bridge points up for
grabs in opening meet
By JACK SMILES
jsmiles@psdispatch.com
points on the board and got us
momentum,” the AHhead coach
said. “You always have the emo-
tions and jitters in the home
opener, but once the ball is put
into play, you just focus on exe-
cution.”
No sequence explains it more
than the second quarter. Down
7-0, the Patriots were deep in
Abington territory, down to the
15. But one sack and a 2-yard
loss on a fullback dive created a
third-and-long and left the Patri-
ots with an empty feeling on an
incomplete fourth-down pass in
the end zone.
“We made way too many mis-
takes,” said Pittston head coach
Mike Barrett as the Patriots also
had six fumbles, losing one of
them. “To throw an interception
two plays into the game is tough.
That’s a ball we should have just
ate. He’s a sophomore quarter-
back and he’ll learn from it. We
played a ton of freshman and
sophomores, and we are a young
football team. As they begin to
get that experience, they will
learnnot tomake those mistakes.
We will just move forward.”
Down 14-0 in the third, Pitt-
ston had another opportunity –
down to the Abington 30, but a
short run by Justin Wilk and
three straight incomplete passes
turned it over to the Comets. The
Lackawanna League club wast-
ed little time, driving to mid-
field and scoring when Dante
Pasqualichio found an open JC
Show in the middle of the field
for a 50-yard score.
Show had a monstrous game,
catching nine balls for 138 yards.
It’s not like Abingtondominat-
ed the offensive categories.
Pittston racked up more than
200 yards of offense, and had the
opportunities.
Abington just capitalized in
the right moments.
“I thought that we were right
with them from an offensive
standpoint and offensive put-
out,” Barrett said. “Our guys
started to go down with cramps,
and we gave two touchdowns
with the interceptions. We will
have to go back and address
some things. All the credit in the
world to them. They do a fantas-
tic job, and they have a great
coaching staff. They play good
football there.”
Pasqualichio threw for 151
yards on 12-20 passing.
Justin Wilk had 45 yards on
the ground for the Patriots, while
Marc Romanczuk added 25.
Gattusso completed three passes
for 42 yards, while James Em-
mett added 34 through the air.
STEPHANIE WALKOWSKI/FOR THE SUNDAY DISPATCH
Mark Romanczuk follows blockers for a gain for PA.
Patriots
Continued fromPage 46
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In their 12-6 season-opening
loss to Scranton Prep on Friday
in West Pittston the Warriors
wrote a script on how to lose a
football game.
Scene one: allow field posi-
tion. Scranton Prep started pos-
sessions on the WA 38, 36, 33,
38 and 40.
Scene two: commit penalties.
The Warriors were flagged for 11
for 75 yards.
Scene three: squander oppor-
tunities. The Warriors kept the
ball for 10 minutes of the second
quarter and penetrated to the
Prep 18 and got field position at
the Prep 23 after an interception
in the third but failed to score ei-
ther time.
Scene four: commit more
turnovers. The Warriors lost the
ball three times to one for Prep
For all that the Warriors were
still in the game and might have
had a chance to tie or win in the
final minute if they recovered an
onsides kick.
The onsides try came with :58
left in the game after the War-
riors had scored on a 3-yard run
WYOMI NG AREA FOOTBAL L
TONY CALLAIO PHOTOS/FOR THE SUNDAY DISPATCH
Warriors burst through the banner just before the start of the game against Scranton Prep.
Field position hurts Warriors in opening loss
By JACK SMILES
jsmiles@psdispatch.com
WA QB Nick O'Brien hands off to fullback No.35 Jeff Skursky with lineman No.51 Dan Resciniti clear-
ing the way. See WARRIORS, Page 49 S
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Tuesday, Sept. 18, 2012
kIngsIon krmory º 10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Booth packages available.
Call 570-970-7374 or 570-970-7356
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timesleader.com
by Nick O’Brien to make it 12-6.
But that’s how it ended as Prep
recovered the onsides try and ge-
nuflected to run out the clock.
O’Brien, the Warriors multi-
talented senior, who rushed for
over 1200 yards last season,
rushed for 138 yards on 31 car-
ries, but never broke off one of
his trademark long TD runs.
In the late TD drive it took the
Warriors 3:06 to go 63 yards
with O’Brien at quarterback. He
passed for 33 yards to Schmitz
and Zezza and ran for 30.
In that 10-minute possession
in the second quarter the War-
riors drove from their own 30 to
the Prep 20, the big play being a
27-yard run by O’Brien on a 3rd-
and-31. With a 1st-and-10 at the
Prep 20, O’Brien picked up two
yards up the middle, but came
out of the pile and limped to the
sidelines. With O’Brien out and
with two five-yard penalties
thrown in the drive stalled. On a
3rd-and-18 from the Prep 28,
quarterback Jordan Zezza and
tight endTrent Grove came with-
in inches of connecting for a TD.
A4th down pass was incomplete
and Prep took over on downs.
In the second half O’Brien
played with a brace or wrap on
his ankle and appeared to be just
a little less quick than usual.
But the loss can’t be pinned all
on the Warriors offense. The
Prep defense – led by Noah Bey,
Aaron Para and Marshall Kupin-
ski – had something to do with
the outcome. Twice Prep caught
O’Brien on the blindside with
untouched blitzing corners re-
sulting in fumbles. One was lost
on the third play after an inter-
ception at the Prep 23 by Kyle
Davis on a ball tipped by a War-
rior lineman. The other fumble
was recovered by WA’s Zach La-
Nunziata resulting in a 20-yard
loss that put the Warriors in a
3rd-and-30 from their own 12.
Prep scored both TDs during a
five minute span of the fourth
quarter on a 31-yard run by Pat
Marino at 10:20 and a 1-yard run
by Kupinski at 4:15.
Outside of those two drives
which started at the WA 40 and
38 the Warrior defense held up
well considering they played
most of the game in their own
end.
Zack LaNunziata was active at
linebacker. Cody Schmitz had a
sack on a corner blitz. Joe Erzar,
Jeff Skursky, Matt Dimick, Joe
Taylor, Dan Resciniti and senior
tackle Carl Zielinski, who also
appeared to be limping, also
came up with defensive plays.
Marty Michaels, a freshman,
started and linebacker, and made
some plays.
The Warriors outgained Prep
157 to134 and had11first downs
to eight for Prep, but couldn’t
overcome the poor field posses-
sion.
It was a hard hitting game and
Prep swarmed O’Brien. Though
the Warriors have some healing
and some work to do, there is no
need to panic. Prep is a quality
opponent and the Warriors lost
their opener last season and
wound up in the District 2 cham-
pionship game.
Friday the Warriors at are Mid
Valley which beat Hanover 48-
14.
Warrior No.21 Cody Schmitz gets off the ground to break up a
Cavalier pass.
TONY CALLAIO/FOR THE SUNDAY DISPATCH
The Warrior cheer section gets revved up prior to the game against the Scranton Prep Cavaliers.
Warriors
Continued fromPage 48
All-everything, Nick O'Brien
sweeps right for a long gain for
the Warriors. O'Brien gained
over 130 yards on the ground.
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Frank Redmond, 23, the for-
mer Wyoming Area and Miser-
icordia all-star from Harding,
considers himself the fastest
man in the Valley. He earned that
honor Friday night by placing
second in the River Street Mile,
the final race of the Valley’s Fas-
test Person series down by the
River Common.
Redmond’s time of 4:28 was
good enough to place him ahead
of former Duke Blue Devil
Sean-Patrick Oswald, 24, for
best overall time in the two-week
event. The series included the
Rich Chase Mile at Kirby Park
and the Giant’s Despair Hill
Challenge. Redmond garnered
an overall time of 16:17 for the
three races while Oswald fin-
ished 10 seconds behind, at
16:27, after winning last night’s
race with a time of 4:24.
“Sean and I were side by side
for the first 1,200 meters. It was
those last 400 meters that he got
away,” said Redmond.
Oswald’s strategy was to con-
serve energy from the beginning
and to surge strongly at the end
of the race. When he came
around the last bend, and down
the final stretch, it was clear that
his strategy was working.
“I knew that this race would
come down to whoever threw
down the hammer at the end,”
said Oswald.
Oswald may have thrown
down the hammer, but the steady
pace by Redmond nailed down
the overall winner for the series.
“Nothing changed for me
from the previous races really. I
wanted to run fast, get a good
time and keep a solid pace,” said
Redmond.
Redmond earns ‘fastest man’ nickname
By JOHN GORDON
jgordon@timesleader.com
AIMEE DILGER/THE TIMES LEADER
Frank Redmond of harding-
finishes the fastest man 1
mile run.
The Felittese Association of
Old Forge will hold its First Race
for Our Lady of Constantinople
at 9 a.m. on Sunday, Sept. 9 in
conjunction the annual Felittese
Festival, Sept. 7-9. The two-mile
race and fun walk race begins at
the Old Forge High School Foot-
ball Stadium and concludes at
the Chapel of Our Lady on the
Felittese Fair Grounds at 145
Third Ave. Registration is at 8
a.m. on race day.
The festival honors Our Lady
of Constantinople, who has been
venerated in the town of Felitto,
Province of Salerno, Italy, since
1790. The association is com-
prised of descendants of Felitto,
Italy. The annual festival is held
annually to bring the descend-
ants together for a reunion week-
end of prayer and ethnic foods
and music. The festival is held
from 5 to 10 p.m. on Friday and
Saturday and noon to 10 p.m. on
Sunday.
After 10 a.m. Mass on Sunday
at St. Mary’s Church, a proces-
sion carrying the statue of Our
Lady of Constantinople will fol-
lowfromSt. Mary’s to the chapel
grounds.
Race and festival proceeds
benefit the chapel, Prince of
Peace Parish and local charities.
For anapplication, email LTer-
ruso@comcast.net, call 489-
0178 or visit Felittese Associ-
ation on Facebook.
Race for a ‘Lady’ in Old Forge next Sunday
Planning the First Race
for Our Lady of Con-
stantinople are, from
left, first row, Chris-
topher Thomas, of the
Sons of Italy; Louis
Mazza, Felittese fi-
nancial officer; and Bob
Calpin, of the former
Scranton Organization
of Area Runners
(SOAR). Second row,
John Guida, Felittese,
Louis Terruso, festival
president and race
director; Chris Guida,
race coordinator; and
Kevin Calpin, of SOAR. S
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Both the local field hockey
teams made the District 2 AA
playoffs last season and played
each other in the first round,
where Wyoming Area defeated
Pittston Area 4-0.
Wyoming Area lost in the sec-
ond round to Dallas 4-1.
In the regular season Pittston
Area was 10-4, finishing third in
Division3behindNorthwest and
Elk Lake. Wyoming Area was
7-8 and second in Division 2 be-
hind Holy Redeemer.
PA is in D3 again this season
with Northwest, Elk Lake, GAR,
Hanover, Tunkhannock, Ber-
wick, Montrose and Meyers.
WA is in D2 with Holy Re-
deemer, Hazleton, Honesdale,
Nanticoke, Wallenpaupack and
Abington Heights.
In D3 PAplays within the divi-
sion, while WA in D2 crosses
over with D1 teams so PA and
WA are not scheduled against
each other.
The Lady Patriots open at
home on Wednesday versus last
season’s division winner, North-
west.
Wyoming’s opener last Friday
was postponed. They open Tues-
day at Nanticoke.
Pittston Area
The last two seasons the Lady
Patriots reachedthe AAplayoffs,
but lost in the first round. So an
obvious goal for them is to qual-
ify again and then win a playoff
game.
“Both are achievable goals for
our group.” coach Caitlin Had-
zimichalis said, “I expect us to be
competitive with the top of our
division again. We have a good
amount of returning experience,
but did lose a few key players on
both ends of the field.”
Help comes in the form of a
large junior class of 10 girls.
“They have a good mix of
players with experience and with
players who are looking to step
up,” Hadzimichalis said of the
juniors.
She also has nine freshmen on
the roster. “The freshmen class is
talented, and it also has a few
players looking to compete.”
Hadzimichalis said finishing
needs improvement. “We’re
looking to improve in the circle.
We have been working on finish-
ing our scoring opportunities.
We’ve done a good job getting
the ball upthe field, we nowneed
to cash in on it. I believe we have
strong midfield play, with a few
different combinations. Our de-
fense has been improving
throughout the preseason, and I
expect that to continue the more
they play together.”
Key players are Liz Mikitish,
Alexa Danko, Lea Garibaldi,
Emily Herron, Dana Maurizi,
Katrina Mikitish, Paige Danko
and Alana Platukus.
The rest of the PAroster: Sa-
ra Czeniakowski, Julia Shandra,
Nicole Chaiko, Lori DeFazio,
Summer McLaughlin, Sam
Moska, Rachel Simanski, Kaila
Slack, Meredith Yozwiak, Ma-
rissa Arena, Liz Baiera, Julie
Lieback, Rachel Naylor, Maria
Garibaldi, Kalina Halchak, Bi-
anca Mattei-Miller, Marissa
Morreale, Haley Norwillo, Julia
Stella and Molly Walsh.
Wyoming Area
Asked to name key players for
the Lady Warriors, first-year
coach Lunda Comiskey listed 28
of them – the whole roster. She
didn’t want to single any of the
girls out. “I feel that everyone is a
key player if we are going to get
it done the right way,” she said.
As a first-year coach she and
the players are getting to know
each other. “They are getting
usedtonewcoaches, newphilos-
ophies, new formation, but all
will come with time.”
Comiskey said she likes the
way the girls have been practic-
ing and she likes their attitude.
“They are showing the will to
win, adapting to change, and
striving to get better day by day.
We’re taking each day one by
one, striving to get better indi-
vidually and as a team. We’re
working on each player’s mental
strength and discipline.”
As far as on the field strategy
Comiskey said she is building
the team from back to front,
meaning from defense to of-
fense.
If Comiskey did opt to name a
smaller list of key players, it
would have likely started with
Serra Degnan, a NCAA D-1
prospect who scored 15 goals
and 34 points last season.
WA roster: Serra Degnan,
Sally Deluca, Abby Thornton,
Gabby Alberigi, Lexi Cool-
baugh, Lindsay Carey, Bree
Bednarski, Faith Mushinski,
Gianna Gennetts, Abby
Schwerdtman, Lauren Perry,
Grace Gober, Kalene Bellas,
Laura Heinzlmeir, Ally Bresna-
han, Renee Gluchowski, Kate
Higgins, Abby Hosey, Paige
Norton, Carrie Pozaic, Kaylee
Rogers, Jillian Spak, Krystina
Stanczyk, Samantha Holcomb,
Emily Kneeream, Julianna
Scappaticci, Christina Granteed
Wyoming Area
Sept. 4 at Nanticoke
Sept 6 at Valley West
Sept. 10 at Crestwood
Sept 12 vs. Lake Lehman
Sept. 17 at Dallas
Sept 19 vs. Del Val
Sept 24 vs. Honesdale
Sept 26 at Lack Trail
Sept. 28 vs. Hazleton
Oct. 2 at Abington Heights
Oct. 4 vs. Wallenpaupack
Oct. 11 vs. Coughlin
Oct 16 at Wyoming Sem
Pittston Area
Sept. 5 vs. Northwest
Sept. 11 at Hanover
Sept 13 at Meyers
Sept 18 vs. Berwick
Sept 20 at Montrose
Sept. 25 vs. Tunkhannock
Sept. 27 at GAR
Sept 29 vs. Elk Lake
Oct 1 at Northwest
Oct. 5 vs. Hanover
Oct 8 vs. Meyers
Oct 10 at Berwick
Oct. 12 vs. Montrose
Oct. 15 at Tunkhannock
Oct 17 vs. GAR
Oct6. 19 at Elk lake
HI GH SCHOOL F I EL D HOCKEY
Field hockey teams gettin’ out the sticks
Season openers for WA
Tuesday, PA Wednesday
PA field hockey seniors Julia Shandra, Sara Czerniakowski and Liz
Mikitish
WA Seniors, Katie Higgins, Faith Musinski, Serra Degnan, Gabby Alberigi, Lexi Coolbaugh, Kalene
Belles
By JACK SMILES
jsmiles@psdispatch.com
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Offer valid from Monday, August 27, 2012 through
Sunday, September 2, 2012. While supplies last.
timesleader.com
LAST DAY TODAY!
Get a complimentary copy of
The Times Leader with any
purchase worth $25.00
or more at participating Gerrity’s!
Participating
Gerrity’s locations:
Wyoming, Luzerne,
Hanover and
West Pittston
The Patriot soccer team
opened their season with at
home against defending Divi-
sion 2 champions Lake Lehman
on Friday, losing 3-0.
Last season the Patriots fin-
ished second Lehman in the
WVC Division 2 with a 10-5-1
record. Lehman was 13-3 and
moved up to D1 this season
PA advanced to the District 2
3A playoffs and lost in the first
round to Williamsport.
To compete for the D2 title
againandget backtothe playoffs
the Patriots will have to do it
without all-star forward Pietro
Colella who graduated in June.
“Replacing a player like Pietro
Colella is not easy,” coach Pat
O’Boyle said. “But we have a lot
of talent back offensively Ian
Tracy, JordanConsagra andMatt
Tavaglione. The defense is
young but showing promise. if
we can mature quickly, we can
have a successful year and com-
pete for a division title.”
Tracy, Consagra and Tava-
glione are the team’s captains
and the reasons O’Boyle sees the
ability to score as team strength.
As only five starters return expe-
rience maybe a weakness espe-
cially early on.
Julian Kester and John Kielba-
sa are two other key players. To
compliment the five returning
starters O’Boyle is looking for
Eann McCloe and Colin Tracy to
step up.
Pittston Area’s Division 2 op-
ponents are Tunkhannock,
Wyoming Sem, Holy Redeemer
and Meyers, but the Patriots’
schedule has them playing one
game against each team in the
three divisions. The play for a
Bridge point at home against
WA on Sept. 21.
Pittston Area
Aug 31 vs. Lake Lehman
Sept. 4 at Holy Redeemer
Sept. 10 at MMI
Sept.13 at Hazleton
Sept.15 vs. Dallas
Sept.17 at Crestwood
Sept.18 vs. Berwick
Sept.21 vs. WA
Sept 25 at Coughlin
Sept 27 vs. Tunkhannock
Oct. 3 at Hanover
Oct. 5 at Meyers
Oct. 8 vs. Wyo Sem
Oct. 10 vs. Valley West
Oct 12 at GAR
Oct. 15 vs. Nanticoke
PI TTSTON AREA SOCCER
Patriot booters looking to stay competitive
PA captains are, from left, Matt Tavaglione, Jordan Consagra and
Ian Tracey
PA -WA game Sept. 17
By JACK SMILES
jsmiles@psdispatch.com
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Ryan Murphy and Charlie
Johnson each scored to lead
Wyoming Area to a 2-0 victory
over Hanover Area at Tenth
Street on Friday afternoon in the
season-opening Wyoming Val-
ley Conference Division III boys
soccer match.
The Warriors got a goal in
each half. Murphy scored in the
first assisted by: Brian Waisowa-
ty at 23:34. In the second John-
son was assisted by Mark
O’Malley at 6:50.
The Warriors outshot Hanover
19-8. Corners were even at three.
Aaron Carter stopped eight shots
to keep the shutout intact.
Lake-Lehman 3, Pittston
Area 0
Chris Edkins scored twice and
Austin Harry netted a goal and
an assist to help the Division 1
Black Knights pull out the victo-
ry at PA in a D1- D2 crossover
game.
The Patriots were in it until the
Edkins first goal. It was 0-0 at
the half
Lehman keeper Colin Masters
posted the shutout, while PA
keeper Zack McKitish stopped
seven shots.
The Patriots offense had a
tough time getting in sync with
only three shots
This week’s games
Tuesday
WA at Nanticoke
PA at Holy Redeemer
Thursday
GAR at WA
Saturday
WA at Holy Redeemer
BOYS SOCCER
Warriors open with
a ‘W’; PA shut out
Both local girls soccer teams
picked up victories in their open-
ing games on the road Friday. PA
won at Lake Lehman and WA
won Hanover.
Pittston Area 6 Lake-Lehman
3
Madison Minnaugh scored
three goals and recorded one as-
sist to lead the Patriots offense in
the victory. Allie Barber, who
burst onthe scene last seasonas a
prolific goal scorer, scored two
goals and one assist.
PA, Katelyn Pugliese scored
the other PA goal on a penalty
kick penalty at 27:34 of the sec-
ond to make it 5-2. Samantha
Mayers had two assists, one each
to Minnaugh and Barber.
The Patriots outshot LL 12-6.
Keeper Jordan Cumbo had six
saves.
Emily Sutton led the Lehman
offense with two goals.
Wyoming Area 3 Hanover
Area 1
Samantha Acacio and Valarie
Bott scored goals for the Lady
Warriors in a 3-1. Acacio also
had an assist to Bott in the
Wyoming Area win.
The score was 1-1 late in the
first half, when Hanover com-
mitted an own-goal to make it
2-1. Acacio’s unassisted goal in
the second sealed it.
Keeper Jordan Chiavacci stop-
ped six shots for the Warriors
who were outshot 10-9.
This week’s games
Tuesday
Holy Redeemer at PA
WA at Nanticoke
Thursday
PA at Wyoming Sem
WA at GAR
Saturday
PA at Dallas
Wyoming Sem at WA
GI RL S SOCCER
WA, PA win
Top, Wyoming Area’s Nicole Cumbo, right, heads
the ball ahead of Hanover Area’s Michelle McNair
in a WVC girls soccer game in Hanover Township
on Friday afternoon
Middle right, PA Jr. Mike Tavaglione, No.9, tries
to get control of the ball from Lehman’s Chris
Edkins.
Middle’ left, No.10 Jordan Consagra from Pittston
Area, goes high in the air to hit a header against
Lake Lehman.
Left, Wyoming Area’s Alee Pettit, right, battles
for the ball with Hanover Area’s Larissa Bannon,
left, and Hailee Shuman Friday afternoon.
BOYS BY TONY CALLAIO. GIRLS BY BILL TARUTIS
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In week two of girl’s high
school tennis both Pittston Area
andWyomingArea tookit onthe
chin with PA collecting the lone
victory of the week. The Lady
Pats had a week of home match-
es while WA had two home
matches and one away.
PAopened the week with Ber-
wick on Monday dropping the
match. Coach KimCollins shift-
ed the line-up against the Bull-
dogs with little success dropping
the match 4-1. PA No.1 Miranda
Warunek scored the lone point
defeating her opponent in
straight sets.
Coughlin traveled to Martin
Mattei courts were the Lady Pats
lost to the Crusaders by the same
score of 4-1. The No.1 doubles
team of Alicia Chopyak/Mik-
haela Moher defeated the Cru-
saders’ Demelier/Adcock, 6-2,
6-3.
The Tunkhannock Tigers were
edged out by PA 3-2, giving the
Lady Pats their first victory of
the season on Friday. Miranda
Warunek, Tatiana Supinski, won
at No.1 and No.3 singles, while
Mikhaela Moher/Claudia Shan-
dra tookthe No.2doubles match.
Warunek and Moher/Shandra
took two of three matches on the
week.
Next up for PA is tough Holy
Redeemer team traveling to PA
on Tuesday for Pittston Area’s
fourth match in a row at home.
On Thursday, the Lady Pats trav-
el to Crestwood.
The Lady Warriors tennis
teamfell to 2-3 at the conclusion
of the week losing all three
matches.
On Monday, WA faced league
standouts Holy Redeemer losing
5-0. All five matches lost in
straight sets.
On Wednesday, mighty
Wyoming Seminary came to
town dropping WA 5-0. Warrior
No.2, Kiersten Grillo managed
to gather up seven games in two
sets, playing a tough second set
losing 6-2, 7-5.
The Warriors traveled to Ha-
zleton on Friday playing MMI
Prep. Two-sport and Warrior
No.1 singles player opted out of
the match to compete in a soccer
game being played on the same
afternoon. Coach Tiffany Call-
aio moved everyone up in the
line-up in singles but failed to
gain a single victory, once again
losing 4-1. The only success of
the match came off the racquets
of Maddie Ambruso/Sam Wil-
liams at No.2 doubles.
WAhosts Hanover on Tuesday
and visits Wyoming Valley West
on Thursday.
The season will officially be
half-over at the conclusion of
this week’s play. Both school dis-
tricts are looking to bounce back
from this past week to get on the
winning side. PAwill be looking
for their second team win but
will have yet another tough week
ahead of them.
The Lady Warriors could see a
victory against the Hawkeyes,
but will face a rejuvenated
WVW Spartan team.
HI GH SCHOOL TENNI S
Rough week on courts as local teams go 1-5
By TONY CALLAIO
Dispatch correspondent
TONY CALLAIO/FOR THE SUNDAY DISPATCH
Miranda Warunek won at No. 1 singles for the Lady Patriots against Tunkhannock.
Mikhaela Moher teamed up with Claudia Shandra for a doubles
win against Tunkhannock. S
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Baloga Funeral Home 14U Girls Softball Team recently finished in second place in
the County Line Softball League. The Girls Finished the Season12-2, playing their
home games in Dupont at the Dupont Lions Field across for the PACC.
Nina Minnelli, Giana Tondora, Taylor Baloga, Abbey Bradigan, Mary Silinskie, Jen-
na Harrison.
Second Row, Coach Mark Bradigan, Coach John Baloga, Jordan Cegelka, Emma
Brieling, Alexsei, Alward, Bianca Concert, Vicki Remley, Carly Warnagiris, Coach
Dave Remley
Missing from photo: Julie Silinskie, Alyssa Neare and Jordan Zbegner
GI RL S SOF TBAL L
Baloga Funeral team takes second in county league
With red Mill having clinched
the regular season title last week,
O’Connor Plumbing defeated
Selinski Insurance 2 - 1 and
moved into second place in the
Emanon Thursday Golf League
heading into the final week of
regular play.
Tom Kerrigan’s 38 and John
O’Connor’s 40 led the winners
and Rick Laneski had 36 for Se-
linski’s.
Bryan Construction upset
Ashley Machine 3 - 0 behind
TomBryan’s 38 and Mike Fiscus
with a 41. Len Coleman had 37
for Ashley.
Powers defeatedAdonizio2-1
and created a tie for the final two
playoff spots. Powers was led by
Jim McCann’s 38 and Clem Pa-
rulis with a 42. Jim Devers had
40 for Adonizio.
Red Mill defeated Hoffman 3 -
0 and stayed the team to beat
heading into the playoffs. Mike
Lazevnick and John Zelonis
combined to shoot a score of 7-
under par 27 in the A match.
Lazvenick had a 4-under 30 and
Zelonis a 36. Shaun Fortney had
36 for Hoffman’s.
Next week is regular season fi-
nal week with a 5:15 shotgun
start.
EMANON GOL F
O’Connors Plumbing
moves into second place
Bassler Equipment swept their
matches this week to wrap the
regular season second half title.
The Bassler men are Doc Cam-
panella, Mark Millington, Joe
Chiumento and Ed Seprish. Af-
ter a dismal first half perform-
ence,
JetSurge Power Cleaning re-
bounded to finish third in the
second half. Henry Korpusik
and Larry Rodeghiero were bril-
liant this week forthe power
cleaners.
Next week starts the post-sea-
son with an unusual beginning,a
round-robin series between
Cuz’s Bar & Grill, Roberts’ Re-
pairs and Blandina Apartments
to determine the first half regular
season titlist. This is important
because it gives the victor an au-
tomatic spot in the first half fi-
nals. The other qualifiers are
Bassler Equipment, Dyller Law
Firm, Atlas Realty and KWIK
’N EZ Market.
The response to the Luzerne
County Bocce Championship
Tournament has been very posi-
tive with half of the allotted posi-
tions taken. Many local busi-
nesses and professionals have
come forward to help sponsor
the tournament.
Standings..........................Points
Bassler Equipment 11-5 ...159
Roberts’ Repairs 10-6 ......157
JetSurge Power Cleaning 9-7
..............................................150
Cuz’s Bar & Grill 8-8 .......151
Blandina Apartments 7-9 .153
KWIK ’N EZ Market 7-9.150
Atlas Realty 7-9 ...............138
Old Forge Chiropractic 7-9
..............................................135
Dyller Law Firm 6-10 ...... 141
BOCCE BAL L
Bassler rolls to second half
title in Yatesville League
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In the Wyoming Valley West
Conference last Sunday West
Pittston played Swoyersville,
Wyoming/West Wyoming/Exe-
ter played Ed-Lark and Duryea
Kingston.
West Pittston won B and C
games 42-0 and 28-26. Swoyers-
ville won the D game 22-0.
WWWE beat Ed-Lark in B
and C by the same 32-0 school.
Ed Lark won the D game 36-28.
Duryea and Kingston split two
games. Kingston won the B
game 14-6. Duryea won the C
game 22-20.
In an inter-league A game
cross river rivals West Pittston
defeated Pittston in an Agame at
Jake Sobeski Staduim.
Today’s Valley West schedule
WWWE at Plymouth
Duryea at West Pittston
Today’s Valley schedule
Pittston at Hanover
JUNI OR FOOTBAL L
PHOTOS SUBMITTED
Rams B teamplayer Daniel Weidl runs the ball against the Swoyersville Sailors game.
WWWE B
and C teams
defeat
Ed-Lark
Rams D teamer Vincenzo Nova runs the ball against the Sailors. S
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TONY CALLAIO/FOR THE SUNDAY DISPATCH
Jr. Patriots No.41 Matt Ambrose pulls in a catch with the Rams Antonio DeNardi covering.
TONY CALLAIO
Rams QB MarcAnthony Minichello runs to his right looking for a
receiver down field in the Pittston-WP A game
Rams C teamer Ethan Elmes runs the ball against the Sailors.
TONY CALLAIO/FOR THE SUNDAY DISPATCH
Rams QB Marc Anthony Minichello hands off to running back Jordan Thomas in the Pittston-WP A
game
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Zach Mulhern’s 37, good for
medalist honors, helped Wyom-
ing Area to score a win on
Wyoming Seminary’s home
course at Huntsville Golf Club,
177- 187.
Frank Henry’s 43 paced Semi-
nary.
WA – Zach Mulhern 37,
Courtney Melvin 45, Colin Her-
ron 46, Madeline Wharlon 49.
WS – Frank Henry 43, Jon
Zirnheld 47, AndrewGolden 48,
Malcolm Lumia 49.
Valley West 154 PA163
Chris McCue shot one over-
par in the Wyoming Valley West
victory at Fox Hill.
Matt Carroll led Pittston Area
shooting two over-par.
WVW- Chris McCue 36, Co-
lin Harrison 38, Evan Pirillo 39,
Dave Chacke 41
PA - Matt Carroll 37, Ryan
Tracy 39, Chris Lynch, Calvin
O’Boyle 47
Dallas 167 PA175
Dallas’ Ryan Georgetti and
Pittston Area’s Ryan Tracy
shared medalist honors with a
round of 38 at Irem Golf Club’s
par-36 course but it was the
Mountaineers who pulled away
with 167- 175 victory.
Nigel Stearns tallied a 40 for
Dallas, while Chris Lynch’s 43
was Pittston Area’s second-best
round.
9 holes at IremGolfClub
DAL– Ryan Georgetti 38, Ni-
gel Stearns 40, Chad Debona 44,
Justin Brojakowski 45.
PA – Ryan Tracy 38, Chris
Lynch 43, Calvin O’Boyle 47,
Matt Carrol 47.
Tryba Preseason Invitational
results
Holy Redeemer’s Marino
Medico won the Tryba Tourney
at Fox Hill. The best local finish-
ers was WA’s Ryan Tracey, sixth
with a 74.
Individual Scores
Mariano Medico, Holy Re-
deemer …32-36-68
6. Ryan Tracy, Pittston Area
…36-38-74
7. Zach Mulhern, Wyoming
Area …35-39-74
13. Matt Carroll, Pittston Ar-
ea… 36-41-77
24. Chris Lynch, Pittston Area
…42-38-80
29. Calvin O’Boyle, Pittston
Area …42-39-81
37. Courtney Melvin, Wyom-
ing Area… 43-42-85
Dave Chacke, Wyoming Val-
ley West …42-43-85
48. Madeline Wharton,
Wyoming Area …45-42-87
Team Scores
Holy Redeemer… 290
Coughlin …302
Pittston Area… 312
Wyoming Valley West …314
Dallas …320
Crestwood …322
Tunkhannock …323
Berwick …324
Wyoming Area …339
Hanover Area …351
Wyoming Seminary …342
MMI …365
Lake-Lehman …369
Hazleton Area …374
This week’s matches
Tuesday
PA at Crestwood
WA at Nanticoke
Thursday
Berwick at PA
Friday Wyoming Area at MMI
HI GH SCHOOL GOL F
Medico cops Tryba; Warriors win league match
Zach Mulhern medalist in WA win at Huntsville
The Moose Lodge in West
Pittston is selling raffle tickets
for an overnight bus trip Oct. 6
and 7 to Pittsburgh that includes
a tail gate partyandtwotickets to
the Steelers-Eagles game Octo-
ber 7. Raffle tickets are $10 each
and can be purchased at the
lodge social quarters or fromany
of the member of the Women of
the Moose.
The drawing is Sept 14 at
Moose Lodge 1207 West Pitt-
ston. Proceeds will benefit
Moose charities. The bus leaves
from Kohl’s in Wilkes-Barre.
Pittston Boys Basketball
Boosters
The Pittston Boys Basketball
Booster Club will meet on
Thursday, September 4 at 6:30
p.m. at the RedMill, 340S. Main
Street, Pittston. An election of
officers will be held and fun-
draising ideas will be discussed.
PA girls basketball meeting
The Pittston Area Lady Patriot
Basketball Booster Club will
meet on Wednesday September
5at 7:00p.m. inLizza’s onNorth
Main Street in Pittston for the
purpose of organizing their fall
activities. All Lady Patriot Bas-
ketball Parents are asked to at-
tend
PA Cheer Boosters
The Pittston Area Cheer
Booster Club will hold their
monthly meeting on September
4 at 7 p.m. at Savo’s. All parents
of JV and Varisty cheerleaders
are urged to attend. Prior to the 7
p.m. meeting a pasta dinner
committee meeting will be held
at 6 p.m. Anyone willing to help
with the dinner should attend
this meeting.
Red Devils meeting
The Pittston red Devils
Sportsmen Club will meet Tues-
day, September 4 at 7:30 p.m. at
Dr. Nicholas Ruggerio’s home in
West Pittston. Finalizing sum-
mer events and discussing fall
and winter events are on the
agenda. Members are urged to
attend this important meeting.
Lady Birds Bowling League
The Lady Birds Bowling
League will begin the 2012-13
bowling season on Wednesday,
September 5 at Modern Lanes in
Exeter. Bowlers are asked to re-
port at 6 p.m. Bowling starts
prompty at 6:15 p.m.
WA field hockey news
WA Field Hockey conduct
will a car wash and bake sale on
Sept.15 from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. at
West Side Auto. Please show
your support by attending the
festivities on August 27 and pur-
chasing a ticket for the car wash.
SPORTS BRI EFS
Moose Lodge raffling trip to Steelers game
AL L SMI L ES
TONY CALLAIO/FOR THE SUNDAY DISPATCH
Warrior cheerleaders, left to right: Nickarena Gilpin, Erin Maloney, Kiersten Gregorio, Danielle Bulger
catch pre-game entertainment at Wyoming Area's opening game Friday night. S
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OBITUARIES
Michael J. “Mike” Nesgoda
Sr., 82, of Dupont, passed away
Thursday August 30, at Wilkes-
Barre General Hospital sur-
rounded by his loving family.
Mike was a proud lifelong res-
ident of Dupont, Pa.
He was born on March 23,
1930, the son of the late Joseph
and Julia Warunek Nesgoda and
a member of Sacred Heart of Je-
sus Church in Dupont.
As an avid angler, Mike could
always be found fishing the wa-
ters throughout Northeastern,
PA with his fishing buddy, John
Wrazien.
Mike loved his Phillies and en-
joyed watching Notre Dame
Football and Duke Blue Devil
Basketball dependingonthe sea-
son.
Mike spent years working in
the mines as a coal worker and at
Corrigan, Inc. and Kaminski
Brothers as a big machine oper-
ator.
He later changed careers and
became an auto body mechanic
working for Roy Stauffer Chev-
rolet, Morreale Mid-City Auto,
and Lispi Chevrolet.
He was a founding member of
the Lone Cabin Sportsman Club
and a lifelong member of the
Polish American Citizens Club.
He served his community as a
Councilman for the Boro of Du-
pont.
Mike was their biggest fan and
was very proud to be called
Grandpa by his two grandsons,
Michael Joseph Nesgoda III and
Ryan Coleman.
Mike is survived by his wife of
56 years Joan Guss of Kingston.
Mike and Joan would have cele-
brated their 57th wedding anni-
versary on September 17th 2012;
daughter JoAnn Coleman and
husband Dennis, Middletown,
PA; son Michael J. Nesgoda, Jr.,
Dupont; grandsons Ryan Cole-
man, Eliza-
bethtown, Pa
and Michael J.
Nesgoda, III
(M.J), State
College, Pa;
sister Dolores
Burgio and husband James,
Wyoming; sister-in-law Jose-
phine Nesgoda, Pittston Twp;
along with several nieces and ne-
phews and cousins.
In addition to his parents Mike
is preceded in death by his broth-
er Frank Nesgoda in 2008.
The family would like to take
this opportunity to thank Dr.
Gerald Gibbons for his service
and concern over the many years
he cared for Mike.
We wouldalsolike toshowour
appreciation and thank the nurs-
ing staff, respiratory staff and the
rehab department at Wilkes-
Barre General Hospital for all
their loving care and commit-
ment to Mike whenever he was
their “guest.”
Your compassion and love is
truly appreciated by our family.
Funeral services will be held
Wednesday September 5 at
9:30am at Kiesinger Funeral
Services Inc. 255 McAlpine St.
Duryea, with a mass of Christian
burial at 10:00am at Sacred
Heart of Jesus Church, Dupont
with Fr. Joseph Verespy officiat-
ing.
Friends may call Tuesday eve-
ning September 4th from5-8pm.
Interment will be held at the par-
ish cemetery.
In lieu of flowers memorial
contributions may be made to:
Senior Outreach Program at Sa-
cred Heart Church 215 Lacka-
wanna Ave. Dupont, Pa 18641 or
to the Dupont Lyons Club 600
Chestnut St. Dupont Pa 18641.
Online condolences may be
made to www.kiesingerfuneral-
services.com
Michael J. Nesgoda Sr.
August 30, 2012
The Annual Flea market at
Holy Mother of Sorrows PNCC,
Dupont, is Sept. 8. For a table,
call Regina Bahaley at 457-
2378. Cost is $10.
Vendors will be under a large
tent. There will be hamburgers,
hot dogs, cabbage and noodles,
pierogies, potato pancakes, and a
framers market.
The sale is from 9 a.m. to 5
p.m.
Flea market next Saturday
Wyoming Area board member
John Bolin reported at Tuesday’s
meeting that as of Aug. 22, the
district had hired Berkheimer
Associates of Bangor to replace
the troubled Centax/Don Wil-
kinson Agency, which has failed
to distribute taxes to many Lu-
zerne County political entities.
District Business Manager
TomMelone reportedthe district
has not had take out a tax antici-
pation note to cover the missing
taxes.
“So far, we’ve been able to
weather the storm,” Melone said.
Before voting to accept the fi-
nance report, board President
Frank Casarella told residents of
the loss the district has sustained
from flood refunds of paid prop-
erty taxes. The district ratified a
total of $54,376 in refunds to
property owners.
The board appointed several
new employees, including Frank
Pugliese as director of physical
plant/supervisor of building and
grounds at a salary of $52,644.
Some residents questioned the
hiring policy used to select Pu-
gliese. Board member Carl Yori-
na fielded many questions about
the qualifications of the candi-
dates for the position and the in-
terview and testing process that
allowed the district to choose
among them.
When that and other appoint-
ments were repeatedly ques-
tioned by residents, Casarella as-
sertedthe boardwouldstandbya
recently adopted nepotism poli-
cy and the best person for the job
would be hired.
In other matters:
• The board tabled a plan that
would raise the salaries of school
administrators over a three-year
period.
• Board members approved an
agreement with Luzerne County
Head Start Inc. to provide Head
Start with a classroom as well as
cafeteria, restrooms and outdoor
play space at the Tenth Street
ElementarySchool at a rental fee
of $3,000 for the 2012-2013
school year.
In addition, the district will
provide meals and snacks to the
Head Start program at a con-
tracted rate of $14,768.
• The tone lightened when a
resident lodged a protest against
the board decision allowing the
Field Hockey Parent’s Associ-
ation to sell confetti at home
football games.
The association had asked for
permission to sell confetti and
doughnuts.
After a discussion of the prob-
lems associated with cleaning up
after confetti, the board voted the
group will be allowed to sell
doughnuts but not confetti.
• The board presented a new
policy for concussion manage-
ment in athletic programs.
The policy will allow the dis-
trict to comply with a new state
law that took effect in July.
• The board also presented for
review a set of procedures that
would allow board members to
attend meetings from remote lo-
cations by using speaker phones,
teleconferencing and videocon-
ferencing.
WYOMI NG AREA
Board nixes request to sell
confetti at field hockey games
By SUSAN DENNEY
Times Leader correspondent
WARRI OR CAPTAI NS
TONY CALLAIO/FOR THE SUNDAY DISPATCH
Warrior captains on field for the coin flip prior to Friday night's opening game of the season. From
left, Jordan Zezza, Trent Grove, Zack Lanunziata, Nick O'Brien.
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F U N E R A L S E R V I C E S I N C .
255 MCALPINE STREET, DURYEA, PA 18641 (570) 457-4387
MARK KIESINGER,
FUNERAL DIRECTOR and SUPERVISOR
OBITUARIES
Bertha Ann Kuckla, age 91, of
Dupont, died Sunday morning,
August 5, at WesleyVillage, Jen-
kins Township.
She was the widow of Joseph
Kuckla, who passed away Febru-
ary 22, 1962.
She was born in Dupont,
daughter of the late Alexander
andAnna Krzywicki Romasiew-
icz, and was a class of 1938 grad-
uate of St. John’s High School,
Pittston. Mrs. Kuckla was a
member of the Sacred Heart of
Jesus Church, Dupont, where
she was past president of the Al-
tar and Rosary Society. She was
a past president of the Dupont
Little League Auxiliary, treasur-
er of the Dupont Senior Citizens,
active with the Girl Scouts and
Boy Scouts, was active with the
Red Cross, where she earned a
10-year service pin, a member of
the Orchard Lake Auxiliary and
worked as a Majority Inspector
on the Dupont Election Board of
the Third Ward for over 30 years.
She was the president of The Pol-
ish Women’s Alliance, Scranton
Council 44, for many years and
Group 267 of Dupont. She was
last honored as the 2010 May
Queen by the Polish Women’s
Alliance of America.
Surviving are three sons, Jo-
seph and his wife, Andrea, Old
Forge; Thomas and John, both of
Dupont; a daughter, Nancy Ge-
orge, Dupont; grandchildren,
Adrianna Rupprecht, Kelly
Alexander, Tara Kuckla, Jesse
James George, Jenna Yanchulis;
Joseph, Matthew, Peter, Cody,
Daniel and John Paul Kuckla; 13
great-grandchildren; one great-
great-granddaughter; sisters
Clara Romasiewicz, Dupont,
and Mary Kilyanek, Duryea;
nieces and nephews.
She was preceded in death by
brothers, Alexander, Peter and
Joseph Romasiewicz, and sisters
Josephine Chiampi, Helen Ro-
masiewicz and Irene Starinski.
Funeral services were held
Wednesday fromthe Lokuta-Za-
wacki Funeral Home, 200
Wyoming Ave., Dupont, with a
Mass of Christian Burial at 10
a.m. in the Sacred Heart of Jesus
Church, 215 Lackawanna Ave.,
Dupont, celebrated by the Rev.
Joseph D. Verspy, Pastor. Inter-
ment in the parish cemetery, Du-
pont.
Bertha Ann Kuckla
August 5, 2012
Betty Grace Stankus, of West
Pittston, died of natural causes
on August 26, 2012. She was 91
years young and full of life.
Betty was a unique and re-
markable woman, wife, mother,
grandmother and great-grand-
mother. She was self-educated
and well versed in the principles
of etiquette and society.
She was a member of the First
United Methodist Church, West
Pittston, and the West Pittston
Women’s Club.
She enjoyed an ever-expand-
ing circle of friends. She worked
in several occupations at the
same time, and always expressed
a warm smile and genuine con-
cern for others. She was gener-
ous to a fault and never demand-
ed a return for her generosity.
Her friendships with others were
timeless and virtually all of her
relationships survived until sep-
aration at death. One of her
greatest satisfactions was pro-
viding the essential tools for the
higher education of her children.
She was preceded in death by
her husband, Leo Leonard Stan-
kus.
Surviving are daughter, Car-
olee and her husband, Richard
Thatcher, Cogan Station, Pa.;
sons, Dr. Richard Stankus and
his wife, Dianne, Barry L.Stan-
kus and his wife, Mary B. Lugar,
West Pittston; grandchildren,
Chad M. Thatcher and wife,
Deanna, Spring Grove, Pa.,
Amanda, Alexandra, Astrid and
Anastasia, Barron Stankus;
great-grandchildren, Benjamin
and Alexander Thatcher, Spring
Grove.
Betty’s body was cremated on
August 28, 2012, wearing the
dress from her 50th Wedding
Anniversary.
There will be no calling hours.
A celebration of her life will be
held at a future date in the First
United Methodist Church,
Wyoming Avenue West Pittston.
Arrangements are by Howell-
Lussi Funeral Home, 509
Wyoming Ave., West Pittston.
Betty Grace Stankus
August 26, 2012
William D. Giles, 92, of Pitt-
ston and formerly of Duryea,
went home to be with his Lord
and Savior, Jesus Christ, on Sun-
day August 26, 2012. Preceding
him in death was a son, William
D. Giles, Jr., and a sister, Beverly
Marucci. He is survived by his
beloved wife of 70 years, Gloria
C. Felts Giles; son, the Rev. Jerry
Giles, and wife, Pat, Long
Beach, Calif.; sister, Priscilla
Miller, N.Y.; grandchildren, Jen-
nifer Chheang and husband So-
phon, Jeffrey Giles and wife
Beth; great-grandchildren, Zion
and Soryia Chheang, Ruby and
Fiona Giles.
Funeral services were Satur-
day in Wesley Village Chapel,
209 Robert Road, Pittston. In-
ternment at the Marcy Cemetery
in Duryea. Arrangements are by
Thomas P. Kearney Funeral
Home Inc., 517 N. Main St., Old
Forge.
William D. Giles
August 26, 2012
Antoinette R. Bartoli, 86, of
Pittston Township, passed
away on Wednesday evening
August 29, 2012, at home, sur-
rounded by her loving family.
Born in Larksville, she was
a daughter of the late Edward
and Adele Doberstein Missal.
Antoinette
attended
Larksville
schools and
was a member
of St. Anthony
of Padua
Church at St. Barbara Parish,
Exeter.
She had worked in the gar-
ment industry and was a mem-
ber of the Laundry and Dry
Cleaning workers union.
Preceding her in death were
her husband of 65 years, Louis
C. Bartoli, in 2006, and a son,
Joseph, in 2005; siblings, Elsie
Torritis, Elizabeth Molesky,
Lydia Palmentera, Alma Mis-
sal; Zigmund , Edward, Otto
and John Missal Jr.
Surviving are daughter, Car-
ol Corcoran, and her husband,
Bill, Pittston Township; sister
Mildred Palmentera, Canyon,
Texas; grandchildren, Bill and
Danielle Corcoran, Karen
Singer, Gina Feagel; four
great-grandchildren; numerous
nieces and nephews.
Relatives and friends were
invited to visitation on Sat-
urday at 8 a.m. until 9:15 a.m.
at the Gubbiotti Funeral
Home, 1030 Wyoming Ave.,
Exeter.
A Mass of Christian burial
followed at 9:30 a.m. in St.
Anthony of Padua Church, 28
Memorial Ave., Exeter.
Interment in St. Cecilia
Cemetery, Exeter.
To send the family an ex-
pression of sympathy or an
online condolence, please vis-
itwww.gubbiottifh.com.
Antoinette R. Bartoli
August 29, 2012
Marian Helen Koteck, 72, of
Dupont, passed away Friday, Au-
gust 31, 2012, at Hospice Com-
munity Care, Geisinger South
Wilkes-Barre.
Funeral arrangements are
pending from Kiesinger Funeral
Services Inc., 255 McAlpine St.,
Duryea.
Marian Helen Koteck
August 31, 2012
Frank Plona, 87, of Duryea,
passed away Thursday, August
30, 2012, at Kingston Commons,
Kingston.
Funeral arrangements are
pending fromBednarski Funeral
Home, 168 Wyoming Ave.,
Wyoming.
Frank Plona
August 30, 2012
John M. Williams, 28, of Du-
pont, passed away unexpectedly
Thursday, August 30, 2012, at
home. He was a son of John and
Colleen Williams.
Funeral arrangements are
pending from the Yeosock Fu-
neral Home, 40 S. Main St.,
Plains Township.
John Williams
August 30, 2012 S
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D u pon tM on u m en tShop,In c.
R o u te 315,D u p o n t,P A • 654-0561
V isit U sAt: w w w.d up ontm onum entshop .com
Servin g N ortheastPA
For O ver 60 Years
B ron ze • G ran ite
M au soleu m s
“R em em bran ce isan everlastin g gift...
T he preciousm em ory ofyour love.”
H ou rs:O pen D aily 9A M -5P M
Satu rd ay To N oon
(A n ytim e B y A ppoin tm en t)
• C ustom d esign service
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Notasecond goesb yth at
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M issing you verym u ch on
th isday,and notju sttoday
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You will foreverb e
in ou rh earts.
W eL oveYou a n d M issYou S o M u ch,
M om ,Da d Ju lia n n a a n d Noel
#17
OBITUARIES
Anthony J. Mirra, 86, of
Wyoming, passed away on Tues-
day, August 28, 2012, at the Re-
gional Hospital of Scranton.
Born in Exeter, he was a son of
the late Joseph and Caroline
Bruzza Mirra.
Mr. Mirra was a member of St.
Anthony of Padua Church (St.
Barbara Parish), Exeter.
He was the proprietor of Mir-
ra’s Farm in Wyoming, working
at the family farm for over 60
years.
He was preceded in death by
his wife, the former Stella
Rayeski, in 2003; sister Mary
Mirra and brother, Vincent Mir-
ra.
Surviving are his son, Antho-
ny Mirra Jr., Wyoming; daugh-
ter, Carol Stash, Wyoming;
grandchildren, Tanya, John; sis-
ters Rose Rayeski, Anita Depas-
cale, both of Exeter; nieces, ne-
phews and cousins.
A Mass of Christian Burial
was celebrated Friday at St. An-
thony of Padua Church of St.
Barbara Parish, 28 Memorial
Ave., Exeter. Interment in Deni-
son Cemetery, Dennison St.,
Swoyersville. Visitation was pri-
vate for family members only.
Funeral arrangements have
been entrusted to the Gubbiotti
Funeral Home, 1030 Wyoming
Ave., Exeter.
To send the family an expres-
sion of sympathy or an online
condolence, please visitwww-
.gubbiottifh.com.
Anthony J. Mirra
August 28, 2012
Theresa Cumbo, 91, formerly
of Pittston, passed away peace-
fully Saturday, August 25, 2012
at Wesley Village in Pittston.
Born in Pittston, she was the
daughter of the late Phillip &
Mary Pettito Pirrelli.
In addition to her parents, she
was preceded in death by her
husband, Sam Cumbo, in 1981
and her beloved son Charles,
from Orlando, Fla., in 2009; sis-
ters, Anna Falvo, Grace Fiore,
Nancy Arnone, Elizabeth Pirrel-
li, Josephine DeAngelo; broth-
ers Charlie, Tony and Johnny
Pirrelli.
She is survived by her daugh-
ter, Catherine Haduck, and hus-
band Charles from Duryea;
daughter-law,
Carol Cumbo,
of Orlando,
Fla.; four
grandchildren,
Charles Ha-
duck Jr. and
wife Donna of Annville, Pa.;
Charles Cumbo and wife Anita;
David Cumbo, Theresa Myers
and husband Tom, all of Orlan-
do, Fla.; five great-grandchil-
dren, Kristine and Samantha Ha-
duck and Michelle, Anthony and
Nicole Cumbo; one great-great
granddaughter, Kayleigh, 11
months old; sisters-in-law, Jen-
nie DeBella and Betty Pirrelli.
Also surviving are many loving
nieces and nephews.
Funeral services were en-
trusted to Graziano Funeral
Home Inc., Pittston Township,
and began at the funeral home on
Wednesday, August 29, 2012
promptly at 10:15 a.m.
A Mass of Christian Burial
was held from The Nativity of
Our Lord Parish, (Holy Rosary
R.C. Church) Duryea, at 11 a.m.
on Wednesday, August 29, 2012.
Celebrant was the Rev. Andrew
Sinnott.
Interment in Marcy Cemetery,
Duryea, at the convenience of
the family.
To submit online condolences,
please visitGrazianoFuneral-
Home.com.
Theresa Cumbo
August 25, 2012
The Sunday Dispatch publishes obituaries of local individuals
who reside, formerly resided or have family living in the Greater
Pittston area.
Obituaries should be submitted by 12 p.m. Saturday to ensure
publication in the same week’s edition.
Email is preferred for submission, but fax or handwritten entries
will be acceptable with a contact name and phone number. Entries
not including a contact name and telephone number will not be pub-
lished.
Email obituaries to sd@psdispatch.com; Fax obituaries to
570.602.0183; or mail themto109 NewSt., Pittston, PA18640. For
more information call the obituary desk at 570.602.0170, or to place
a memorial ad call 570.602.0168.
Obituary Policy
Genevieve (Jean) Simalchik,
passed away peacefully at home
August 24, 2012, surrounded by
her family.
She was a devoted mother to
her daughters and sons-in-law,
Joan Simalchik and Robin Bre-
on, Toronto, Marian and Tom
Czarnowski, Wyoming.
She will be deeply missed by
family and her wide circle of
friends of all ages.
Jean was born in Larksville
December 22, 1924, and grewup
in Lyndwood where she was a
graduate of Hanover High
School, class of 1942.
She started working for the
Russell Ice CreamCompany and
then as a bookkeeper for Landau
Furniture Company, Wilkes-
Barre.
She met her husband Albert at
a Sans Souci dance on July 4,
1946, and they married exactly
two years later.
They celebrated their 64th
wedding anniversary July 3. In
1954, the family moved to Phila-
delphia where they lived for 23
years, after which, they moved
back and settled at Shickshinny
Lake for the next 23 years,
spending her last years in
Wyoming.
She and her husband spent 20
years wintering in Fort Lauder-
dale, Fla., enjoying the warm
weather and the ocean.
She greatly enjoyed being a
housewife and gardener and be-
longed to the Big Band Society
and the Shickshinny Lake La-
dies Club.
Jean was very easy to relate to
and will be remembered as a
sympathetic listener, a good
shoulder to lean on and a keeper
of confidences.
She never missed an occasion
to send greeting cards and al-
ways celebrated the holidays,
great and small.
She was preceded in death by
parents, George Mihalchick and
Anne Sobashinski Mihalchick;
brother, George Mihalchick Jr.
Funeral services were held
Tuesday from the Metcalfe-
Shaver-Kopcza Funeral Home
Inc., 504WyomingAve., Wyom-
ing, with a Mass of Christian
Burial in St. John the Evangelist
Church, 35 WilliamSt., Pittston.
Interment in St. Mary’s Nativity
Cemetery, Plymouth Township.
Jean had many special rela-
tionships with children and was
loved by all.
Donations to her memory may
be sent toSt. Jude Children’s Re-
search Hospital Memorial and
Honors Program 501 St. Jude
Place, Memphis, TN 38105-
9956.
Genevieve (Jean) Simalchik
August 24, 2012
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#17
OBITUARIES
Dominic P. Collotty, of North
Main Street, Ashley, died
Wednesday, August 29, 2012, in
Hospice CommunityCare, Geis-
inger South Wilkes-Barre.
Born in Ashley, he was a son
of the late Phillip and Isabelle
Farino Collotty, attended Ashley
schools and was employed as a
furnace technician prior to retir-
ing. He served his country in the
United States Army, with the
rank of Corporal, during World
War II, serving in Northern
France, Normandy and Central
Europe. Dominic was a member
of St. Leo’s/Holy Rosary Parish,
Ashley and was an avid fisher-
man, hunter and bowler.
He was preceded in death by
sister, Victoria
Platko; broth-
ers, George,
Frank, John
and Joseph
Collotty.
Dominic is
survived by his loving wife, the
former Gladys Bowman; daugh-
ter, Donna Rugletic, and her hus-
band, Ronald, West Wyoming;
son, Dominick J. Collotty, Ash-
ley; five grandchildren, Tracy
Schmitt and her husband, Mi-
chael; Cristen Skepulski and her
husband, John; Patrick Heffron
and his wife, Erin; Melissa Hef-
fron; Angelina Collotty; six
great-grandchildren, Kira, Tay-
lor, Jake, Ella, Nathan and
Mckenna; nieces and nephews.
Funeral service was private
from the Lehman Family Funer-
al Service Inc., 689 Hazle Ave.,
Wilkes-Barre, with the Rev.
Thomas J. O’Malley, his pastor,
officiating. Entombment in St.
Joseph’s Walk Mausoleum in St.
Mary’s Cemetery, Hanover
Township.
Memorial contributions, if de-
sired, may be made to theAmer-
ican Cancer Society, East Re-
gional Office, 712 South Keyser
Ave., Taylor, PA 18517 orwww-
.cancer.org. Online condolences
may be sent by visiting the funer-
al home website atwww.lehman-
funeralhome.com.
Dominic P. Collotty
August 29, 2012
Aqueline Marie Park, 60,
daughter of the late Theodore
and Marie Powell Wolman,
passedawayTuesday, August 28,
2012, in the General Hospital,
Wilkes-Barre, following an ill-
ness.
Born in Larksville, she was a
graduate of Wyoming Valley
West High School, Class of
1970. She had formerly resided
in Harding and currently in Pitt-
ston.
Surviving are daughter,
Heather Wharton, and husband,
Thomas, Pittston; son, Kevin
Park, and wife, Jacklyn, Exeter;
brother, Theodore Wolman, Ply-
mouth; sister, Denise Mikulka,
Pittston; grandchildren, Made-
line Wharton and Kevin Park.
The family requested that fu-
neral services be private and
there will be no calling hours.
Arrangements by Yanaitis Fu-
neral Home, Plains Township.
Aqueline Marie Park
August 26, 2012
Dorothy Groner, 84, of Dal-
las, passed away Sunday, Au-
gust 26, 2012 at Meadows
Nursing Center, Dallas.
Born in Plymouth, she was
the daughter of the late Mat-
thew and Emma Merrell Jones
and was a graduate of Ply-
mouth High School.
Dorothy had worked for Ma-
ry Macintosh in Wilkes-Barre
for many years. She loved
playing bingo.
Dorothy was preceded by
her husband, Elwood Groner.
She is survived by a daughter,
Sandra, and her husband, Ge-
orge Kline, Duryea; grandson,
George Kline, Dallas; grand-
daughters, Teena O’Connor
and Joy Hogan, both of Har-
vey’s Lake; Beth Hunsicker,
Old Forge; Arlette Heppding,
Duryea; 11 great-grandchil-
dren; numerous step-children
and step-grandchildren.
Funeral was held privately
at the convenience of the fam-
ily. Arrangements are by the
Richard H. Disque Funeral
Home Inc., 2940 Memorial
Highway, Dallas.
Dorothy’s family would like
to thank the staff at the Mead-
ows Nursing Center for all the
care and support they gave to
Dorothy.
Dorothy Groner
August 26, 2012
John M. Nagy, 78, of Spring-
brook, passed away Saturday,
August 25, 2012, at Riverside
Rehab and Nursing Center, Tay-
lor. He was born in Dupont,
March 31, 1934, and was a son of
the late John and Madeline (Kli-
mek) Nagy.
John was a member of St. Mi-
chael’s Byzantine Catholic
Church, Pittston. He attended
Dupont schools. John was a U.S.
Army Veteran serving during the
Korean War. He retired in 1979
from RCA, Dunmore. John was
a member of the V.F.W. Post
6520 Cortez, Mt. Cobb.
John was a good-natured and
humorous man. He appreciated
and loved the outdoors and took
great joy in gardening, hunting,
fishing and connecting with na-
ture. He was an impressive, self-
taught violin player and enjoyed
all genres of music. While serv-
ing in Korea, he shared his talent
by playing in a band entertaining
the troops. Throughout his life,
he also played in several local
bands. Music, nature, family and
friends were cherishedaspects of
John’s life, a life he lived fully
and with great happiness.
In addition to his parents, he
was preceded in death by his
brother, Frank.
John is survived by his wife of
51 ½ years, the former Dorothy
Pearage Nagy; sons, John, Tenn.;
Brian and his wife, Denise, Mos-
cow; daughter, Jacqueline and
her husband, Michael Yalch,
Nanticoke and sister, Evelyn
Pearage, Dupont. Also surviving
are his grandchildren, Kayla, BJ,
Michael, Cassandra; many niec-
es and nephews.
Funeral services were Tues-
day from Kiesinger Funeral Ser-
vices Inc., 255 McAlpine St.,
Duryea, with a Mass of Christian
burial in St. Michael’s Byzantine
Catholic Church, Pittston, with
the Rev. Joseph Bertha officiat-
ing. Interment was at the parish
cemetery. AMVETS Honor
Guard of Dupont provided mil-
itary honors. Online condolenc-
es may be made towww.kiesin-
gerfuneralservices.com.
John M. Nagy
August 25, 2012 S
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In Loving Memory Of
Steven Koval
Our hearts still ache in sadness
And secret tears still flow.
What it meant to lose you,
No one will ever know.
When we are sad and lonely
And everything goes wrong.
We seem to hear you whisper
“Cheer up and carry on”
Each time we look
at your pictures
You seem to smile and say,
“Don’t cry, I’m only sleeping,
We’ll meet again someday.”
Sadly missed by Mom, Dad,
Sisters and Brother.
OBITUARIES
Lillian Licciardone Cusuma-
no, 93, of Old Forge, died Satur-
day morning in the Northeast
Hospice Unit of the Regional
Hospital of Scranton. She was
the widow of Vito P. Cusumano,
her loving husband of 54 years,
who died on August 5, 2000.
Born in Old Forge, daughter of
the late Domenic and Grace Di-
Rocco Licciardone, she was a
1937 graduate of Old Forge High
School. Lillian was a devoted
homemaker and lifelong parish-
ioner of St. Mary of the Assump-
tion Church, Old Forge and be-
longed to its former Altar and
Rosary Society.
Lillian’s family was the center
of her life and simply meant the
world to her. She was blessed
with nine grandchildren and
eleven great grandchildren.
Gatherings at her home on Sun-
days and holidays were an inte-
gral part of family life. She leav-
es a wonderful legacyof love, de-
votion, and dedication to family
values that will live on for gener-
ations to come.
Surviving are two sons, John
Cusumano, and wife Beverly, of
Perkasie, and Louis Cusumano,
and wife Amy, of Old Forge; a
daughter, Rose Ann Moriano,
and husband Anthony, of Old
Forge; nine grandchildren, John,
Dominick, Vito P., Anthony, and
Christopher Cusumano, Natalie
Ferretti, Carla
Cusumano,
Louis Moriano,
and Michael
Cusumano;
eleven great
grandchildren;
and numerous nieces and neph-
ews.
She was alsoprecededindeath
by four brothers, Louis, Charles,
Joseph, and Frank Licciardone;
and a sister, Matilda Licciar-
done.
The funeral was held
Wednesday at 9:30 a.m. fromthe
Victor M. Ferri Funeral Home,
522 Fallon St., Old Forge with
Mass of Christian Burial at 10:00
in St. Mary of the Assumption
Churchat Prince of Peace Parish,
West Grace and Lawrence
Streets, Old Forge celebrated by
the Rev. Joseph F. Cipriano, pas-
tor emeritus. Interment services
in Old Forge Cemetery.
Memorial contributions may
be directed to Prince of Peace
Parish, 123 West Grace St., Old
Forge, PA18518. To leave an on-
line condolence for Lillian’s
family visit www.ferrifuneral-
home.com.
Lillian Licciardone Cusumano
August 25, 2012
Arline C. Passetti, 85, of Oak
Street, Sugar Notch, passed away
on Saturday, August 25, 2012, at
Celtic Health Care inpatient unit
at Geisinger South Wilkes-Barre.
She was born in Wilkes-Barre
on January 8, 1927. She was a
daughter of the late Arline C. Le-
wis.
She was a member of Holy
Family Church, Sugar Notch, and
was also a former volunteer with
the American Red Cross.
She loved spending her time
with her family, especially with
her grandchildren. She also en-
joyed talking on the telephone
with her family and friends.
She was preceded in death by
her husband, Evaristo P. Passetti;
infant grand-
daughter, Kris-
tan T. Passetti;
grandson, in-
fant grandson,
Charles Z. Pas-
setti and broth-
er, Dave Lewis.
Surviving are her daughters,
Colette Yermal and her husband,
David, Ellicott City, Md., Anne
Richards and her husband, Do-
nald, Pittston, Jacqueline Reese
andher husband, Richard, Freder-
icksburg, Va.; sons, Edward Pas-
setti, at home; Robert Passetti and
his wife, Marie, Glen Lyon;
grandchildren, Jennifer Krieger,
Robert Passetti Jr., Susan Tho-
mas, Jeffrey Passetti, April Pas-
setti, AudryRoseBayhurst, Alex-
ander Passetti, David Yermal Jr.,
Eric Yermal, Michael Richards,
Eric Richards, Kyle Reese, Cory
Reese; great-grandchildren, Kay-
leen, Shealyn and Andrew Yer-
mal, Emma and Brady Thomas,
Aidan Krieger, Apalonia Passetti,
SareinaWootton, LondonFenner,
Daniel and Dylan Bayhurst. Two
nephews also survive.
Funeral services were Tues-
day from the George A. Strish
Inc. Funeral Home, 105 N. Main
St., Ashley. A Mass of Christian
Burial was in Holy Family
Church, with the Rev. Joseph Ka-
kareka officiating. Interment in
St. Charles Cemetery, Sugar
Notch.
Arline C. Passetti
August 25, 2012
Anne D. Chokola, 82, of
Wilkes-Barre, passed away
Monday, August 27, 2012, at the
Mountain View Care Center in
Scranton.
She was born on January 1,
1930 in Algodones, N.M., a
daughter of the late Patrick and
Dolores Pera Vigil.
She was a graduate of St. Jo-
seph’s College in Albuquerque,
N.M., where she received her
bachelor’s of art degree in Edu-
cation.
Anne was formerly employed
at St. Joseph’s Hospital and by
the U.S. Army Corps of Engi-
neers in Albuquerque.
For many years she and her
husband, Peter, owned and oper-
ated the Chokola Bottling Com-
pany in Wilkes-Barre.
Anne was a member of St. Ma-
ry’s Church -
Our Lady of
Fatima Parish
in Wilkes-
Barre.
She was pre-
ceded in death
by her husband, Peter T. Choko-
la, in 2009. She was also preced-
ed in death by her brothers, Babe
Vigil, Jacob Vigil; sisters, Eliza
Archibeque and Beatrice Vigil.
Surviving are children, Susan
Chokola, Wilkes-Barre, with
whom she resided; Christopher
P. Chokola, Wyoming; Lisa Ma-
rie Chokola, Wilkes-Barre;
grandson, Mark Joseph Choko-
la, Wilkes-Barre; several nieces
and nephews.
Funeral services were held
Friday morning at 9 a.m. from
the Nat & Gawlas Funeral
Home, 89 Park Ave., Wilkes-
Barre, with a Mass of Christian
Burial to follow at 9:30 a.m. in
St. Mary’s Church - Our Lady of
Fatima Parish, 134 S. Washing-
ton St., Wilkes-Barre. Interment
was in St. Mary’s Cemetery, Ha-
nover Township. Memorial do-
nations may be made to Make-
A-Wish, 1327 Pittston Ave.,
Scranton, PA18505. Online con-
dolences may be sent by visiting
Anne’s obituary atwww.natand-
gawlasfuneralhome.com.
Anne D. Chokola
August 27, 2012
Helen M. Appel, 65, of Pitt-
ston, passed away Saturday, Au-
gust 25, 2012, in Hospice Com-
munity Care, Geisinger South
Wilkes Barre, after a courageous
battle with cancer for the past
nine years.
Born in Pittston, on August
29, 1946, she was a daughter of
the late Jacob and Catherine
Karsko Morgan.
She was a graduate of Pittston
High School. Helen was a for-
mer member of St. John the Bap-
tist Church, William Street, Pitt-
ston.
She was employed as a lead
technician for the Social Securi-
ty Administration-WBDOC for
29 years.
Helen enjoyed spending time
with her family and engaging in
family activities.
She is survived by husband
Edward Appel; daughter Alisha
F. Seely and husband Shawn,
Plains; granddaughter Jacinta
Appel, Exeter; sister Theresa
Wozniak; two nieces and one ne-
phew.
Funeral services were
Wednesday at 11 a.m. at the Ho-
well-Lussi Funeral Home, 509
Wyoming Avenue, West Pitt-
ston. Monsignor John Bendik,
pastor of St. John the Evangelist
Church, Pittston, officiated.
Interment was in St. Mary’s
Cemetery, Hughestown.
Donations may be made to
Traditional Home Health and
Hospice, 113 West Drinker
Street, Dunmore, PA18518.
Helen M. Appel
August 25, 2012
Mrs. Jane Regan, 79of Duryea
passed away Saturday, August.
25, 2012, at Hospice Community
Care at Geisinger South Wilkes-
Barre.
She was preceeded in death by
her husband, Francis I. (Pete) Re-
gan; brothers, Joseph, Alfred
and John; and sisters Stella Mos-
kaitis and Alice Romanoski.
Surviving are son, Kevin, of
New York; sister Edna Wasilew-
ski of Elmhurst; brother-in-law,
Edward Romanoski of Duryea;
nieces and nephews; great-niec-
es and great-nephews.
Funeral was held Tuesday
from the Bernard J. Piontek Fu-
neral Home Inc., 204 Main St.,
Duryea, with Mass of Christian
Burial in Holy Rosary Church,
Duryea, with the Rev. Andrew
Sinnott officiating. Interment in
Holy Rosary Cemetery, Duryea.
Mrs. Jane Regan
August 25, 2012
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C M Y K
SUNDAY DISPATCH SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 2, 2012 PAGE 1B
Social Section
Inside
Schools ..............................2
Birthdays............................3
Religion..........................4-7
Classified......................8-14
S E C T I O N B
➛ S O C I A L
Amy Lynn Rodano and Francis Joseph Crossin were united in
marriage on September 3, 2011, at the First United Methodist
Church in West Pittston. The ceremony was officiated by Pastor
Janet Tiebert.
The bride is the daughter of Frank and Nancy Rodano. She is
the granddaughter of Williamand Clara Players, of West Pittston,
and Marie Rodano and the late Joseph Rodano, of Plains.
The groomis the sonof FrankandDonna Crossin, of Kingston.
He is the grandsonof the late Francis “Chink” andHelenCrossin,
of Luzerne and the late Joseph and Eileen Schilling, of Dallas.
The bride was given in marriage by her father. She chose her
sister, Christina Rodano as maid of honor and her close friend,
Lindsey Maiolatesi, as matron of honor. Bridesmaids were Ste-
phanie Rodano, cousin of the bride; and Maria Godfrey, Saman-
tha Bellas, Nacole Turner, friends of the bride. Flower girl was
Sophia Medico, cousin of the groom.
The groomchose his brother, Michael Crossin, as his best man.
Groomsmen were Robert Anders and Dan Fetko, cousins of the
groom; Joseph Rodano, cousin of the bride; Anthony Decker,
Bryan Bellas and PJ Piskorik, friends of the groom.
Readings were given by Emily Scappatura and Ryan Crossin,
cousins of the bride and groom.
Mrs. Crossin is a graduate of Wyoming Valley West High
School. She graduated fromEmpire Beauty School and is a styl-
ist and co-owner of Stazione Salon, Old Forge.
Mr. Crossin is a graduate of Wyoming Valley West High
School and a graduate of Kutztown University. He is currently
employed at Commission on Economic Opportunity. An evening
cocktail hour and reception were held at the Radisson Lackawan-
na Station Hotel, Scranton.
The bride was honored with a bridal shower hosted by her bri-
desmaids and mothers of the bride and groom at Rodano’s
Wilkes-Barre. Parents of the bride hosted a rehearsal dinner at
Rodano’s.
Following the wedding, the couple honeymooned in French
Polynesia, visiting the islands of Tahiti and Moorea. They reside
in Plains.
Amy Lynn and Francis Joseph Crossin
United in marriage
JosephJ. Gentile andNuria Philipps were unitedinmarriage on
August 25, 2012 in Sacramento, California.
Mrs. Gentile is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. WilliamPhilipps,
of Santa Cruz, California. Agraduate of San Jose State Universi-
ty, she is employed as a retail manager for Macy’s in Sacrament.
Mr. Gentile is the son of Joseph and Margaret Gentile, of Exe-
ter. He is the grandson of Joseph and the late Faustine (Olesky)
Zekoski, of Wyoming, and the late Joseph (Jasse) and Margaret
(Manganello) Gentile, of West Pittston.
A 20012 graduate of Wyoming Area High School and a 2005
graduate of Shippensburg State University, he took graduate
courses at Johns Hopkins University and received his master’s
degree from American Military University. Formerly employed
as a police office with the Washington D.C. Metropolitan Police
Department, he is nowemployed as a Deputy USMarshall by the
US Marshals Service in Sacramento. He is a member of the Pa-
cific Northwest Regional Fugitive Task Force.
Followinga honeymoontriptoHawaii, the couple will reside in
their new home in Sacramento.
Mr. and Mrs. Joseph J. Gentile
Exchange vows
John ‘Butch’ and Barbara Yankowski Shatrowskas, of Wyom-
ing, celebrated their 50th wedding anniversary on August 18.
The couple was married at Saint Joseph’s Church in Port Grif-
fith by the late Father Walter Skursky. Charlene Gostynski Jones
served as maid of honor and Jack Fugowski was best man.
Mrs. Shatrowskas is the daughter of the late Stanley and Car-
oline (Mondlak) Yankowski. Mr. Shatrowskas is the son of the
late Mary (Evans) Shatrowskas Lulewicz, the late John Shatrow-
skas, and the late Leo Lulewicz.
Mrs. Shatrowskas works as secretary for DaVita Dialysis in
Dunmore. Mr. Shatrowskas is self-employed in excavation and
construction.
The couple has three children, John (Butch) Shatrowskas and
his wife Kim, Wyoming; Jackie Zukosky and her husband, Rob-
ert, Wyoming; and Jason Shatrowskas and his wife Courtney,
Wyoming. They also have four grandchildren: Kasey and Ally-
son Shatrowskas and Tara and Tiffany Zukosky.
John (Butch) and Barbara Shatrowskas
Golden anniversary
Timothy and Linda Tomlinson of Old Forge, celebrated their
30th anniversary on August 28.
The couple was married in the Trinity United Church of Christ
on August 28, 1982 by Rev. Robert Barroll and Father Czeslaw
Kuliczkowski.
Their marriage has been blessed with two children, Jessica La-
comis, Virginia and Samantha, at home.
Mr. and Mrs. Timothy Tomlinson
Wed 30 years
Calvin and Lorraine Miller, of
West Pittston celebrated their
50th wedding anniversary Satur-
day, Aug. 25.
They were married on August
25, 1962, at St. Joseph’s R.C.
church, Wyoming by Rev. J. Pap-
ka.
Parents of the couple are the
late George and Mary Legas and
Harvey and Marjorie Newton.
Calvin is retired fromCascade
Tissue in Suscon. Lorraine is re-
tired from Diversified Informa-
tion Technologies in Scranton.
They are the proud parents of
their son Gary.
Gary and his wife Charlene
will celebrate their 25th Wed-
ding Anniversary on October 3,
2012.
Afamily dinner will be held in
the couple’s honor.
Millers celebrate 50th wedding anniversary
Mr. and Mrs. Calvin Miller The Millers on their wedding day
Ed and Marge Strucke, of Du-
pont, will celebrate their 72nd
weddinganniversaryonSeptem-
ber 7.
They were married on Sep-
tember 7, 1940, at Our Lady of
Mt. Carmel Church, Pittston.
Claire Cocco, deceased, of
Pittston, served as maid of honor
and Albert Strucke, deceased,
brother of the groom, served as
best man.
Margaret Miceli served as bri-
desmaid and Albert Cocco was
usher.
The couple are the proud par-
ents of three sons, Edward, Rob-
ert, deceased; and Jonathan.
They are blessed with seven
grandchildren and eight great-
grandchildren.
They celebrated their anniver-
sary with a family dinner.
Ed and Marge Strucke married 72 years
C M Y K
PAGE 2B SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 2, 2012 SUNDAY DISPATCH
➛ S C H O O L S
Mr. Raymond J. Bernardi,
Wyoming Area School District
superintendent, announced that
there will be an Open House at
Montgomery Avenue Elemen-
tary School, 100 Montgomery
Avenue, West Pittston on Tues-
day, Sept. 4 at 6:30 p.m. prior to
the Montgomery Avenue PTO
meeting. The public is invited to
tour the renovations at the school
that were completed subsequent
to the flooding of September 8,
2011.
WA10th Street PTO News
The following will be sent
home the first week of school:
Great American Fundraiser,
Homeroom Mom Form for K
through3rd, a “GoingPaperless”
information form.
Picture Days will be Sept. 11,
12, and 13.
Get Acquainted Night will be
on Thursday – Sep. 13.
A meeting will be held on
Sept. 19at 6p.m. at Montgomery
Ave. Elementary School for any
5th or 6th grade Wyoming Area
students interested in joining the
band.
The 6th Grade Dance is on
Sept. 28 in the school cafeteria
from 5:45 p.m. to 7:45 p.m.
Playground Clean Up will be
on Sept. 29 at 10 a.m. Please
bring any supplies you may have
(rakes, screwdrivers, cleaning
supplies).
Roba’s Kindergarten Field
Trip is scheduled for Oct. 12.
Great American Fundraiser
will be available for pickup Nov.
13 during Parent /Teacher con-
ferences.
Bake sale will be held on Nov.
13 from12 p.m. to 7 p.m.
Please register your grocery
store card online to help benefit
Tenth Street for Price Chopper
(http://www2.pricechop-
per.com/toolsforschools/) and
Shur Save (http://
www.escrip.com).
Keep collecting box tops and
Campbell’s soup labels and send
them in with your child.
Next PTO meeting will be
Thursday, Sept. 6 at 7 p.m. in the
school cafe.
WYOMI NG AREA
Open house set
at Montogmery
Avenue school
Pittston Area
Week of Sept. 3
High School and Middle
School
Monday: No school.
Tuesday: Chicken & noodles,
dinner roll, green beans, fruit,
milk
Wednesday: Diced buffalo
chicken hoagie, carrots, fruit,
milk
Thursday: Hot turkey sand-
wich, mashed potatoes & gravy,
fruit, milk
Friday: Chicken fajita with let-
tuce & tomato, peas, fruit, milk
High school breakfast
Grab & go
Cafeteria store has hot break-
fast sandwiches, cereal with
toast, breakfast bars, fresh fruit,
juice & low fat milk.
Middle school breakfast
Monday: No school.
Tuesday: Scrambled eggs with
toast or sausage &cheese on En-
glish muffin
Wednesday: Pancakes with
syrup or egg, bacon &cheese on
English muffin
Thursday: Breakfast pancake
& sausage on a stick or egg &
cheese on bagel
Friday: Waffles with syrup or
ham & cheese on bagel
Intermediate, primary, kin-
dergarten
Monday: No school.
Tuesday: Grilled chicken patty
on bun with lettuce & tomato or
hot dog on bun with pickles,
peas, peaches, milk
Wednesday: Fajita with chips,
lettuce & salsa or hot ham sand-
wich with lettuce & tomato,
green beans, mixed fruit, milk
Thursday: Corn dog nuggets
with BBQ sauce, or Sloppy Joe
on bun, baked beans, chunky ap-
plesauce, milk
Friday: Sausage & cheese on
bun with tomato slice or pizza,
carrots, pears, milk
Alternates: ham & cheese
wrap with tortilla chips or crispy
chicken salad with bread slice or
turkey sandwich with celery
Breakfast
Monday: No school
Tuesday: Ham, egg & cheese
on bagel
Wednesday: French toast
sticks with syrup
Thursday: Hot pocket
Friday: Waffles with syrup
Wyoming Area High School
Tuesday
Regular or Spicy Chicken
Nuggets
Whole Wheat Bread
Green Beans/ Garden Greens
Juicy Peaches
1/2 Pint Milk
Wednesday
Mac and Cheese
Whole Wheat Bread
Stewed Tomatoes/ Crisp Salad
Mixed Fruit Cup/ Fresh Fruit
1/2 Pint Milk
Thursday
Chicken Fryz
Whole Wheat Bread
Mixed Greens/ Roasted Chic
Peas
Juicy Pineapples/ Fresh Fruit
1/2 Pint Milk
Friday
Bosco Sticks W/ Dipping
Sauce
Spinach Salad/ Seasoned Fries
Diced Pears/Fresh Fruit
1/2 Pint Milk
Wyoming Area Elemetary
Tuesday
Chicken Nuggets with Whole
Wheat Bread
Alternate:
Cheese Sandwich OR Peanut
Butter and Jelly OR Yogurt with
Cheese Stick & Animal Crack-
ers
Sides:
Tender Green Beans
Fresh Garden Greens Salad
Juicy Peaches or Fresh Fruit
1/2 Pint Milk
Breakfast:
Dutch Waffle
Wednesday
Mac and Cheese OR Mini
Corn Dogs
Alternate:
Cheese Sandwich OR Peanut
Butter and Jelly OR Yogurt with
Cheese Stick & Animal Crack-
ers
Sides:
Crispy Salad
Stewed Tomatoes
Chilled Fruit Cup or Fresh
Fruit
1/2 Pint Milk
Breakfast:
Scrambled Eggs w/hashbrown
& toast
Thursday
Baked Chicken Fryz w/
Whole Wheat Bread
Alternate:
Cheese Sandwich OR Peanut
Butter and Jelly OR Yogurt with
Cheese Stick & Animal Crack-
ers
Sides:
Italian Bean Sslad
Mixed Greens
Juicy Pineapples or Fresh
Fruit
1/2 Pint Milk
Breakfast:
Fluffy Pancakes w/Syrup
Friday
Bosco Pizza Sticks w/ Marin-
ara Sauce
Alternate:
Cheese Sandwich OR Peanut
Butter and Jelly OR Yogurt with
Cheese Stick and Animal Crack-
ers
Sides:
Relish Tray (Fresh Veggies)
Spinach Salad
Diced Pears or Fresh Fruit
1/2 Pint Milk
Breakfast:
Bagel with or with Jelly
SCHOOL MENUS
Jenkins Township Lions Club, announced this year’s annual scholarship winners. They are Joseph McGarry, first, place, $500; Megan
Zelonis, second place, $300; and Kathryn Ross, third place, $200. The Jenkins Lions Club has sponsored this programfor 25 consecutive
years.
Jenkins Twp. Lions award scholarships
Wyoming Area Catholic
School, of the Holy Redeemer
Regional School System, an-
nounces the following events:
Sept. 3
No School in observance of
Labor Day
Sept. 4
After school care begins
Sept. 7
Drive-in Movie; Back to
School Fun!
Sept. 12
Dress down for students who
celebrate their birthdays in Sep-
tember.
Sept. 19
Family Mass – 7:00 p.m.
Sept. 26
Dismissal at 11:00 a.m. Teach-
er in-service.
Family Mass
As a school community,
Wyoming Area Catholic will
celebrate the beginning of the
new school year with a Family
Mass. The Mass is scheduled for
Wednesday, Sept. 19, at 7:00
p.m. Refreshments will be
served after the liturgy.
Intramural sports
WAC’s intramural sports pro-
gram will begin the week of
Sept. 10 and will run until Nov. 2.
The programs offered beginning
that week will be flag football
(boys and girls) and volleyball
(co-ed).
Students in grades 4-8 are eli-
gible to participate.
The Parent’s Release Form
and Physician’s Certificate sent
in August mailing (also available
on Edline) must be in the school
office prior to beginning any
sport – no exceptions.
Schedule is as follows:
Boy’s Flag Football
Tuesday & Thursday
3:00 to 4:00 p.m.
Girl’s Flag Football
Wednesday & Friday
3:00 to 4:00 p.m.
Volleyball
Monday
3:00 to 4:00 p.m.
Students will bring their
change of clothes to school the
day of the sport to change after
dismissal. Parents are asked to
pick their children up fromthese
activities promptly at 4:00 p.m.
Mr. Jerry Renfer will be the
coach for all of the above sports.
If there are any questions,
please call the school at 654-
7982.
Book Fair
The book fair is scheduled for
Sept. 14- 19. The theme is All
Star Readers. The schedule is as
follows:
Sept. 14 – Student Preview
Day
Sept. 15 & 16 – 8:00 a.m. to
1:00 p.m. – St. Cecilia’s Church
Hall
Sept. 17-19 Shopping hours
for students 8:00 a.m. to 3:30
p.m.; scheduled by class.
Sept. 19 – Book Fair will be
opened after Family Mass.
Mrs. Theresa Sabetta, librar-
ian, is the coordinator of the
Book Fair.
After School Care
After care will begin on Tues-
day, Sept. 4. The After Care Pro-
gramwill provide supervision in
an atmosphere of cooperation
and responsibility. Time will be
provided for snack, play, rest and
homework.
For snack time, each child
must bring his/her own snack.
After care starts at 2:45 p.m.
and will run until 5:45 p.m. on
regular school days and from
11:00 a.m. to 5:45 p.m. on early
dismissal days.
Candy Sale
The Gertrude Hawk Christ-
mas Candy Sale will begin on
Sept. 4. Brochures and order
forms will be sent home with
students. Orders are due on Oct.
12.
Reminder
Please send in completed
emergency form and supply fee.
Labels and box tops
Campbell’s soup labels and
Box Tops for Education pro-
grams will continue at Wyoming
Area Catholic for the 2012-13
School Year. Parents are asked to
continue to support these two
programs. The labels and box
tops can be sent into the office.
WYOMI NG AREA CATHOL I C
Family Mass to be celebrated Sept. 19
The Luzerne County Commu-
nity College Nursing Depart-
ment recently served as a host of
the third annual Northeastern/
Central Pennsylvania Interpro-
fessional Education Coalition
(NEPA-IPEC) student care sum-
mit.
The program was a collabora-
tive care summit between
LCCC, King’s College, Univer-
sity of Scranton, Marywood
University, Penn College of
Technology, Misericordia Uni-
versity and The Commonwealth
Medical College.
Close to 600 students were in
attendance at the various sites.
LCCC hosted 65 students and
14 facilitators from various
healthcare professions. The goal
of the programis to increase and
improve communication be-
tween healthcare students.
Shown at a student care summit held at Luzerne County Community College are, fromleft, seated, Susan Koronkiewicz, Kingston,
assistant professor, nursing, LCCC; Sandra Rochon, Mountain Top, CNS, WBGH; Sandy Hollock, Wapwallopen, assistant professor,
nursing, LCCC; Marisue Rayno, Weatherly, associate professor, nursing, LCCC; Virginia Clarke, Avoca, professor, nursing, LCCC;
and Jennifer McMicken, Pharm.D., Wilkes-Barre, pharmacy practice resident, Wilkes University. Second row, Paran Mukhija, Pharm.
D.,Wilkes-Barre, Wilkes University; Julie L. Olenak, Pharm.D., Hanover Township, associate professor, pharmacy practice, Wilkes
University; Linda Szmal, Mountain Top, Mansfield University; Peggy Sosnak, Wilkes-Barre, associate professor, nursing, LCCC; Dr.
Deborah Vilegi-Peters, Mountain Top, dean, nursing and health sciences, LCCC; Karen Noss, Plains, associate professor, nursing,
LCCC; PamMacNeely, Shavertown, PA faculty, King's College; and Laurie Brogan, Pittston, physical therapist, Gentiva Health Ser-
vices. Third row, Nancy Glidden, Nanticoke, secretary, nursing, LCCC; Mark Ercolani, Laflin, paramedic class coordinator, LCCC;
Edward Foote, Pharm.D., FCCP, BCPS, Trucksville, professor and chair, pharmacy practice, Wilkes University; Peter McCoshell,
Kingston, medical student III, TCMC; Nick Frusciante, Edwardsville, professor, nursing, LCCC; Mary Waclawski, Nanticoke, secretary,
nursing, LCCC; and Nicole Evanosky, Dallas, professor, physical therapy, Misericordia University.
600 ATTEND
LCCC hosts student care summit
C M Y K
SUNDAY DISPATCH SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 2, 2012 PAGE 3B
➛ B I R T H D A Y S & S T U F F
Jake Patrick Bonin, son
of John and Tara Bonin,
of Harding, will celebrate
his sixth birthday on Sep-
tember 3. He is the grand-
son of John and Norina
Conden, of Wyoming,
and Larry and Florence
Bonin, of Swoyersville.
He attends kindergarten
at Sarah J. Dymond Ele-
mentary School. Jake has
a brother Ryan, 7 ½ years
old.
Jake Bonin
Hannah Emily Brid-
gland, daughter of Jim-
my and Michelle Brid-
gland, of Avoca, will
celebrate her seventh
birthday today, Sep-
tember 2. She is the
granddaughter of Da-
vid and the late Do-
lores Kundla, of Port
Griffith, andlate James
and Kathleen Brid-
gland, of Pittston.
Hannah
Bridgland
Samuel John Hull,
son of Joseph and Amy
Hull, of Duryea, cele-
brated his fifth birth-
dayonAugust 31. He is
the grandson of Jack
and Ellie Kuligowski,
of Dupont; Ronald
Hull, of Maryland; and
the late Katie Hull, of
Dickson City. He is the
great-grandson of the
late Joseph and Helen
Kulick, of Dupont;
Lottie Kuligowski and
the late Joseph Kuli-
gowski, of Dupont; the
late Susan Hull, of
Olyphant; and the late
Catherine Brizinski, of
Dickson City. Sammy
has an older brother,
Jacob, who is 7 1/2
years old.
Samuel Hull
Sophia Laudato,
daughter of Megan
Bartuska and Ray-
mond Laudato, of
Avoca, celebrated
her first birthday on
August 30. Mater-
nal grandparents are
Bruce and Patti Bar-
tuska, of Avoca. Pat-
ernal grandparents
are Raymond and
Theresa Laudato, of
Old Forge. Maternal
great-grandparents
are David and Ar-
lene Clifford, of
Avoca. Sophia had a
princess party held
in her honor with
family and friends.
Sophia Laudato
Extreme Candy Factory from
the Wilkes-Barre Blight School
of Dance recently competed at
the New York State Tournament
of Dance at the Clemens Center
in Elmira, NY.
The group competed in the16-
18 large group category, placing
first in tap and contemporary
and second in modern.
Extreme Candy Factory also
won a special Triple Star Award,
as did Alorah and Rebecca Col-
well for their duos in the 13-15
age category.
Dancers are instructed by
Candice Miscavage, Chrissy
Howe and Kelly Howatch.
Blight dancers compete in New York
Members of Extreme Candy Factory who competed at the New York State Tournament of Dance are, fromleft, first row, Michela Pan-
tano and Elisa Rivera. Second row, Susan Hao, Alexis Selli, Rebecca Colwell, West Pittston; Jillian Perrone, Kourtney Kukowsky.
Third row, Kristen Opiary, Taryn Chopyak, Rachel Leandri, Wyoming; Kiersten Unangst. Fourth row, Kailee Traficante, Maria Cinti,
Alorah Colwell, West Pittston; Robyn Fannon, Rachel Kollar. Fifth row, Jessica Hiscox and Kaitlyn Miller. Absent at the time of the
photo were Jacquelyn Miles, Emily Traficante and Marielle McDonald.
The Luzerne County Council
and Wyoming County Commis-
sioners officially proclaimed the
name change of the Luzerne-
Wyoming Counties Mental
Health/Mental Retardation Pro-
gram to Luzerne-Wyoming
Counties Mental Health and De-
velopmental Services at a cere-
mony held July 25 at the Luzerne
County Courthouse.
Well over 200 families, self-
advocates, human service staff,
and state and county officials
came together to witness the un-
veiling of the new name.
The newterm“developmental
services” represents a shift in
how individuals with special
needs are referred. Following
2010’s federal legislation man-
dating the removal of the term
“mental retardation” from all
federal statutes, Gov. Tom Cor-
bett signed HB 458, removing
the words “mental retardation”
from the MH/MR Act of 1966.
These historic legislative ac-
tions are now being carried for-
ward on a local level through the
bi-county joinder’s new name.
The Luzerne County Council and Wyoming County Commissioners officially proclaimed the name change of the Luzerne-Wyoming
Counties Mental Health/Mental Retardation Programto Luzerne-Wyoming Counties Mental Health and Developmental Services at a
ceremony held July 25 at the Luzerne County Courthouse. Fromleft, first row, are TomYoniski, field representative for Senator Lisa
Baker; Gina Galli, chair of the Name Change Committee, Luzerne-Wyoming Counties Mental Health and Developmental Services;
Lauren Jones, self-advocate; PamZotynia, Arc Luzerne County; Wyoming County Commissioner Ronald Williams. Second row,
Richard Burns, Luzerne-Wyoming Counties Mental Health and Developmental Services; State Rep. Eddie Day Pashinski(121st Dis-
trict); State Rep. Karen Boback (117th District); Debi Reznick, district office manager for State Rep. Tarah Toohil (116th District); and
Wyoming County Commissioner Chairwoman Judy Kraft Mead. Third row, David Kauffman, executive assistant to the State Office of
Developmental Programs Deputy Secretary; David Wilson and Dr. Mahmoud Fahmy, members of the Luzerne-Wyoming Counties
Mental Health and Developmental Services advisory board; Mary Dysleski, Luzerne County Office of Human Services; James Bo-
beck, chairman of the Luzerne County Council; and Brittany Burgess, clerk to Luzerne County Council.
LUZERNE, WYOMI NG COUNTI ES
Mental Health name change approved
Adele Maynor cel-
ebrated her fourth
birthday on August
25. Griffin Maynor
will celebrate his first
birthday on Septem-
ber 4. They are the
children of Kenric
and Tara Maynor, of
Duryea. Their grand-
parents are Ross and
Annmarie Scaranti-
no, or Duryea; Glenn
Maynor, of Lumber-
ton, NC; and Jean-
nette Baker, of Pem-
broke, NC. Adele and
Griffinare students at
Hildebrandt Learn-
ing Center in Moosic.
They enjoy music,
reading and walking
their dogs. Parties
were heldtocelebrate
their special days.
Adele Maynor
PAGE 4B SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 2, 2012 SUNDAY DISPATCH
➛ R E L I G I O N
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The annual Mass in Italian
will be offered today Sunday,
Sept. 2, inSt. Peter’s Cathedral in
Scranton. The Mass begins at 10
a.m.
The liturgy is celebrated in
conjunction with La Festa Italia-
na, which occurs this weekend,
Sept. 1-2-3, on Courthouse
Square, one block from the Ca-
thedral.
The Most Reverend Joseph C.
Bambera, D.D., J.C.L., Bishopof
Scranton, will preachthe homily.
The principal celebrant is Father
David P. Cappelloni, pastor of
SS. Anthony and Rocco Parish
in Dunmore and La Festa chap-
lain.
Concelebrants will include Fa-
ther Philip A. Altavilla, V.G., Fa-
ther Thomas M. Muldowney,
V.G., Father Joseph F. Cipriano,
Father Thomas E. Roach, S.J.,
Monsignor Constantine V. Sico-
nolfi andother priests of the Dio-
cese.
Father Brian J.T. Clarke is the
master of ceremonies. Deacon
Edward R. Shoener will be the
deacon for the liturgy.
The Mass will be broadcast
live by CTV: Catholic Television
and will be available for viewing
later in the day on the Diocesan
website at www.dioceseofscran-
ton.org.
CTV will rebroadcast the
Mass on Tuesday, Sept. 4, at 8
p.m., and on Wednesday, Sept. 5,
at 10 a.m.
Music ministry for the Italian
Mass will be provided by the
choirs of SS. Anthony and Roc-
co Parish, Dunmore; Holy Fam-
ily Parish, Luzerne; and UNICO
Scranton Chapter, accompanied
by a brass quartet, all directed by
Joseph Moffitt.
The organist will be Eugene
Mentz, and Monica Spishock is
the tympanist. Dominick DeNa-
ples, Nick Luongo, Patrick A.
Luongo, Patrick F. Luongo and
Rose Caprio will accompany on
mandolin and guitar. John Baldi-
no is the cantor.
Christopher Macchio will be a
guest vocalist.
The lectors are Heather Lucia-
ni and Jeff Addley. Stephanie
Longo is the leader of prayer.
The Prayer of the Faithful will be
led by Diane Alberigi, William
R. Genello and Michael Semian.
The offertory gifts will be pre-
sented by Carl Graziano, Patrick
F. Guido, Joseph Guido, Ro-
seann Novembrino, Christopher
and Louis DiMattio.
Patrick Caramanno, Johnath-
an Eboli, Stephen Eboli, Antho-
ny Santoli, Angelo Valvano and
Guy M. Valvano are the ushers.
Local youth attend
conference
Nine youth and their adult
leaders from St. John the Evan-
gelist Parish Community in Pitt-
ston June 20 to June 24 attended
the One Bread, One Cup Sum-
mer Liturgical Leadership Con-
ferences for High School Youth
and Campus and Youth Minis-
ters on the campus of Saint
Meinrad Seminary and School
of Theology in St. Meinrad, Indi-
ana.
During the five-day confer-
ence, the youth learned about
their Catholic faith through ses-
sions of catechesis, liturgical and
spiritual formation, and partici-
pation in liturgies. They also are
trained in liturgical ministries,
such as lector, Eucharistic minis-
ter andcantor, learningskills that
they can use in their parishes and
high schools.
Attending the conference
were: MollyFarrell, Michael and
Brianna Gorski, GaryLoughney,
Michael Gorski and Lucas
Mark. Also attending were the
adult leaders, Pat Flynn, Paul
Kendzor and Deacon Jim Corte-
gerone.
Unable to attend was Mrs. Pat
Mark.
The One Bread, One Cup con-
ference is held three times each
summer as a program of Saint
Meinrad Seminary and School
of Theology. High school youth
(grades 9 to12) are eligible to at-
tend one of the three summer
conferences.
Parishes or high schools from
across the United States can ap-
ply to send up to six youth to at-
tend the conference.
The School is operated by the
Benedictine monks of Saint
Meinrad Archabbey and offers
initial and continuing education
for priests, permanent deacons,
lay ministers and the summer
youth conferences.
For more information, visit the
website: oboc.saintmeinrad.edu
Pediatric Clinic
The Care and Concern Pediat-
ric Health Clinic, located in the
former Seton Catholic School
MATTERS OF FAI TH
Mass in Italian today at St. Peter’s Cathedral
Celebration of St. Joseph the Worker continues at Oblates of St. Joseph Seminary
Recently the Second Presbyterian Church, Pittston selected Tom and Jean Devlin as the recipients of their Member of the Year
Award. This award is given by the children of Michael and Minnie Orlando, in their parents' memory and given to a member who
gives to their church unselfishly.
Tom and Jean over the years have been involved in several groups. For example, Jean was a member of the Choir and Golden Star
Bible Class and Tom was a member of the Men's Club. But they are best known for their kindness that they show by sending cards
and visiting members who are either hospitalized or home bond and also visiting the local nursing homes.
Tom and Jean reside in Plains with their son, John, who also participates in many of the church's activities and also visits members
with his parents.
Shown in the picture is the John, Jean and Tom Devlin. Second row is Rev. David Brague, Lou Lucarella and Maria Orlando Doyle.
Second Presbyterian Church is located at 140 Parsonage Street, Pittston and holds Sunday worship is held at 10:00 a.m. The Rev.
David Brague is pastor of the church.
For additional information, please contact the church office at 654-1411.
See FAITH page 5B
C M Y K
SUNDAY DISPATCH SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 2, 2012 PAGE 5B
➛ R E L I G I O N
The Department of Business
at Misericordia University is
hosting the symposium, “The
U.S. Bishops’ Pastoral Letter:
Economic Justice for All After
25 Years,’’ on Thursday, Sept. 6
at 7 p.m. in Lemmond Theater in
Walsh Hall on campus.
The Most Reverend Joseph C.
Bambera, D.D., J.C.L., Bishopof
the Diocese of Scranton, will
serve as the keynote speaker.
The event is open free to the
public.
The symposium will feature
an in-depth discussion among
featured scholars and academics
from Misericordia University
and King’s College who have
backgrounds in religious stud-
ies, economics, business and en-
trepreneurship.
Bishop Bambera will open the
symposium with his keynote ad-
dress, “U.S. Bishop’s Pastoral
Letter: Economic Justice for All
After 25 Years,” and then a panel
discussion will ensue.
The discussion will be fol-
lowed by a question-and-answer
session where members of the
audience can engage the panel-
ists by asking questions about
their individual presentations or
other aspects of the pastoral let-
ter.
Symposium panelists include
Margarita Rose, Ph.D., professor
and chair of the Department of
Economics at King’s College;
Joseph Curran, Ph.D., associate
professor and chair of the De-
partment of Religious Studies at
Misericordia University, and
Timothy Kearney, Ph.D., assist-
ant professor andchair of the De-
partment of Business at Miser-
icordia University.
“The symposium is an oppor-
tunity to open a broad societal
discussion on this vital topic,’’
said Dr. Kearney. “The issues so-
ciety wrestled with in 1987 –
high unemployment, the envi-
ronment, poverty, immigration,
and globalization – still confront
us today.’’
The National Conference of
Catholic Bishops approved the
pastoral letter on Catholic social
teaching and the U.S. economy
in November 1987.
Overall, the pastoral letter out-
lines howthe economy exists for
people and that all people have a
correspondingdutytocontribute
to society.
The symposium will explore
howsociety addresses economic
issues in a manner that is fiscally
responsible and beneficial for
all, while maintaining a moral
and social aspect to the decisions
that are being made.
For more information about
the Misericordia University
symposium, ““U.S. Bishop’s
Pastoral Letter: Economic Jus-
tice for All After 25 Years,’’
please call (570) 674-6430.
FoundedandSponsoredbythe
Sisters of Mercy in 1924, Miser-
icordia University is Luzerne
County’s first four-year college
and offers 37 academic pro-
grams on the graduate and un-
dergraduate levels in full- and
part-time formats.
MI SERI CORDI A UNI VERSI TY
Symposium to discuss U.S. Bishop’s Pastoral letter
Most Rev. Joseph C. Bambera, Bishop of Scranton, to serve as keynote speaker
Bishop Bambera Dr. Curran Dr. Kearney Dr. Rose
building on William Street in
Pittston, is open the first and
third Thursday of each month.
Free healthcare is providedfor
infants through age 11.
Registration is from 4:30 to
5:30 p.m.
Participants should bring your
child’s immunization records
with them.
Parents or guardians must be
present to have their child exam-
ined. All services are free and
confidential.
The clinic is sponsored by the
Care and Concern ministries of
the Parish Community of St.
John the Evangelist, Msgr. John
Bendik, Pastor.
For more info call 855-6035.
Reformed Presbyterian
Church
1700 Wyoming Ave., Forty Fort
Pastor Rev. R.F. Dymond
Morning Worship: 10:30 a.m.
Bible School: 11:45 a.m.
Wednesday evening prayer
service: 6:30 p.m. every other
Wednesday
Call 570-693-1918.
Bennett Presbyterian
501 Bennett Street, Luzerne
The church is handicap acces-
sible.
For info call 288-7361 or 695-
2853.
Bethel United Methodist
532Main St. Avoca
(570) 457-2566
Pastor Sharon Dietz
(570) 282-0104
Sunday – Worship Service -
11:15 a.m.
Communion first Sunday of
each month – non perishable
food items will be collected this
day.
Mondays – Bible study – 6
p.m. alternating each week with
Brick UM Church, Duryea.
1st Thursday of each month –
food give-away 4 to 6 p.m. for
needy of Avoca and Duryea.
Non-perishable food items
and monetary donations are ac-
cepted at this time.
Brick United Methodist
935 Foote Ave., Duryea
(570)457-4424
Pastor Sharon Dietz
(570) 282-0104
Sunday Worship Service 9:45
a.m. Sunday School – 10:15 a.m.
during morning Worship
Services for ages 3-12
Communion first Sunday of
each month – non perishable
food items will be collected.
Mondays – Bible study – 6
p.m. alternating each week with
Bethel UM Church, Avoca.
Miracle of Awareness – coffee
time – 6 p.m. meeting 7 p.m.
Thursday – New beginnings
meeting 7 p.m. Third Thursday
of each month – United Metho-
dist Women – 6:30 p.m.
Christian and Missionary
Alliance Church
317 Luzerne Avenue
West Pittston
A home economics workshop
will be held Saturday, Sept. 15
beginning at 10 a.m. on proper
methods of canning and preserv-
ing vegetables.
The cost is $3 per person for
supplies.
Pre-registration is recom-
mended by calling the church of-
fice at 654-2500.
The church is hosting a Soup
Kitchen Monday evenings from
5 to 6:30 p.m. for individuals and
families in the community in
need. People interested in volun-
teering are asked to call sponsors
the Davis family of Dallas at
760-4830.
Rally Day will be held begin-
ning a new Sunday School class
year, Sunday Sept. 9 at 9:30 a.m.
and is open to in-
terested individu-
als and families in
the community in-
terested in grade
level Bible teach-
ing. Registration
for classes will be-
gin at 9:10 a.m. on
the Sept. 9. For ad-
ditional informa-
tion call the church
office.
A couples night
will be heldonSat-
urday, Sept. 22 at 6
p.m. Pre-registration is required.
Registration and information
can be attained by calling the
church office.
ASundayeveningteachingse-
ries will begin Sept. 9 through
Nov. 25 at 7 p.m. The series is
open to individuals in the com-
munity without cost. Pre-regis-
tration is required. For more in-
formation call the church office.
A Spiritual formation week-
end with Rev. David Janssen will
be held Friday, Sept. 21, and Sat-
urday, Sept. 22. Friday session at
7:30 p.m. and Saturday session
started 9:30 A.m. All session are
without charge. Registration
starts 7 p.m. Friday and 8 p.m.
Saturday.
Alliance Church
Luzerne Ave. and Parke Street
West Pittston
The clothes closet will open
on Wednesday from 6 to 8 p.m.
People with emergency needs
can call the church office at 654-
2500 for special appointments.
The closet accepts gently used
clothing and shares it with the
community without cost.
First Baptist Church
Rev. James H. Breese, pastor,
Water Street, Pittston
Sunday 9:30 a.m. Worship and
Praise Service/Children’s Sun-
day School, Adult/Teen Sunday
School immediately following
service. Wednesday 7:15 p.m.
Bible Study
First Congregational UCC
500 Luzerne Avenue
West Pittston
Rev. Joan Mitchell, Pastor
Sanctuary is handicapped ac-
cessible.
Sunday at 11 a.m. Morning
Worship Service, Pastor Bob
Mitchell will lead the service
this morning.
First Presbyterian Church
14 Broad Street Pittston
Sunday Worship 9:15 a.m.
with Rev. William N. Lukesh.
First United Presbyterian
Church
West Pittston
Rev. James Thyren 654-8121
Services are being held at St.
Cecilia’s Roman Catholic
Church on 1700 Wyoming Ave,
Exeter, as the parish recovers
from the flood of Sept. 2011.
Sunday, Sept. 2: 11 a.m., Wor-
ship.
Wednesday, Sept. 5: 9 a.m.,
Morning Circle.
First United Methodist
Wyoming Ave., West Pittston
Full Gospel Chapel
Avoca
Adult Sunday School, 9:30;
Sunday morning worship at
10:30 a.m.
Wednesday evening Bible
study and prayer service at 7:00.
The churchalsohosts the Rose
of Sharon Church with Rev. Vin-
cente Torres on Sunday after-
noon at 3:00 p.m. for the Hispan-
ic community.
Glendale Gospel Church
105 Church Drive
Glendale/Pittston Township
Sunday Service 10:45 a.m.
Harding Church
of Christ
RR 1 Box 187A, Falls
Sunday services: 10:00 a.m.
Sunday School and 11:00 a.m.
Church Service.
Call 388-6534
www.hardingchurchofchris-
t.org
Holy Mother of Sorrows PNCC
212 Wyoming Avenue, Dupont
Rev. Zbigniew Dawid, Pastor
Sunday Mass, 8:00 a.m.; Tra-
ditional Mass, 10:30 a.m.
Daily Mass, 9 a.m. Monday
through Saturday
Sat., Sept.8: The Annual Flea
Market will be held from 9 a.m.
to 5 p.m.
If anyone would like to rent a
table for the Flea Market you
have 13 days to apply. $10.00 per
table.
Contact Mrs. Regina Bahaley
at 457-2378.
There also will be food for
sale, hamburgers, hot dogs, cab-
bage and noodles, pierogies, po-
tato pancakes etc.
Sun., Sept 9: The annual Har-
vest Festival (Dozynki) will take
place on the church grounds
from11 a.m. till 6 p.m.
The blessing of the harvest
wreath will take place in church
at 2 p.m. Games of chance for
children and adults. 50/50 Bin-
go, Big Raffle, Chinese Auction
and arts and crafts. Music by Joe
Lastovica and The Polka Punch.
Independent Bible Church
328 Main Street, Duryea, PA
18642.
(570) 451-0346 Home/Office.
JLaCava@TheBibleChurch.org
Inkerman Presbyterian
Main St., Inkerman
Services: Sundays, 8:30 a.m.
Langcliffe Presbyterian
1001 Main St Avoca
Sunday worship 11:15 a.m.
The Langcliffe Church is
handicapped accessible.
Nursery is provided for chil-
dren during worship.
Moosic Alliance Church
608 Rocky Glen Road, Moosic
Pastor: Doug Jensen 457-
6020
maccma2@verizon.net
Sunday morning Sunday
School for all ages at 9:30 a.m.
Sunday morning Worship at
10:45 a.m.
Prayer meeting, Wednesdays
at 7:00 p.m.
Celebrate Recovery Ministry,
Thursdays at 7:30 p.m.
Nativity Of Our Lord
Stephenson St., Duryea
Mass Schedule
Saturday
4:00p.m. HolyRosaryChurch
5:30 p.m. Sacred Heart of Je-
sus Church
Sunday
8:00 a.m. Holy Rosary Church
9:30 a.m. Holy Rosary Church
11:00 a.m. Sacred Heart
Oblates of St. Joseph
Highway 315, Pittston
Masses are held daily in the
seminary chapel at 7 a.m. (Mon-
day – Friday) and on Saturday
mornings at 8 a.m. There are no
weekend Masses.
Confessions are heard daily
from 9 a.m. – noon and from 3 –
6 p.m.
Office hours are Monday –
Friday: 9:30 a.m. – 5 p.m., eve-
nings and weekends by appoint-
ment. Office phone number is
654-7542. You can now contact
the Oblates on Facebook:
www.Facebook.com/OBLATE-
SOFSTJOSEPH or on Twitter
@OblatesStJoseph
Every Wednesday evening
Mass is celebrated at 7 p.m. in
conjunction with the Novena to
St. Joseph &St. Joseph Marello.
Novena prayers and the blessing
of the first-class relic of St. Jo-
seph Marello, Founder of the
Oblates of Saint Joseph Congre-
gation, immediately follow the
Mass. All are welcome to partic-
ipate!
Tune into Catholic Radio 750
AM. The radio studio is located
in the seminary building and is
broadcast daily from dawn to
dusk. For more information
about this sta-
tion, contact Ed
Niewinski at
287-4670.
The Oblate
Fathers thank
all who attend-
ed last Sun-
day’s “End of
Summer” Out-
door Chicken
Bar-b-q Din-
ner. Special ap-
preciation to all
who volun-
teered their
time and hard work, as well as all
those who made financial dona-
tions, offered gift certificates,
prepared beautiful specialty bas-
kets and other needed items. It
was a beautiful day and we are
grateful that our seminary
grounds were filled with friends
from near and far to support our
fundraiser. May God bless you
all!
Labor Day Triduum
The annual Labor Day Tridu-
um is continuing in honor of St.
Joseph the Worker with Mass
this eveningat 7p.m. inthe semi-
nary chapel. Father Brian Craw-
ford, O.S.J., General Councilor
of the Oblates of St. Joseph
(Rome, Italy), is serving as ho-
milist.
Tomorrow morning a special
Labor Day Mass will be offered
by the Oblate Fathers at 10:30
a.m. honoring St. Joseph the
Worker and asking God’s bless-
ings upon all workers and for the
new school year. Bread will be
blessed & distributed at the con-
clusion of the Mass as a symbol
of the fruit of our labor. The pub-
lic is invited to participate in the
three-day preparation and spe-
cial Labor Day Mass.
The Josephite-Marellian Lay
Association will begin the new
social year with their first meet-
ing of the year this Wednesday,
Sept. 5, following the 7 p.m
.Mass/Novena. New members
are always welcome to join this
society, which supports the spiri-
tual and apostolic works of the
Oblates of Saint Joseph.
Monthly Vocation Holy Hour
will be held this Thursday, Sept.
6, at 7 p.m. in the seminary chap-
el. The Holy Hour consists of ex-
position of the Blessed Sacra-
ment, private adoration, recita-
tion of the rosary with vocation
theme meditations, Scriptural
reflection, general intercessions
and benediction. Rev. Paul
McDonnell, O.S.J., seminary
rector, invites the area faithful to
participate in this monthly devo-
tion praying for an increase of
vocations to the priesthood and
religious life.
Blue Army First Friday Vigil
is set for Sept. 7, starting with
confessions at 8 p.m., followed
by Mass to the Sacred Heart of
Jesus, adoration of the Blessed
Sacrament and devotions to the
Blessed Virgin Mary. The night
ends with the Scapular Enroll-
ment toOur Ladyof Mt. Carmel.
The public is invited to attend.
AMemorial Mass for Dolores
A. Abbey, who passed away on
June16, will be held in our chap-
el on Saturday, Sept. 8, at 11a.m.
The family invites relatives and
friends to participate.
For more news and informa-
tion about the Oblates of Saint
Joseph locally and around the
world, go to our website:
www.oblates-stjoseph.com
St Joseph Marello
William St., Pittston
There will be one Mass only
during the week: Monday to Fri-
day at 11:30 a.m.
Saturday Evening: 4:00 and
7:00 p.m.
Sunday: 8:00, 9:30, 11:00 a.m.
M o n d a y - L a b o r D a y
Feast of Saint Joseph the
Worker
Monday, Sept. 3 (Labor Day)
the Oblates of St. Josephwill cel-
ebrate the Feast of St. Joseph the
Worker with a special concele-
brated Mass at 10:30 a.m. at the
Oblates of St. Joseph Seminary
Chapel, Route 315, Laflin. At the
conclusion of the Mass, bread
will be blessed and distributed to
everyone as a symbol of the“
fruit of our labor”.
Novenas
Every Tuesday after 11:30 a.m.
Masses novena to the Miracu-
lous Medal and Mother Cabrini.
Every Wednesday after 11:30
a.m. Masses novena to Saint Jo-
seph & St. Joseph Marello
Every Tuesday at 7 p.m. there
is a Holy Hour.
The Rosary is recited 20 min-
utes before all week day Masses
and weekend Masses. Come and
join us in this beautiful devotion
to the Blessed Mother.
FIRST FRIDAY: Masses at
11:30 a.m. with devotion to the
Sacred Heart of Jesus.
Confessions will be heard be-
fore Masses.
FIRSTSATURDAY: Mass at
8:00 a.m. with prayers to the
Blessed Mother.
Anyone wishing to donate
fresh flowers in memory of a
loved one, may bring themto the
church on Saturday morning.
Thank you.
Anyone interested in renting
the Parish Banquet Hall or Meet-
FAITH
Continued from Page 4b
The annual Labor Day Triduum is continuing in honor of St. Joseph the
Worker with Mass this evening at 7 p.m. in the seminary chapel. Father
Brian Crawford, O.S.J., General Councilor of the Oblates of St. Joseph
(Rome, Italy), is serving as homilist.
Tomorrow morning a special Labor Day Mass will be offered by the Oblate
Fathers at 10:30 a.m. honoring St. Joseph the Worker and asking God’s
blessings upon all workers and for the new school year. Bread will be
blessed & distributed at the conclusion of the Mass as a symbol of the
fruit of our labor. The public is invited to participate in the three-day
preparation and special Labor Day Mass.
See FAITH page 6B
C M Y K
PAGE 6B SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 2, 2012 SUNDAY DISPATCH
➛ R E L I G I O N
ing Room should call Christine
Silinskie, hall manager, at 704-
8861 for details and/or a tour of
the facility. Great for wedding
receptions, bridal showers, grad-
uations, bereavements, semi-
nars, birthday parties, etc. Some
2012 dates are still available.
Sacrament of Anointing of the
Sick—please notify the Parish
when a relative is sick or hospi-
talized. The Sacraments of Pen-
ance, Eucharist and Anointing of
the Sick are a joy and privilege to
administer. If you know you are
going to the hospital for surgery,
please notify Father and he will
be glad to anoint you after Mass.
If there is anyone whois ill, inthe
hospitals, in rehabilitation, nurs-
ing homes or home bound and
wishes a clergy visit, please noti-
fy the rectory at 654-6902.
Anyone who is having diffi-
culty coming to the altar to re-
ceive Holy Communion, sit in
the first pew. The Priest \ the Eu-
charistic Minister will come to
you.
CCD Registration for the
2012-2013 school year will be
held on Wednesday, Sept. 5, at
6:30 p.m. in the Parish Center.
Parents and guardians must reg-
ister all public school children in
grades Kthru 8. The registration
fee is $10 for the first child in a
family, $5 for the second child,
and $5 for the third child. Addi-
tional children are free.
Classes for Kindergarten to
grade 6 on Wednesday, Sept. 12.
Opening Mass for the Religious
Education Program will be held
on Sunday, Sept. 16 at 11:00 a.m.
Classes for 5th and 6th graders
will begin on Sunday, Sept. 23 at
8:45a.m. Childrenwill attendthe
9:30 a.m. Mass.
Any child who has some diffi-
culties to follow this schedule,
please call Terri Audi at 654-
3326 or Father Joe at the Rectory
at 654-6902.
Children who have received
the Sacrament of Confirmation
will have a special program be-
ginning on Sunday, Oct. 14.
High School students will
have a special program begin-
ning with the Advent Season.
St. Joseph Marello Senior
Choir will resume rehearsals on
Sept. 10, Monday at 7:00 p.m.
The Office will be closed on
Monday, Sept. 3, for Labor Day.
Fr. Joe will be available for any
emergencies.
Blood drive to be held on
Wednesday, Sept. 5, from12:30 -
6 p.m. in the Parish Center.
Corpus Christi Parish
Luzerne Ave., West Pittston
A Mass of Thanksgiving and
pasta sinner are scheduled for
Saturday, Sept. 8, at Immaculate
Conception Church in West Pitt-
ston at 5 p.m. in the ICC Church
Hall.
There is no charge for the din-
ner. It is intended to reunite ALL
local residents affected by the
flood and the many volunteers
whodedicatedtheir time, talents,
donations and kind deeds to as-
sist those in need. Reservations
are required by Sept. 5 by calling
Darlene @ 817-0318.
Catechetical Sunday
Sunday, Sept. 16, is Catechet-
ical Sunday. On that day, chil-
dren pre-K and older are invited
to bring their parents, grandpar-
ents to “Meet the Teachers”. The
parents are welcome to review
the books the children will be us-
ing, and discuss with the teacher
any concerns you might have.
For children attending classes
at Immaculate Conception,
teachers will be available from
9:15 a.m. to10:15 a.m. in the fol-
lowing locations: pre-k & K in
ICC hall on the stage, 1st, 2nd,
3rd, and Confirmation prep in
the school, 4th grade in ICC hall
and 5th grade in ICC rectory.
At Holy Redeemer, all teach-
ers will be in the church hall
from9:45 a.m. to10:45 a.m. Re-
freshments will be served at both
sites.
If you have not yet registered
your child for CCD classes, you
may do so at that time. Registra-
tion forms may be found in the
church vestibule or on our web-
site.
Youth Choir
All children are welcome to
join the Youth Choir. Directors,
Mary Supey and Mary Ellen
Gianuzzi will be starting prac-
tice later this month. To sign up
now just visit our website
www.corpuschristinepa.com.
Our Lady of the Eucharist
Parish
535 N Main Street, Pittston
www.eucharist-pittston.org
Mass Schedule
Saturday Vigil: 4:00 p.m.
Sunday: 8:30 a.m. and 10:30
a.m.
Daily Mass: 8:00 a.m.
Sacrament of Reconciliation
(Confessions)
Saturday from 3:30 p.m. to
3:45 p.m. and by appointment
Religious Education
Classes for grades 1– 6 will be
held from 9:15 to 10:15 a.m. be-
ginning Sunday, Sept. 9. Confir-
mation classes will be held from
5:00 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. beginning
on Sunday, September 16th. If
you have any questions with re-
gard to the Religious Education
program, please call Sister Mary
Ann at 654-0263.
Labor Day
Morning Mass on Monday,
September 3rdwill be celebrated
at 9:00 a.m. Due to the Labor
Day holiday the parish office
will be closed on Monday. In
case of an emergency, please call
654-0263.
Little Rock Scripture Study
Father Tom will lead a Scrip-
ture Study beginning on Tuesday
Sept. 18. There will be two pro-
grams, one onTuesdaymornings
from 8:30 a.m. until 10:00 a.m.
and one on Tuesday evenings
from7:00 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. Both
programs will be held in the par-
ish hall at Our Lady of the Eu-
charist, N. Main Street, Pittston.
The title of this study will be
Revelation. There will be 7 ses-
sions. In order to be able to order
the necessary materials, we ask
that you call the parish office
(654-0263) or e-mail olepitt-
ston@gmail.comto register. The
program is open to all from the
greater Pittston area.
Ministry Schedule
The schedule for Liturgical
Ministers for Sept. through Jan.
is on the parish website.
September Parish Calendar
The September parish calen-
dar has been posted on the parish
webpage, along with the calen-
dars for Religious Education.
Prince of Peace Parish
Old Forge
St. Mary’s Church, Lawrence
Street, Saturday Vigil 4 p.m.
Sunday, Mass 8 and 10 a.m.
St. Lawrence Church, Main
Street, Saturday Vigil 5:30 p.m.
Sunday Mass 11:15 a.m.
Sacred Heart of Jesus
Lackawanna Ave., Dupont
This week’s Mass schedule:
Monday through Friday at 7
a.m., Saturday at 4 p.m. and Sun-
day at 8:30 a.m. and 10:30 a.m.
The Women’s Society will
meet on Tuesday, Sept. 4 at 6:30
p.m. in the church hall.
The Holy Name Society will
meet on Wednesday, Sept. 5 at 7
p.m. in the church hall. Ticket re-
turns for the Ziti Dinner should
be made. The dinner is on Sat-
urday, Sept.29 in the church hall.
Ticket out dinners will be avail-
able from 3 to 5 p.m.. Sit down
dinners from 4 to 6 p.m.. $7 for
adults and $3 for children under
12.
All students – fromPre-Kthru
College – along with their fam-
ilies can join in the celebration of
a "BacktoSchool Mass" todayat
the 10:30 a.m. Mass.
Right after Mass, everyone is
invited to enjoy refreshments in
the church hall.
Registration for CCD classes:
Students in grades 1 and up
.Sept.9 from 8 to 10 a.m.; Sept.
12 from 6 to 7 p.m. Both regis-
trations in the church hall.
This year is especially impor-
tant for students in grades 5 and
up because of Confirmation in
the Fall of 2013.If students donot
take part inthis school year’s ses-
sions, theywill not be eligible for
Confirmation until 2016.
The first CCD class will be
held on Monday, Sept. 24.
St. Barbara Parish
28 Memorial Avenue, Exeter
Office Hours: Monday – Fri-
day 9:00 a.m. – 3:00 p.m.
Evenings, by appointment.
Phone: 654-2103
The Parish Office will be
closed Monday, Sept. 3, in ob-
servance of the Labor Day holi-
day.
The 2013 Mass Book will be
openas of Sept. 4. Because of the
increased number of parishion-
ers of St. Barbara Parish and to
ensure that Masses are available
to all parishioners, we will be
scheduling Masses for 3 months
at a time. Mass intentions are
scheduled on a first come first
served basis. Also, Mass inten-
tions may be changed based on
the availability of a priest or if
there are anyunforeseenchanges
in the daily Mass schedule.
Thank you for your cooperation
and understanding.
St. Barbara’s Christian Wom-
en’s Organization will hold their
monthly meeting on Tuesday,
Sept. 11 at 6:30 p.m. at the
Church hall. Upcoming year will
be discussed. All women of the
parish are invited to attend. The
meeting will begin with the reci-
tation of the rosary.
Religious Education (CCD)
classes will start at St. Barbara’s
on Sunday, Sept. 23, at 9:00 a.m.
in the parish center. There are
currently about 100 students reg-
istered. If you have not yet regis-
tered your child for religious ed
classes, please do so immediate-
ly. All students must be regis-
tered to attend. Registration
forms will be available in either
church or at the office. Remem-
ber that there is a book fee of $16
for any child registered after Au-
gust 31.
There has been a great re-
sponse from volunteers in the
parish to assist with the religious
ed program, but the programcan
always use more. If you’re inter-
ested, please contact JimRose at
the parish office.
Confirmation will be held at
St. Barbara’s next Fall (2013).
All children in grades 6, 7 and 8
must register and regularly at-
tend religious education classes
to be eligible.
Finally, it’s not too late to vol-
unteer for the religious educa-
tion program.
St. John the Evangelist
Parish Community
35 William Street
Phone: 654-0053
Pittston
Parish office will be closed
Sept. 3 for Labor Day. Mass will
be celebrated at 9 a.m. in the up-
per church.
Bereavement support group
will meet Tuesday, Sept. 11, from
7 to 8:30 p.m.
Knitting Ministry – Sept. 2-
6:30 to 8 p.m.
Knights of Lithuania – Sept. 9
12 p.m.
Bereavement Support Group –
First meeting Sept 11 - 7 to 8:30
p.m.
Altar and Rosary Society
meeting – Sept. 10 – 1:30 p.m.
Church Hall
Holy Name Society meeting –
Sept. 16 – 11 a.m. Seton Audito-
rium
The Greater Pittston Food
Pantry is sponsored by the Care
and Concern Committee of St.
John the Evangelist Parish. Any-
one in need of food is asked to
call 654-9923. Distribution of
food is by appointment only.
The Free Health Clinic is open
at 5:30 p.m. every Wednesday in
the former Seton Catholic High
School, first come first serve.
Greater Pittston Kids Closet
celebrating its third anniversary
provides new and gently used
clothing.
Hours are Wednesday from 9
to 11:30 a.m. and 5 to 7 p.m.
The Closet always accepts do-
nations of new and gently used
clothing.
St John’s Lutheran
7 Wood St., Pittston
570-655-2505, stjohnspitt-
ston@verizon.com
Pastor John Castellani
Organist, Marcia Collera
Reader, Tracy Drummond
Acolyte, Trisha Renna
Greeter, Nancy Castellani
Ushers, Frank Capobianco
and Darwin Perschau
GLS is a year round fund rais-
er. Leave a message for Tracy if
you have any questions or want
to get involved.
The parish’s 2nd Annual Pig
Roast is Sept. 22 from2 to 6 p.m.
There will be a bake sale and
basket raffle again this year.
Adult dinner and beer $20; adult
dinner without beer $12; kids age
6-10 $7; kids 5 and under free.
Amy Saunders is contact person.
Council meeting is scheduled
for Tuesday, Sept. 4 at 6:30 p.m.
Rally day pot luck brunch will
be held Sunday Sept. 9 after
church service to "kick off" our
Church school year.
Bible School starts Tuesday
Sept 11 at 7 p.m.
Weekday school starting starts
Thursday, Sept 13 at 5:30 p.m.
Planning committee will start
on Tuesday Sept., 18 at 7 p.m.
The Altar Guild held an orga-
nization meeting. Sara Garron
will be the chair while Barb Lau-
rie will be secretary. There are17
members. Mandatory meeting
Wednesday Sept. 5 at 7 p.m.
Bulletin and Votive candle
openings for Sept. 9. Leave a
message for Doris Mersincav-
age.
Aluminum cans, preferably
crushed, are still being collected.
JimFox and Bob Schumaker are
spearheading this project.
Speaking of recycling LWML
are saving postage stamps for
missions. Please leave a 1/4 inch
around the stamp. For every
pound of stamps one bible is
printedandshippedintothe Mis-
sion Field. Leave a message
Sharleen Palamia.
Altar Guild for the month of
September: Michelle Cherney,
Kathy Capabianco and the alter-
nate is Marcia Colleran
Aycolyte Schedule: Sept. 2
Trisha Renna, Sept. 9 Justin La-
zanowicz; Sept. 16, Katie Colle-
ran; Sept. 23 Sarah Ciesla; Sept.
30, Emily Goyne.
Guests are welcome to wor-
ship and perhaps to join this Par-
ish Family. If you have any ques-
tions, comments or suggestions
please call and, leave your name
number and your message and a
member of our Church will get
back to you.
St. John’s P.M. Church
316 Main St., Avoca
Pastor Rich Rock
570-457-8281
Sunday Worship 10:00 a.m.
Holy Communion the first
Sunday of every month
Bible Study every Wednesday
6:00-7:30 p.m.
St. Maria Goretti
Laflin Road, Laflin, PA. 18702
Pastor: Monsignor Neil Van
Loon
42redwood@comcast.net
www.stmariagoretti-laflin.org
Elementary school children
attend Religious Education
Classes on Sunday morning
9:30-10:45 a.m. The registration
forms and full schedule for the
year are inthe foyer of the church
this weekend. The first C.C.D.
class will be on Sept. 9. Parents’
Meeting for all Confirmation
will be on Sunday, Sept. 16 at
9:30 a.m. in the Parish Center.
Children in grades 6th, 7th or 8th
grades, who have not received
Confirmation, are required to
join this class.
Any adult or high school stu-
dent interested in volunteering in
the C.C.D. program can call the
Parish Office at 655-8956.
Harvest tea
This fun-filled evening is a
fundraiser to raise money for the
Msgr. Gray Merit Award which
is presented each year to a wor-
thy senior from our parish.
October 10, 7 p.m. until ? $10
Beginning on Friday, Sept. 14
and ending on Sunday, Sept.16,
there will be a special event
called “Up and Over” for all stu-
dents in grades 7th and 8th at the
Fatima Renewal Center.
The weekend includes a num-
ber of fun activities and events,
including an outdoor obstacle
course.
In addition, there will be a
Mass, a movie, opportunities for
free time and all-you-can-eat,
buffet-style meals.
Bring friends and get to know
new friends.
For more information, please
check the Fatima website:
www.fatimarenewalcenter.org.
ST. Gabriel’s Center
Schedule of retreats for Sep-
tember and October:
Sept. 7-9 “Walking with Jesus
Today through the Gospel of
Luke.”
Sept. 14-16 “Come Talk with
Me: Conversing with Jesus To-
day through the Gospel of John.”
Oct. 19-21 “Discovering Love
in a Most Unusual Place.”
All three weekends are direct-
ed by Rev. Paul Zilonka, C.P. of
Immaculate Conception Monas-
tery, Jamaica, NY.
For additional information
contact the Retreat Center Office
@ 586-4957 or email to kpor-
ter@epix.net.
September Calendar
3 - Labor Day - Parish Office
Closed
9 - C.C.D. - 9:30 a.m. - 10:45
a.m. Classes begin for elemen-
tary school students in the base-
ment of the Church
16 - Meeting of Parents of
Confirmation Students - 9:30
a.m. in Parish Center
17 - Spiritual Life Committee
Meeting - 6:30 p.m. in the Parish
Office
Scripture study
Father Maloney will lead a
Scripture Study beginning on
Tuesday, Sept. 18.There will be
two programs – one on Tuesday
mornings from 8:30 a.m. until
10:00 a.m. and one on Tuesday
evenings from 7 p.m. until 8:30
p.m. Both programs will be held
in the parish hall at Our Lady of
the Eucharist Parish, North Main
Street, Pittston.
The title of this study will be
REVELATION. There will be 7
sessions.
In order to be able to purchase
the necessary materials, call the
Parish Office at Our Lady of the
Eucharist (654-0263)or e-mail:
olepittston@gmail.com to regis-
ter.
Memorial opportunities
If you wish to memorialize a
loved one, living or deceased,
please contact the Parish Office
to make the arrangements.
Altar candles: Acandle will be
lit andburnonthe altar duringall
the Masses offered during the
month which you choose as your
memorial.
Sanctuary candles: A candle
will burn in memory of or in
honor of your loved one during
the week which you choose as
your memorial.
Bread and wine: The bread
and wine used for consecration
can be offered for your intention
during a Mass of your choice.
Catholic Choral Society
The Catholic Choral Society
will begin its 64th season on
Tuesday, Sept. 4, with rehearsals
on Tuesday evenings at 7 p.m. at
the IHM Center at Marywood
University. The group, com-
posed of members fromboth Lu-
zerne and Lackawanna counties,
performs sacred, classical,
Broadway and popular music at
performances in both counties.
New members are welcome. No
auditions are required.
The first concert is scheduled
for October. For further informa-
tion, please see www.catholic-
choralsociety.org or call 570-
587-2753.
Labor Day
There will be a special Mass
on Labor Day, Monday, Sept. 3,
at 10:30 a.m. honoring St. Joseph
the Worker in the Oblates of St.
Joseph Seminary Chapel, High-
FAITH
Continued from Page 5b
Recently the youth group of St. Monica's Parish of the Wyoming's presented a donation to the SPCA, which was raised at a recent
lemonade stand. In front: Jessica Walkowiak and Hallie Stark. Standing, front: Emily Cheskiewicz, a representative of the SPCA,
Faith and Ashley Kessel and Gianna Paoloni. Back row: Michelle Stark and Jon Kessel.
See FAITH page 7B
C M Y K
SUNDAY DISPATCH SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 2, 2012 PAGE 7B
➛ R E L I G I O N
Great First Week
Thanks and congratulations to
the students, parents, faculty and
staff on a great first week of
school! Everyone was excited to
see both new and familiar faces.
School administrators appre-
ciate the effort on everyone’s
part. Special thanks to the main-
tenance, cafeteria and office
staffs, and to the teachers and
aides for their work this summer.
It was truly “above and beyond
the call of duty!”
After School Care
Holy Rosary School will once
again offer an After School Care
Program (ASCP) for the 2012-
2013 school year.
Students enrolled in grades
Pre-K 4 to 8th are eligible. This
program will reflect the philoso-
phy and mission of Holy Rosary
School, and is designed to meet
the needs of students and par-
ents. The ASCP will provide a
safe, nurturing environment that
is a natural extension of the
school community.
On regular school days, the
program will operate from the
time school is dismissed until
5:30 p.m. The After School Care
Program will not be available on
early dismissal days or when
school is closed, and will begin
on Tuesday, Sept. 4.
All families who may partici-
pate in the After School Care
Program must complete a regis-
trationform, whichwas included
in the first day folder of the ol-
dest child in each family.
Cafeteria Information
Holy Rosary School is a par-
ticipant in the National School
Lunch Program, and offers daily
nutritious lunches which meet
all federal guidelines for healthy
student meals. Participation in
the school hot lunch programfor
grades PK-8 is highly recom-
mended.
School lunch prices for the
2012-2013 school year are $3.00
per day, and reduced price lunch-
es are $.40 per day.
Applications for free/reduced
price lunches are available in the
school office. Please be assured
applications are kept in the stric-
test confidence.
Arrival and Dismissal
Weather permitting, students
will gather each day in the park-
ing lot behind the school prior to
the opening bell at 7:45 a.m. In
inclement weather, students will
gather in the gym.
Buses will discharge and pick
upstudents onStephensonStreet
directly in front of the school,
and car riders will be dropped off
and picked up on Stephenson
Street in front of the school as
well.
For the safety of your students,
please use the following traffic
pattern in the morning: Ap-
proach the school on Stephenson
St. fromMain Ave., and proceed
into the bus lane/drop off lane.
Move to the curb, stay in the lane
as it moves forward, and drop off
your child in front of the school.
Please do not approach the
school from River or Watt
Streets, as dropping children off
that way forces them to cross
traffic. Please do not remain in
the middle of the road and drop
off students, as that forces the
students to walk in front of or be-
hind cars and buses that are pull-
ing out.
Dismissal begins at 2:15 p.m.,
with bus riders dismissed first,
followed by car riders and walk-
ers. Whenyour child(ren) are be-
ing picked up at dismissal,
please follow these directives,
and if someone else is picking up
your child, please make them
aware of these directives as well.
Please do not enter the bus lane
and park in front of the school to
pickupyour childonce the buses
depart in the afternoon.
Also, no cars will be permitted
to exit the parking lot, or exit
from parking spaces around the
school until all students are dis-
missed.
The dismissal takes approxi-
mately 10 minutes; therefore, if
you must leave before that time
elapses, do not park in the school
lot or across the street. For the
safety of your children, cooper-
ate fully with these directives.
Gift Certificates
Gift certificates will not be
sold during the first week of
school, due to the early dismiss-
al. The usual schedule will re-
sume on Thursday, Sept. 6.
If you have any questions,
please contact the school office
at 457-2553.
Return to School Mass
All family and friends are in-
vited to our Back-to-School Lit-
urgy, which will be celebrated on
Friday, Sept. 7 at 9:00 a.m.
PTO Meeting Rescheduled
Due to a scheduling conflict,
the first PTO meeting has been
rescheduled for Tuesday, Sept.
11, at 6:30 p.m. in the school
cafeteria. New officers will be
introduced, and plans for the up-
coming year will be discussed.
There will be no PTO meeting
this Tuesday, Sept. 4.
Holy Rosary Golf Classic
Calling all golfers! The school
is looking for golfers for the
2012 Holy Rosary Golf Classic -
the 4th annual golf tournament.
The tournament will be held
on Sunday, Sept. 16 at Edgewood
in the Pines Golf Course in
Drums. Registration and lunch
will begin at noon, and the tour-
nament will open with a shotgun
start at 1 p.m.
The tournament fee is $100per
player, and includes lunch and
dinner, course fees anda cart. If a
foursome signs up together, their
$400 fee will include a tee spon-
sorship.
There will be prizes awarded
for special shots and holes and
great raffles, includinganiPadas
the grand prize.
Sponsors and registrations are
still being accepted. Contact
Debbie Davis at 451-1762 or the
Holy Rosary School office at
457-2553 for more information.
All monies raised will benefit
the school.
Holiday Market Place
The 2012 PTO Holiday Mar-
ketplace will be held on Sunday,
Sept. 23 from10 a.m. to 4 p.m. in
the school auditorium. Please
save the date and get a “head
start” on our holiday shopping!
Awide variety of vendors will
be on hand, and of course, there
will be delicious food available
to purchase.
Admission is $3 for adults and
$2 for children, and children un-
der 6 are free. Any questions or
interested vendors may contact
Debbie Davis at 451-1762.
Tab Collection
The Holy Rosary Student
Council will be collecting ring
tabs for the Ronald McDonald
House throughout the school
year. Please send them to school
with your children.
Recycling
In addition to cartridge recy-
cling Holy Rosary also has cell
phone recycling. Select cell
phones can be dropped off in the
same location and recycled for
credit. For more information or
for a list of qualifying cartridges,
visit www.fundingfactory.com
or contact Mrs. Skutack at 457-
2553.
Labels & Box Tops
Campbell’s Soup labels and
Box Tops for Education are be-
ing collected at Holy Rosary
School.
These programs enable Holy
Rosary to provide educational
resources that may be unafforda-
ble through the regular budget.
They offer exciting merchandise
like computers, software, sports
equipment, reference materials,
science and art items, even musi-
cal instruments.
Please continue your support
of these programs by sending in
your labels tothe school office or
by placing them in the church
vestibule. If you have any ques-
tions, contact the school’s office.
Also, please check labels for ex-
piration dates. They can be sent
in immediately and processed
before they expire; there is no
need to wait until you accumu-
late a quantity.
HOLY ROSARY SCHOOL
Return to school Mass to be celebrated Friday
way 315, Laflin. Mass will be
celebrated by the Oblate Fathers
and bread will be blessed at the
conclusion as a symbol of the
fruit of our labor and distributed
to the faithful.
The Labor Day Mass marks
the end of a three-day spiritual
preparation, praying in a special
way for all workers and the un-
employed. All are welcome
St. Mary’s Polish National
Catholic Church
200 Stephenson St. Duryea
Rev. Fr. Carmen G. Bolock,
Pastor Phone: 457-2291
Email: padre@saintma-
ryspncc.org
Website: saintmaryspncc.org
Holy Mass: Sunday 9:30 a.m.
Weekdays: 8 a.m.
Holy Days: 8 a.m. & 7 p.m.
St. Monica’s Church
363 West 8th Street, West
Wyoming, PA 18644
Office Hours - 9:00 a.m. to
4:30 p.m., Mon. – Fri.
Phone: 570-693-1991
Email: olos363@verizon.net
www.stmonicanepa.com.
Father Leo McKernan, Pastor
Mr. William Jenkins, Deacon
Mass Schedule
Saturday Vigil: 4 p.m. OLOS
Sunday: 8:30 a.m. STJ; 11a.m.
OLOS
Daily Mass at OLOS – During
summer months. Mon-Tues-
Wed.-Fri: 7 a.m. (Please note: no
Thurs. p.m. Mass)
Special September Masses: la-
bor Day, Sept. 3, 9 a.m.; Sept. 10
6 p.m. Mass before women’s
Night of Refelection; Sept. 17:
6:30 p.m.
Bible Study will resume on
Thursday, Sept. 6 after the 7 p.m.
Mass followed by Compline (the
Night Prayer of the Church.)
ADORATION OF THE
MOST BLESSED SACRA-
MENT: First Friday, Sept. 7. Ex-
position and Adoration of the
Blessed Sacrament will followat
7 p.m. Mass until Midnight.
Benediction of the Blessed
Sacrament and the Divine Prais-
es will follow. All are welcome
and encouraged to attend.
St. Monica’s Sweat-shirt/T-
shirt Sale: is still underway. This
sale will be offering red t-shirts -
$10, crew sweatshirts $18, hood-
ed sweatshirts $26 and zip up
hooded sweatshirts $30; these
will be available in both youth
and adult sizes. Note adult sizes
1x and up will require additional
charge. Order forms are at the
entrances of each Church site.
Any questions contact Tom
Tomsak at 237-2188.
Women’s Evening of Reflec-
tion – On Monday, Sept. 10 at
6:00 p.m. Mass will be celebrat-
ed followed with a Conference at
7:00 p.m. given by Sister Joan of
the Capuchin Sisters of Naza-
reth.
Other Capuchin Sisters will
join her.
At 8:00 p.m. there will be a so-
cial in the Church Hall. At 8:45
Sung Compline (Night Prayer of
the Church.)
A registration sheet will be
available in the Church Hall or
anyone who would like to attend
may call the Parish Office a 693-
1991.
R.C.I.A – Rite of Christian
Initiation of Adults – After La-
bor Day there will be a newclass
starting for those adults interest-
ed in becoming Catholic or in-
quiring into the Faith.
First Friday Pro-Life Rosary
Vigil: Will be held on Sept. 7
outside the Planned Parenthood
Building at 63 N. Franklin
Street, Wilkes-Barre, and every
First Friday of the Month at 9
a.m.
Every Sunday of the Month at
7 p.m. the Rosary will be recited
at the Fatima Grotto on North
Street across from Holy Cross
Retirement Center in Wilkes-
Barre.
Parishioners in hospitals,
nursing homes and shut-ins who
want to receive Communion or a
visit from Father McKernan or a
Minister of Communion, please
let the Office know.
Home Bound Parishioners can
watch the Mass celebrated daily
on T.V. on E.W.T.N. and the Ca-
tholic Channel from the Cathe-
dral in Scranton. Check the pa-
per for times.
The 36th Annual Rosary Rally
is Sunday, Sept. 23, starting at
the American Legion, 259 Shoe-
maker Street, Swoyersville with
Devotions & Mass at 3:00 p.m.
at St. Elizabeth Ann Seton Par-
ish, 116 Hughes Street, Swoyers-
ville. More information will fol-
low.
Call Father McKernan or the
Parish Office at 693-1991 or
email at olos363@verizon.net.
St. Peter’s Evangelical
Lutheran Church
100 Rock Street, Hughestown
Stpeters_elc@yahoo.com
654-1009
Worship Service Sunday 9
a.m. Handicapped accessible, all
are welcome
As of Sept. 9 Sunday School at
9 a.m., Worship Service at 10
a.m.
Confirmation classes will be
starting, if you are in 7th or 8th
Grade please call Pam Hanczyc
@ 313-2829 to register.
Queen of the Apostles Parish
715 Hawthorne St.
(570) 457-3412
stmarysavoca@verizon.net
www.stmaryavoca.4lpi.com
Queen of the Apostles Parish’s
choir practices take place Mon-
day evenings from 7 to 9 p.m. at
St. Mary’s Church, 715 Haw-
thorne St. New members are
welcome. Please use the hand-
icapped entrance on the right
side of the church.
Every Tuesday from 8 a.m. to
8 p.m., the parish has Adoration
of the Blessed Sacrament. Eu-
charistic Adorers are needed for
the 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. and
the 12:30 to 1:30 p.m. time slots.
If you can help, call Ann Jake at
457-3521 or the parish office at
457-3412.
The Rosary and the Litany of
the Sacred Heart of Jesus is
prayed for the intentions written
in the adoration and lobby books
along with the special intentions
of those present at 7:30 p.m. fol-
lowed by Benediction.
The parish will have its First
Friday Healing Mass at 7 p.m. on
Sept. 7.
Faith formation classes will
resume on Sunday, Sept. 9 and
Monday, Sept. 10 at St. Mary’s
School, 742 Spring St.
The First Eucharist class will
meet from 9 to 10:30 a.m. on
Sept. 9 and students in grades
K-8 will meet from 4:30 to 5:45
p.m. on Sept. 10. Registration
forms need to be returned by
Sept. 2.
The youth group will meet on
Sunday, Sept. 9. New members
are always welcome. Contact
Lori Ostrowski at 457-8840 for
more details.
The women’s guild will meet
at 2 p.m. on Sunday, Sept. 9 in St.
Mary’s School auditorium, 742
Spring St. Refreshments will be
served.
There will not be a meeting on
September 11 in order for mem-
bers to attend the 9/11 Memorial
Mass at the church.
The pastoral council will meet
at 7 p.m. on Monday, Sept. 10 in
the rectory, 715 Hawthorne St.
The parishioners of Queen of
the Apostles Parish and the Avo-
ca Fire Department will pay trib-
ute to the victims of the Septem-
ber 11 terrorist attacks at their
11th Annual September 11 Me-
morial Mass at 7 p.m. on Tues-
day, Sept. 11 at St. Mary’s
Church.
Members of local fire and po-
lice departments; emergency
medical personnel; military per-
sonnel; veterans; Avoca Boy
Scout Troop 316; Cub Scout
Troop 316; Venture Crew 3701;
the Ancient Order of Hibernians,
Avoca Division; American Le-
gion Post 607; V.F.W. Ladies
Auxiliary, Post 8335; state Rep.
Michael Carroll; former state
Rep. Thomas Tigue; borough of-
ficials; and bagpipers will proc-
ess from the Avoca Fire Depart-
ment to St. Mary’s Church.
The procession route will be-
gin at the Avoca Fire Depart-
ment, 740 Main St., pass under a
fire truck ladder arch which will
be raised over Hawthorne Street
and end at St. Mary’s Church.
The procession will assemble at
6:45 p.m. at the fire department
and process to the church shortly
thereafter.
During the Mass, all of the
participants will receive a spe-
cial blessing from the Rev. Phil-
lip J. Sladicka, pastor.
Following the Mass, there will
be a reception in St. Mary’s
School auditorium.
The back to school and Cate-
chetical Sunday Mass will take
place at 11 a.m. on Sept. 16 at St.
Mary’s Church.
The youth group will sponsor
a “Make Your Own Smoothie
Party” in St. Mary’s School audi-
torium following the Mass.
The worship committee will
meet at 7 p.m. on Monday, Sept.
17 in the rectory.
The social concerns commit-
tee will meet at 8 p.m. on Mon-
day, Sept. 17 in the rectory.
The buildings and grounds
committee will meet at 6:30 p.m.
on Monday, Sept. 24 in the recto-
ry.
The parishioners are currently
selling the harvest edition of
their “Pot of Gold Match the
Daily Number” raffle tickets.
For just $10 per ticket, you will
have a chance to win $75 daily
and $100 on Fridays throughout
October.
There will also be $250 prizes
on Oct. 1 and 10 and $1,000 on
Halloween.
The winning number is based
on the evening daily number of
the Pennsylvania Lottery.
To purchase a ticket, call the
rectory at 457-3412, and it will
be mailed to you.
Daily Masses: 8 a.m.
(Wednesday at 7 p.m.)
Eucharistic Adoration: Tues-
days from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m.
Miraculous Medal Novena:
Wednesday following the 7 p.m.
Mass
Weekends Masses: Saturday
at 4 p.m.; Sunday at 8, 9:30 and
11 a.m.
Confession: Saturdays 3-3:45
p.m.; anytime upon request by
calling 457-3412.
Prayer Chain: 457-5867
Second Presbyterian
143 Parsonage St., Pittston
654-1411
Sunday, Sept. 2:10:00 a.m. –
Worship and Holy Communion
Tuesday, Sept. 4:6:30 p.m. –
Clean Plate Club at Grotto, Har-
vey’s Lake 7:00p.m. –AAMeet-
ing
Saturday, Sept. 8:10 a.m. – 2
p.m. – Car Wash $5.00 donation
per car
Sunday, Sept. 9:9:30 a.m. –
Sunday School Kick-Off Break-
fast in Fellowship Hall; Worship
to follow
Trinity Episcopal Church
Spring Street and Montgom-
ery Avenue, West Pittston
Parish Mission: “To live and
build holy community.”
All welcome: Worldwide An-
glican Communion
“We believe in one holy, Ca-
tholic apostolic church.”
Web of information and links
at www.trinityepiscopalchurch-
westpittston.org and www.dio-
beth.org.
Sunday Holy Eucharist: 11
a.m. every Sunday.
Food Pantry: September items
needed are pastas and sauces.
Gerrity’s gift cards, cash dona-
tions and other non-perishable
foods also accepted.
Prayernetwork. Open To Pub-
lic. Daily prayer for those with
needs requesting prayerful sup-
port. Start Prayernetwork at par-
ish office 654-3261.
Youth Program: 10:45 a.m. ev-
ery Sunday. Weekday special
events andservice projects as an-
nounced.
Faith Forum for Adults: En-
richment for adults seeking spir-
itual renewal and opportunities
for ministry and volunteerism.
Parish Life Events Team: Bi-
monthly first Sundays.
Parish Council: Every second
Sunday.
Women of Trinity: Every third
Sunday.
WOT Ministry Invitation. The
Women of Trinity have under-
taken a ministry to help support
Good Shepherd Episcopal
Church of Scranton in their ou-
treach to the homeless of the re-
gion.
Each month after enjoying a
home cooked meal at Good
Shepherd all who have needs
may “shop” for necessities like
clothing, shoes, and toiletries in
a store-like setting in the
church’s refurbished basement
of donated items.
The Woman of Trinity has
supported this ministry by deliv-
ering donations of clothing, new
undergarments and socks and
toiletries to the Scranton church.
WOT will continue to collect
trial size and hotel toiletries and
invites the parish community to
join with themin helping the less
fortunate.
Donations of trial size and
sample size toiletries are wel-
come.
Party and Banquet Space.
Newly renovated banquet room
and kitchen.
All Day Rental $100. Reserva-
tions at 654-3261.
Music Together Classes: Fun
and music for infants and chil-
dren through age five accompa-
nied by a parent or caregiver.
Visit www.musictogether.com
for information on Music To-
gether. Next semester starts
Sept. 25.
For registration information
call 654-3261.
FREE Chicken BBQ - to
commemorate the first anniver-
sary of the flood and celebrate
the resiliency of our West Pitt-
ston neighbors, Trinity will host
a FREE chicken BBQ for our
West Pittston neighbors affected
by the flood on September 9
from12:30 until 2 p.m.
Reservations please at 570-
654-3261 or trinityepiscopal-
westpittston@hotmail.com.
Special celebration of Mass
that day at 11 a.m. All are wel-
come.
United Methodist Church
Corner of Broad & Church
Sts.
Pittston
Rev. Susan Hardman-Zimmer-
man
Sunday Worship Service 9:30
a.m.
Children’s Sunday School:
9:30 a.m.
Holy Communion: 1st Sunday
each month
Choir Rehearsal: Thursday’s
at 7 p.m. unless told otherwise
United Methodist Women:
2nd Monday.
Hoagie Sale will be on Tues-
day, Sept. 18.
Choices are ham, salami and
cheese or turkey and cheese with
or without onion. Price of hoa-
gies are $4 each.
Orders must be in by Sunday,
Sept. 16.
To place an order or for addi-
tional information call 654-3936
or 693-1572.
On Wednesday, Sept. 19, there
will be an Ad. Council meeting
at 7 p.m. Members of the church
are welcomed and encouraged to
attend.
Chicken Dinner is scheduled
for Saturday, Oct. 27 from 4:30
p.m. to 7 p.m.
Dinner includes 1/2 roasted
chickenfamilystyle, mashedpo-
tatoes, green beans, pepper hash,
cranberry sauce, dessert and
beverage.
Tickets purchased in advance
are highly recommended. Alim-
ited number of tickets will be
available at the door.
Cost of the dinner is $9 for
adults and $4.50 for children un-
der 10. To order tickets or addi-
tional information call 603-1915
or 332-9156 - please leave a
message if no answer.
FAITH
Continued from page 6B

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